18 Burst results for "Bill Bauer"

"bill bauer" Discussed on The 2 Robbies

The 2 Robbies

07:33 min | 2 months ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on The 2 Robbies

"One-storey it got done for organizing spying gate. Opponents meet with celebrate. It was counting on county, so yeah, yeah, so that's that's one thing that was like when read it's like. Wow! Does he have a big deal? Big Story sentence binding. was He didn't really want to apologize. Say Certainly, so that's what we do. That's why I do. The rules are different. This country won't do anymore. And then the other one rob is when team scoggins against his team. Yeah, that's a team in the game mistaken. Yeah, is forest always it. It was I'm not sure the opponent was. But least go to gold that wasn't really right and been kicked out, or whatever those control missy about everybody went crazy about. It leads scored, and then he just said you know like. Let them score a goal. I guess I wasn't really right. Over it was was forced. Millions of new. Let them. Go the other. People were saying Mike is that okay is is the okay to do that. I mean it was pure sportsmanship. This guy from from what indisposed shit to the other end of it. He's a character. He plays brilliant football. I remember covering is Athletic Bilbao team. Alita I'm Bill Bauer logo team. He went in there rob and Harare's piracy under Harare, but a match and they turned into this silky, lovely footballing side of Bilbao and brilliant Lalita that nobody seemed before that football club. He's been national team with Chile curate a beautiful team. Should I play football again Argentinian managers as well I mean he's. He's a colorful character that we know some of the permanent managers of taking mental about. How does he how he coaches? He's the most passionate detailed eccentric crazy football manager on the planet on. Going to be a better place when Wigan ll be. Allowed to school in jump ship, it was Aston Villa K yeah. Last season last season, yes. Even been dangerously who was in charge Yeah, crazy guy was going to bring some crazy highlighted league, and we welcome them and look. Lazy, it's an image, but if task for outcomes now westbound. Crashing into them fit fine, and then those in in the playoffs well so time time to come to them just. WanNa Finish your point on. The podcast is just want to finish with the crew at least champions, and we've marveled at law. Great things that have happened. This folklore. Sense of hinted disappointment rob since restart the got trial that. Quite finished. Maybe we would like Bay with the blocked. A mess with a disappointment is and. It ends there. I mean nothing nothing will take away how good they've been in my memory. Rob And I I do up strong memories of champions and I I remember when I make sure I remember what made them great and I remember what may great. This season has been magnificent thirty away, and all that we know how important is for the football game to be back at the top of English football a how improves the premier league, and how and how much closely united with those was flight tiles I would have liked them to go out a bit more aggressively trying to win the the. The record would have been the censure in Mecca the hundred points. He got a couple of seasons ago, got the winds couldn't it would have been city to as well to say that yeah? So I'm. Disappointed rob without could use a whole. Hey, and he saw said about is it is a different culture in England on Europe in terms of records do. An nothing is a different culture. I know in America that steps numbers are are very much more celebrated in studied. Than in European football things like who wants to trophies. We won the title European stuff Morvan numbers of points numbers of wins, or whatever is that called point? Yes, go to point what will say things like the invincibles. The held in great esteem. Record And I'm glad I'm slightly where I just. Little disappointed say and again I WANNA mobile at what they're doing done it. If amount fully based off, what did not seize Nola WanNa give me a huge credit and in the bull. Seemed to be assault and maybe correct sel that Liverpool of lawn, and then you know. How many more are they gonNA win. People say what they don't win another one the next ten years fifteen years. You could have had one that was mandated in special. Yes. He's going to special yesterday. They'll say oh the one two years ago. I take anything to Israel. To three full Morgan come, you could have made over hundred points at the high points. Most whitten's possibly. The biggest mall. Of winning, those are things that will mean something down the line now if you win another ten in the next twelve years, maybe not, but if you don't you know, it's Shamin someone. And I mean I know that he's rotating a few. The younger players yeah. This game was a was a priest. Is a very very strong side doesn't just prove the one. You're not quite the difference of that Lil age. Yea of one when you know you want something special when you go for for for tile. Those chemo was those big games. You got a little extra. Couple of percents that makes a difference when all day it does. Make a difference defensively particularly. Allison and Virgil Van Dyke cocky. They looked cocky tomato. Moving performances, they've been the difference. Make Xavier the guys lawsuit. Help create what we see. This game of course I'm not I'm not talking. To now. We China Ironic thing about it. Two guys who have changed the altitude who have made him site. It's just when you know on Nov just when you of. Diction fantasies continue to say it, so my mind went when they went Charles. It also got few games last. These as you go out with little intentions. It drops off after ten or fifteen minutes and I think that's what we're saying you know for. We've never been child, so we can't joke about actually, but it just looks to me like he's just. NF. Liverpool to be awesome to win the title Liberal Liverpool. It wouldn't have been it. The sloppy Van Dyke in this Lopiano. Human Nature thing that I. Don't think you can in fact. I just I know it's. One before Alison made up that ball out. It was a mistake a few minutes earlier. Each try to clever. Daily Click one. Just a little bit of me, touch of arrogance remember when he first joined the club Robbie to try. And Stop Him straight away. It's almost like the little little part of in just popped up again. Whereas a little bit swagger confidence you right write may effect about to win this game for the short very different, and you know we'll see what neat what will happen in some whether there's new pass refreshing up a whether isn't whether this group again. Is Unaffected by this this last this the last. Nine Games. Yeah, go again for next season as manager..

rob football Liverpool Harare Chile Aston Villa K Bilbao Israel Mike Bill Bauer chemo Alison Robbie Charles assault Alita Europe Van Dyke Nola
"bill bauer" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:01 min | 4 months ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"H. S. dot com slash radio service fees limitations and exclusions apply see plan for details thank you for making ten ten wins your number one choice for news in New York all the time and you give us twenty two minutes we'll give you the world really good outside good morning it is sixty five degrees at nine forty on this Saturday may sixteenth I'm Brian Britton here's what's happening having a death a firefight a bizarre morning in Manhattan the man is found dead the suspects set fire and fights with cops when they arrive some beach is ready to open a new York in New Jersey but in the city they are a no go according to the mayor city pools remaining shut down for the time being as well Republicans are calling it dead on arrival when it gets to them in the Senate and house Democrats passing a three trillion dollar stimulus package yesterday another sporting event hearing on fans can't go but NASCAR's back this weekend Darlington Raceway for the real heroes four hundred jacket weather mostly sunny pleasant really just a beautiful Saturday high seventy eight winds everyone traffic and transit here's bill Bauer traveling a long island here we see a long island's big three L. E. northern southern state parkways there Nassau and Suffolk counties in good shape sunrise highway though we do have an accident on the eastbound side heading towards Fifth Avenue in the bay shore area second because some slowdowns for you in the garden state route three eastbound side in the Rutherford area two separate accidents at least a twenty minute back up trying to get through that stretch of real estate so you want to steer clear of the garden state parkway the road marketing in towards two eighty is really start to get dicey as far as delays are concerned so you might want to keep that in mind as you travel through that stretch of real estate now here's what you need to know about your bridges and tunnels across the board we are still in good shape for you G. W. bridge like it Allah titles no major problems to report start to see some north bound volume going by Yankee Stadium up into the cross Bronx expressway over on the Deegan and southbound side of the hajj heading in towards Westchester Avenue you.

Rutherford Suffolk Senate Yankee Stadium G. W. bridge New York bill Bauer Darlington Raceway NASCAR New Jersey Manhattan Brian Britton
"bill bauer" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"He's looking in corral barefoot shit. There's a couple of barefoot afoot kickers in the N._F._l.. Today Mary Decker and Zola Budd Mary. Decker tripped Zola Budd barefoot runner. Thank you know but you didn't take it. Yeah we're going Zola. BUDD was the barefoot runner to frank corral kick barefoot that could have been as planned foot though unlikely very unlikely so. I was just at the Nike headquarters last weekend weekend so I'm all Nike I was GONNA say so. Maybe you have some info shoes well. I'm GonNa tell you a moment. What do you think they okay? I'll tell you what they are first and then you can get so much they went for their waffle soled running shoes. They were designed by Nike Co founder on a waffle iron. That's exactly right. I'm GonNa show only because me and Mike August driving and he said you know Phil Knight. What's the University Oregon or whatever and he made running shoes and he made them on a waffle notion higher? Yeah Yeah Co founder Bill Bauer men actually known for nineteen seventy two Olympic trials the one twelve pairs ever made the only known unwarranted set and as Adam said Baron was inspired to create the Waffle soled traction pattern for Nike's early running shoe by experimenting with his wife's Waffle iron pouring the rubber into the mold to create the prototype this starting price for the she was eighty grand final sale price shattered the estimate which was one sixty sixty. What do you think they went for? The one hundred sixty is what it Shannon. That's what yeah it shattered the one sixty estimate well. It's you know guns cars guitars sneakers watches. I like the collector stuff shattered. I gotta say it's a pretty strong word but yeah okay quarter Mil. I was GONNA say four seventy five four thirty seven five with the ten percents right. What about forty five yeah that's right? Wow Wow the guy who bought them by the way he <hes> this Dude Miles Nadal he plans to display the sneakers at his private. Museum in Toronto called the dare to Dream Automobile. The Museum Ziamon believe you frank corral that he kicked barefoot expand kind of luck. You should know that off the top off your hands. Why would anyone kicked barefoot? Shatter your foot thick. There was barefoot kickers in the N._F._l.. I just annoyed prefer that I mean the ball's metal leather now. I'm not immediately kicked barefoot but I'm Sologne. Who Am I thinking? There were beverly kickers before my time. There is a few barefoot kickers in the League one was for the rams and if it wasn't Frank Corral Tony Franklin Tony Franklin kicked Barefoot Carla's <hes> Mike Lansford yeah no frank around low <hes> not not seen it yet all right well. It'd probably pop up pretty fast if you did it yeah. Maybe it's Franklin I was thinking of Rams had a barefoot kicker. who was his barefoot? Who is the barefoot placekicker for the rams? Now's Mike Lansford Lansford all right well there you go. We'll production on fast and furious nine has shut down after a crew member suffered a serious head injury. A spokesperson from universal tells the Hollywood reporter quote we had injury.

