14 Burst results for "Bilal Sarwari"

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

06:52 min | 4 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Afghans the way their country was about to be. We'll speak to Spencer Ackerman about his new book, Reign of Terror. How the 9 11 Era Destabilized America and produce Trump. All that and more coming up. This is democracy. Now. Democracy now dot org. The war in peace Report I'm Amy Goodman today. In this special broadcast. We begin with the long time Afghan journalist Bilal Sarwari. We spoke to below first on August 18th three days after the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan after the US backed Afghan president Ashraf Ghani. Fled the country. I began by asking Bilal about whether who was surprised the Taliban cease power before US troops withdrew from Afghanistan. Actually, I was trying to get a marriage certificate for me and my wife and we were trying to get a passport for newly Born daughter, So I had spoken to government officials the day before. Some of them are my friends. The next morning I was heading towards those offices when I heard that the presidential palace employees were told to leave. And the Presidential Protection Service, which is Afghanistan's equivalent of secret service at the time or taking up positions. So there was a lot of confusion and then in a matter of basically 30 minutes or so. We found out that the then President Bashar Bani was supposed to go to the minister of defense to have a meeting at the National Command Center, which is a walking distance or a short drive been instead. Mr Oni had told his Secret service detail that he would want to fly there. So the minister defense was waiting. The Army chief of staff was waiting. The helicopters changed directions in the We're heading towards the Hamid Karzai International Airport. I think once That fact was revealed. The entire government in Kabul crumbled in no time just like it had crumbled across many of Afghanistan's provinces where mass surrenders Were negotiated between important provincial you know, officials and the Taliban. I think it's a Taliban, uh, strategy as well as fighting on the battlefield over the last many months, at least. They offered this insurance that they offered the surrender deal. And I think this was the work of months, if not years, So it was surreal in many ways, because I had started my career in 2000 and one when the Americans were bombing the Taliban. I was a fixer translator. Across from the Pakistani city of Peshawar. And then I saw the fall of Taliban and it was unbelievable to see how the tables turned how there was panic and fear my family this time. Was here. This time I was I am a father to new baby girl and I was not exempted from the panic and fear Will they'll be fighting whether it be blood shed? What will the Taliban do? Thanks God. Kabul fell to the Taliban without bloodshed without fighting, although vacuum created did result in some looting and some harassment and irregularities of the citizens. Of Afghanistan, So I would say for me, it was almost like, you know, uh, in no time this happened, I just couldn't believe it. Like many other rough ones, Bilal as we begin to wrap up, he wrote a piece for the telegraph. You said it's broken me from within. Afghan journalists reveals heavy toll of covering his country's collapsed That was the header you right? I became a father recently because my own family and relatives saw so much heartbreak these past few years. I pray that if God gave me a baby girl, I would name her solar, which means peace. I did that thinking that at least my daughter Might grow up in a normal country. So you are trying to leave right now. How do you go about that? Have you thought about staying? Do you think you could possibly be safe in Kabul in Afghanistan? Well, my, you know, Like harnessed opinion here is that I would love to tell the story. The people of Afghanistan. I think everything that has happened, including including the loss of friends, but within the government outside of the government, and you know I have friendships, whether they Taliban. I have a classmate from my ideas in Peshawar is a refugee and we went different ways. Has left me thinking. What is it that I can do? That will comfort me. You know, that would make me think that I'm doing something better. And over the years I've been having this conversation with myself and then I committed myself. You're telling the story of this country to the world, not only the news side of it, I created a hashtag Afghanistan University many years ago and where I basically showed the world the other side. Beautiful valleys. You know, the the National Beauty the legs. You know what Afghanistan could potentially offer in the future. If tourism was to come back here, and to be honest with you, I would love to be here. Like the rest of my colleagues and be able to tell the world our stories because 20 years ago, this country did not have this generation of reporters and we all this and large parts. Our international colleagues where we started working as fixers and translators 20 years ago, and they helped us get where we are, so I think it's very important for the world as well to have a credible and vibrant Afghan media. Where different voices can be heard because we live in a world where we are interconnected, you know, there's no more any country and the rest of the world that will not matter for anyone else. You know, humanity is something that gives me hope. You know, people cared these days about any country and anyone, especially like when you look at the activists on social media. And such platforms So I hope that I'm able, and I hope that my daughter is able to basically one day go to school here. But there are things that are beyond my control thinks that You know, people like myself and my colleagues and other have ones simply are powerless. We can't do that. I hope that this generation of leaders both the Taliban and Former officials and politicians can leave a legacy where we walk away from more painful historical political past, where governments came with coups and Tanks and with bullets. And for this, I think the people of Afghanistan over the last 20 years of Pi, uh, prepared like a massive price and a lot of sacrifices..

