19 Burst results for "Bill Burns"

"bill burns" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:18 min | Last month

"bill burns" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"The morning with producer Don On my top 1071 everything entertainment because you don't know what It's just fun to just you know, somebody Welcome back Jason and Alexis in the morning of my talk with 71. Talking about SNL and Bill Burns monologue, which is getting a lot of traction. Our buddy thesis Who I trust. Very much. You've got mail. He has a different perspective, because he actually is a fan of this dude and knows him well, so just to get the other side pieces rights Bill Burress. Bill Burr, is it Burns Burner burn one of the best comedians of our generation, he writes, especially in terms of writing. He's definitely not sexist, Controversial topics are his brand. His intentions were to make people laugh. Period. I wish you guys knew his comedy and a stance on gay rights, women religion, etcetera. He's a legit. Good, dude. Like a legit, really respectable guy. So I think you know what I when you first said it nice. All pictures unfold. That guy. Yeah, on hell's a big fan of him, too. Oh, really? Yeah, He's he, really? He had me listen to one of his stand up, man. It was something where he caused a lot of controversy. But then it turned out it started a really great conversation. I wish I could remember it right now. And of course, he's asleep. And I'm going to let him sleep. Because you know we were up late last night with the baby s O. I'll leave. I'll let him be right now. But But, yeah, he's a big fan of him to roommate predicted that this outcome Get four. He was even on the air, she said. Oh, good he's hosting this weekend. I'm gonna tape it because he's going to make virtually everybody mad and I love him. And then yesterday before she went home, she said, I can't wait. Wait to watch that tape because Not only did he make everybody mad, but I hear that, he said. Something really mean about middle aged white women. Did you weigh that? She is, which is so she was really looking forward to being offended by so that that's that's her stance. Okay, That's the roommates dance, Kenny. Yeah, that's before she left. I love it. I really don't. I really don't know. I've always been really attracted to super super offensive comedians because to the Indians are the most A messed up people on the planet who they obviously had horrible lives, and they've somehow turned it into a comedy. So I've always been really attracted and really enjoyed the super super offensive, So I'm probably going to have to watch this. Yeah, I watched the whole thing. But thesis is right. I'm not a fan of his. So I don't know his work. Maybe I would have a different perspective. Just buy that if people just tune in for that, and they didn't know anything about him. Yeah, like I mean, I represent that group of SNL viewers. I got the war. I got a very different impression. And I was really questioning intention. So I took a lesson first time. Yeah, I will gladly admit Win. And if I'm wrong, so I will invest. I will watch some other stuff of his because I was not real familiar. So thanks Thesis. And Kenny's roommate and on hell, Thank you. 7 50 is the time So wonder woman was going to come out this summer on and it was Then it was pushed back to the vault. And then it was pushed back till Christmas and now it's like 2023 or something. I don't know. But it's not a theatrical opening. Yeah, so But wonder woman is not is keeping busy, though. What is she doing? Yes, he is OK. Delgado was a good guy. Know what are we saying?.

Bill Burr Jason Bill Burns Kenny SNL Bill Burress producer Delgado Don Alexis
"bill burns" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Amanpour

"Everyone and welcome to on for his what's coming up. We always have the authorization to defend American interests as Iran threatens to break out of uranium limits, set by the nuclear deal, America considers a full.

Iran America
"bill burns" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"It's true. So there's lots of things that can be done to delay or the State Department's kind of top heavy institution right now too. And then you've got to build modern skills on top of that we talked about the revolution. And technology need to. Attract people who are conversant, and you know, artificial intelligence synthetic biology because it's the role of the State Department support a president's effort to help build some workable international rules of the road on these issues. Same as to climate change. Same true, increasing significance of economic issues and traditional national security policy, and then third this is an area that, you know, far better than I do I think both the State Department and in elected political leadership need to recognize as a pretty big domestic disconnect in our society right now between people in Washington in the establishment again in a sense and lots of American citizens who when we preached the virtues of disciplined American leadership don't really need to be persuaded of the value of American engagement in the world. But they're skeptical about the discipline part because if seeing overreach they've seen instances where you know, it seems like people are taking advantage of us too. So we all tell ourselves, right? And the. War. The wars have helped in that regard. No, it's a classic case of overreach. That's come back to haunt us like a rock two thousand three and as we saw after Vietnam, right? And that makes people suspicious, and so that was not invented by Donald Trump. You know, that's a disconnect which existed imprisoned. Obama was quite eloquent about speaking to it. But we need State Department. I think needs to do a better job not just recognizing that this connect, but acting on it. We all tell ourselves rightly that smart foreign policy begins at home, you know, in a strong economic and political system, which is of course, true. But it ends at home to you know, in better jobs and healthier environment and more security, and we need to do a better job as you were suggest in before of helping Americans understand the practical value of, you know, smart diplomacy overseas to not an easy task not an easy task. Well, but I suspect and not just in Europe. Role as president of the Carnegie institute for international peace that you Mr. burns will be in the middle of those discussions for for for some years to come. So it's great to be with you. Thanks to politics. It's pleasure. University of Chicago. Great to see you again. Thanks so much. Thank you for listening to the acts files presented by luminary media. And the university of Chicago institute of politics, the executive producer of the X files is Matthew Jaffe, the show is also produced by Pete Jones, Zane Maxwell Samantha Neil. An Allison Siegel for more programming from the IOP. Visit politics dot EU, Chicago dot EDU..

