18 Burst results for "Bill Bryson"

"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:32 min | 2 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

"But. But after this he after the war, he survives falling out of a plane three miles in the sky. He gets a job in factory. Guess factory gets chlorine gas poisoning survive status works in another factory gets self. Uric acid survives that then survives a middle pipe dropping on him only just in this case then goes on the lives onto a ripe old age. Goes. Yeah Pretty. Pretty Pretty Lucky pretty extraordinary. You say that probably no area of human generated listen to than six which. One of the problems you've found with all the research that was done these bobby. Kennedy's of this world and the sheer hearts of this world into human sexuality. Conclusions are almost always dubious at for for obvious reasons when his if I. IF I start asking you personal questions about your sex life, it is unlikely that you will tell me you'll be completely candid. And I am the same I mean even even in Discrete Var. Obviously, you're not going to do over the radio, but I mean even in a discreet environment. Was Just you a researcher? The they found various tests that people. Don't hesitate to lie about one of the things they did was was tested. Women find out how many sexual partners they would would prepared to own up to having had, and if the women thought they were hooked up to a lie detector test when the question was. They suddenly had about a third more sexual partners the when they didn't think anybody could possibly check up on them. So all these research research research is a hyping that the work is based on People's preparedness to give truthful answers to questions about six lives with no one. No one will ever do right so so you see these weeds sort of weed outside. He's not Sonata statistics. I mean the the the the sort of margin for error on anything to do. A sex analysis is is pretty pretty huge as part of the reason why we know so little about one of the fascinating things. I discovered is that it's only recently been discovered that many of the drug trials conducted on. An test subjects have almost never included. Women never included almost never included women because of fear of how a woman's Menstrual Cycle Mutt skew the result of of attest that seems remarkable to me. Yeah, unless the judge specifically designed for a woman, and they tend not to use women in the test, and and they don't, and they never test things. Some people with multiple conditions so that if you have diabetes and a heart condition, they won't test diabetic drug on you so because they want to keep the test pure and uncomplicated, but it's especially bad for longtime. They just thought you know the. Difference Between Men and women was one of scale so a smaller man. My Man, so you just adjust the dosage for women and everything will be fine, and what they found is that women and men are completely different in how they respond to various drugs, but but of drugs were they were they just what they did was just June a scaled down the dosage for woman, and then discover subsequently that actually these drugs having completely different effects on women of different hormonally bones that often different in terms of their business and so many different ways, women, a different from men, and yet and yet and yet women. Outlive men, and they seemed like they always have outlived US bill every society ever studied, and even with the perils of childbirth, women still outlive men. What's what's what do you think's going on? Can't. I can tell you that there's. There's lots of speculation about it, but but it is. It is profound irony because you know women are so much more exposed to risk than than men in terms of childbirth which. Know historically kills a lot of human beings, but it's never killed a single man. You know I mean it's a really dangerous thing to do. Especially of over history and women are the ones who tend to nurse the sick in there for much more exposed to anything that's infectious or contagious, and despite having this greatly heightened risk, women everywhere live longer considerably longer than animal prepared to take risks minimal likely to go and fight and die in battle. Minimal likely to take on dangerous professions even when you see kind of allow for that when you you know. Because men do have you know the men are far more likely to die from accidents and falling off roofs and getting in car, crashes and stuff, but even when you allow for that, women still live much longer than men and the presumption is I. Don't know that anybody's ever established anything that would come close to be improved, but presumptious in some ways it's related to hormones. Testosterone kills you the one thing that they in a way that nobody really quite understands, but the one thing that known. That UNIX who don't produce testosterone in the same way. I also live as long as women do. They live much longer to women. Anybody has been castrated will. The benefit I. Definitely the only benefit is that you could live longer, so it's almost certainly to do with the male and female hormones, and that brings us to longevity longevity, so interesting thing that seems to be overwhelmingly associated with longevity is a happy cultural, happy family that I've been connected having people who care about you in living longer, and and being closer to communities where where there's a strong family, tradition and the elderly are not just kind of shipped off to. To be kind of warehoused somewhere, so does that kind of maybe indicates the cigarette longevity psychology they know, or or or is it just more like the having the the fine quality of care you get from a that is also presumably if you're living with your family and they, they might detect an illness more quickly than you would. If you on, there might be more insistent about you getting treated. That's one possibility, but I think I. I suspect and again always stress I'm not an expert on this, but my own suspicion is, that is simply. Simply because they feel, they feel feel as if they are important. They don't feel as if you know the one thing you hear again and again from elderly people. Particularly you know really do people is. They don't want to be a burden. They can have so sorry. They are a burden. They you know I think elderly people sometimes just kind of lose the will to live, because they feel guilty about being alive and being being you know holding others younger people back, so is the secret of longevity, then just displacing the guilt onto our children. Feel, sorry. So you'll see them to. Donate. Which I think. We're putting, but I think the secrets would be having children who genuinely care back looking after you and keeping you because it's that's what is done culturally and his ten by people who know that when they get become old themselves that they will be looked after intern and yet the modern world. We build a modern world whereby with time poor There's not enough. There's a care crisis on. Both genders are in the workforce of course working longer longer hours There's less children than for the elderly, and for and for the informed disabled people as well I. Mean this. All of this is becoming a real crisis. I mean this all of those reasons that you were just talking about, but also as medical science improves able to keep the body going with it doesn't it isn't particularly isn't necessarily happy. Body I mean one of the. Statistics I. Remember Reading said for every year of added life we've we've got now only nine months of those a healthy, so for every year of added a third that year you'll be unhealthy and so you know what was happening is allowing people to live longer and longer and longer, but increasingly frail bodies, and.

Testosterone diabetes Discrete Var US bobby Kennedy researcher intern
"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:44 min | 2 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