Nike Mike Lansford rams BUDD Zola Budd Tony Franklin Tony Franklin Zola Budd Mary Mary Decker Nike Co Zola Phil Knight Museum Ziamon Bill Bauer Mike August Co founder founder Toronto Shannon University Oregon
Investor Drops Almost $1 Million on Sneakers at Sothebys

Business Wars Daily

05:34 min | 1 year ago

Investor Drops Almost $1 Million on Sneakers at Sothebys

"Vis episode of Business Wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from Pitney Bowes. Try It free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale. When you visit http dot com slash B W daily Uh Brom wondering I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily happy Monday my friends talk about a way to boost your brand? Sotheby's the high auction house this month auctioned off one hundred pairs of rare sneakers from Nike Adidas and other major sneaker makers this auction positioned athletic shoes as art objects and it began on July eleven it was supposed to continue through tomorrow July twenty third but a funny thing happened on the way to that date. Most of the air went out of the room when Canadian businessman bought ninety nine of the one hundred pairs for a total of eight hundred fifty thousand dollars at production time. Only one pair was still available a pair of Nike waffle flat. Latin moon racing shoes made by hand back in Nineteen seventy-two got an extra eighty thousand dollars to spare well. That's the starting bid but the pair was expected to fetch up to one hundred sixty thousand dollars Nike Co founder Bill Bauer men is set with designed the shoe using a waffle iron to imprint the tread by hand. The company made only a dozen pairs for runners at the nineteen seventy-two Olympic trials the B._B._c. reports that the parents Sotheby's is the only one believed to be unwarranted so what treaded treasures did miles at all make off with for his eight hundred fifty thousand dollars at all scooped up such iconic kick says the Nike Mags. That's the self lacing sneakers like those in the nineteen eighty-nine movie back to the future to that pair one of only only eighty nine ever made came with a starting bid of forty thousand dollars also among the collectibles Nidal now owns a rare pair of yee's Kanye West's line for Adidas and a pair of limited edition Air Jordan for sneakers sneakers code designed with EMINEM. The collection came from online street wear and sneaker consignment Shop Stadium Goods Stadium goods existence alone shows just how elevated sneakers and street wear have become never mind the fact that Sotheby's exhibited these sneakers and. Museum cases like historic artifacts are diamonds. According to vox designer sneakers now considered legitimate luxury goods coveted by the same wealthy shoppers who dropped thousands on haute couture for Adidas Nike the auction served highlight the he ever increasing status of sneakers especially limited edition pairs and shoes designed for specific teams and for celebrities like the Air Jordans designed for Karl Lagerfeld it also highlighted Nike in particular which appeared to be over represented presented in the collection outside of the money that miss fear of the auction house Nike has long driven up prices on Air Jordan's by releasing limited edition highly designed sneakers Adidas got in the game with drops of Kanye West's easies which can cost cost upwards of five thousand dollars and that's for a new pair neither Air Jordans nor yeezy are truly built for performance but rather for style and Flare Collector Miles Nidal says he's enamored with objects of popular culture. He told C._N._B._C. C._N._B._C. that he plans to show the sneakers at his dare to Dream Automobile Museum in Toronto where he has a collection of one hundred forty two cars and forty motorcycles sure Nidal spent a lot of money for a whole bunch shoes but he doesn't hold. All the record for spending on collectible sneakers know that record was set two years ago by a bitter who paid one hundred ninety thousand dollars for a pair of signed converse shoes that Pricey pairs said we've been worn by Michael Jordan Jordan in the nineteen eighty-four Olympic basketball final according to Reuters that the record is held by converse not knock your adidas goes to show that as powerful as those two brands are they still can't win the hearts or the feet of every sneaker lover out there and it shows that rarity no matter the object drives up both desire and prices which means the Sotheby's auction was nothing but good for Nike and Adidas and they didn't have to lift a finger or tie a single she lies from laundry this business wars daily. Hey listen to our show. Take a second give his five star rating when apple podcasts. Would you better yet leave a review. Thanks so much I'm David Brown and we'll be back with Tamar. This episode is brought to you by central online from Pitney Bowes Shipping and mailing from your desk. Ask has never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney bowes with simple online is just click sand and save for his lowest four dollars ninety nine cents. That's right four dollars. Ninety nine cents a month send envelopes.

Nike Adidas Adidas Sotheby Pitney Bowes Collector Miles Nidal Nike Pitney Bowes Shipping Nike Co David Brown Kanye West Shop Stadium Goods Stadium Michael Jordan Jordan Bill Bauer Karl Lagerfeld Apple Founder Toronto Dream Automobile Museum Reuters Pricey
"bill bauer" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"Yeah, it seems like you both had a bit of a mixed review of this overall. But while about the second did that get any better smithereens. Smithereens is about social media o'clock Mira classic topic. But it felt like a distinctly black mirror. Black mirror episode. Why feel black mirror? Well, I mean, as you said earlier, it was very much. It's like Mary usually takes place, different genres. And this was very much paying on the kind of British police drama style thing, but the technology and it really takes a backseat. It's very much a personal story. And it's about a man struggling to deal with his grief after the death of his fiancee, and sort of in the beginning of the, it's very clear that he has some kind of bugbear with social media, and particularly with this social media company called smithereens. And we'll let believe. You know, he he thinks they have some role in his fiancee's death. But it comes clear to me pretty early on that, really, they don't. Yeah. Exactly. And actually, you kind of get it right from the beginning. He's having these kind of flush blacks flashbacks these fresh bags. He attends of this grief session. Something is obviously playing on this character Chris's maligned as he does is he kidnapped say employees from this company's marine ends up on a police chase ends up in a field holding a gun to this guy's head and saying, get me on the phone with the CEO of this company. Billy bauer. What did you make of the portrayal of Bill Bauer and his Asia media company? So when we believe our he is on a ten day Solent retreat, and he's a very he's just come from burning man..

Billy bauer Bill Bauer Asia media Chris Mira CEO ten day
"bill bauer" Discussed on This Week in Computer Hardware

This Week in Computer Hardware

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on This Week in Computer Hardware

"They get scattered around your house. We are down for and I'm pattern Norton joined as always by Mr. Sebastian peak of PC per welcome Bax best in as it'd be back. Patrick how you doing? I'm full of mirth and good cheer and shock. Enjoy at what I will affectionately call the return of the nexus series to Google. That can only be good news. Yeah. Google I o took place this week something that was intimidated. But of course, not real until it was actually announced the Google pixel three es essentially, the story on this is you got a four hundred dollar pixel camera. Oh, well, a four hundred dollar phone that includes a pixel camera mostly, you know, ten ADP OLED display small Bessler actually not a little bigger than ten eighty p. Let me just walk through this. Oh, LED display small vessels polycarbonate body, and I'm okay with plastic bodies because they break less than they Ben less mid level processor, a Qualcomm Snapdragon six seventy run at two gigahertz dream, no six fifteen graphics. This bothers some phone reviewers a lot because they're like I want the latest Snapdragon eight hundred series. And the reality is most of us apps may launch a little slower and some apps may run a little slower. But for most people that Snapdragon six seventy is more than enough power. They're claiming with their thirty thousand thirty thousand three thousand Bill Bauer battery Google says the standard three as going to get thirty hours or general use. They've got eighteen watt fast charging and they're saying seven hours of battery life with fifteen minutes charging the three the standard one packs of five point six inch panel two thousand two hundred twenty by one thousand eighty pixels..