State Department university of Chicago institut president University of Chicago Donald Trump Chicago Vietnam Obama IOP Allison Siegel Europe Carnegie institute Washington Pete Jones Matthew Jaffe executive producer
"bill burns" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"But we'll wake up five or six years from now and find that sanctions, which we've been always used well, but when we've used them strategically have been a pretty potent instrument aren't as potent anymore. And then there's another set of dangers of collisions. I think, you know, whether it's between us and the Iranians and the Middle East or between so of our closest partners and the Iranians, and then the real danger of esscalation to and you know, I worry that the main purpose of the administration strategy right now is not really to produce a. Better nuclear deal, but rather to produce either the capitulation of this aronie regime or its implosion. And I think those aims are not tethered history. At least as I've understood it with your we can do a lot of economic damage to Iran. I don't underestimate that for a moment. But I think it it tends in some ways to play to the strengths of the hardest of the hard liners and that regime, and you know, I just wouldn't underestimate the dangers of an escalation and of collisions in part of the world where they really end. Well, we I'm sure that he's also being in courage by some of our allies in the region SUNY allies in the region, the Saudis in particular talked about those relationships because you write about, and I thought it was really important how one balances values in America's stood for human rights in the world. That's been a fundamental. Value and self interest. So for example, the situation we face with the Saudis and the slaying of Jamal kashogi how how should the administration have dealt with that given all the equities. Well, it started a note of humility because you know, over my three and a half decades as a diplomat. I certainly didn't always get it right in striking the balance between values that matter not just to Americans, but to lots of people around the world and self interest. You know, when you have a big stake in counterterrorism cooperation. How does that balance against genuine concern about human rights violations? Having said that I think in a relationship like the US Saudi relationship, which matters to both of us. I think it's really important not to check your values at the door. I think you know, people will argue that you have to be careful about pushing values too hard because you're going to disrupt a relationship or make it more brittle. Actually, I think, you know, not raising those kind of concerns is is actually what's going to make those societies and leadership's more brittle over time. So in the case of Saudi Arabia. It seems to me the United States ought to be quite strong in our support for legitimate efforts at social and economic modernisation what the crown prince Mohammad bin someone has laid out hard as it is to achieve. We ought to be strong in our support of Saudi Arabia against legitimate external threats, whether it's Ron or anybody else, but we should be equally direct equally blinded. Our concerns about overreach whether it's overreach domestically. You know, the kind of repressive tendencies that caused this regime to murder Jamal kashogi and Saudi diplomatic establishment in Turkey. And to push back against external overreach like in Yemen today, which is a humanitarian catastrophe, but also I think a strategic catastrophe for the Saudis as friends we ought to be honest about our concerns there and not not be indulgent. You you wrote about Syria as a major failure of American policy. You were you're there for part of that story. What went wrong, you you? You were blunt about the decision that President Obama made I drawing the red line. And then yeah, I mean, I I had enormous. Empathy and sympathy for the president's concern about not getting dragged into another major military intervention in the Middle East, the shadow of same principle that you that you yourself raised in Iran about Iraq and the truth is the shadow of Iraq two thousand three and that strategic disaster hung over. I think all of our reactions to the spring and the pace with which you know, those changes came down the pike. I think in Syria. What all of us got wrong me included was an imbalance of ends. And means, you know, the classic challenge you face in state craft where we set maximalist ends Assad must go there's a red line that if the Syrian regime uses chemical weapons against its own people will react..

Iran Saudi Arabia Middle East Jamal kashogi Syria United States Iraq president Obama SUNY Yemen Assad murder Turkey America Ron six years
"bill burns" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Great. Thank god. Died, but you know, it's thirty years ago that he helped negotiate that treaty which was a big step forward at the time. And of course, now it's about to die on the vine. And so a lot of that old arms control architecture that was built up in the worst of the Cold War. You know, I think is is beginning to fall away. And that's that's a real shame. But no, I'm Norma sleep. Proud of my dad, and how much was were these kinds of issues of he also was the director of the arms control disarm agency. After that left the military to do that how much of that was sort of dinner table talk. How much not a lot? You know? My dad didn't bring the office home. But you know, you sort of grow up with two so in a way that was my exposure to public service. I mean, I saw through the is military service. But gave me a sense of, you know, the satisfaction the fulfillment that you can derive from that to did you did, you know from an early age once you decided that you weren't going to be an NBA. Player. Right. That was a very early age. Yeah. Did you know that that some some something in the foreign foreign service foreign policy room? I wish in your future. I wish I could say that I had assorted deep plan from an early age. I when I was eighteen when my best friends in high schools father became the US ambassador to Egypt summer in nineteen seventy four. So I spent four months that some are living in Cairo started to learn Arabic that was my first exposure really to the world overseas, but also to the world diplomacy too. So I you know, I got a preview of it. Then that was a pretty pretty Royal time to be over. There was I was there in after the the the war and seventy three the war in seventy three. And I was there in June of nineteen seventy four when president Nixon on his last legs as president made his trip to the Middle East too. So I remember him coming through Cairo in that period. As a very impressionable eighteen year old. So, you know, I started so dot is that right? Yeah. I did that's summer as well. Which was fascinating ambassador aisles the US ambassador, then went out to deliver a message. To Saddad, and I went along along with his family, and it was it was a very informal lunch with Saddad at his fake -ation home on the Mediterranean. So you know, you get exposed I think to the world of diplomacy and international affairs at a very early age. So and that's really fortunate. We I want to talk about the Middle East, and we'll get to it. But just mentioning so that makes you realize how things happen that you can't plan for that can change the course of history, of course, was assassinated rubbing in Israel in the nineties in the midst of a big push toward which you are. Yes. Around aware of in for a peaceful solution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and you you just. Think about these people who fired the shots. I guess, you know, going back to the Archduke Ferdinand through history. But and just changed the course of history because actually it matters who is in who are in these jobs. It does no leadership matters enormously. Whether it's a really complicated part of the world like the Middle East or anyplace else, and you know, people like Sadat, and it's Rabin who are prepared to take risks and have a larger vision of the interest of their countries and the value of peace when they get removed from the scene, and that kind of brutal way at leaves a void. And then then you see the way in which people stumble in foreign policy, you you got a Marshall scholarship you studied at Oxford. And then you join the foreign service and your first posting was in the Middle East in Jordan had a kind of inauspicious did getting. Yeah. Used to tell the story to new foreign service. Officers to remind them that you don't have to have a rocket propelled start in any profession. I was persuaded extra thought this was a great idea. Great adventure to drive a truck filled with communications equipment from a mind capital. Jordan to Baghdad in Iraq middle of the Iran. Iraq war in the nineteen eighties. And.