"This th- rights and the nick in that's that whole system connects to to the rest of the body. And it's such a finely placed thing the spice where we digest food and the trekkie where we actually breathe from, tell the story you in there about the great British. Engineer with a wonderful name of isn't bad, kingdom Brunell and how he came up with that. was. He was a workaholic parks along but one day he he was amusing. His children is very fond of his kids, and he decided to use them with the magic trick where you pull out of your ear and. Or something and. But the, but the the trick the trick is was that he had to hide a coin. I can't even remember the value of the coin, but he he hit a coin under his his tongue in order to produce it as the as the climax of the trick. But as he was doing the trick, and going through all his various motions, he accidentally swallowed the coin and. You know as you can kind of imagine. The the look of puzzlement followed by alarm. This coin slid down his throat and lodged at the base of his right at the take your with. Splits did it lodge. Or flat I don't know I mean. Brief. Brave, but he knew enough about anatomy to know that this was not this was no place to have a corn, and and it was, it was very uncomfortable, was apparently it wasn't painful and it didn't stop him from breathing, but but it only had to turn sightly of turn on its side, and it would be like a manhole cover. I. Mean it would just it would block the airway altogether, so it was. This is not something that you wanted to have in their. NOT DEAL WITH All kinds of things to get it out I mean mostly initially they just held him upside down by his ankles, and gave him big shakes, and kind of clapped him on the back, and all that and this coin would not come out. And then he built a contraption in which he could be suspended ups. Identity Swung back and forth. Idea ankles with her. Again because he's he was an engineer and he you know he he, his way of thinking was to come up with some kind of an engineered solution, and so he was swollen this contraption and he believed that the beat upside down the gravity would pull on it, but also the motion would might shake it lose. That didn't work. A A very distinguished surgeon was called in, and he decided to try to have a cut up his. You know put making a decision his throat on each. Other. With some forceps, and that didn't work either, because Banal started, choking and coughing and sputtering, and that was I mean you can imagine how distressing would be without anesthetic to have somebody sticking for substandard your throat so at. And then then six weeks after after this crisis began, and it was the talk of the nation, people were sending an advice from all over income, and and abroad he had himself strapped into his contraption once more in kind of act of desperation, and the coins fell out, and he was, he was fide, but the the point of all that story in the book is that we are the only creatures that have this very high risk of choking all the time slot when people eat, because we use the same passageway for breathing, and and as swallowing food, and is only just the this little trap door that Gladys Sans era, your lungs and food into stomach can beyond and. You know very often. It could get confused think of yourself to dinner party. When you're having a good time, and you're breathing constantly. You're eating carelessly just sort of throwing down your throat, and because you're in party mood, you're throwing red wine down on top of that. You'd get him a little bit intoxicated. Laughing sometimes. Erupt in laughter. And all you have all of these these these various things going on with with Aaron food going in different directions at all. You know potential conflict. Wonder. We don't choke all the time it's. It's really quite a rare event. Although we've all had the experience of having feud, go down the wrong way, and it's really quite uncomfortable. Experience the the sense of taste. We have how much what we think is. Taste is really smell. Oh i. Think as much as ninety percent I. Think is the term they is. There's a simple way it method. You can test this yourself, which is just get. A bowl of jelly beans pincher nostril so that you cannot smell and close your eyes in just a random, take a flavored jelly bean out of a bowl and bite into it, and if you have an also covered, you cannot detect whether it's charrier, grape, or watermelon, whatever the many flavors are us can't tell all you. All you get is the taste of it which is sweetness you'll taste. You'll taste. Literally taste the sugar, but but the flavor is is really aroma. It's what goes up, Astros. When particularly aware of it. and. That's why in English and lots of other languages we use taste and flavor and aroma all. You. Try Holding your what you eat a strawberry. It doesn't really test if anything exactly. Yeah so I. Mean what you taste or the. Basics you know salt bitter sugar. AB- sweet. You know that kind of thing those. That's what all your taste. Literally. When you talk about taste, it's just that basic sensations you get on your tongue, but all the kind of richness of. GUSTA toy experienced. That's that's really a Roman flavor. Flav the generated by by molecules going up also in being perceived by 'cause. I inside your head. Against the hot, you got some indication on what a powerful mechanism! The hotties how it? HOW POWERFUL IT OPERATES! As a pump in order to push and. Pump blood through through a assistant. I mean think about it you. You harm these one hundred thousand times a day and it just I mean imagine if I gave you a little bulb, and it was a tube attached to it, and you had your job was in order to keep yourself alive. You had to squeeze every second about every second, and within a force to send fluid up this tube, a couple of meters I mean 'cause. 'cause you if you stand on your head. Heart was still pumped. We'll still pump blood to your feet. You know so. It can consent blood along way around the body, but he mentioned to having to do that with pumping this with your hand once every second non stop twenty four hours a day. Obviously he would be an impossibility because you have to rest Bihar, does that and by large doesn't complain about it. You know and. One of the most extraordinary figures I came across was the criminal were loaded the heart of lifetime. Is it was? It is equivalent to lifting one ton weight, one hundred and fifty miles into the air. That's how much energy heart expensive a lifetime goodness knows. How anybody ever calculated that but I think it does give you a pretty good idea. Imagine trying to a one ton, but this is one hundred fifty miles into the air, but that's the kind of work that your heart does, and you know I mean you'll go to sleep tonight. You'll rests completely, but your heart will just keep working as normal and it does nonstop. Thank. You attended the dissection of a cadaver in an anatomist school somewhere. What are your feelings like as you went into that room? And how did how did you respond emotionally? During the course of that that out, it was just it was a wonderful day, and I didn't know what to expect. I'd never been exposed to anything like this before frightened when you walked into the room I. I think most people would be and I mean things are pretty natural emotion. You're being confronted wasn't just a body of and this is a room full of bodies and body parts, and and when I mean the the first thing is struck by an environment like that. At least I.

Engineer Brunell Bihar Astros Heart Aaron
"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

06:39 min | 2 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

"Dusk comes from. If you think about it, we. Seal drew's get dusty. So what is it is causing? The dusk is mostly just humans shedding skin. The the thing that causes all the racism in the world is the skin color. They're pretty much. How much of that is us? Anyway? It just a sliver like. Less than a millimeter which is. One of the most astounding things I had I got to spend today's dissecting lab connecting room where students medical students are taught in Nordenham in England. I'm one of the things that out of all the mazing things that I was exposed to those in those two days was where the surgeon who is showing me round one point. He just cut back a sliver skin on this cadaver I mean so so thin is to be translucent him. You could see her, and he said that's where all the all the color is. Go down past a millimeter. Level and all human beings whatever their races are identical. You can't tell if you take off that outer millimeter. You can't tell what the Chinese of Caucasian. FLACCO or what is absolutely nothing to distinguish any of us? We are identical to. The level underneath the skin, so there is no such thing as rice biologically biologically it's is not at all it's it's it's. It's a convenience. It's a way for us to categorize people, and in that sense it's it's fairly harmless, but it's it's obviously when people begin to use it as a way of of attributing characteristics to people and mental attributes and things like that it becomes permission while you should have things I shouldn't two years. Looking at all that they're all kinds of advantages that are conferred on people for having dark skin, having more militant me, this can remain flexible. It's able to resist I'm how would you raise more so why Palsson this world like you and me? What? What's the point of that were there because people like you supposed to end up in your heart, Saudi country because. The people were because they went to northern Europe and ended up at higher latitudes. and kind of desperate, ever the body to get more UV rays. Because it's it's you need it. It's good for you to way of producing vitamin D in your body. Which is you? You absolutely vitally needed? The idea was that people who are in hot tropical places would naturally have have dark skin APP because it would protect them from the effects of getting too much UV rays and people northern hemisphere weather where the the sun is not so penetrating indirect would have lighter skin, but the problem is of course what happens is simply now live all over the planet lots of. Almost all of end up in places that were our bodies are not really designed to be in, and hence the consignment of skin cancer in a place like Australia thing. Hair grows out of out of the skin on the human body. It's seems obvious why they'd be a natural selection advantage in having a ahead to keep Ed's warm. Why! Why the here under the in the bathing suit area bill with this? Nobody really knows I mean. There's all kinds of theories in fact with any any area anything to do with human body. There's always theories. Everybody's got years you know. Why do we have fingerprints? What do they therefore? What are the you know? Why? Why should you be distinctive in my not? What we do, we have here in these certain sizes, and I can just tell you all the theories, but but nobody really knows one is that somehow it has something to do with sent with trapping sent, but I don't know that they've ever. Ever been a a group of people anywhere particularly. Enraptured by sexually excited by. Armpit sent acid. That doesn't seem to hold water lot. Also some people said we appeal because because it helps avoid chafing. But again! I can't see that. That's aren't demonstrated in any way, so there's lots of theories, but they all. Kind of seem pretty half baked, and obviously just based on speculation with there isn't any way of proving that I think perhaps mean my own suspicion, and of course you have to bear with anything I say the when I've referred to my suspicious I, not qualified to make these judgments I mean. They're not a scientist or anything, but it just seems to me that you know hair. Certainly on top you had is is some some way is in some way connected with sexual attraction. I, mean we. We find people with with a good head of hair. We find tend to find more attractive, and so must be. That must be part of the reason why we've maintained hair where we have. One of the things really creepy at was the discovery that do pot in your book that within human skin without pause to a tiny tiny microscopic matz living the skin called Dominic's falaki Lauren he's tiny little. All over US fading out Skin Bill You were they? Yes, and they come out. Yes, but but luckily because microscopic. They're actually no more I mean. If you see photographs of them, they look horror. Goes Astray. Photograph. Yes! They, really horrible because they're so small that we can't see them, so You don't need to lose it. He sleepover, but you know if if you start thinking about all the all the things are delivering on inside. You is slightly horrifying and clearly distasteful. Swimming in bacteria. Fungi in all kinds of things that you know you. Even when? One of the things that was interesting was that you actually have more of that stuff on your skin after a shower them before that you don't want. Will you your washing all this stuff away and making yourself clean, but actually what you do is you tend to flush it out, so you get rid of smelly stuff I mean you come out of the shower smelling lot sweeter, but also you know. If somebody did a kind of. Census of what's on you. The the the number would either be steady or possibly even greater, because you're sort of bringing all these things out flushing them out. They need to be there. I mean the the idea that human. The body is a temple is silly idea really? I mean the analogy was given by another guest on the show bodies a forest floor. That's what it ought to be like the idea that way we ought to be pristine is. Creepy and a bit. We'd actually through better. Yeah, it's I mean and it's funny. You people have germ phobias for instance is just as it is such an impossibility to get germs out of your life and this idea that somehow. Avoid I know touching door handles and toilets and things that somehow that's going to save you. is is crazy because you were just exposed to jobs. All the time I mean, you just can't avoid it and trying to keep yourself away from other people's jobs. It's impossible because they're just. They're just. Aerosols in the air. Wherever you go, you're.