Spencer Ackerman Bilal Sarwari Bilal Amy Goodman Taliban 2000 Presidential Protection Servic 30 minutes Kabul Trump August 18th Oni Reign of Terror Peshawar 20 years ago President today both next morning Ashraf Ghani
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:37 min | 5 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Several of taliban's top political leaders have returned to afghanistan after years of living in exile. The taliban co founder. Mullah do gun eight by dr. Who is expected to become afghanistan's next president arrived in kandahar today. Bardar was released from pakistani prison. At the request of the trump administration. Three years ago he was deeply involved in the. Us taleban talks in doha. meanwhile former afghan president hamid karzai held talks today with the head of the uh connie network powerful faction of the taliban. This all comes as the taliban moves to secure. Its control of afghanistan on tuesday. The taliban held a news conference where they promised amnesty for former government officials and pledged to eradicate opium production. The taliban also made promises to protect some rights of journalists and women. The government offices will be activated soon and all employees including women and will return to work and work in areas permitted by sharia law. We and you see that in the field of medicine education police and other sectors of society and we need women because it is a necessity of society. Despite the taliban's pledges many women across afghanistan have not left their homes since the taliban seized control earlier today the taliban opened fire on hundreds of protesters in the northeastern jalalabad who marched through the streets holding the black red and green afghan flag aljazeera reports. Two protesters were shot. dead and twelve. Were wounded the taliban also reportedly beat journalists covering the protests in kabul the capital. The taliban has used live ammunition at checkpoints outside the international airport where the us and other foreign governments are evacuating. Its citizens and allies. The us has also used live ammunition at the airport. Killing to the us has so far evacuated eleven hundred people but as many as fifteen thousand us citizens remain in afghanistan on tuesday the us air force revealed it had found human remains inside the wheel of one of its c. Seventeen planes that flew out of kabul on monday. At least two people died monday after falling to their death after trying to cling onto a departing. Us plane meanwhile. The biden administration announced that it would freeze nearly nine and a half billion dollars held by the afghan government in us banks blocking the taleban from accessing. The money we begin. Today's show in kabul where we're joined bilal sarwari. He is an afghan journalist based in kabul. Who's been reporting on afghanistan for twenty years. Blonston where i speaking to you. Since the taliban seized control of afghanistan your response were you surprised. The significance of the president ashraf ghani fleeing the country. And what's happening now in the streets around you was trying to get married certificated For me and my wife in we'll plan to get a possible for newly born daughter. So i have spoken to government officials a day before some of them were my friends. The next morning. I was hitting towards those offices when i heard that the presidential palace employees were told to leave End at the presidential protection service which is on his equivalent of secret service. At the time. Were taking up positions so there was a lot of confusion and then in a matter of Basically thirty minutes or so. We found out that they didn't president ashraf vanni was supposed to go to the minister. Defense to have a meeting at the national command center which is a walking distance or a short drive but instead Mister had told his secret service detail that he would wanna fly there. So minister defense was waiting. The army chief of staff was waiting. The helicopters changed data actions in the what heading towards the hamid karzai international airport. I think once that fact was revealed the entire government in kabul problem bold in no time just like it crumbled across many of of line of sounds provinces where mass surrenders were negotiated between important provincial.

taliban afghanistan kabul Bardar hamid karzai Mullah kandahar doha biden administration afghan government jalalabad bilal sarwari Blonston ashraf ghani us air force Us presidential protection servic ashraf vanni national command center
Taliban Takes Key Northern Afghan Cities as Battles Rage On