Middle East director Cairo US Iraq ambassador to Egypt president Nixon NBA Saddad Jordan Archduke Ferdinand Israel Baghdad president Sadat Iran Mediterranean
"bill burns" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Anyone who knows anything about American diplomacy knows Bill burns universally respected career diplomat. He served under Republican and democratic administrations in sensitive roles, including Bassett award to Jordan ambassador to Russia. And finally as deputy secretary of state in the Obama administration. He was the man who laid the groundwork for the Iran nuclear agreement, and it's been involved in most major foreign policy issues for a generation. He's written a book called the back about his career and service of this country and making the case for the importance of diplomacy. Basseterre burns came to the institute of politics recently. We sat down to talk about his career about the need for diplomacy and the state of the world today. Bill burns great to be with you. It's great to be with you. I. Had the privilege of sitting in on some meetings on some on the sidelines on some weighty issues during my years in the White House and always always admired you as as sort of the thoroughgoing professional. So it's really a pleasure to be with you. Enter talk about your life and career in this great new book of yours the back channel. But I and you. In keeping with my sense of you, you right? Very little about yourself as your life in particular, you're growing up and so on and you devote yourself to the craft of diplomacy and your and your significant role in the history of the last thirty years, but I want to delve into your short 'cause I had I did not know about that. Your dad was such a prominent person in the military, and and indepao really did both but tell me about him. Sure enormously, proud of my dad, he was a career army officer rose to the rank of Major General you born at Fort Bragg, Fort Bragg, North Carolina and spent you know, I grew up outsing from one army post to another around the US. I went to three different high schools started in California than Oklahoma, Pennsylvania. Stop there for seconds had to be challenging for. I mean, I moved my family once when my kids were small, and it was it was hard for them to read to adjust to a new school. And so you were doing perpetually. It's true. No. It's a hard adjustment. Sometimes. But when you're in that world in an army family sorta like foreign service families. That's just the way it is. And so you think that that's normal in a way it had its benefits, you know, I love playing basketball and baseball in high school, and I was mediocre at both. But you know, if you had a bad season one place you reinvent yourself. The next time, you know, internet, then they could look up your, no, right? But there must you noted somewhere maybe in the book, but it also equipped you for. You know, going to new places dating people you have it makes you adaptable. I think it it certainly gives you a good sense of your own country to and a lot of times professional diplomats that challenge you run into as you absorb yourself and other societies and you can lose touch with your own. And I was lucky because I was a quipped from that experience growing up in the way that I knew my own society, pretty well and its strengths. And you know, it's diversity and physical beauty and everything else. And so I always tried to draw on that as a diplomat overseas. Your dad was very much involved in the most significant issue of of of his era, which was a nuclear proliferation and disarmament helped to negotiate the the intermediate range nuclear treaty, which is now just kind of poignant. I'm and I saw my dad, you know, who's now eighty seven and doing great. Thank god. Died, but you know, it's thirty years ago that he helped negotiate that treaty which was a big step forward at the time. And of course, now it's about to die on the vine..

officer Bill burns deputy secretary Iran White House Fort Bragg Obama administration Bassett Basseterre institute of politics Russia Jordan baseball North Carolina California US Pennsylvania Oklahoma
"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"But I think we did build over time fair amount of professional respect in the sense that those guys understood we were speaking for President Obama and for secretary Kerry then and that we could deliver. On the things that you know, we were committing to and they demonstrated the same thing on their side. And so that's what led, you know, alternately working very closely with, you know, other wonderful colleagues like Wendy, Wendy, Sherman, and others of our mutual friends in the US government, and our international partners. You know, we were able to produce an interim agreement towards the end of two thousand thirteen which was a pretty good deal. I think in a very good foundation for what later became the comprehensive nuclear agreement. So, but it was a fascinating experience. It's the kind of thing that you know, you prepare your whole career for it didn't produce perfect agreement in the end, but perfect is rarely on the menu. For diplomats. It did produce in the JCP away the comprehensive agreement what I'm convinced to this day was the is the best of the available alternatives for preventing Iran from developing a nuclear weapon a Bill just certificate off. Of Ben's question about Iran. I mean in nineteen Fifty-three the CIA helps them into coup in Iran, Elliot Abrams reemergence in government is reminded us of all the wonderful things. CIA didn't Latin America, stabilized governments and otherwise support unsafe re people over the years was there ever a time when you were in Basseterre and a country say where you grabbed your CIA counterpart by the SCRUFF of the neck and said, hey, stop helping. I was pretty fortunate to be honest with you in the cei-. Senior personnel that I worked with, you know, really good professional relationships, and you know, the sort of same thing during different periods. When I worked in Washington, but you know, good embassador is responsible for what happens in country. You're the president's Representative on the ground. And so, well, it's not to micromanage, you know, the other sort of agency or department chiefs were working for you. You know, you've got to trust them, professionally what you have to expect is that they're going to be transparent with you. And you're not going to be surprised by actions that they may be taken. And I was I was fortunate in that sense. I was not surprised, you know, during the course of my tenure as ambassador on Iran Bill, you know, they they obviously had divisions in their own system of that even the JCP away they've complied with it. And now we've pulled out and and they're pursuing this kind of pressure campaign with not really evident results. Do you see any path? Way to the Iranians somehow staying in this deal as it currently exists with the Europeans Russia and China through say the next election. We'll the absent a war, which is not impossible with the people in charge in Washington. Do you think that this deal can exist on life support in future? President who's a democrat can come back into it. You know, it's it's possible. Been I think I think the the temptation the inclination at least of the Iranian leadership right now is to try to hang in there. And I say that again with, you know, fully understand in the ways in which Ronnie and behavior can threaten our interests the interests of our friends in the Middle East quite beyond the nuclear program. But I think, you know, their inclination right now is to take advantage of the fact if they can that, you know, in effect after spending all those years working with you guys in serving President Obama to isolate Iran, you know, we've managed to largely isolate ourselves right now. Now, and you know, people like real high knee, like the president of Iran, like, you know, the foreign ministers Arief for pretty savvy. And I think they understand that creates an opportunity for Ron the problem is you suggested is going to be a they oversold the economic benefits of the nuclear agreement to their own people, it's becoming increasingly difficult to show much economic benefit because the reimposition of US sanctions are taking a toll. And then there's the danger of collisions whether advertently or inadvertent. And I take that very seriously because you know, if you look at Syria, if you look at the Gulf itself, if you look at Yemen today, which is both the humanitarian strategic catastrophe..

Iran president President Obama US JCP CIA Washington cei Wendy Elliot Abrams secretary Kerry Basseterre Syria Gulf Yemen Ben Middle East Ron
Former Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns talks CIA

Pod Save the World

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Former Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns talks CIA