Nordenham Europe FLACCO scientist US Ed Australia England Dominic Lauren
"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:56 min | 2 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

"Paradox for Huma. Bilas now tends attention to the most wondrous and complex thing we know of in the entire world. That is you dear listener. or rather your body. Bill Bryson loves your body. and. That's because the human body is impossibly sophisticated machine. That bill puts it. Works Twenty four hours a day for decades without for the most part needing regular servicing. All the installation of spare parts runs on water. And a few organic compounds is soft and rather lovely is accommodating me. Mobile and plants reproduces with enthusiasm makes jokes feels a fiction appreciates a red sunset and the cooling breeze. You says bill a truly a wonder. Those book is called the Body a guide occupants. Hello, welcome back. Think is wonderful to be back. The book begins with an appreciation of the actual pound or dollar value of the body itself now what we told as a kid about this. What I vaguely recollection of being told by biology teacher in junior high school middle school that the human body could be made the elements necessary to make human body could be bought for something like five dollars or eight dollars ten dollars some fairly trivial amount, I don't know the exact amount, but was stuck with me because it just seemed, it just seemed so remarkable that the stuff that makes us. Carbon, oxygen and hydrogen all that could be bought a off the shelf. And that was something that stuck with me, and then just by chance when I started doing the research of the book I discovered that in two thousand thirteen, the society of chemistry in Britain had done a much more careful exercise to see how much it would cost to make a human. Specimen in this specimen was benedict cumberbatch the actor benedict. Cambridge Science Festival in two thousand thirteen, and he was the guest host the festival that year, so they used him as their template. And, and just what we all have, all comprised would compose of fifty nine elements, and out of the hundred, or so, that appearance occurred nature, and they worked out exactly how much it would cost to get all of them together in the right amounts and impure fide form, and came up with a figure that translates into Australian dollars about one hundred seventy thousand. Australian dollars five. Thousand. Dollars so very very much more than than the five or ten dollars. I was told. That you have you said that then? PBS television network in America, the exactly equivalent exercise, and came up with a figure of one hundred and sixty eight us. Dollars for the components necessary to make a body, so there's obviously quite a lot of. Argument I think I think. In Britain since. I think see the chemistry. In Britain, they were very group about using only the most purified things you have thirty pounds of carbon in new, and their carbon cost a lot like forty thousand pounds suicide like eighty thousand dollars. Big Part of the overall budget was spent on carbon, whereas I think the PBS went out and bought some charcoal or Depends on? How you source these materials. Get you pretty low fuming. At the Royal Society of chemistry you. You talk strange. Kind of figure well, let's let's miles, so we've got all those elements. Pull them apart out of the human body, and into little piles and floss cats. That's what it would amount to something within the realm of of that figure, and yet and yet there's those little piles of elements, and then there's us there's US the thing. Of It all that. I still find that the most an amazing notion that. The things that make us are exactly the same thing. You would find in pilot dirt and another. Could you go all around the earth? Find all of these elements in in inert form under threat throughout the universe, and yet somehow here on this one planet the. Whole of The vastness of space at do all these elements assemble in the way. The makes makes living things. A bacterium is miraculous enough, but then makes things as sophisticated as the can actually think about what it means to be us. That's extraordinary thinking of all the. Planets that are in the in the cosmos and the universe, and the idea that those elements would somehow assemble themselves into some form that would regal reproduce. That's just seems remarkable scientists still deeply mysterious to us. Mysterious in the sense that no you know, scientists can replicate it. There's. All the people in the world, and put them together and give them all those elements, and they cannot make even one human sal, whereas as we sit here now. If we make a million new blood cells alone, you, you're constantly gender. We do it ever that. Your bodies do it for us effortlessly, but we cannot do it independently at all, and you know is partly because whereas we really are at the beginning of of self knowledge about how the body works, I mean ten thousand years so now presumably will know a lot more about these things, but right now we're pretty much at the beginning, but also is just. Is So complex that we can't even begin to master need rudimentry form how about the the actual specific form of each individual the idea that each one of us yourself could appear in such a distilled, and says specific form from the meeting of however many people through the passing down of DNA through millennia like that that have vanishingly unlikely as well. Isn't it and just think about how many how many potential us were in? I don't want to get too graphic about tuna. Just think about how much sperm your dad producing in his lifetime and. With every every time it was fifty, sixty, eighty, million little Richard Filers. And only one of them is whole lifetime and then. Episode of the same for. His parents and the parents before them has you to be here now. I mean the the statistical chain of improbabilities is just staggering. Guests on recently. Who said that Gee? My parents have to a the almost went to candidate instead, some among could have been Canadian unless it. Wouldn't have existed at all. People don't understand it. Yes, yes, I mean if they they've watched some different television program where the right night or something if If they had gone out to dinner instead of Whatever you know I mean the list of of kind of miraculous events necessary, and the chain of it going all the way back to the beginning of dawn of life. Necessarily get you hear me here. Any one of us here is just vanishing the improbable. It's not to console yourself with if basically boring or unpleasant. How how on and vanishingly unlikely it is that you still yes? You go from the body from the outside in in from the top to the bottom beginning with skin I think I knew this, but I don't think I knew this that most dust in the world is dead skin is that. HIGH PROPORTION OF! Yeah I, mean I. I sort of fudged that a little the book because. If you re around in. You'll get lots and lots of different statistics anywhere from thirty percent of dust is dead skin to ninety eight percent. So much of these things nobody knows I. Mean People just kind of pluck figures out that out of the air. So I just said that. If you if you run your finger long dusty south of a big proportion of of the track you make is disturbing, little bits of your former self, so, but it is the fact that we constantly shedding skin flakes all the time you have to your skin is is protective layer, and is constantly regenerating, and and little bits of little practically microscopic bits of it falling off all the time, so you know if you stay in a room. That's where most of the.

Britain Bill Bryson Royal Society of chemistry benedict cumberbatch US PBS Cambridge Science Festival junior high school middle scho America Richard Filers
"bill bryson" Discussed on The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

03:29 min | 4 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

"To believe I love. You both. Keep doing what you're doing. She should watch that conspiracy theory with me. Watch that together look out identified flying object. Just means they don't know what it is could be a Russian spy plane for all anybody knows. Could there be aliens. I would think if they figured out how to get out of their galaxy and they could get all the way to our galaxy and technologically advanced. I don't think that they would have such a tough time. Grabbing are people are beaming people opera taking them away. It just seems like a lot to do it so no I don't buy any of it. I don't think they've been here yet. It'd be cool if they were but I don't think they've been here yet. But that's what do I know? I mean they could be here. I believe in another galaxy. Far Far Away there's life so why not teleportation. Maybe that would be cool. Can we get that down all right one more call because we've had so many of them and I hate not playing your calls Janette? I'm Chicago land and I wanted to comment on your shows. I mean they're great. I love the very real with your anxiety or pressure in your depressive episode with the Virus. I totally get it. People are you know can relate to what you're talking about in booker. I love it. You Love Bill Bryson. The I read his book a walk in the woods a few years ago when I have walked pieces of. At Appalachian trail that he would. I turn and look and just yesterday even to read to more of a book so I started his audiobook at home. And that's the history of things in our home which is Kinda cool so far and then I ordered the book the history of all things. So that's coming in the mail paperbacks I can sit and read it in the sun so thanks again for your podcast. affects he. Who when you have this podcast. It's you don't know who you're affecting in a positive way. Keep doing it. What a sweet call. Let's end on that. Yeah by the way I got more comments of people asking me about that. Damn Bill Bryson book than probably anything. We've ever done on the show before I need to do. Booker's books really do. I mean I can't tell you how many people another one he wrote and forgive me if I have this wrong because I've read so many years ago but I believe it's called made in America. I think I'll look it up because I actually have the hard copy somewhere around here but it is phenomenal. If I'm wrong corrected next episode but read that one to God. That one's really good eight hundred. Seventy one eight five any closing thoughts their Peres. He had people who have a lot more time. So they're reading books and just I don't know hopefully everybody's staying sane as possible all right. We'll do this next week. Everybody have a nice weekend. Take care so welcome to your Demi Energy I'm your host Demi Brunette and I'm so excited to have you joining my bag. Some things you can expect from this. Podcast ARE SOME JUICY GOSSIP. Some good advice some fun. Exciting guests and a lot of other surprises. Make sure you subscribe to spotify apple podcasts. Podcast ONE WHEREVER YOU. Listen to your podcast..