Google Mr. Sebastian peak Bax Qualcomm Norton ADP Patrick four hundred dollar fifteen minutes eighteen watt two gigahertz thirty hours seven hours six inch
"bill bauer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Can you think of a single product that's named after the salesman in a company, not the CEO, not the patriarch the salesman because I wrecked. My brain nNcholas, and I couldn't think of one off the top of my head. No. And I'm sure if I thought about it for a couple of hours, I couldn't I couldn't think of any of that kind of speaks to the marketing genius. That shuck Taylor had. Would it be other things that congress did to kind of develop the game further as they published this yearbook it kind of a who's who book of basketball today? So if you're team wanted to be in the yearbook, you just had to send a photo of your your team. And where you played. All the players were. And of course, you had to wear the the converse shoes in the picture. But in this book, Chuck Taylor would say, you know, here's your some tricks of the game. Here are the best players playing the game travelling from town to town. He really had an eye for who was good who is an up and coming college player at coaches called him for advice on will who should my scouts go after. So he was kind of a self developed expert in the game. And this him a place in the Basketball Hall of fame. So, you know, we have another example of a salesman not only having his name on a shoe, but ending up in a sports hall of fame. It's remarkable how he deployed every tool in the tool kit to sell and actually it just sounded to me from reading your book that he didn't think of himself as a salesman, but an evangelist for this ministry called basketball. Exactly. And you know, part of that comes from he's connection to the game. Because he was an actual player. He saw maybe a different side of it that a noble salesman wouldn't see. So there was a a level of expertise that also attracted people to these clinics here, you would hear a professional player really tell you how to play here. Here are the real trick. Here's what here's what the people are actually wearing. So it it did have a a certain degree of expertise when he went out. That's great. And let's talk about a track. Coach who had a tremendous impact on the world of sneakers, sports, and the culture. Let's talk about Bill Bauer men. He coached nine sub four minute miles at the university of Oregon the most of any coach in America four NCA team championships twenty four NCAA individual titles and coach thirty three Olympian. Some call him the bear Bryant the Nick Sabin of the running world. That's perfectly accurate. He really knew the sport in and out, but he would do experiments with everything having to do with, Robin. He would unions backyard. Knicks up different combinations of rubber to creates a you know, a good running surface to run on. He would make the clothes that his runners wore the out of the lightest material he could find but he also experimented with shoes. You know in those days there weren't as many choices for running shoes as we have today. He surmised that the best running shoe with probably one that was made specifically for the athlete. You didn't waste any extra material. It was you'd be fit perfectly. It didn't have an extra ounce on it that it that it didn't need to have. So he would use his runners is kind of human Guinea, pigs well, making his own shoe concoctions overtime. He got a little better and better at it. And this copy I of one of his former students runner by the name, Phil Knight. Now, Phil Knight had just returned from a trip to Japan business idea. And while he was in Japan he'd met with the executives of the company called on its super tiger. Now, we kind of know this company more as a six today. But it'd be the nineteen sixties. They were they were tiger shoes. They were still fairly good shoes. But the time and Phil Knight says to his old coach, look, we can make some money importing these shoes. These Japanese shoes to the US market because they are of similar quality to the Adidas improve shoes at her out there. But of course, cost much less. So of course. Jumped at the chance and not only to you know, to to have a little side money, but you also have the ear of shoe company. That would finally listen to him. So of course, over time their company, which is called blue ribbon sports gained more and more success. And they eventually spun off to a company that we know today as Nike now, the bones of Nike are built into of course, running shoes and making kind of the the perfect running shoe. So it it definitely came from an area of expertise. Indeed and talk about a breakfast. The changed Bauer means life and waffles Darmon coach in Oregon, and as as we know Oregon, the Pacific northwest is very wet. You know, they're running shoes today. Detraction wasn't wasn't great. Not not enough to really gripped mud not enough to go over concrete. They're easily and minute was also obsessed with with coming up some some sort of pattern for the soul and as. The story goes he used in the kitchen one Sunday wife is out he sees the waffle iron. Then he has an idea like, wait a minute. The waffle pattern is a pattern. I'm looking for. So he pours molten rubber in the wa- flyer, and it gets stuck, and then he goes to the store to to buy another waffle iron. And then, you know, does this tests and finally he comes up with the the waffle soul. Now. Of course, the the actual soulmate for the shoes isn't made me waffle iron the waffler just provided the the seed of the idea, but the the waffle soled shoes proved to be good enough grip for practically any surface. So this was kind of the beginning of the the jogging shoe as we know it, and although jogging seems common in normal. Now, it wasn't always. So was it either running as a hobby wasn't really wasn't really a thing. You know, if you went outside in the fifties and sixties and saw someone running it. We kind of strike he was odd deal. The only people that might go out jogging. We're, you know, boxers training and the local town nutcase, and that was it. But in the fifties and sixties in going onto the seventies. Started to become kind of a a new trendy thing to go outside and run. Just practice is. Win Doberman traveled to New Zealand with his relay team the coach there for the New Zealand Olympic team said, you know, what why don't you come on a race or just just a Sunday run with us. We says, okay. You know, track coach going on Iran. Okay. Seems easy. But what he discovered was he Darmon couldn't keep up with with any of the people and some of them were much much older than him. They blazed by them. And he was wondering why why is it that? I can't keep up with these people, but they seem to just go for miles and miles and the New Zealand track coach had a exercise regiment called jogging. So Byron took this idea brought it back with him to work in and kind of started the is very small jogging boom in Oregon, so go across the coast to New York now. So another jogging boom was taking shape for lebeau who is working in the fashion industry in Manhattan, but he was also a early jogger and he is known today as the founder of the New York City marathon that really New York City marathons just went around central park a few times, but Fred Leepo had the idea that by exp-. Ending the marathon across all boroughs at the city. It can really kind of act as a an advertisement forty York. Not just an advertisement for the city. But also as an advertisement for chocking one person was saying that the best singles bar in New York was central park because he can just go up to someone else that was jogging and strike up a conversation. So what Fred we voted and what Bill Barham did was kind of start and exercise movement kind of as I exercise fad that the US has known. Dr Ken Cooper is my personal doctor. I'm pretty fortunate to have him for my annual checkups and he wrote a book called aerobics, which you talk about here as well. You know, I talked to Dr Cooper just before this interview. I said, you know, what what should I talk to nNcholas Smith about? And he reminded me the back when he was doing his work and he had trained NASA. Astronauts, a worked in the air force a remarkable, Dr he was on this quest to prove the next or size. Jogging aerobics would actually increase life expectancies and health and he wanted to get people in their fifties. Sixties and seventies to start running. The medical establishment came down on him. Like a ton of bricks the fifth year olds will be dying in the streets that this was a terrible idea. Well, there there was kind of his thought that you know, any any sort of physical activity was a dangerous if you weren't quote, unquote, the the right person. And this is something that at come back to this New Zealand story that Bill Barham and went on we saw, you know, man, come to his aid that was not only older than him but add survived a heart attack. This kind of woke something up in his mind that, you know, this this cardiovascular exercise, wasn't fact good for you. And you know, what Dr Cooper found was. You know, doesn't matter really if you're young or old if you're active it does add years to your life. And when we come back more of our conversation when nNcholas Smith is terrific book kicks. The great American story of speakers. That's not fair. We hear it all the time yet. What is fair is fair. When everyone gets the exact same amount fours fair.