"In nineteen Fifty-three the CIA helps them into coup in Iran, Elliot Abrams reemergence in government is reminded us of all the wonderful things. CIA didn't Latin America, stabilized governments and otherwise support unsafe re people over the years was there ever a time when you were in Basseterre and a country say where you grabbed your CIA counterpart by the SCRUFF of the neck and said, hey, stop helping. I was pretty fortunate to be honest with you in the cei-. Senior personnel that I worked with, you know, really good professional relationships, and you know, the sort of same thing during different periods. When I worked in Washington, but you know, good embassador is responsible for what happens in country. You're the president's Representative on the ground. And so, well, it's not to micromanage, you know, the other sort of agency or department chiefs were working for you. You know, you've got to trust them, professionally what you have to expect is that they're going to be transparent with you. And you're not going to be surprised by actions that they may be taken. And I was I was fortunate in that sense. I was not surprised, you know, during the course of my tenure as ambassador on Iran Bill, you know, they they obviously had divisions in their own system of that even the JCP away they've complied with it. And now we've pulled out and and they're pursuing this kind of pressure campaign with not really evident results. Do you see any path? Way to the Iranians somehow staying in this deal as it currently exists with the Europeans Russia and China through say the next election. We'll the absent a war, which is not impossible with the people in charge in Washington. Do you think that this deal can exist on life support in future? President who's a democrat can come back into it. You know, it's it's possible. Been I think I think the the temptation the inclination at least of the Iranian leadership right now is to try to hang in there. And I say that again with, you know, fully understand in the ways in which Ronnie and behavior can threaten our interests the interests of our friends in the Middle East quite beyond the nuclear program. But I think, you know, their inclination right now is to take advantage of the fact if they can that, you know, in effect after spending all those years working with you guys in serving President Obama to isolate Iran, you know, we've managed to largely isolate ourselves right now. Now, and you know, people like real high knee, like the president of Iran, like, you know, the foreign ministers Arief for pretty savvy. And I think they understand that creates an opportunity for Ron the problem is you suggested is going to be a they oversold the economic benefits of the nuclear agreement to their own people, it's becoming increasingly difficult to show much economic benefit because the reimposition of US sanctions are taking a toll. And then there's the danger of collisions whether advertently or inadvertent. And I take that very seriously because you know, if you look at Syria, if you look at the Gulf itself, if you look at Yemen today, which is both the humanitarian strategic catastrophe.

Iran President Trump CIA CEI Elliot Abrams Washington Basseterre Latin America JCP Syria Gulf Yemen Middle East United States RON Barack Obama Arief Ronnie Representative
"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"Even if it wasn't a know particularly popular one India ministration at that time current and former State Department officials seem to describe working at St. in the Trump era is almost a traumatic experience. And I imagine them many of them were listening wonder what it might be like on the other side. And frankly, if institution if the building will fully recover so trying to think of a different period of time for state, then might have been equally as challenging, and I thought of two thousand three when then secretary of State, Colin Powell went to the UN to make the case for war in Iraq. And he gave a presentation based on intelligence there was just catastrophically wrong. I knew you greatly admired Secretary Powell you worked at the State Department before during and after that period of time. How did the agency the State Department bounce back from such a difficult moment? It was a rough time, and you know, and you know that period. Well, Ben from your work on the Iraq study group of victory Baker in with Lee Hamilton, it was a it was a painful period, when you know, I I've seen lots of moments of differences between agencies, you know, during different eras in Washington. But that was the the most intense the differences between Powell State Department Rumsfeld's Pentagon differences with Vice President Cheney staff and the White House, and it was a another collection of allusions, which led us down. You know, what truly was a tragic path in Iraq in two thousand three. You know, we tried to be honest about our concerns again being self critical. I wasn't I certainly was not effective in winning any of those battles. You know within the administration in that era? Remember at one point Ryan Crocker who was one of my colleagues in the near east bureau in the State Department and other guy named David Pearson. I. Spent a couple of hours brainstorming about everything we sought could go wrong if the United States essentially on its own invaded, Iraq and toppled Saddam because our concern was always less about the military challenge and more about managing the day after in Iraq. And so we we put together a memo, it was really more kinda hastily collection. You know, put together collection of horrible 's more than a coherent memo. But just kind of listing all the things that we could go wrong, and it was our antidote to the incredibly rosy assumptions that were coming out of some of the civilians in the Pentagon, and you know, some folks in the White House, and it was imperfect. We got a lot of things wrong. But you know, I've always thought you got to be honest as a career official about our concerns, and my biggest professional regret to this day is that I didn't push as hard as I should have. And certainly not as effectively as I should have. Well, I respect your yourself. System because you don't you don't hear a lot of that from Don Rumsfeld, the other folks who are a little more responsible than you. Okay. So again, the book is called the back channel it got that name because you are one of the greatest diplomats of generation. So we're gonna ask you some impossibly difficult challenges in expect you to solve them on a podcast. So if you're ready, I will fire away. Okay. So the reports that Al Assad since he basically one this year civil war that Arab states are looking to reengage with him and game back the influence that they've lost in the region to Syria, Iran and Turkey, the US apparently is blocking the Arab states efforts at reengaging with Assad. So I think the US should deal with someone like Assad going forward. I mean, do we have to engage with him given all the security challenges that Syria represents or presents to us or is he just a pariah until he moves on you. I think he's I think the shoreline is going to remain a pariah for a while. With with good reason, given the atrocities that he and his regime have committed..

Iraq State Department Al Assad Secretary Powell Don Rumsfeld Powell State Department United States White House Pentagon Saddam India UN Ryan Crocker Syria Washington Ben Vice President Lee Hamilton
Former Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns Talks 2003 Iraq

Pod Save the World

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Former Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns Talks 2003 Iraq

"And former State Department officials seem to describe working at St. in the Trump era is almost a traumatic experience. And I imagine them many of them were listening wonder what it might be like on the other side. And frankly, if institution if the building will fully recover so trying to think of a different period of time for state, then might have been equally as challenging, and I thought of two thousand three when then secretary of State, Colin Powell went to the UN to make the case for war in Iraq. And he gave a presentation based on intelligence there was just catastrophically wrong. I knew you greatly admired Secretary Powell you worked at the State Department before during and after that period of time. How did the agency the State Department bounce back from such a difficult moment? It was a rough time, and you know, and you know that period. Well, Ben from your work on the Iraq study group of victory Baker in with Lee Hamilton, it was a it was a painful period, when you know, I I've seen lots of moments of differences between agencies, you know, during different eras in Washington. But that was the the most intense the differences between Powell State Department Rumsfeld's Pentagon differences with Vice President Cheney staff and the White House, and it was a another collection of allusions, which led us down. You know, what truly was a tragic path in Iraq in two thousand three. You know, we tried to be honest about our concerns again being self critical. I wasn't I certainly was not effective in winning any of those battles. You know within the administration in that era? Remember at one point Ryan Crocker who was one of my colleagues in the near east bureau in the State Department and other guy named David Pearson. I. Spent a couple of hours brainstorming about everything we sought could go wrong if the United States essentially on its own invaded, Iraq and toppled Saddam because our concern was always less about the military challenge and more about managing the day after in Iraq. And so we we put together a memo, it was really more kinda hastily collection. You know, put together collection of horrible 's more than a coherent memo. But just kind of listing all the things that we could go wrong, and it was our antidote to the incredibly rosy assumptions that were coming out of some of the civilians in the Pentagon, and you know, some folks in the White House, and it was imperfect. We got a lot of things wrong. But you know, I've always thought you got to be honest as a career official about our concerns, and my biggest professional regret to this day is that I didn't push as hard as I should have. And certainly not as effectively as I should have.