Bill Bryson Booker Peres Demi Brunette Chicago Janette spotify America apple
"bill bryson" Discussed on The Current

The Current

10:53 min | 9 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on The Current

"By living badly by drinking too much smoking or anything. It's going to take years and years if not decades to do it because your body protects you it looks after you. Another extraordinary fact I came across was just blew me away was that is according to a professor at Stanford. He's he's estimated that we all get cancer something in the order of five or six times a day but several dozen times. I'm so weak and couple of thousand times a year you your body gets cancer. And that's because yourselves thirty seven trillion cells in their constantly. Renewing themselves to reproducing. So did you know every once in a while. There's something's going to go wrong and cancer is just to sell this out of control but your body your immune system identifies these things before they can grow into tumors and kills often flushes them away before they caused you damage. But this is exactly the sort of thing body's constantly after you and right now as as we sit here and all your listeners. They were all breathing in pathogens. And you know there's things in the air and sometimes of course they make you sick and you get a cold or flu or something but most of the time your body protects you from all the stuff that you're taking in and I just as marvelous to it looks after so well without us really doing too much normally normally to gained so much respect for my body from reading the book. I want to look at some specific examples of of what you learned about our bodies and that starts right something basic. As kids we learn we have five senses. How many do we really have? You can count on systematize all different ways but at least thirty because as we have the elemental senses that we all know about seeing and hearing and that but then also you know you have for instance a sense of where you are in space. You know your eyes are closed. You know whether you're sitting up a line flat and that's called appropriate and lots of other senses. Let's look at something. One specifically typically the map of tongue shows where we taste sweet sour salty bitter hockey that again certainly my school days in the fifties and sixties I can remember having these areas of your tone mapped out in fact it's not as much messier than that. It's your your taste taste. Buds are all over. The place and the interesting thing about taste is what you can taste on. Your tongue is only the very basic elements as you say bitter salty uh and so on real flavors is entirely a process of smell. You don't realize that and Until you have a cold or something in your and your sense of smell isn't working very yeah well and then. Suddenly food doesn't have much flavor to it but almost everything you eat your sense of its deliciousness is not because what you get on your tongue in your mouth but drifts up into nostrils Charles and one consequence that is people lose their sense of smell are usually just totally miserable. Everybody thinks that sense of smell is a fairly minor saddened saddened that you could you know if you had to dispense with one of your senses. You could give it up but in fact it I mean I've never lost my sense of smell but I've learned in doing the research for the book. Is that people who do lose their sense. Really really miserable existence because foodstuffs having any flavor and life just kind of loses its richness as my Michael ninety-three now had lost his sense of smell. And I can tell you that. It's been very difficult for him so there's some on the ground research. There's I mean there's all kinds heads of other things that can happen to you. There's a condition known as caused me. Which is where everything? Smells like feces everything so everything. Yeah Yeah I mean that could be pretty miserable so if you smelling well just blessed and okay. I'm happy with that for myself okay. So let's talk about these things and I for listeners listeners. I'm holding up my two thumbs here much. Made of the fact humans can do things that many animals can cause we have opposable thumbs. How much truth is there is it is it isn't it isn't I mean I always? I have to stress with these seats. That aren't you know I'm not. I'm not a medical person. I'm not an anatomist to Monday. Tell you what I've learned by talking to people who are qualified. But what I do know from talking to authorities authorities is that it's often written that humans have opposable thumbs with all that somewhere before but in fact most primates have opposable thumbs. It's what it means is that your thumbs can touch all your your finger in there for you can get a good grip. You can move around quite a bit in a way other creatures. Can't but what what is actually different about the humans as I understand it as three tiny muscles cels in there with exotic names on them is called the first Var Inter Ossius of Henley. I remember that name and then to others with equally exotic names and I don't know exactly what they do. They really do. Help us to manipulate our thumbs. Daft way which is why we can do really delicate tasks I mean. Even even the best chimpanzee could not be a jeweler or something unique thing that they don't aspire to be jeweler then it would be difficult. I want a very basic that I'd never credible but dr pointed out to me so thumbs actually on sideways. Always that flat your thumb. Put Your hands off that which is why if you're typing you. Strike the case with the side of your thumb in you. Do it with the tips of your fingers but you. You can't type with the tip of your thumb because it's on sideways pointing in their own right. I'm just thinking about that now. So is there are there other features actually actually make us different from other animals. Yeah I mean all kinds of things I mean. We Walk Upright which obviously is distinguishing characteristic. And because we walk up we've had to make all kinds of bodily modifications with which sometimes have been beneficial but very often if not the main consequence of our upright anatomy demean. Women feel experience every time they give birth the need to have hips that support. Your weight is such a way that you have. Women will have very narrow birth passage and a very complicated maneuver that the baby has to go through to get out some other. Primates can give birth in just moments in seconds. The baby just drops out right since just false out okay. Having done all of this research about our bodies how do you see yourself differently from when you began this product. Oh well first of all I really appreciate what my body does for me. I mean you know life is is a miracle I mean it really is as soon as I set at the very beginning of our conversation atoms that make you everywhere else in the universe. They just lie. They don't do anything they make rocks and they make stars and you know but they don't make animate besides and we get our Adam somehow give us life allow us to move around. It's we're very very lucky. And with only creatures that have ever existed that really have insight and ability to appreciate and just be able to have a conversation that we're having now so to be a human tastic gift and a knife is short. I mean even in a good full human life only gone for about six hundred and fifty thousand hours so you think of ours you waste watching television or just fooling fooling around texting and things like that. Six hundred fifty thousand doesn't seem to have the abundant and yet we we go through most go through without really doing good things for bodies were without even just appreciating how lucky we are to have body that looks after so the one the books is giving me the experience has give me as just an appreciation for what a gift it is is to be human and how really we all to look after ourselves a bit better having said that. I don't keep intending to. But it is the hardest thing in the world and back but it's really hard. I'm probably because I'm on this book tour down. I'm traveling everywhere. I have to just eat when I can. I'm not able to exercise the way I want. I want to. I swear as soon as I get home gonNA lead a virtuous life go on diet and exercise it's religiously and just be a good person. We're going to take back with you. You're bringing us around to talking about death and the end which is where your book comes to the end. The natural end is death and I'm wondering how much improvement we're seeing in health and longevity nowadays compared to development the century ago. Well you've just touched on the two slightly contradictory things health and longevity certainly longevity zebedee all over the world especially in the advanced world in which we get to live longevity just keeps getting better and better I mean life spans better better but because medical science nights can keep you alive longer. Doesn't necessarily mean that can keep you alive healthily longer. We're not killed off by the things that used to kill us off earlier. So we can live longer. Lives means that we're prater other things like notably dementia and Alzheimer's a generation or two ago people tended to die before they before a lot of them got dementia inch now so many people that are living so long that dementia is almost an inevitability for very high proportion of people. So that is a problem. We've got is. How do we keep extended in life but also then extending the quality of life and this is something that we haven't resolved and there's no? There's no real prospect yet. I mean one of the alarming. Things is that Alzheimer's has been known condition for over a century. And yet you know anyone who goes to Dr Today with the symptoms of Alzheimer's the doctors today no more for them than a doctor could have done in one thousand nine hundred hundred. I mean we have made absolutely zero progress against this terrible disease of ageless. We need to have a cure for that. And lots and lots of other things otherwise a lot lot of people are going to be condemned to fairly wretched final years. Another activists is is as we were talking about before about cancer. If we cured all cancers tomorrow how how much would that extend the average life very little there is a law of diminishing returns with us. Because we're living so long now and because cancer tens and what happens if you don't get cancer there's something else will get you. I mean the one inevitabilities that you will die so however much you stop certain things from you something else will get you but I I like to think that in an upbeat where the World Health Organization.

Alzheimer professor World Health Organization Stanford Adam Charles Michael cold flu prater
"bill bryson" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:18 min | 9 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on The Current

"December. Twenty four addition of the current Benedict cumberbatch. Wherever you go you have our fan? But yes and somebody saw that addict on location in Boston and meets the rushed home and went on to register so she writes his fine. He's told her that. I thought I suspect to about five five eleven wannabe six footer. But nuts ripped not fat on that man. It's all muscle a senior wholesome goodness and you just think I couldn't smell him. I I really try. Just the lightest humber. Musk in the Boston Journal. Direct.