salesman Phil Knight basketball Bill Bauer Oregon New York shuck Taylor Bill Barham New Zealand US Dr Ken Cooper Basketball Hall of fame Nike nNcholas Smith university of Oregon congress Japan CEO Adidas
"bill bauer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"This is our American stories, and we're back with Nick Smith talking about his book kicks. We would just learning about the origin of Chuck Taylor sneakers. Shoes named after a salesman who was basketball's Johnny Appleseed. Can you think of a single product that's named after the salesman in a company, not the CEO, not the patriarch the salesman because Iraq, my brain nNcholas. And I couldn't think of one off the top of my head. No. And I'm sure if I thought about it for a couple hours, I couldn't I couldn't think of any in that kind of speaks to the marketing genius that Chuck Taylor had one of the other things that congress did to kind of develop the game further as they published this yearbook is kind of a who's who book of basketball up today. So if your team wanted to be in the yearbook, you just had to send a photo of your your key Bannon where you played all the players were. And of course, you had to wear. The the converse shoes and in the picture. But in this book, Chuck Taylor would say, you know, here's your some tricks of the game. Here are the best players playing the game travelling from town to town. He really had an eye for who was good who is an up and coming college player and coaches called him for advice on who should my scouts go after. So he was kind of a self developed expert in the game. And this him a place in the Basketball Hall of fame. So, you know, here we have another example of a salesman not only having his name on a shoe, but ending up in a sports hall of fame. It's remarkable how he deployed every tool in the tool kit to sell and actually it just sounded to me from reading your book that he didn't think of himself as a salesman, but an evangelist for this ministry called basketball. Exactly. And you know, part of that comes from his connection to the game because he was an actual player. He saw. Maybe a different side of it that a noble salesman wouldn't see. So there was a a liberal of expertise that also attracted people to these clinics here, you would hear a professional player really tell you how to play here. Here are the real trick. Here's what here's what people are actually wearing. So it it did have a a certain degree of expertise when he went out. That's great. And let's talk about a track. Coach who had a tremendous impact on the world of sneakers, sports, and the culture. Let's talk about Bill Bauer men. He coached nine sub four minute miles at the university of Oregon the most of any coach in America four NCA team championships twenty four NCA individual titles and coach thirty three Olympia in some call him the bear Bryant the Nick Sabin of the running world. That's perfectly accurate. He really knew the sport in and out, but he would do experiments with everything having to do with routing. He would use backyard mix up. Different combinations of Robert at creates a you know, a good running surface to run on. He would make the clothes that his runners wore the out of the lightest material he could find but he also experimented with shoes. You know in those days there weren't as many choices for running shoes as we have today. He surmised that the best running shoe with probably one that was made specifically for the athlete. You didn't waste any extra material. It was you fit perfectly. It didn't have an extra ounce on it that it that it didn't need to have. So he would use his runners is kind of human Guinea, pigs well, making his own shoe concoctions overtime. He got a little better and better at it. And this copy of one of his former students runner by the name, Phil Knight. Now, Phil Knight had just returned from a trip to Japan business idea. And while he was in Japan he'd met with the executives of the company called on its super tiger. Now, we kind of know this company more as a six today. But it'd be the nineteen sixties they were they were tiger shoes. There was still fairly good shoes. But the time and Phil Knight says to his old coach, look, we can make some money importing these shoes. These Japanese shoes to the US market because they are of similar quality to the Adidas improve shoes that are out there. But of course, cost much less. So, of course, Arben jumped at the chance not only to you know, to to have a little fight money. But to also have the ear of a shoe company. That would finally listen to him. So of course, over time their company, which is called blue ribbon sports gained more and more success. And they eventually spun off to a company that we know today as Nike now, the bones of Nike are built into of course, running shoes and making kind of the the perfect running shoe. So it it definitely came from an area of expertise. Indeed and talk about a breakfast, the changed Bauer man's life and waffles Darmon coach in Oregon, and as as we know Oregon and the Pacific northwest is very wet. You the running shoes of the day? Detraction wasn't wasn't great. Not not enough to really gripped mud not enough to go over concrete. They're easily and government was also obsessed with with coming up some some sort of pattern for the soul. And as the story goes, he's in the kitchen one Sunday wife is out he sees the waffle iron, and he has an idea like, wait a minute. The waffle. Pattern is a pattern. I'm looking for. So he pours molten rubber in the wa- flyer, and it gets stuck, and then he goes to the store to to buy another waffle iron, and you know, does his past. And finally, he comes up with the the waffle soul. Now. Of course, the the actual soulmate for the shoes is made any waffle iron, the waffler just provided the deceit of the idea, but the the waffle soled shoes proved to be good enough grip for practically any surface. So this was kind of the beginning of the the jogging shoe as we know it, and although jogging seems common in normal. Now, it wasn't always. So was running as a hobby wasn't really wasn't really a thing. You know, if you went outside in the fifties and sixties and saw someone running it, we kind of strike, he was awesome deal. The only people that might go out jogging. We're, you know, boxers training and kind of the local town nutcase, and that was it. But in the fifties and sixties in going onto the seventy s. Started to become kind of a a new trendy thing to go outside and run just practice. Cise win Doberman, traveled to New Zealand with his relay team the coach there for the New Zealand Olympic team said, you know, what why don't you come on a race or just just a Sunday run with us who says okay, you know, track coach going on around. Okay. Seems easy. But what he discovered was he Darmon couldn't keep up with with any of the people and some have been much much older at him. They blazed by them. And he was wondering why why is it that? I can't keep up with these people, but they seem to just go for miles and miles and the New Zealand track coach had a exercise regiment called jogging. So Byron took this idea brought it back with him to work in and kind of started the is very small jogging boom in Oregon, so go across the coast to New York now. So another jogging boom was taking shape for lebeau was working in the fashion industry in Manhattan. But he was also a early jogger and he is known today as the founder of the New York City marathon that really New York City marathons just went around central park a few times, but Fred Leepo heavy idea that by. Expanding the marathon across all five boroughs of the city. It can really kind of act as a an advertisement forty York. Not just an advertisement for the city. But also as an advertisement for chocking. You know, one person was saying that the best singles bar in New York was central park because you can just go up to someone else that was jogging and strike up a conversation. So what Fred we voted and what Bill Barham, it did was kind of start and exercise movement. Come to the first exercise fad that the US is known. Dr Ken Cooper is my personal doctor. I'm pretty fortunate to have him for my annual checkups and he wrote a book called the robotics, which you talk about here as well. You know, I talked to Dr Cooper just before this interview. I said, you know, what what should I talk to nNcholas Smith about? And he reminded me the back when he was doing his work and he had trained NASA. Astronauts, a worked in the air force a remarkable Dr. But he was on this quest to prove the next or size. Jogging aerobics would actually increase life expectancies and health and he wanted to get people in their fifties. Sixties and seventies to start running. The medical establishment came down on him. Like a ton of bricks the fifth year olds will be dying in the streets that this was a terrible idea. Well, there was kind of his thought that you know, any any sort of physical activity was a dangerous if you weren't quote, unquote, the the right person, and this is kind of something that at L O come back to this New Zealand story that Bill Barham and went on we saw a man come to his aid that was not only older than him but had survived a heart attack. This kind of woke something up in his mind that, you know, this cardiovascular exercise, wasn't fact good for you. And you know, what what Dr Cooper found was it. You know, it doesn't matter. Really if you're young or old, if you're active it does add years to your life. And when we come back more of our conversation when nNcholas Smith is terrific book kicks the great American story of sneakers. That's not fair. We hear it all the time yet. What is fair is fair. When everyone gets the exact same amount for fair when one person gets more because she's worked harder or smarter. This simple question about fair is a big deal. Politicians make laws based on their idea. What fairies interestingly, both ideas affair are. Right in a family seems fair that all get the same. It's only fair that a teacher gives students about the same amount of attention. However in life, the other type of fair seems well most there it's only fair that people who take on the more difficult jobs or work longer hours get paid more than others. Besides those who work better don't earn more than others. They would feel they were treated unfairly and probably work less. So it is fair to say that both types of fairness are needed still when you think something is not fair think which. Type of.

salesman nNcholas Smith basketball Phil Knight Chuck Taylor Dr Ken Cooper Bill Bauer Oregon US New York New Zealand Basketball Hall of fame Bill Barham Nike Johnny Appleseed Bannon Iraq university of Oregon Japan congress
"bill bauer" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