Iraq State Department Secretary Powell Powell State Department White House Pentagon Ryan Crocker UN Washington Vice President United States Lee Hamilton BEN David Pearson Cheney Official Saddam Baker
"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"How do people try to? Formulate ideas for dealing with very big challenges that are more responsive to public opinion, or to the lessons of the last ten or fifteen years since nine eleven I think part of it is got to be honest with people you got to be straight with people as I think President Obama was about the areas, especially in Iraq, where we got ends, and means way out of whack, you know, where we based strategy on some pretty badly flawed assumptions and ended up with a YouTube cost in American blood and treasure. So I think you've gotta be able to make the case to people that were capable of disciplined leadership. I think you've also got to be able to make a case in here. I'm being self critical. I don't think, you know, those of us in the State Department over many years did nearly as good a job as we should at helping Americans understand that you know, when we do big business deals overseas which embassies helped to facilitate that lead directly to creating jobs and improve. Improving, you know, the chances for prosperity for lots of Americans we need to drive that home to people, and we haven't always done as good a job of that. So, you know, in a sense, you know, we need to make clear to people not only smart effective foreign policy begin at home in a strong economic and political system, but it ends there too in better jobs, and, you know, more prosperity and a healthier environment and better security. So it's it's a big challenge in. It's that's not a partisan statement. I mean, I think that's a challenge for both parties and people across it ministrations. I worked in. Yeah. Agreed in the book, you write about a whole bunch of parts of your career, including when you're Basser to Russia, which meant, you know, you dealt with Putin a lot from the time you are living in Moscow to when you're deputy secretary of state and the second Obama administration. What is he like, what's it like to sit in a meeting with him or share meal, and do you think he changed over the past few decades or did his political situation chain? Change which led to different behavior. He's not a very sentimental guy. This is starting point. And you know, I think like anybody, you know, he's changed a little bit over the course of the last couple of decades. But you know, he's fundamentally distrustful distrustful his own political elite distrustful of most Russian citizens distrustful of foreign leaders. And I remember, you know, the first time I met him as embassador, you know, you go through this ceremony of presenting your credentials. So you carry a letter right in this case from President George W Bush to present him in the Kremlin, which is both of you guys know is kind of built to inspire awe and foreigners who are coming into that these use cavernous reception halls long Carter's, I remember walking down this very long card or sixty foot high ceilings, you come up to these two two story tall bronze doors, and you kind of are kept waiting there for a little while then the doors open and outcomes. For the American student president of Russia who again is both of you know, is on a very imposing figure. He's probably about five six or so, but you know, this was meant to shock and all the new American ambassador, and it pets effect as well. And I remember I stuck out my hand to shake his hand and also hand over my credentials and before I had gotten a word out. President Putin said you Americans need to listen more. You can't have everything your own way anymore, and this was in the summer of two thousand and five. So you know, that was.

President Putin President Obama Russia President George W Bush State Department Iraq president Moscow Obama administration deputy secretary Carter fifteen years sixty foot
"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"I am thrilled to welcome back to the show and Basseterre Bill burns. He's the author of the new book of the back channel which is out on March twelfth, but you need to preorder it today because it's going to be a bestseller. And everyone knows that. If you preorder a bestseller, you look cooler than all your friends who are also going to be reading it because everyone's going to read the backbone that's on right? Yeah. I think if you are looking for like the person in this country, who's been at the center of our foreign policy for the last three decades who has the most lessons to impart on the rest of us, and who I hope is not done in his career in public service. So has another act you definitely need check out his book the great stories in it. I've read it, you know, Bill serve as embassador in Russia and Jordan troubleshoot shoot it in the Middle East. He was deputy secretary of state. He opened the secret channel with the Iranians in Amman that led to the Iran nuclear deal. There are great stories and great insights about our foreign policy. So. Run don't walk to the preorder button on your computer this Bill. Thank you for being here. I hope that was extended enough plug. It's great to be with both you guys. And certainly one of the highlights of my checkered career was the chance to work with both of you and the Obama administration. Thank you so much. So there's a great course, there's a great passage in the book from when you were just young young, maybe even pre foreign service officer. I think he might have been taking your foreign service exam when you were asked I believe by your examiners. What's the biggest challenge in American foreign policy today? And you replied, I think it's us after Vietnam we have to do a better job of understanding which problems we can solve in which we can manage. I thought that was a beautiful distillation of an important argument. When you look at the amount of money and time spent in Iraq and Afghanistan and the Middle East peace process, for example. Do you think that we are still the biggest challenge I think if anything that lesson has deepened over the thirty five years ago or so since I I took the foreign service. This exam. I mean, I think you know today is both of you guys know very well. There's a pretty big disconnect between people like me, you know, card carrying members of the Washington establishment and lots of American citizens who don't I think need to be persuaded of the importance of disciplined American leadership in the world. But what they're not. So convinced of is the disciplined part, and you know, that was both the result of a tragic war in Iraq in two thousand and three of the financial crisis in two thousand eight but that disconnect still looms pretty large. And so in a sense that the challenge the problem in a way is still us bridging that disconnect, and you know, whomever, got elected in two thousand sixteen was going to was going to have to address it. I just think President Trump over the last couple of years has widened that disconnect and aggravated rather than making it better Bill. I mentioned this on the last podcast. We did. Which is I always at Munich at the experience and. You know, what was interesting to me a little, you know, troubling and speaks exactly what you're saying. Is that you could have basically picked just about anybody out of that crowd and found support for continued troops in Afghanistan continue troops in Syria criticism of Obama for not going into Syria against the sod. And I remember making the point in one of my interviews, which reflected a lot of the those views is, look, even if you think all those things are the correct policies. You have to recognize in our democracy that there's just not support for the policies anymore that the one thing Republican voters and democratic voters seem to agree on is that we've been over extended in these wars and Obama's answered that was the opposite of Trump's Obama's answer was more diplomacy right agreements like the Iran deal. Trump's is to pull back, but I guess the question I have is how do you democratize that establishment?.