Benedict cumberbatch Boston Journal Boston Musk
"bill bryson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:58 min | 10 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Bill Bryson and I listen to it with my boys on the way in and I highly come I highly commend this to those of you who drive your kids to school or from school find a good book on tape my son Michael is very interested in biology you know how does our brain work what causes people to go brought blind why can't we reverse blindness is always been very interested in these kinds of questions and so my wife recommended this book by bill Bryson who I've liked as an author for years and this morning around them to school and of the story in the book comes up bill Bryson says ninety nine point one percent of the human body is just six elements phosphorus calcium oxygen hydrogen nitrogen and carbon ninety nine point one percent of body over two thirds of that is oxygen wow that's a ninety nine point one percent of who we are who we are it's we are physically well when I mention someone you love deeply you care deeply about or when you think of someone who's music or writings are movies acting or leadership or sportsmanship I don't mean being a nice guy on the field I mean throwing a great touchdown the craftsmanship really excites you it's not their carbon their nitrogen their calcium or phosphorous their hydrogen their oxygen is the essence of who they are they can't be measured can be observed can be memorialized on film but what's even more important any of those things is the love we give care we give to people who at that time may not even be able to understand or even appreciated but we do it we do it for some reason that we can't even quantify because we know we must because we are required to there's a scene in the movie for versus Florian can miles is driving in Carroll Shelby's trying to heat carousel was trying to recruit him back to come back and drive from being a mechanic and he said why don't we do this he said there is no because we we have to we're required to it's in our blood it's who we are and so many of you out there deserve to be honored recognize spotlighted highlighted and I won't be able to do that for everyone of you but I want you to know that you are making a difference.

Bill Bryson Michael Florian Carroll Shelby one percent
"bill bryson" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:57 min | 10 months ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on KTRH

"Bryson and I listen to it with my boys on the way in and I highly come I highly commend this to those of you who drive your kids to school or from school find a good book on tape my son Michael is very interested in biology you know how does our brain work what causes people to go brought blind why can't we reverse blindness is always been very interested in these kinds of questions and so my wife recommended this book by bill Bryson who I've liked as an author for years and this morning were rotten into school and of the story in the book comes up bill Bryson says ninety nine point one percent of the human body is just six elements phosphorus calcium oxygen hydrogen nitrogen and carbon ninety nine point one percent of body over two thirds of that is oxygen wow that's ninety nine point one percent of who we are who we are it's we are physically well when I mention someone you love deeply you care deeply about or when you think of someone who's music or writings or movies or acting or leadership or sportsmanship I don't mean being a nice guy on the field I mean throwing a great touchdown the craftsmanship really excites you it's not their carbon their nitrogen their calcium their phosphorus their hydrogen their oxygen is the essence of who they are they can't be measured can be observed can be memorialized on film but what's even more important any of those things is the love we give the care we give to people who at that time may not even be able to understand or even appreciated but we do it we do it for some reason that we can't even quantify because we know we must because we are required to there's a scene in the movie for versus four can miles is driving in Carroll Shelby's trying to heat carros always trying to recruit him back to come back and drive from being a mechanic and he said why don't we do this he said there is no because we we have to we're required to it's in our blood it's who we are and so many of you out there deserve to be honored recognize spotlighted highlighted and I won't be able to do that for everyone of you but I want you to know that you are making a difference.

Michael bill Bryson Carroll Shelby one percent
"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

13:30 min | 1 year ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast Bill Bryson is back on conversations today bill is of course the best selling author of wonderful books on Australia the UK on science and language and travel the universe he likes to take on whole worlds of knowledge now of in the entire world and that is you do not or rather your body Bill Bryson loves your body and that's because the human body is an impossibly sophisticated machine that this bill puts it works twenty four hours a day for decades without for the most part needing regular servicing installation of spare parts runs on water and a few organic compounds is soft and rather lovling is accommodating me mobile plants reproduces with enthusiasm makes jokes feels affection appreciates red sunset and the cooling breeze you says bill are truly a wonder the Russians new book is called the Body a guide for occupants hello book back thank you it's wonderful to be back the book begins with an appreciation of the actual pound dollar value of the body itself now what were you told us a kid about this you know what I vaguely recollection I've been told by a biology teacher in junior high school middle school that the human body could be made the elements necessary to make a human body could be bought for something like five dollars or eight dollars ten dollars some fairly trivial amount I don't know the exact amount but it was and that stuck with me because it just seemed it just so remarkable that the stuff that makes us you know carbon oxygen hydrogen all that could be bought off the shelf or just a few dollars and that was something that stuck with me the and then just by chance when I started doing the research the book I discovered that in two thousand thirteen the Royal Society of chemistry in Britain had done much more careful exercise see how much it would cost to to make a human specimen in this specimen was benedict cumberbatch the actor benedict he was it was for the Cambridge Science Festival in two thousand thirteen when he was the guest host of the festival that year so they used him as their template and what we all have wall comprised would compose of fifty-nine elements and out of the hundred or so that occur nature and they worked out exactly how much it would cost to get all of them together in the right amounts and in purified form and came up with a figure that translates into Australian dollars is about one hundred and seventy thousand Australian dollars thousand dollars surveys much more than than the five ten dollars I was told that you said that then P. B. S. television can America did exactly equivalent size and came up with a figure of one hundred sixty eight. US dollars for the components necessary to make a body so there's obviously quite a lot of arguments I think I think what the I saw in Britain in Arkansas and I think that I was there was cited chemistry in Britain they were they scooped us about using only the most purified the things you have thirty pounds of carbon in new and their carbon cost a lot like forty thousand pounds so it's like eight thousand dollars that big part of the overall budget was spent on carbon whereas I think the pbs they just went out and bought some charcoal or depending on how you source material Awesome let's get you a pretty low right but the world decided chemistry gets you benedict cumberbatch strange sherlock kind that kind of figure well that's that's marvelous enough so if you've got all those elements pulled them apart out of the human body and into little piles six that's that's what it would amount to something within the room of that and yet and yet there's those little piles of elements and then there's US there's us the thing with surrounding Calvin that I still find that the most amazing ocean to the things that make us are exactly the same thing as you would find any pilot dirt and not only could you all around earth find all of these elements in in your form on earth but threat throughout the whole universe and yet somehow here on this one planet the only place we know and the whole of the fastness of space do all these elements assemble in a way that makes makes living things I mean a bacteria is miraculous enough but but then makes things as sophisticated as us that can actually think of it what it means to be US extraordinarily thinking of all the planets that in the in the cosmos and the universe and the idea that does elements would somehow assemble themselves into some form that would regal and reproduce that's just seems remarkable scientists still deeply mysterious too doesn't it well this mysterious and in the sense that note no scientists can replicate it this get all the people in the world and put them together and give them all those elements and they cannot make one human sal whereas as we sit here now every second we make a million new blood cells alone I mean you you constantly Geno we do it ever that's in our bodies force effortlessly but we cannot do it independently at all and it's partly because whereas we really are at the very beginning of of self knowledge about how the body works and ten thousand years now presumably will know a lot more about these things but right now we're pretty much at the beginning also is just is so complex that we we can't even begin to master even rudimentary form how about the actual specific form of each individual the idea that each one of us yourself could appear in such a distilled and says specific fall home from the meeting of however many people through the passing down of DNA through millennia like that have vanishingly unlikely as well it wasn't it think about how many how many potential us there were in I don't want to get too graphic about it but just think about how much sperm your dad producing in his lifetime and every every time it was fifty sixty eighty million little richard filers and only one of them and his whole life then gone this epa the same for his parents and the parents before them for you to be here now I mean the statistical chain of improbabilities is just staggering the guest on recently said that g my parents instead of coming to Australia I almost went to candidate instead some among could have been Canadian and I said no you wouldn't have existed ooh yeah understand it yes yes I mean if if they've lost and different television program but the right night or something if if they had gone out today instead of well whatever you know I mean the list of a kind of miraculous events necessary and the chain of it going all the way back to the beginning of Donovan five necessary to get you hear me hear anyone of us here is just vanishing improbable console yourself if you've had a particularly boring or unpleasant I said how how on vanishingly unlikely it is that you existed all yes you sorta go from the body from the outside in and then from the top to the bottom beginning skin I think I knew this but I don't think I knew this that most dust in the world is dead skin was that Bryant junior high proportion of yeah I mean I sort of edged a little bit in the book because because you get if you re around in it you get lots and lots of different statistics anywhere from like thirty percent of dust is dead skin ninety eight percent so much of these things nobody knows I mean people just Kinda pluck figures out of the out of there so I just said that if you you run your finger longer dusty south of big portion of of the track you make is disturbing little bits of your former self so but but it is fact it's we constantly shedding skin flakes all the time you have to your skin is protective layer and is constantly regenerating and little bits of will practically microscopic bits of folly off all the time so you know if you stay in a room that's where most of the dusk comes from if you think about you know seal dunes get dusty so what is it causing the dust and it's just human shedding skin the the thing that causes all the racism in the world is the skin color they pretty much how much of that is us anyway it just a sliver like less than a millimeter which is one of the most astounding things I was I got to spend two days in affecting lab dissecting room students medical students are taught in Nordenham in England and one of the things that all the mazing things that I was exposed to in those two days one was where the surgeon who was showing me round one point he just cut back a sliver of skin on this cadaver I mean so so thin is to be translucent you could see third and he said that's where all the all the color is where I go down past the major level and all human beings whatever their racist are identical you can't tell now if you take off that admin you can't tell the Chinese of Caucasian black or a what is absent nothing to distinguish any of us we identified to the level underneath the skin so there is no such thing as rice biologically no biologically it's not at all it's just it's a convenience it's a way for us to categorize people and in that sense it's it's fairly harmless but it's it's obviously when people begin to use it this way of of you know attributing characteristics to people and mental attributes and things like that it becomes pernicious while you should have things in they shouldn't use looking at all that they're all kinds of advantages that can third on people for having dark skin having more militant than me this can remains more flexible it's able to resist half would uv rays more so why are they pal skains in this world like you and me whoa what's the point of that because because people like you supposed to end up in your heart Saudi country because the Pale people were because they went to doc northern Europe and ended up at higher latitudes and and it kind of desperate ever for the body to get more you've raised because it's it's needed it's good for you to the way of producing vitamin D in your body which is you you absolutely vitally needed the whole idea was that people who are in hot tropical places would naturally have have dark skin APP because it would protect them from the effects of getting too much UV rays and people northern hemisphere whether whether the sun is not so trading interact with would have lighter skin but the problem is of course what happens is simply now live all over the planet and lots of almost all of his end up in places that were so our bodies are not really designed to be in and hence the sign amount of skin cancer in a place like a strategy thin hair grows out of out of the skin on the human body it's kind of seems obvious why there'd be a natural selection advantage and having a on a head to keep his warm why the hair under the almond in the bathing suit area this is nobody really knows I mean there's all kinds of theories in fact with any any area anything to do with human body there's always theories everybody's always got ideas you know why do we have fingerprints what are they therefore what why should you be distinctive in my not what why do we have here in these certain sizes and I mean I can just tell you all the theories but but nobody really knows one is that somehow it has something to do with sent with trapping sent in but I don't know that they've ever ever been a a group of people uh-huh particularly enraptured by sexually excited by arm pick sent that doesn't seem to hold water a lot and there's also some people say that we have pubic have because it helps void chafee but again I can't see that that's demonstrating anyway so there's lots of theories but they don't lane of seem pretty half baked and obviously just based on speculation with there isn't any way of proving that I think perhaps in my own suspicion because you have to bear in mind with anything I say when every fridge my unsuspicious I am not qualified to make these judgments I mean I'm not a scientist but it just seems to me that that has certainly on top of your head is it some way is in some way connected with sexual attraction I mean we we find people with with a good head yeah we find tend to find them more attractive and so it must be that must be part of the reason why we've maintained hair where we have one of the things that really creepy at was the discovery took part in your book that within human skin within our pause a tiny tiny microscopic matz living skin called democracy wchs he's tiny little minds we've got them all over is fading now skin bill and they come out at yes but but luckily they really look horrible but of course they're so small that we can't see them so you don't need to lose any sleep over but if you started thinking about all the all the things even on inside Jewish is slightly horrifying and clearly distasteful swimming in bacteria and fungi in all kinds of things juneau you'd even when one of the things I.