13:53 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"And joining us now is Andy Reid is a senior fellow and founding editor Jessica who previously served in the White House as associate counsel to President Barack Obama and also worked in congress conducting beside of US national security matters. And he's latest article at Jessica is the enactment of Bill Baugh. Welcome to background briefing. Andy reid. Thanks so much for having me. Well, thank you, Andy. And it does seem that the walls are closing in on Donald Trump. There was a lot of publicity surrounding the BuzzFeed release on Friday. The next day, of course, special counsel came out and said that impact that story was not accurate. And we were just talking to mossy Wheeler about of course today Rudy Giuliani. Melissa implied that the White House improperly nevertheless weighed in on the special counsel. And Donald Trump was quite happy that the council made that statement about the saying that part of that story, we're an inaccurate. What do you make of it? All now, the dust is settling. Hard to tell exactly what the sourcing is on BuzzFeed. I mean, my best guess would be that. It's a it's people involved in the southern district of New York's investigations who have some evidence about what special counsel may. Or may not have rather than special counsel team. It seems in some ways like more of a fight about the characterization of the evidence. So I think we still really don't know who's the better version of the truth here between but the by seat story and special counsel's office. So but in any event, however, you cut it. It's pretty clear that Cohen's version of events here is that he was going to fight a congress, and he presented those lies to the White House and the president who was in a position to know that they were untrue. Either. See theory directed him to lie to congress or under the best version of the facts of president fat passively by while someone was telling him that they were gonna lie to congress on the president's be happens at nothing. So in either event, it's pretty damning evidence. However that particular controversy shakes out. So let's move to William bar who will soon be the attorney general and the minute that he becomes the attorney general he's in charge of the Muller reports, and she's not going to recuse himself in spite of his nineteen page memo that he wrote for no particular reason, at least none that we've understood that came out of the blue unsolicited, and it got President Trump's attention because he was critical of the special counsel in the same way. That Matthew Whitaker got trumped attention by going on television and trashing the mullahs. So used suggesting that Bill by the two possibilities Bill by is a Justice department company man who is taking a final daunting assignment in public service to protect the department of Justice from political parents from the president the reaffirm its legitimacy in the eyes of the public in the show of the rule of law is upheld. Or is he a woo. Wolf and sheep's clothing donning the God, but traditional attorney general paying to independent just judgment of the rule of law in order to position himself to protect Trump from ballooning federal state and congressional investigation. So those are the two possibilities that you pose could you also pose a third possibility. I don't at the wish of sounding conspiratorial apparently, a Malas wife and Bill Bill bows wife of best friends. We know not only is Bill Bauer. Companyman? He's also a bushman I served full Bush senior is it possible that? Basically. Wrote that pieces and audition to get the job to in effect. Protect mela. Well, I'm not quite radio. Well, I did preface it by saying it was a conspiracy theory. But you know, it was striking. That far was was quite adamant that he is, you know, lifelong north thirty years long friends with Muller, and he said he made one comment during his confirmation hearings. And we'll be friends when this is over. So he's not going to give any distance there on Muller. And I'm sure that if President Trump was watching that he was probably you're tasting to him since he's been out there calling Muller every name in the book in calling all of which went over and over again. But going back to what is going to attorney general. It's the best way to audition for a job in the Trump Justice department is to attack the Muller's investigation and in some ways, they'll Mars. On the investigation or sort of mild compared to the kind of stuff you're seeing judge green or other stuff on FOX. And they were sort of narrow, but they also. What bars desired outcome, here wise, what he was trying to do with send signals to Trump world that he was gonna be no a loyal follower. So while I think the jury is out on what he what kind of attorney general he'll be the troubling data points stacked up over these years where President Trump is attacking just officials. Attacking judges, you know calling legitimate investigations a witch hunt and bar is no gauging debating points about whether or not the series of the case that Muller maiden. That's gaining our writer not rather than shouting rooftops that the president is attacking the rule of law. So I'm I'm concerned, but he was saying a lot of the right things about the Justice Department's role attorney general's role is having an independent judgement and needing to follow the law and the facts where they take you. So I guess we'll see because it doesn't look like it's going to be any stopping his confirmation. And again, I'm speaking with Andy Reid is a senior fellow and founding editor Jessica who previously served in the White House associate counsel to President Barack Obama and also worked in congress conducting either side of US national security, Madison his latest article that Jessica is the 'nigma of Bill so. What do you think the time line? Here is Andy before bar takes the reins at which point. He's in charge of the Muller inquiry and its fate. You know, I would guess that. This is going to get scheduled for vote pretty quickly. I would be surprised if he's sworn in within the next two weeks, but again with the complications of the government shutdown, you know, all bets froth in terms of everyone's schedules right now. So I'm not a hundred percent, sure. What four time look like. But you know, I at this point. I don't think there are a whole lot of other steps to be taken other than the committee vote, and then you know, a floor vote. And I and I'm assuming that Mitch McConnell will be anxious to bring that to the floor as quickly as possible to try and put that behind him. So what happens to Whitaker then? At that point. Is in an acting role. He would revert back to the role that he had previously which I believe was chief of staff to the attorney general now far may have his own people. He wants to bring in his own chief-of-staff. So either Whitaker will exit the department be reshuffled or or remain in that previous role of chief of staff to the attorney general's office. And what about the all of the concern and speculation that well, it's it's I think it's pretty likely if not certain that he was putting their both as the is and is of the White House, and and to do what he could to stymie the investigation. Do you think he's done anything? Have. We been too alarmed by the fact that this guy was so unqualified and so- craven in auditioning for the job. I don't think we have all the data points yet. You know, one of the big moments where we get some information on that front is that Whitaker after being threatened with a subpoena and agreed to testify in front of the House Judiciary committee and mid February. So at that point, I'm sure that a number of members of congress, especially on the democratic side. We'll be asking those very questions. I don't think there's been anything catastrophic. The Muller inquiry because I think we would have heard leaks about that. If it had happened, and you know, don't count out the effect that all of the questions about Whitaker's legitimacy to as acting attorney general when he had not been Senate confirmed may have had on freezing him from doing the more aggressive version of Trump's bidding. Its also seems very likely that Trump had no idea what it kind of sleazy business record. This guy had Whitaker. Not the Trump's headed anything, but a sleazy business record. Well, you know, president wants to have headaches about their support. And you know, part of the problem with President Trump is that he has attracted a lot of other people who have had fairly unsavory business dealings in the past serve in his administration. And I'm sure it's annoying to him to have to deal with no problems with the secretary of interior of problems about the business dealings of the acting attorney general, but you know, that's kind of. What you get when you bring that kind of folks in and you have don't have the best that operation. Well, let's just turn to the mechanism of this inquiry. And the fact that the attorney general is in charge of it because sessions recused himself rod Rosenstein, ended up in charge of it. A rod Rosenstein is indicated he's leaving. So by comes in. He's in charge. Mine is standing is the way that the rules are written. The Justice department rules about a special counsel investigation that they are confidential. The word confidential seems to cover an enormous amount of ground. So let's start with that Ken by basically redact anything he wants, or at least redacted grand jury testimony and classified material. Well, I would I would expect grand jury material and classified material be redacted under any theory. So let's just start with. There are going to be legitimate redaction made on case. Now, there's intense public interest in seeing this report and so much so that I would suggest that there may be legitimate declassification decisions that made the declassify some of the signals intelligence in foreign phone. Call intercepts at Saturday if they bear directly on the central questions of this inquiry. But one thing we shall set our expectations is that, you know, the Justice department isn't gonna pub issue public report that contains a bunch of grand jury testimony that's covered by statutes. But put that to the side. There does seem to be some discretion here for the attorney general to be sort of, you know, more fully transparent versus less and here. You know, that's one of the big looming questions about the barn nation. Now. He made a commitment to the center that he was going to be as transparent as the law would allow, but what he means by the law and regulations could mean executive privilege, and in that case, he could be really expanding the scope of the things he wants to hide from public view in a way that I think the unacceptable, given the intense public interest in this in this product. Now, one thing that Muller can do is the the regulations require that there be a report to congress about any significant actions that Muller wants to take our disapproved by the attorney general. So if Muller decided he wanted to indict say when Trump's children, and he turning general had you can't do that. I'm gonna pull the plug then that would require a report given to congress to that effect that that there was an indictment sought of per, you know, Trump child acts. And here was a evidentiary basis to do. So and the attorney general said, no, there are some things where it's beyond your general the ability despite the report, and so it'll be interesting to see if there's been that kind of internal desktop that would trigger that provision. So what do you expect? I mean, everybody's is has not everybody. But a lot of people have those random anticipation about this report. And the the likelihood is that it may not affect his base, particularly in terms of them sticking by him and Fox News, and and sort of put these people inside of this bubble whether they're impervious to facts in evidence, that's not likely to change shift the needle, but my sense is what's likely to perhaps influenced the base is the fourth coming testimony of Michael Cohen, not that he's not going to be the greatest witness in..

President Trump attorney Muller president special counsel Matthew Whitaker congress Trump White House Andy Reid President Barack Obama Bill Bill Jessica who associate counsel Justice Department US Justice department Bill Bauer
"bill bauer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