Bill deputy secretary Obama President Trump Middle East Iraq Iran Obama administration Afghanistan Syria Amman Vietnam officer Washington Munich Jordan Russia
"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"The the fact that we're basically through our policies like not even our words here. We're indicating that we don't even recognize the Palestinian who are they if they don't they don't have the state now there are these people living in the West Bank. Their land is being taken away the settlements are in coaching further and further into the West Bank. We retracted our diplomatic recognition of them. They're just these stateless people, what is our policy towards them that to me is pretty offensive if you care about human rights as well. And so again, I think Ilan Omer doesn't do herself any favors because she should be making debate about that. And saying like she'd be saying like why are we shutting down diplomatic representation of the Palestinian people instead of kind of engaging this dual loyalty trope? So nobody wins in this now Dylan, Omar, not like her critics, not the Democrats not Republicans like everybody looks like they're just using this for their own political purposes, and that is doing nothing to help Israel that is do nothing help the Palestinians, and it's doing nothing to. Kind of combat the real scores of any semitism here, which is emanating from white supremacists. Not from Muslim members of congress. Yeah. Ilan Omar has apologized in the past for other unfortunate comments compellingly to me offensively. Honestly, she needs to fix this. Because she's she's hurting her own cause. But that's at it also doesn't justify. I mean, someone in the West Virginia state house put up a poster that had a photo of the twin towers getting struck on eleven with her face. You know, people are make death threats against right? So like, we this is it goes into dangerous place. When everyone demagogues these issues, I get if I if I look I had a Muslim assistant wonderful woman named Ramona kmed who wrote a great piece of the Atlantic a couple of years ago, but she wore hit job, and she would get harassed on the the metro on the way home like when Trump's campaign was picking up and the anti Muslim rhetoric was picking up. She started to get like harass them the metro she felt uncomfortable walking at night. I'd have to. Call her when she got home mixers. Okay. Like, and that's an experienced Muslims are having around this country right now. Right. And I do understand the frustration embolism saying like, well, how come nobody cares about that, you know, and how come nobody's calling that out? Right. And that's I think very legitimate expression. And I should say that Jews have traditionally been allies with other groups who felt marginalized in the civil rights movement Jews were huge supporters of Martin Luther King because they saw solidarity. Amongst minority groups and Martin people I I would hope that American Jews could express solidarity with what Muslims are going through just as fiercely as a all also police this kind of speech that is hurtful to Jews like that's been one of the great attributes and the juice commune in this country. And if something good can come out of this. I do hope that there can be that kind of allegiance among the Jewish community the Muslim community here in the United States. Agreed okay. One more topic. That is frankly, I'm a little sick of talking about. But we. Must. Okay. So a few months ago. Trump said we're getting our troops out of Afghanistan. And then I read the times a couple of days ago. And there's report that Trump will keep around seventy five hundred troops in Afghanistan for three to five years as we negotiate a peace agreement with the Taliban. So that's Afghanistan. Trump said we were getting all our troops out of Syria right away. And then today he sent a letter to congress saying he wouldn't hundred percent agrees with keeping a military presence in Syria. So these are separate wars. And replaces I yes, we should separate them out. First of all, okay. So with Afghanistan, I feel like when we did President Obama's Afghanistan and Pakistan review back in two thousand nine the military told us we're told Obama that presence of under around ten thousand troops or so with indefensible and thus not an option because you wanted to force you forum for force protection. Right. You new basically two runways? So of one infrastructure is overrun, you can send forces from another place to defend them. So that confused me second. I'm glad that they're negotiating with the Taliban. And maybe a power-sharing agreement is inevitable. But I guess seeing. It written in that way was stark..

Trump Afghanistan Taliban Ilan Omar Martin Luther King Dylan Ilan Omer West Bank President Obama West Virginia congress Ramona kmed Israel United States Syria Atlantic
"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"I do not think Illinois Mars in any semi like this. There's nothing about anything. She said that suggests that she has some visceral dislike of Jews. She's just been very careless in her language about certain stereotypes that have historical resonant. So that's something. I'd like to see, and frankly, we were just talking to somebody. I'd also like to see her, you know, I welcome diversity views on on Israel in the Democratic Party. I think it's healthy to have different. You know polls people on different points of the spectrum. She's more critical than even I am of the Netanyahu government that fine. Let's have a big ten of us on these things, but she should be making your case about policies. Like, I'd actually like to hear say like, what does she think that we should be doing to help Palestinian suffering Gaza? Or like, what does she think we should be doing to promote a Palestinian state like she my vice to her would be to focus your energy, your comments on the policy that you'd like to see put in place because when you kind of get into this territory, you know, you end up in this kind of circular firing squad set. Second. I don't think the Democrats are right to have this resolution. First of all, it's not necessary. It's prolong this conversation, and frankly, it does raise questions about like. Well, why this I mean, people say racist stuff all time in congress or they they use stereotypes against Latinos. I mean, we could use a lot of what aboutism here. But the reality is if you're only going to call out a block Muslim woman for making comments about Israel, and you're not gonna call out a lot of other behavior. Then that's not a great, look, you know. And so either you're going to have to do these resolutions over and over again every time somebody says something or you're basically indicating that you you're singling this one member out when she's far from the only member of congress who said something offensive. I think there was a member who yelled like go back to Puerto Rico or something recently recently. Right. You know, that kind of past steep tonight again, I don't wanna do what aboutism either. But Steve king said racist disgraceful things for decades for retweeting, white nationalist as recent. Is like a week or two ago? He was stripped of his committee assignments. But I think like he is the agreed GIS example, where some sort of serious congressional action is warranted. I I don't know what this resolution does that putting out a statement than saying your piece wouldn't have done. Well, and let's have a like a even more uncomfortable conversation here, the the anti semitism that is literally putting people's lives at risk in the US is not emanating from people like L on Omar, right? Like the fucking asshole who shot up a bunch of people in the synagogue in. Pittsburgh wasn't motivated by opposition to Israel. No. He was motivated by vile, anti semitism, end by the president is states who is trafficked in hate and traffic in bigotry of every kind against Jews against Muslims against people, the anti semitism that that we have to be worried about infecting our body politic is actually not like criticism of these really government. It's criticism of Jews here in America. Right. And so that to me is what is particularly infuriating. I guess about like the fact that we whip ourselves into a frenzy when Ilan Omar says he sings meanwhile, when their reports about white supremacists terrorism like the Republicans are trying to suppress that in our administration. Right. I mean, if you wanna talk about any semitism his dangerous, we should be talking to the president on states. And the words that he uses, and we should be talking about why it is that more and more white supremacists. Are being radicalized coincidence to Donald Trump being president? I don't think that is a coincidence..