Bill Bryson Britain benedict cumberbatch ABC Royal Society of chemistry Cambridge Science Festival junior high school middle scho US UK America Australia P. B. Arkansas two days eight thousand dollars forty thousand pounds ninety eight percent ten thousand years twenty four hours five ten dollars
Hurricane Dorian approaches Kennedy Space Center in Florida

Dana Loesch

10:36 min | 1 year ago

Hurricane Dorian approaches Kennedy Space Center in Florida

"AM but you can listen to the program on Facebook twenty four hours a day all right yeah Kerrier I just wanted to say this is my first time to live with my mom and join the show when you have a great day thank you very much you have a great weekend to Clark I appreciate that okay there we go you bet all right now let's go to the question was for the radio prize package it forty three after the hour Nick Milton crabapple calls every week and he tells us his brother's name and Dave Davis calling from Woodstock good morning Dave your own o'neill outside welcome to the program good morning again mail and talk to you in a few years you're talking about the L. how's the blade a raider OC right yeah that's exactly right see is Milton crab apples your brother's name and you are quite correct and you'll give us an opportunity to send to you a radio prize package it'll give us a couple of weeks but you'll enjoy the package well I sure thank you you should call more often I will matter fact we'll talk to you later you bet so you soon there we go we got a winner for that that's all right now now less let's see it's forty four after the hour we've got time for this list top now too Richard is calling from West Virginia always enjoy Richards calls good morning Richard how are you Sir well a second level of the numbers well that's a personal problem there okay under some today with us so when I heard that your first name is Donald yes although o'neal Donald o'neill Williams that is correct hello Neil Williams well wonderful and I could you talk about this all the time to talk about the fishers choice bait yes and I'm just wondering what that if you just go buy a bottle of those why do you need anything else time flies or anything else if you can keep or is that just maybe this pressure bay to just for cuts in certain type of fish well okay the fishers choice but you're primarily for catfish and bring him something something shoreline because you know I a warm meal warm a super warm I am a piece of shrimp a piece of cricket bats that's going to be for shallow water Bram and cat fishing because you're going to school to throw it out there and leave it and the smell and era is going to attract the by okay so let's just FOR cat Fishin Bram up well thank you that I am the way yes the way you were promoting other sound like all you have to do is buy a bottle those fissures choice you can judge anything with that but the way you buy it's a it's so it's a convenient way to use live bait without having to use live bait not available any place in the United States yes it's available at Walmart and I own Amazon you can buy it on Amazon also features choice and you can either at Walmart your muscle for a bottle Fisher choice then there you go right so nail thank you glad you called I always enjoy that Richard you bet I do there we go let's see it's forty six after the hour we've got time for this list talk to John own o'neill outside John is calling from New York good morning John proud to have your show yes greetings from the cascade mountains where during a thunderstorm you do not want to be on the summit of slide mountain yeah why is that hi windows during a thunderstorm the lightning's raining down on you I'll bet so yeah you start repent of your sins real quick but that's in the high mountains the highest mountain in the Catskill Mountains about forty two number kidding here's a here's an here's an interesting fact about lightning when you see the lightning you see the lightning bolt okay right that blight the boat is going from earth to the clouds it has already traveled from the clouds to earth it's going in reverse it it's amazing and how quickly it comes down on yeah maybe one day maybe one day the scientists will figure out how to harness that energy and a lot of it whole boy oh boy one lightning bolt could could power a city like Atlanta for a year incredible incredible is right so how's life in the Catskills that's still really good this time of year o'neill I've been sleeping out as much as possible because eighty percent of Americans cannot see the Milky Way at night that is not right I really appreciate the unit and I just also camping out the I've done that many times during the years I've been fortunate to see a glowing wood chips hello the words it's called foxfire fungus I've been fortunate twice once actually camped out in Florida and another time up here in the Catskills it's rare sight but the I don't know any of the calls of ever seen it before but it's quite something let me ask yeah John let me ask you a question when you're citing the stars is probably best in the winter time when this low humidity I guess yeah but when you're doing that do use but not killers or do you use a scope powerful scope well we like I mentioned to you before we saw all the moves around Jupiter which is used in a spot in scope for that borne out yet I was quite amazed then I have my camera equipment my set up a toll for the lines and was actually able to photograph that yeah I read a let me recommend a book to you it's called it's called ocean breeze let me say yes by it by bill Bryson and the name of the book is a short history of nearly everything and I could talk about it for I could talk about it for a half an hour but in the book he details some things about the subject of our call now that being viewing the stars and their galaxies and I'll post the following to you in confirmation but also seeking your reaction and and that is this he say is that with the naked eye I own a a nice night you can see two thousand stars may be five thousand with the naked eye with a but not killers you can see fifty thousand stars with go ahead I even have a night vision and when you put that up all righty and bring them up tails he details in that book a fellow in Australia I don't recall his name it doesn't matter and he is a professional at what we are talking about and wins he is sixteen inch telescope in Australia where the humidity is practically zero and where there is no light from any city he can see a hundred thousand galaxies well it meant something I'll bet you will just a generous portion of that with what you do well I'm I'm definitely blessed and I don't take anything for granted one one third by my throat to some people of their Campanella with the police do whatever yes I'd I'd backpack quite a bit slower sponge in your backpack because so you're bound to get a little bit of water in the tank you could just sponge up and bring it out there you go and what is next to nothing fantastic good idea yep good idea and it'll just just one more thing sure school thank you yes squirrel huntin you might think nothing of it but it is couple times my life in my younger years where I was happy to have a squirrel in rice dinners that's about all I had at the time I think we'll have it hi good in the state of I'll tell you this then I'll go in Louisiana squirrel hunting is so popular I think it's Louisiana it's so popular that no one works that day it's a holiday own day of the squirrel season that's great in that wonderful yes yes terrific for taking your child hunting because you see lots of game add you get lots of shots and well there's a lot of reasons why but squirrel hunting is an outstanding participant and at last a long time Hey listen I'm glad you called and I want to I want to know more upon your next call about your astronomy if you will hi my amateur but I I'm fascinated by it as I am and when you get a chance yet bill Bryson a short history of nearly everything I guarantee it your what Reuel read it over and over and over have a great weekend pile but you bank say later this is o'neal with o'neal