10:10 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Talking about his book kicks. We were just learning about the origin of Chuck Taylor sneakers. Shoes named after a salesman who was basketball's Johnny Appleseed. Can you think of a single product that's named after the salesman in a company, not the C E O, not the patriarch the salesman because Iraq in my brain nNcholas, and I couldn't think of one off the top of my head. No. And I'm sure if I thought about it for a couple hours, I couldn't I couldn't think of any in that kind of speaks to the marketing genius. That shuck Taylor had one of the other things that congress did to kind of develop the game further as they published this yearbook is kind of a who's who book of basketball up today. So if you're team wanted to be in the yearbook, you just had to send a photo of your your key. And where you played all the players were. And of course, you had to wear. The the converse shoes in the picture. But in this book, Chuck Taylor would say, you know, here's the here's some tricks of the game. Here are the best players playing the game. You know, traveling from town to town. He really had an eye for who was good who is an up and coming college player at coaches called him for advice on who should my scouts go after. So he was kind of a self developed expert in the game and this earned him a place in the Basketball Hall of fame. So, you know, we have another example of a salesman not only having his name on a shoe, but ending up in a sports hall of fame. It's remarkable how he deployed every tool in the tool kit to sell and actually it just sounded to me from reading your book that he didn't think of himself as a salesman, but an evangelist for this ministry, co basketball exactly, and you know, part of that comes from his connection to the game because he was an actual player. He saw. Maybe a different side of it that a noble salesman wouldn't see. So there was a a liberal of expertise that also attracted people to these clinics here, you would hear a professional player really tell you how to play here. Here are the real trick. Here's what here's what people are actually wearing. So it it did have a a certain degree of expertise when he went out. That's great. And let's talk about a track. Coach who had a tremendous impact on the world has sneakers sports and the culture. Let's talk about Bill Bauer men. He coached nine sub four minute miles at the university of Oregon the most of any coach in America four NCA team championships twenty four NCAA individual titles and coach thirty three Olympia in some call him the bear Bryant the Nick Sabin of the running world. That's perfectly accurate. He really knew the sport in and out, but he would do experiments with everything having to do with, Robin. He would use backyard mix up. Different combinations of rubber to creates a you know, a good running surface to run on. He would make the clothes that his runners wore the out of the lightest material he could find but you also experimented with shoes. You know in those days there weren't as many choices for running shoes as we have today. He surmised that the best running shoe with probably one that was made specifically for the athlete. You didn't waste any extra material. It was you fit perfectly. You didn't have an extra ounce on it that it that it didn't need to have. So he would use his runners is kind of human Guinea pigs well, making his his own shoe concoctions overtime. He got a little better and better at it. And this caught the eye of one of his former students runner by the name, Phil Knight. Now, Phil Knight had just returned from a trip to Japan business idea. And while he was in Japan, he met with the executives of the company called on it's super tiger. Now, we kind of know this company more as a six today. But in the nineteen sixties they were they were tiger shoes. There were still fairly good shoes. But the time and Phil Knight says to his old coach, look, we can make some money importing these shoes. These Japanese shoes to the US market because they are of similar quality to the Adidas improve shoes at her out there. But of course, cost much less. So of course. Dr jumped at the chance and not only to you know, to to have a little side money, but to also have the ear of a shoe company that would finally listened to him. So of course, over time their company, which is called blue ribbon sports gained more and more success. And they eventually spun off to a company that we know today as Nike now, the bones of Nike are built-in to of course, running shoes and making kind of the the perfect running shoe. So it it definitely came from an area of expertise. Indeed and talk about a breakfast, the changed Bauer man's life and waffles Darmon coached in Oregon, and as as we know, Oregon and the Pacific northwest is very wet you. They're running shoes of the day. Detraction wasn't wasn't great not not enough to really grip mud not enough to go over concrete. They're easily and Darman was also obsessed with coming up some some sort of pattern for the soul and. The story goes he's in the kitchen. One Sunday wife is out he sees the waffle iron. Then he has an idea. It's like, wait a minute. The waffle pattern is a pattern. I'm looking for. So he pours molten rubber in the wa- flyer. And it gets stuck in. He goes to the store to to buy another waffle iron and does his tests. And finally, he comes up with the the waffle soul. Now. Of course, the actual soulmate for the shoes is made any waffle iron, the waffler just provided the the seed of the idea, but the the waffle soled shoes proved to be good enough grip for practically any surface. So this was kind of the beginning of the the jogging shoe as we know it, and although jogging seems common in normal. Now, it wasn't always. So was it either running as a hobby wasn't really wasn't really a thing. You know, if you went outside in the fifties and sixties and saw someone running it. We kinda strike he was odd deal. The only people that might go out jogging. We're, you know, boxers training and kind of the local town that case and that was it. But in the fifties and sixties in going onto the seventies. Started to become kind of a a new trendy thing to go outside and run. Just practice is window Doberman traveled to New Zealand with his relay team the coach there for the New Zealand Olympic team said, you know, what why don't you come on a race or just just a Sunday run with us who says, okay. You know, track coach going on Iran. Okay. Seems easy. But what are you discovering? Was he Darmon couldn't keep up with with any of the people and some of them were much much older than him. They blazed by him. And he was wondering why why is it that? I can't keep up with these people, but they seem to just go for miles and miles and the New Zealand track coach had a exercise regiment called jogging. So Byron took this idea. Brought it back with him to to Oregon and kind of started the is very small jogging boom in Oregon, so go across the coast to New York now. So another jogging boom was taking shape for lebeau was working in the fashion industry in Manhattan. But he was also a really jogger and he is known today as the founder of the New York City marathon that really New York City marathons just went around central park a few times, but Fred Leepo, heavy idea that by expanding the marathon across all five boroughs of the city. It can really kind of act as a an advertisement forty York. Not just an advertisement for the city. But also as an advertisement for jogging. You know, one person was saying that the best single Spar in New York was central park because you can just go up to someone else that was jogging and strike up a conversation. So what Fred we voted and what Bill Barham, it did was kind of start and exercise movement. Kind of the first exercise fad that the US is known. Dr Ken Cooper is my personal doctor. I'm pretty fortunate to have him for my annual checkups and he wrote a book called aerobics, which you talk about here as well. You know, I talked to Dr Cooper just before this interview. I said, you know, what what should I talk to nNcholas Smith about? And he reminded me the back when he was doing his work and he had trained NASA. Astronauts, a work in the air force a remarkable Dr. But he was on this quest to prove that exercise jogging aerobics would actually increase life expectancies and health and he wanted to get people in their fifties. Sixties and seventies to start running. The medical establishment came down on him like a ton of bricks. The fifty. Year olds you'll be dying in the streets that this was a terrible idea. Well, there there was kind of his thought that you know, any any sort of physical activity was a dangerous if you weren't quote, unquote, the the right person, and this is kind of something that that I'll come back to this New Zealand story that Bill Barham and went on we saw, you know, man, come to his aid that was not only older than him but add survived a heart attack. This kind of woke something up in his mind that you know, this cardiovascular exercise wasn't that good for you. And you know, what Dr Cooper found was it. It doesn't matter. Really? If you're young or old, if you're active it does add years to your life. And when we come back more of our conversation when nNcholas Smith is terrific book kicks the great American story.

salesman Dr Ken Cooper Phil Knight basketball shuck Taylor Oregon Bill Bauer Chuck Taylor US New York Bill Barham New Zealand Basketball Hall of fame Darmon Johnny Appleseed Nike Iraq nNcholas Smith university of Oregon
"bill bauer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And as long as they can get the machine to work for them. That's what that's what matters and President Trump had a particular problem, he came into office, not as a Republican, but as a nationalist as an economic nationalist, and a cultural, nationalist and staffing up administration with a party that had never existed before he ran. He's looking for people who will advocate for him who will be his guy, including he named a new chairman of the joint chiefs of staff nine months before he needs. To do that. What what does that tell you? And also a new attorney general William bar. What do you make those two? Prepare for turnover political year. No, I think the bar choices a good one. You know, he has picked some establishment choices here, which is rare for Trump. I mean, most of these choices are disruptive g they don't have the experience. Well, no, Trump is running against the very experience that his voters think has ruined the country. So these outsider choices I mean, the Washington Post said that when she was first appointed at state that she had no qualification. Looking like, Heather Locklear. Would anyone have said that about a democratic appointee of? Been at the State Department for almost two years. And we forget she also worked for Rex Tillerson does have some experience. But again, the key thing about Donald Trump is he was elected to disrupt and change his country. And we're seeing that in his appointments, rare is the one like Bill Bauer that that has establishment support and just on the military, again, why nine months early on on a military nomination. I have no idea you'd have to tell you. It's actually a bit of a mystery about why we don't know what this means about Dunford if he's going to leave early or feet if this transition is going to take nine months. And let me just ask you go back to the Muller probe quickly and the southern district of New York, which we've been talking about all morning, how much does this damage Donald Trump going forward, politically, I think politically a I'm not sure frankly, because we have seen up until this point Republicans largely stand with him, even as we get revelations at both in the SDN y probe that relates to the payments to women and certainly in the Muller prob-. I did think it was interesting in your interview with Senator Rubio where he noted that a part in for Paul Manafort would would essentially cross a line there. And he wants to watch to see whether there is some movement on the Republican side, if they do start to get nervous about some of the revelations from are certainly the revelations from SDN, y which are incredibly significant, and then certainly what Trump might do if relation to apart. How much will this damage Donald Trump? None exactly can't fall off the floor all track. All right. His base right now and it sticking with him. No matter what and a Republican. They will say he's totally cleared. Well, no, I think they'd say look Muller has an empty holster. Usually you get the little guy to flip on the big guy for the same thing. Hey, we put out the hick. Right. You you did this guy in tell us the boss ordered you to do it. And we'll let you go on this one. Well, there's no little guy charged with collusion yet. So Republicans would say Muller's got an empty holster on the big issue. He was sent to to get Trump care. Just one second, Jerry. I want to return to where we started which was the memorial for George H W Bush which were such powerful tributes. But there was that one moment that I think you all probably watched when President Trump came in went down that row Hillary Clinton barely looking at Milania Trump looking. -greeing Herbert not ever looking at Donald Trump. It was hard to ignore the tensions there. What what what would your observation? Well, my observation was the Tableau of American history that that represented each one of those men were put there in that row by the American people operating our constitution. That's our history right there. And he doesn't like them tough. They don't like him tough. And I think the notion that we make a great deal out of the bad blood between this this president in prison. I think one of the facts that the Democrats have had a trouble coming to terms with is is maybe one of the most under covered stories in America that Donald Trump is the forty fifth president of the United States of America. And just the last for about ten seconds. I think on the same thing there was a Washington Post article. And I can't remember who wrote it that said that Tableau is also just a message about we have peaceful turnover of power in this country. And we can talk about whether President Trump. His role in this. But there is something nice. And h w allowed us to see that that all of this president can sit together in a church in worship they did. Indeed. Thanks very much for joining us, and among the many tributes to George Hw Bush. This week was a twenty one.