Ilan Omar Israel president congress Illinois Donald Trump Netanyahu Puerto Rico Democratic Party US Pittsburgh Steve king America
"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"But I think it is, you know, yet another indication that one of my worries about the us government in general and national security is once you acquire capability you don't like to give it up. Yeah. So like once you're doing drone strikes. You don't want to stop the drone strikes. Once you are collecting metadata you'd want to stop collect metadata. And I think this could hopefully be an example of all these post nine eleven powers at the government gave it self. If it is true that you really don't need these at they're not essential. Then you shouldn't be doing it. You know, you don't you? Don't just kind of create a hedge and say, okay, we're gonna collect everybody's meta data. Just just in case. No, you should only be doing the type of surveillance it is necessary. And by the way, I do believe that some surveillance is necessary. If you want to disrupt the terrorist attack like you need to be able to get into certain people's emails, right? But. Again. I think frustrating sign that that perhaps this wasn't quite as central. We were cast in fairness the NSA maybe the programs no longer useful. Because all the terrorists moved to what's app and signal and other encrypted apps. Yeah. Look that's charitable explanation. But we should say that while the NSA wasn't listening to the substance of everyone's calls. You can learn a lot about someone from their meta data. If they're having an affair, you know, it's happening. You basically know where they are at certain times like you can figure out a lot about someone's pattern of life. So it's the other thing that's crazy about this story is this again random hill staffer on a podcast discloses that in part the program was shuttered because of technical regularities that had contaminated the agency's database with message logs it had no authority to collect the person. So what that also says is the fix it. Obama tried to put in place did not safeguard our civil liberties in the way, we thought it was. So again, it's like it's hard to trust heart vans. Here. Yeah. Yeah. I mean. Yeah. I think it does demonstrate I mean, what Obama was trying to do was to say that. There are certain capabilities are necessary. There's a certain amount of surveillance. It has to take place. However, if you're actually going to access the contents of niemoeller phone, call that should be like a search warrant, it should be like, you know, you have to go to judge and the judge has to say that. That's okay. And and therefore there's this extra barrier of the rule of law. But as you say just the holding of mass amounts of data is I think something that would be concerning to people, you know, why they need to track all these phone calls, and that there's no foolproof way. There's just like you can't guarantee that you're not going to have a civilian casualties in a drone strike. You can't guarantee that the mass collection of data like this won't lead to certain if not abuses at least mistakes or glitches as this hill staffer indicated wild s-. Story..

Obama us
"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"I, you know, I think he was the highest ranking foreign service officer for the State Department deputy secretary of state that doesn't ever happen. But you how to whole bunch of other positions ambassador to Jordan ambassador to Russia. He's been on the show before. But I, you know, I just can't tell you how impressive it is to see someone like Bill at a table with like, you know, seven four star generals, and they're deferring to him and his opinion. He's just I think he probably would have been Hillary secretary stay that was the broad assumption. Was he would've been secretary state? And you know, who knows if a democrat wins he will be on the shortlist of anybody to be set. Chris it. Yeah. Seriously. Listen up people at there. Okay. Let's get to some news items. I wanna start with something that you texted me this morning that made us both very annoyed. So the New York Times reported that the NSA has quietly shut down he program that analyzes Americans domestic call logs and tests, it's otherwise known as meta data. I want to be clear that we're not mad that they shut this program down where mad. About the rest of the story. Yeah. So this program started in after nine eleven it was disclosed by Edward Snowden in two thousand thirteen and was pretty scandalous, frankly. I was I was gone at that time. You're lucky. Yeah. You had to deal with this. So the the program, I think as it was constituted, then ended and was replaced by something far more or William named the USA twenty fifty and God, why do we do that? But long story short. I mean, this this news that this really sensitive. Controversial NSA program was shut down was disclosed by a random. Yeah. He'll stop start there on a lot. You really need to step up arm. You should bible on bake some news. Let's let's break. Some classify news like this guy did. But unite both read this entire like what the hell because one of the most frustrating things about working national security, national security communications in particular is that you're constantly told that programs like this are critical national security to busting terrorists. And that if they go away, we're all gonna they're all going to die. And thus we are told to say those things, and we take them on good faith from people we believe in trust. But we don't have a great way to fully vet out these arguments, and like I would love to know what the hell change between then. And now that meant we could shut this program now, maybe was terrorist behavior. Or maybe the thing wasn't that important in the first place. Yeah. And so for people who didn't suffer through the disclosures in the White House. The original program was the US government literally vacuumed up everybody's meta data about all their phone calls. And then, you know, the idea was that we weren't Liz. Listening to the phone calls government wasn't listening phone calls. But you could try to match, you know, there's a phone number so say with a terrorist. You see who that person is in touch with you, if you if you want to access the actual phone calls, you know, you need a warrant. But just the fact of the government holding all this information was concerning. Obama made some changes what he basically did is instead of the govern- holding this information the phone companies would hold onto this information. And then the government could go to them and try to access it if they wanted to. But I think what is really frustrating is, you know, the view of the NSA articulated the time that you know, we is the in the White House had to wrestle with is. This was essential. You know that that if we didn't have this tool there would be terrorist attacks and if this random hill staffers, correct like the government isn't even using this capability anymore. And so therefore, it's likely this program could expire and that we have to acknowledge totally contradicts what we were being told. And frankly, what we? We ourselves are at least me you weren't there anymore said, which is that this was an essential tool. Now, again, we did perform it in the in the Obama administration t take this meta data out of the government's hands and leave it with phone companies..

secretary Obama NSA White House Bill Chris USA deputy secretary officer Liz State Department Jordan Hillary Edward Snowden New York Times Russia William
"bill burns" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Kickass News