Facebook One Day Milton Twenty Four Hours Eighty Percent Sixteen Inch
"bill bryson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"C. You told doesn't matter how big the warnings. Are you gonna have cigarettes that recalled warnings cigarettes, like coming up black pack with a skull-and-crossbone on the front called tumors? Lineup around the block. Well, I can't wait to get my hands on these things. I bet you get a tumor as soon as. Doesn't matter. How big the warnings are how much they cost keep raising the prices. We'll break into your house is to get the cigarettes. There are drug where addicted okay? I love to smoke. I smoked seven thousand tax day. Okay. And I am never quitting. I don't care. How many laws they smoke in your apartment under a blanket with all the lights out is that. The cops are outside. We know you have the cigarettes come out of the house with a cigarette. Above your head. Copper. Right here. Yeah. So tonight, I will receive a number of emails from well-meaning individuals, and they'll go like this, Michael. I had a loved one died from lung cancer, Michael. And I wanna make cigarettes illegal. I had a good friend who died on a motorcycle wearing a helmet. Because another person was driving badly. Hit him killed him. Should we therefore make motorcycles illegal? Well, Michael you make a good point. We could do both Michael we could do both. I've known some people that drink themselves to death. In fact, a lot of people drink themselves to death, whether literally or liver disease throat disease, oh sorts of other things. Well, my now. Say it. But before it 'cause you know, ain't nothing. Good to come a drinking and prohibition. Was one of the most awful legislative experiences experiments in this country's history. I'm reading a book called one summer nineteen twenty seven by Bill Bryson, and he has a couple of chapters on prohibition. I'm still reading it's a long book. Be quiet. And. He is no conservative by any stretch imagination. Not even a civil libertarian, but he refers to prohibition as one of the worst legislative experiments in American history. If not the worst. First of all alcoholism increased increased during prohibition. Secondly, the number of deaths related to drinking, do you know that the United States government? As one of its experiments to get people to stop drinking during abolition during prohibition. They poisoned some of the alcohol that went into the market in hopes that that would frighten people that you didn't want to get hold of the poisonous stuff. Do you know what that did to the price of bootleg whiskey? Senate through the roof. Because now you allowed branding. It's not just a commodity anymore. If you were a good supplier, you could ensure that your supply was clean and people willing to pay for that. Because it was a strychnine product that they were putting into the supplies that was killing people you drink it, and you die, right? There was an awful awful death as reported in this book. So if you were someone that could assure I've kept this in my presence. It's a clean supply the bootleg industry. The mafia grew in power there were murders related to it. Exactly what's going on with the with with the supply of drugs today when you push something like that into the illegal realm. They create their entire own hierarchy and structure to enforce it makes it deadly. It's exactly what they did. So you have to stop making laws based on things you don't like guess what? Some people won't get enough sleep. Guess what? Some people are going to cheat on their wives or their husbands. We used to make daddy legal in some countries. They punish that by death. Well, Michael, maybe that it helped MAC, maybe it'd help. No, no. You create laws of unintended consequences. When you do that leave people be an understand that you cannot control them. You can't and you shouldn't try, and you have no authority.

Michael Bill Bryson Senate liver disease United States throat disease
"bill bryson" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on WLAC

"Tonight, I will receive a number of emails from well-meaning individuals, and they'll go like this, Michael. I had a loved one died from lung cancer, Michael and I wanna make cigarettes illegal. Okay. I had a good friend who died on a motorcycle wearing a helmet. Because another person was driving badly. Hit him killed him. Should we therefore make motorcycles illegal? Well, Michael you make a good point. We could do both Michael we could do both. I've known some people that drink themselves to death. In fact, a whole lot of people drink themselves to death. Whether literally. Or liver disease throat disease. Call sorts of other things. Well, Michael, I'm mean. Say, but I'd be for it. Because you know, ain't nothing. Good to come drinking. And. Prohibition. Was one of the most awful. Legislative experiences experiments in this country's history. I'm reading a book called one summer nineteen twenty seven by Bill Bryson, and he has a couple of chapters on prohibition. I'm still reading it. It's a long book be quiet. And. He is no conservative by any stretch, the imagination not even a civil libertarian, but he refers to prohibition as one of the worst legislative experiments in American history. If not the worst first of all alcoholism increased increased during prohibition. Secondly, the number of deaths related to drinking, do you know that the United States government? As one of its experiments to get people to stop drinking during abolition during prohibition. They poisoned some of the alcohol that went into the market in hopes that that would frighten people that you didn't want to get hold of the poisonous stuff. Do you know what that did to the price of bootleg whiskey? Is Senate through the roof. Because now you allowed branding. It's not just a commodity anymore. If you were a good supplier, you could ensure that your supply was clean and people willing to pay for that. Because it was a strychnine product that they were putting into the supplies that was killing people you drink it, and you die, right? There was an awful awful death as reported in this book. So if you were someone that could assure I've kept this in my presence. It's a clean supply. The bootleg industry. The mafia grew in power there were murders related to it. Exactly what's going on with the with with the supply of drugs today when you push something like that into the illegal realm. They create their entire own hierarchy and structure to enforce it makes it deadly. That's exactly what they did. So you have to stop making laws based on things you don't like guess what some people won't get enough sleep. Guess what? Some people are going to cheat on their wives or their husbands. We used to make daddy legal in some countries they punished by death. Well, Michael, maybe that at help MAC, maybe it'd help. No, no. You create laws of unintended consequences. When you do that leave people be and understand that you cannot control them. You can't and you shouldn't try and you have no authority.

Michael Bill Bryson liver disease Senate United States
"bill bryson" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Tonight, our will receive a number of emails from well-meaning individuals, and they'll go like this, Michael. I had a loved one died from lung cancer, Michael and I wanna make cigarettes illegal. Okay. I had a good friend who died on a motorcycle wearing a helmet. Because another person was driving badly. Hit him killed him. Should we therefore make motorcycles illegal? Well, Michael you make a good point. We could do both Michael we could do both. Known some people that drink themselves to death. In fact, a lot of people drink themselves to death. Whether literally. Or liver disease throat disease. Call sorts of other things. Well, Michael mean? Our no say it, but I'd be for it. Because you know, ain't nothing. Good to come a drinking. And. Prohibition. Was one of the most awful. Legislative experiences experiments in this country's history. I'm reading a book called one summer nineteen twenty seven by Bill Bryson, and he has a couple of chapters on prohibition. I'm still reading it. It's a long book be quiet. And. He is no conservative by any stretch, the imagination not even a civil libertarian, but he refers to prohibition as one of the worst legislative experiments in American history. If not the worst first of all alcoholism increased increased during prohibition. Secondly, the number of deaths related to drinking, do you know that the United States government? As one of its experiments to get people to stop drinking during abolition during prohibition. They poisoned some of the alcohol that went into the market in hopes that that would frighten people that you didn't want to get hold of the poisonous stuff. Do you know what that did to the price of bootleg whiskey? It's Senate through the roof. Because now you allowed branding. It's not just a commodity anymore. If you were a good supplier, you could ensure that your supply was clean and people willing to pay for that. Because it was a strychnine product that they were putting into the supplies that was killing people you drink it, and you die, right? There was an awful awful death as reported in this book. So if you were someone that could assure kept this in my presence. It's a clean supply. The bootleg industry. The mafia grew in power there were murders related to it. Exactly what's going on with the with with the supply of drugs today when you push something like that into the illegal realm. They create their entire own hierarchy and structure to enforce it makes it deadly. It's exactly what they did. So you have to stop making laws based on things you don't like guess what some people won't get enough sleep. Guess what? Some people are going to cheat on their wives or their husbands. We used to make daddy legal in some countries they punished that by death. Well, Michael, maybe that it helped Mackel maybe it'd help. No, no. You create laws of unintended consequences. When you do that leave people be an understand that you cannot control them. You can't and you shouldn't try and you have no authority.