President Trump Muller president Washington Post George H W Bush William bar chairman of the joint chiefs o Heather Locklear Bill Bauer Rex Tillerson State Department attorney Paul Manafort New York Dunford Senator Rubio Jerry Hillary Clinton Herbert United States
"bill bauer" Discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

"No, I think the bar choices a good one. You know, he has picked some establishment choices here, which is rare for Trump. I mean, most of these choices are disruptive with g they don't have the experienced. We'll know Trump is running against the very experience that his voters think has ruined the country. So these outside our choices. I mean, the Washington Post said that when she was first appointed state that she had no qualification other than looking like, Heather Locklear. Would anyone have said that about a democratic appointee of been at the State Department for almost two years, and we forget she also worked for Rex Tillerson does have some experience. But again, the key thing about Donald Trump is he was elected to disrupt and change this country. And we're seeing that in his appointments, rare is the one like Bill Bauer that that has a stab. Management support and just on the military again, why nine months early on a military nomination. I have no idea this you'd have to tell you. It's a bit of a mystery about why we don't we don't know what this means about Dunford, if he's going to leave early or if this transition is going to take nine months, and let me just ask you just go back to the molar probe quickly and the southern district of New York, which we've been talking about all morning how much does this damage Donald Trump going forward, politically, politically, a I'm not sure frankly, because we have seen up until this point Republicans largely stand with him, even as we get revelations both in the SDN y probe that relates to the payments to women, and certainly in the Miller prob-, I did think it was interesting in your interview with Senator Rubio where he noted that a part in for Paul Manafort would would essentially cross a line there. I think we'll have to watch to see whether there is some movement on the Republican side if they do start to get nervous about some of the revelations from Muller, certainly the revelations from SDN, y which I think are incredibly significant. And then certainly what Trump might do if we're relation to apart. How much will this damage Donald Trump? None exactly at fall off the floor all track. Has his base right now and it sticking with him. No matter what and a Republican. They say, he's totally cleared. Well, no, I think they'd say look Muller has an empty holster. Usually you get the little guy to flip on the big guy for the same thing. Hey, we put out the hit. Right. You you did this guy in tell us the boss order Judah, do it. And we'll let you go on this one. Well, there's no little guy charged with collusion yet. So Republicans would say Muller's got an empty holster on the big issue. He was sent to to to get Trump on just one second tier? I want to return to where we started which was the memorial for George H W Bush which were such powerful tributes. But there was that one moment that I think you all probably watched when President Trump came in went down that row Hillary Clinton barely looking at Melania Trump looking. -greeing her but not ever looking at Donald Trump. It was hard to ignore the tensions there. What what what would your survey? Shen? Well, my survey shin was the Tableau of American history that represented each one of those men were put there in that row by the American people operating through their constitution. That's our history right there. And he doesn't like them tough. They don't like him tough. And I think the the notion that we make a great deal out of the bad blood between this this person that person I think one of the facts that the Democrats have had a trouble coming to terms with is is maybe one of the most undercover stories in America that Donald Trump is the forty fifth president of the United States of America. And just a less word got about ten seconds. I think I'm the same thing. There is a Washington Post article. And I can't remember who wrote it that said that Tableau is also just a message about we have peaceful turnover of power in this country. And we can talk about whether President Trump his role in this. But there is something. Nice Hw allowed us to see that that all of those presidents can sit together in a church in worship they did. Indeed. Thanks very much for joining us..

Donald Trump Trump Melania Trump Muller Washington Post president Bill Bauer Heather Locklear State Department George H W Bush Paul Manafort Rex Tillerson New York Judah Senator Rubio Shen Dunford Hillary Clinton America United States
"bill bauer" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"We are here in the conference room, the most lovely conference room of the adaptive training. Jim, it is in the heart of Texas, right? Outside of Dallas. We are joined by two footballers who have changed their course and are doing amazing things for people with disabilities in this country. You take different classes what every every semester almost and you pick people to come here and learned that they can face the challenges in front of them. So can you explain a little bit more about that? I think the point you hit it earlier. If you treat people broken that broken, you know, I think the medical community at some point cash runs out, insurance runs out and then people with disabilities, no matter how that came to be. They say, what's next? Where do I go? How do I find a place to better myself? And I've just been one is a former Mr. relevant and somebody that I felt like Colin to had to climb and scratch and claw to try to make it in the league. Now we've had this opportunity to expand what the league taught us and repurpose it in here to look people in their eyes and see the potential in them more than what they see is broken in them. And that's just the way to create a gym program around focusing on what you can do, not what you can do. Dave, how did you to link up match dot com. Dark time. Shout out to my beautiful wife. Sarah in our beautiful girls. Now, Colin was running the marketing arm to- Sita's account and heard about the gym through navy seal. We're actually founded the gym and when I met him, I just like he just fit. It was just like, do this guy has to be here. I know I couldn't pay him what he needed, that's for sure, but I just knew that he would come alive in this atmosphere. So talk about what that transition has been like for you. I learned about David through another navy seal who came and spoke up our agency. And as soon as I heard about what he had gone on here, I just wanted to be a part of it. I was never military, but my grandparents, both my grandfathers were, and it was something that always wanted to be an NFL player. We sort of had that no quit mindset and it was it was even for David. I mean, after we finished looking for a place for ourselves, the military was one of the first options that came to my mind as something to try to be a part of. So when I heard about that after the Training Foundation and the work that they did with the military is a natural fit for me, wind to the part of that, and it started out just training some of the guys. I'm recent to the team. I'm new to the team, but. It's so addicting, the atmosphere how they how team atmosphere that so used to in the NFL and what a lot of these guys are used to in the military. And let's talk about the atmosphere because I think that's really important this gym versus other gyms that I've seen where physical therapy is fucking tough. Like mentally, physically, it's tough and it's tough when you feel like you are a broken person from my own experiences, I saw my dad had a stroke and go into a training facility where everything when you go in there and just feels like sad sack, Sally everything is completely beat down. This is a different place. So explain like kind of the process of your vision for the gym and when people walk in what they expect to see what you want them to see if you bring stoke, everybody else brings stoke and like I know that sounds very surfer, Kelly, west coast guy me, but no, like how do we make this exciting and fun. These people, they oftentimes don't see themselves as athletes. And the Bill Bauer is that if you have a human body, you're an athlete, whether you're competing sport or not. So the experience shapes a belief which changes the behavior, which creates a result, a gym that says, you have this behavior, you'll get these results that's not sustainable for us. We can create something that's an atmosphere where it's fun..

David Colin NFL stoke Texas Dallas Bill Bauer Jim Dave Training Foundation Sarah Sally Kelly Sita
"bill bauer" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"The Nike boycott quote, unquote as of twenty seventeen. The Nike brand was valued at twenty nine point. Six billion dollars z. this just in. That's a lot of money. That's that's that's six. The company was founded on January twenty fifth nineteen sixty four at the time, known as blue ribbon sports at the time. Kid argue those first five or six years of the company. There must have been a major boycott going on because nobody was buying. Blue ribbon Bill Bauer men and Phil Knight started the company officially became Nike seven years later in nineteen seventy-one. It took those homeys seventh biblical number. It is the number of completion. It took seven years to figure that out. Now the company takes his name from Nike, the Greek goddess of victory. And at the time, there were people that ma- mad the company was named after a Greek goddess. Now, here's the deal. Nike is running a commercial right now that's promoting the quarterback, turned activist or forced to become activists. Callin Catholic as is new as a new company spokesperson to celebrate their thirty years in business and z. there's a lot of discussion. There's a lot of outrage. People have seen the commercials you have you seen the commercial? Yes, I saw for the first time I believe last night I heard about it. Well, let me give you the stats since the commercial brand. Okay. And this is the time of the recording of show which is recording this show on September eleven. And our thoughts go out to those who've been lost there on September eleventh. Those who lost their lives in the terrible tragedies of that day as of September, eleventh of twenty eight teen. Since that controversial commercial came out that sparked people to burn their shoes and caused people to outraging threatened to boycott. The company's sales have jumped thirty one percent year over year month every month z. what are your thoughts on this? Tell you what? There's a lot more lovers and haters out there. And the thing about it is that the people that aren't going to buy Nike probably weren't going to buy Nikes anyway. And the people that are gonna buy Nike now are moved or move by that commercial or go out there and buy an extra pair just because they're now they're gonna show. They're supporting like if you're gonna burn yours, which is kinda stupid. By the way you put it on my stuff to get back at you. It's just like cutting for noses by face. But the point is, is that the lovers I normally find in business like Chick-fil-A membership flay years ago when they had their. Every company has their their boycott, your big bump because everybody was like we support Chick-fil-A and so the lovers came out and there's a lot more lovers and haters in that came out and it was it was a big boom for them, and it just goes to show you clay just goes to show. I was talking about this today with the buddy of mine is eighty, bad press. I mean, can you have bad? I was thinking about, I actually had some audio audio. I shouldn't do this..