"So secretary Clinton President Obama made a very tough decision actually, based on some contact that then chairman of the foreign relations committee, John Kerry had with Sultanov Oman to act as a go-between with Iran. On out of that relationship. Secretary Clinton sent a couple of her colleagues to see whether there was something real here. There was a sense, particularly after president. Ronnie was elected of Iran a slightly more moderate, though a very conservative cleric nonetheless not modern in our terms. But in Iran, in terms was elected. The president then decided to ask a Bill burns, who was deputy secretary of state. Jake Sullivan who was by then national security advisor for Joe Biden had been secretary Clinton's head of policy planning to lead a small group to see if we couldn't get some traction on at least an interim plan that would give us time to negotiate the whole plan. And it was understood that at some point that bilateral secret channel would be brought into the multilateral channel that would fall to me to do. And so I started to join though secret negoti. Nations towards the end. And we brought a bracketed text to the p five plus one, and I'm not sure I want to give away the story in the book. But when we did that with the foreign ministers, we didn't initially get a particularly great reaction. It ultimately did get to a place where everyone could agree and create the space and time to get the full joint comprehensive plan of agreement. But those secret channels are quite critical. And I think people are amazed that one can still do that in a twenty four, seven media world where people seem to know everything that's going on. You actually can still do these things. There must have been times when this drug on when you had doubts and things got heated. I wonder. Was there ever any truth to the stories that there were shouting during the negotiations and supposedly the secret service had to rush into the room because they were afraid the Orion, foreign minister was attacking John Kerry well, there were a couple. Of times one time at the Palais Coburg in Vienna where we held both Somerset of talks in twenty fourteen and then in twenty fifteen. When we finally came to conclusion, I spent twenty six days at the Palais Coburg eight exactly one meal outside of the hotel. There was an evening where secretary Kerry and foreign ministers reef of Ron were in a room and it got quite heated such that some of my colleagues from other countries were concerned and let the secretaries detail know that they were concerned him. Basically what what they went in and said is everyone can hear what you're saying. So there was that, and there was a time when we had a very tough tough bilateral meeting in Geneva. After the supreme leader of Iran seemed to undermine what had been agreed to in. Lows on creating parameters for a final agreement. So we met with the Iranians, we always had Helga Schmidt, the deputy of the European Union's High Representative join us so that our colleagues would know we weren't doing things buying their backs but and has some transparency. So we met bilaterally and there was such a tough moment that secretary Kerry banged his fist down on the table. He doesn't get angry, very easily got really angry and his pen flew across the table and hit my counterpart Abbass rachi with that flying pen, not a great thing in diplomacy. Everybody understood that was inadvertent and we got passed into it. Probably sober everybody up a little bit so that we had to get serious about what we were doing and you actually open the book by telling a great story about date, twenty five in Vienna, and you've got the deal and you're at the eleventh hour. The Iranians, one of renegotiate a point. Point and you just that point, you're mentally exhausted and you lose your cool little bit and actually show some vulnerability during the negotiations, but ends up being a good thing. And it's a great story because I love that it's sort of illustrates that no matter how much you follow the rule book onto Goshi hitting. There's always that human element that can change the game. Absolutely negotiations can't be reduced to a single set of techniques. You have to deal with people in front of you. And very importantly, I think generally in life, when you bring your authentic self, your actor most powerful. Sometimes you don't even know it..

Iran secretary John Kerry Secretary Clinton Palais Coburg president deputy secretary Vienna Sultanov Oman Obama Joe Biden chairman Ronnie Jake Sullivan Bill burns Somerset European Union Geneva Ron
"bill burns" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"bill burns" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"It's tuesday on the west coast wednesday on the east coast many are stuck somewhere in between welcome beyond reality radio with myself jason hawes and the always awesome jv johnson so last night we said that there was some schedule flipflopping going on for tonight's program and i think we we won the the role of the dice here we got the i don't know how to put it but we really really scored big time here we've got bill burns coming onto bill burns and many of you might remember to show you which came on scifi for a short period of time or a history but it was pretty much from the same company go centers and bills just he's a great ufo guy is been in the field for a long time let alone he covers so many different things as well i know he was writing a book on edison versus tesla and and their last invention and just so much more so i'm looking forward to this yeah it's going to be a great conversation excited about this was certainly take your phone calls later in the show so make sure you get ready to call with your questions or comments but don't do it if you're driving and you don't have like a bluetooth connection now i know jay you don't text and drive you know you use ma'am i right in my truck i just hit the button and you do use your bluetooth connection for phone calls in the car i do the same thing and it's a good thing because norfolk virginia is the first one of the first communities to test new technology which puts cell phone usage detectors into street signs okay but if cellphone usage detectors but if you're on it using ear bluetooth they would still show that it's being worked i mean how do they know that it's you're not using your hand this is this is what the technology part is all about well they aren't necessarily interested at this point in phone calls they are definitely interested in texting texting occurs in short quick bursts of data and these devices in the street signs can deter tell the difference between the short bursts of data which would be considered a text versus telephones telephone conversation which is a long stream continuous stream of audio back and more so but then again like i said i've got the steering wheel i can just hit the button and say yeah i don't know how they're going to point out my wife and then and then it goes from there so i don't know it'll be interesting to see this an experiment right now and they're not writing tickets based on this what they're doing is they are there's a lighting sign that a flash that a warn you get off your cell phone if you drive by this thing with your whatever picks up and you're doing what you're not supposed to be doing so little sign flashes and i think that's huge because i'll tell you and is there some really really well i i thought people shouldn't be texting and driving at the same time and the the worst part is sometimes i see officers doing it all the time well you know we have we had a good common friend who was a state trooper in new york state and used to tell us that you know the cellphone law doesn't apply to police officers yeah one they say because they're using their phone for official business so i'm not gonna ask probably listening so don't pull us over and give it a ticket but we greatly respect you yes but no on a serious note yeah it's it is tough i mean he cheese and you get all the crazy people out there out there doing it it's just i mean how many times have you been driving along particularly highway nelson you see a car veer into the you know the left shoulder the right shoulder whatever you and you know what's going on in the car ahead of your you drive by a car it's going specifically slower than the speed limit and you look and sure enough there's something going i've seen people like reading on an ipad you know as you drive by them yeah some of this stuff is just face timing the.

jason hawes
"bill burns" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"bill burns" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The rest of your life bill burns probably will in the upper percentile of respected ufologists in the country as well as a biographer written biographies about mickey rooney he's in the documentary on right now on netflix called bombshell about heady lamar although you might not recognize bill because he's not wearing hat and sunglasses so you have to pay attention to the chiron quickly i'm not used to seeing you without your aviators on bill well yeah when i did a recent ancient aliens i also was wearing a jacket and tie no sunglasses and no hat so impostor that's impostor that's not the real bill i was inside it was a middle of manhattan movie filming this and you just walk around with bomber jacket a baseball had and glasses in that area been hadn't they think you're a terrorist but if i had to draw you i would try that and sunglasses unabomber jacket that's how i i mean that's how i picture you but you know it's interesting because you were not the only celebrity in obviously in this documentary on netflix about this subject but so was a mel brooks who is most famous for playing off of the name hetty lamar with his character in blazing saddles i thought that was an interesting choice to because he had a lot to say about her he did shoes she was a very popular star she was at mgm she had a very story life when it came to her relationships with people like louis mayer at mgm various agents uh circling around mgm mgm in the nineteen forties and we're talking about this is the studio of judy garland this is the studio mickey rooney of court gable of william powell it was an exciting time in american motion picture history in american motion picture history from the nineteen thirties when mickey i broke into mickey rooney broke into mgm all the way through through the war and then things changed after the war but in that period of time in the late nineteen thirties through the early nineteen forties mgm was one of the was the only studio making money doing the great depression paramount warner brothers fox they will losing money they had to really struggle to survive but mgm found under formula with younger stars including people like how you more judy garland mickey rooney they found.

mickey rooney netflix chiron hetty lamar mgm louis mayer judy garland william powell manhattan mel brooks mickey i