Michael Bill Bryson liver disease Senate United States Mackel
"bill bryson" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on KTRH

"Tonight, I will receive a number of emails from well-meaning individuals, and they'll go like this, Michael. I had a loved one died from lung cancer, Michael and I wanna make cigarettes illegal. I had a good friend who died on a motorcycle wearing a helmet. Because another person was driving badly. Hit him killed him. Should we therefore make motorcycles illegal? Well, Michael you make a good point. We could do both Michael we could do both. Known some people that drink themselves to death. In fact, a lot of people drink themselves to death. Whether literally. Or liver disease throat disease, all sorts of other things. Well, my mean. Say, but I'd be for it. Because you know, ain't nothing. Good to come drinking. And. Prohibition. Was one of the most awful. Legislative experiences experiments in this country's history. I'm reading a book called one summer nineteen twenty seven by Bill Bryson, and he has a couple of chapters on prohibition. I'm still reading it. It's a long book be quiet. And. He is no conservative by any stretch, the imagination not even a civil libertarian, but he refers to prohibition as one of the worst legislative experiments in American history. If not the worst first of all alcoholism increased increased during prohibition. Secondly, the number of deaths related to drinking, do you know that the United States government? As one of its experiments to get people to stop drinking during abolition during prohibition. They poisoned some of the alcohol that went into the market in hopes that that would frighten people that you didn't want to get hold of the poisonous stuff. Do you know what that did to the price of bootleg whiskey? Senate through the roof. Because now you allowed branding. It's not just a commodity anymore. If you were a good supplier, you could ensure that your supply was clean and people willing to pay for that. Because it was a strychnine product that they were putting into the supplies that was killing people you drink it, and you die, right? There was an awful awful death as reported in this book. So if you were someone that could assure I've kept this in my presence. It's a clean supply. The bootleg industry. The mafia grew in power there were murders related to it. Exactly. What's going on with the with the supply of drugs today when you push something like that into the illegal realm. They create their entire own hierarchy and structure to enforce it. Makes it deadly. It's exactly what they did. So you have to stop making laws based on things you don't like guess what? Some people won't get enough sleep. Yes. What some people are going to cheat on their wives or their husbands? We used to make that illegal in some countries. They punish that by death. Well, Michael, maybe that it helped MAC, maybe it'd help. No, no. You create laws of unintended consequences. When you do that leave people be an understand that you cannot control them. You can't and you shouldn't try, and you have no authority.

Michael Bill Bryson liver disease Senate United States
"bill bryson" Discussed on Good Job, Brain!

Good Job, Brain!

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Good Job, Brain!

"Tell you like it burn me for the rest of the day. Could use that free diaper. They had them right there. What am I doing with our own? You know, I just developed an obsession with thermostat turned this. So I'm learning a lot and finding a lot of fun. Interesting things. One of the things I came across was an awesome book. I have no connection to this book. This is plugged that. I enjoyed the book the book is called baby meets world by author nNcholas day. And it's a funny insightful, very trivia history oriented rice, and you know, what very much so of a Bill Bryson coach to. Yeah. The history of here's how the ancients, and here's how just secret things that you may not have known about raising a baby from this book. I learned a lot of really interesting things. We'll come back in the second. So one thing I've learned firsthand experience. Really is nursing nursing is hard nursing is a big deal. And I'm not even the one on the clock. So to speak. Like from TV and movies. It's just like, oh, baby. Baby. Just starts nursing. No problems. Beautiful. It is beautiful. But there is a lot of work that goes into it. There are a lot of ways. It could go wrong. There are a lot of just hurdles that you might have to deal with. And so I was really interested reading about time. Feeding the Baid rest feedings typically by when I say nursing, I mean, specifically breastfeeding mothers milk into the baby. It's it's hard. It's a big deal. And I know there are a lot of moms out there saying, yeah. No crap. Right here saying, yeah, I guess call it. It's something that you do not realize. Yeah. Yeah. You don't think about it? Just thinking the water dispenser. Yeah. You know? So one of the really learned from this book in particular, really, drove home the point is yes, nursing hard. But it's hard enough. Even now, you know when my wife, and I were fortunate enough to have the time time off work time at home both of us can be there. We have all these experts giving us advice and helping us, and it's still it's there's hurdles that we have to get over. So learning about how much of a challenge nursing was in history just over it, really blew my mind. Some of the things that civilizations in people had to deal with right? So okay. First of all, I've heard the term wet-nurse, right? You know, the wet nurse like, okay. That's someone who breastfeed your baby for you. Right. Okay. I had no idea like how important what nursing has been through history. Especially like as we come into the industrial age like just at the dawn of the industrial age in particular. Karen? Maybe you'll answer this. Yeah. I've heard the term, but never really I thought it was like a babysitter. Or like a like a main or something? Zeal. So she she breastfeeds. How does she have how she's racing milk? She is a mom, right? So the baby her own baby. So it's like kinda double duty like I'm doing this. So might as well. Yeah. Other babies can. Oh, okay. Interesting. Right. So yeah. So I mean people long ago long ago figured out like oh babies elite food if we matched up with some water make it easier for them babies will even drink animal milk. If we put it in a little thing mix it up, and so we find all these civilizations have solved this problem a long time ago..

Bill Bryson Karen milk
"bill bryson" Discussed on The Starters

The Starters

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on The Starters

"That's the purpose wait a debate i would love to tell you to leave your stupid comments in your pocket but well i need your opinions on this gentlemen reading the disaster artist my life inside the room the greatest bad movie ever made last night spurs game this isn't the first time we've seen something like this someone reading a sporting event or basketball game up or down though on reading at an nba game in general fine with it he was not reading during gameplay it was clear this was during a break okay there's fifteen minutes at half there's literally fifteen minutes he could be reading three and a half minutes in between quarters seventime house per team there's lots of times educated during during game play absolute the problem is not he brought that book with a full intention of reading so start time out so the brakes in play fine but i guarantee he picked up during the play at one point good it's not a good point every high school team you know the fans when the other highs will get in their lineups read out all the fans out the newspapers out so you're not seeing those guys out on the court coming on this classic zing this guy wasn't doing zing but if you want to read more you just gotta have materials raining good book then that's not a good book now hawks it's interesting bill bryson book lay should be into time by reading no problem reading on a baseball i assume so much.

baseball basketball nba bill bryson fifteen minutes
"bill bryson" Discussed on Hello Internet

Hello Internet

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"bill bryson" Discussed on Hello Internet

"Some kid who's had a social media count forever with the dumb name who just wants to keep keeping it becomes the ceo of an important company and then all of his announcements are on this social media with this with his old handle right that he made have when he was thirteen like i just it tickles me to think that that's going to happen eventually or like i look forward to a president declaring war on snapchat and disappear 24 hours did he declared the snaps not there anymore odds i cast greg rubbed this episode of halloween janette is brought to you by our good friends at audible audible brings you and unmatched selection of audio books original audio shows news comedy and more you can get a free audio book with a 30day trial at audible dot com slash hello internet one of the things i like about listening to audio books is i find much more than a physical book it's easier to re read an audio book that you like a law and i have a few favorites that i like to revisit on occasion and one of those that's been on my mind given some of the things we've been discussing on hello intranet is built brayson's in a sunburn country bill bryson if you're unaware is a funny expats travel writer who i've enjoyed a bunch of his books a walk in the woods where he goes through the appalachian trail is also quite good and i think i have recommended to you before but in a sunburn country this is the book where he visits australia and i think perhaps i need to revisit this book so i can more deeply understand oughta.

social media ceo greg janette brayson bill bryson writer president halloween australia 24 hours 30day