Nike Bill Bauer outraging Phil Knight seven years Six billion dollars thirty one percent thirty years twenty fifth six years
"bill bauer" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on Here & Now

"You could call it Piecyk Ling researchers, and Vermont Vermonter experimenting with turning human urine into fertilizer for farms and gardens. With the grant from the National Science Foundation, the rich Earth Institute is testing the effectiveness of fertilizing with urine sanitized with heat and figuring out whether trace amounts of medications would make their way into food. The concept is not new bags of her Liser made from processed human waste solids or showing up in more and more nurseries around the country according to the EPA it's perfectly safe to use in any garden. But as Jacob fenced-in from member station w. a. AMU reports and environmental group is questioning just how safe it is every day. The seven hundred thousand residents of the district of Columbia, plus a lot of visitors do this. Each flush travels through a network of almost two thousand miles of sewer pipes to the city's southernmost tip. So yeah, this is what I think of when I think of wastewater treatment plant is a big circular tank and sort of a foul smell. So this is one of our sedimentation basins. If you ever flying into Reagan, you can look down, you can spot us pretty easily. Bill Bauer works for DC water. He tells me this is the first step in treating sewage separating out what's referred to as solids we think about. That's Ganic matter. It's nitrogenous foster essentially plant food, four years ago, Washington DC became the first city in North America to install this high tech system to turn human waste into a rich soil amendment, giant pressure, cookers kill pathogens. Then microbes digest the solids, even further in what's basically a huge composter. The final product is called the bloom and the smell is not bad. Most common descriptive. We get the orders for material is kind of an earthy smell maybe bit musty. DC water spent almost half a Bill. Billion dollars on this system. But Brouwer says, utility will recoup the cost within fifteen years both by producing electricity for methane during the process end by selling bloom to gardeners landscapers, currently, DC water sells only about one eighth of what it produces and gives away the rest. Now, marketing is being ramped up and for the first time, bloom is being sold in big blue and white bags at nurseries in the DC area. Cadillac. Francis go and is a plant physiologist retired from the university of Maryland in his electric golf cart. He's showing me around his large, lush garden, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, all grown using bloom, go and says, it's one of the best fertilizers he's ever used and he's been studying compost for decades. He's worked on projects, composting, all sorts of things, crab waste chickens, garbage, interned him, nickname the guru of composting in the nineteen seventies. He started working on composting human waste, his work with excrement earned him, a new nickname king. He says, the environmental benefit is huge. It's a lot like the local food movement. We are also now producing our local fertilizer for growing those crops. We replenishing in this oil, those nutrients that we've taken that we've eaten sewer authority have been recycling sewage solids for many decades Milwaukee. Wisconsin has been doing it for more than ninety years making a fertilizer called. Organize, the practice has been growing since the late eighties when congress banned dumping sewage in the ocean, despite the obvious benefits, many environmentalists are extremely sceptical. Kathy plume is with the DC chapter of the Sierra Club. Wastewater has a lot of.

Columbia Bill Bauer Piecyk Ling Jacob AMU National Science Foundation Francis Vermont Vermonter Wisconsin rich Earth Institute EPA Milwaukee Kathy plume Reagan North America Sierra Club university of Maryland
"bill bauer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the story and what is the difference between colton religion and where do i determine my moral compass on the difference between right and wrong now if peaceful coexistence between rush corum and antelope was the original goal for everybody sure didn't last long don't make state ren if somebody doesn't do something just awesome which triggered most of the craziness that was to follow this is chapman speaking when we started doing research we found that like the first real line that was drawn in the sand between these two groups was over land use they didn't know this but other than hawaii oregon had d most strict land use laws in the country and the plot of land that they bought the big muddy ranch that was sixty four thousand acres was known for exclusive farm use only which limited like what kind of buildings you could have on there how many houses you could have on the property and so very early on the co founder of nike bill bauer men who shared a property line with this commune starts putting together this legal defense with an environmental group called thousand friends of oregon to dismantle the city and for this group would just spent one hundred twenty five million dollars building there topi they thought as an act of survival to go into the closest town to them which was antelope which was nineteen miles away and buy up all the for sale property move in their own followers to their community and then they would therefore be able to take over political control of the town which would allow them inc rights which would allow them to build their businesses would allow the their church there in town and so they move over sixty followers into this very conservative cowboy ranching town of antelope and basically took it over one of the interesting parallels that we found in the series was on first glance the cultural divide between these groups is so fast but antelope was a very religious town that had transformed their barren wasteland into their little city and they had a church right in the middle of town and.

co founder oregon chapman hawaii nike one hundred twenty five millio sixty four thousand acres
"bill bauer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Religion and where do i determine my moral compass on the difference between right and wrong now if peaceful coexistence between rush and antelope was the original goal for everybody sure didn't last long dell makes a state ren if somebody doesn't do something to stop them which triggered most of the craziness that was to follow this is chapman speaking when we started doing research we found that like the first real line that was drawn in the sand between these two groups was over land use they didn't know this but other than hawaii oregon had the most strict land use laws in the country and the plot of land that they bought the big muddy ranch that was sixty four thousand acres was known for exclusive farm use only which limited like what kind of buildings you could have on there how many houses you could have on the property and so very early on the co founder of nike bill bauer men who shared a property line with this commune starts putting together this legal defense with an environmental group called thousand friends of oregon to dismantle the city and for this group who had just spent one hundred twenty five million dollars building their utah they thought as an act of survival to go into the closest towns them which was antelope which was nine miles away and buy up all the for sale property moving their own followers to their community and they would therefore be able to take over political control the town which would allow them inc rights which would allow them to build their businesses allow their church there in town and so they moved over sixty followers into this very conservative cowboy ranching town of antelope and basically took it over one of the interesting parallels that we found in the series was on first glance the cultural divide between these groups is so vast but antelope was a very religious town that had transformed their barren wasteland into their little city and they had a church right in the middle of town and had prayer in public school and and these are buying large frontier townsfolk that aren't looking for handouts are pull yourself up by your bootstraps type people and the russian issues wanted their own city with church right in the.

dell co founder oregon utah chapman hawaii nike one hundred twenty five millio sixty four thousand acres
"bill bauer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"bill bauer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My moral compass on the difference between right and wrong now if peaceful coexistence between rush purim and antelope was the original goal for everybody sure didn't last long don't make the state rent if somebody doesn't do something just awesome which triggered most of the craziness that was to follow this is chapman speaking when we started doing research we found that like the first real line that was drawn in the sand between these two groups was over land use they didn't know this but other than hawaii oregon had the most strict land use laws in the country and the plot of land that they bought the big muddy ranch that was sixty four thousand acres was known for exclusive farm use only which limited like what kind of buildings you could have on there how many houses you could have on the property and so very early on the co founder of nike bill bauer men who shared a property line with this commune starts putting together this legal defense with an environmental group called thousand friends of oregon to dismantle the city and for this group we just spent one hundred and twenty five million dollars building there utopia they thought as an act of survival to go into the closest town to them which was antelope which was nineteen miles away and buy up all the for sale property move in their own followers to their community and then they would therefore be able to take over political control the town which would allow them inc rights which would allow them to build their businesses would allow them out their church there in town and so they moved over sixty followers into this very conservative cowboy ranching town of antelope and basically took it over one of the interesting parallels that we found in the series was on first glance the cultural divide between these groups is so vast but antelope was a very religious town that had transformed their barren wasteland into their little city and they had a church right in the middle of town and had prayer in public school and and these are by and large frontier townsfolk that aren't looking for handouts are pull yourself up by your bootstraps type people and the russian issues wanted their own city with their church right in the middle of it and wanted to practice their way of life another place we see competing narratives.

co founder oregon chapman hawaii nike twenty five million dollars sixty four thousand acres