BBC Newshour

02:05 min | 6 months ago

Taliban Takes Key Northern Afghan Cities as Battles Rage On

"Taliban in Afghanistan. Say they have now captured three cities in the north of the country, and it's hard not to conclude that the fighting for control of the country is going the Taliban's way. The government has acknowledged that the city of Taloqan, capital of Takhar province, Has fallen to the militants, with sources saying some provisions. Provincial officials were still trapped. Earlier, the Taliban said they had also taken the cities of Konduz and sorry pool. But the Defense Ministry in Kabul said special forces were still inside Kunduz city taking the battle to the insurgents, and an Interior Ministry spokesman said Afghan forces were winning back control and would defeat the Taliban. No, I haven't to other ensemble. So how do you have? Well? Yeah, one. The Afghan security forces, backed by the Air Force have launched a clean up operation in Kunduz City. They have been making progress and have captured some areas of the city and the Taliban have suffered heavy casualties. The city will soon be cleared of the terrorists. Reinforcements have also been deployed in other high risk provinces, and these cities that the Taliban want to capture will soon become their graveyards Hardship. Bilal Sarwari is an independent journalist in Kabul, and he's been telling me about today's developments on the ground. Well, we know that there's very heavy fighting inside the city of Kunduz, with the Taliban, managing to seize control of the provincial governor's office, as well as the police headquarters in the center of the city. But we've also seen you know very heavy fighting between Afghan special forces commandos in the Taliban. One Kunduz resident told me that there was a rain of bullets and shrapnel that hit homes. People simply could not basically even venture out of their living rooms, let alone seeing the street. We know that most of the districts in Kunduz province did fall to the Taliban a few weeks ago, even a month or so ago without much of a fight, So the city of Kunduz was always besieged. The Taliban were always at the four gates of the

Taliban Taloqan Takhar Konduz Defense Ministry Kunduz City Kunduz Kabul Bilal Sarwari Interior Ministry Afghanistan Air Force
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 6 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. US forces and their allies may have largely left Afghanistan, but the country's four decade long war continues. NPR's DEA Hadid reports. This is perhaps the moment when the Afghan conflict entered a new phase in April, when President Biden announced American troops withdrawing there's time to end America's longest war. Since then, the Taliban have overrun about half of Afghanistan. Officially the negotiating peace with the Afghan government. But on the ground, mid level Taliban commander tells us the goal is quite different. He spoke to NPR's producer fossil Manila cast his eye over the phone. He requested anonymity because he doesn't want Afghan forces to identify him control. Operating. These military achievements are so we can rule the country. He goes on to say their strategies to overrun key districts and encircle urban centers to force their surrender. The Taliban also taking control of border crossings to deny the Afghan government revenue from customs duties and to compel neighboring countries to deal with them. One of the Taliban's greatest achievements was to overrun much of northern Afghanistan. Earlier this month, Afghan journalist Bilal Sarwari shed a video of turban fighters strolling through usually conquered Green Valley. They will cry out Long live the Islamic emirate, which is what the Taliban called themselves the pace of, uh, the fall of major districts. Is not only surprising It's quite shocking, shocking because northern areas were once the bastions of resistance to the Taliban, the Taliban commander We spoke to says that's why they targeted these areas to curb any nation Opposition. Taking the North also shows how the Taliban's fighting force has evolved. The North is dominated by ethnic Tajiks and Uzbeks..

Sasha Pfeiffer Steve Inskeep Bilal Sarwari April NPR Taliban Green Valley NPR News four decade DEA US Manila President Biden Earlier this month American Afghanistan northern Afghanistan Tajiks Hadid Afghan government
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:21 min | 7 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on KCRW

"But in a city like Kabul bit in a school, a hospital Clinica highway. I can't think of a single place which would be you know a normal place anywhere else in the world. But in Afghanistan, that is, I think. The depth of the tragedy. Do people have much confidence that the government is, as the Pentagon spokesman was just saying, capable of pushing back and stabilizing the situation? Well, the U. S military drawdown takes place at a time when Afghanistan doesn't have a credible and meaningful peace process. There's no permanent ceasefire. This is how the American government sold their negotiations and talks and know how with the Taliban. Said These were peace talks that the Afghan government had to release 6000 Taliban prisoners, which included their fighters and commanders that that would lead to peace talks. As well as a permanent ceasefire. It didn't lead to that, and the Afghan government was never part of those negotiations. So at this time, I think you will also find a lot of Afghans who worked with the Americans. Over the last 20 years. It's a generational relationship. It's closer. You know, personal friendship, So there's a sense of deep betrayal by those who have been, you know friends with the Americans from District police chief prosecutor to someone in Kabul. But I think I have ones are equally upset and heartbroken by how their own government has let them down, and I think this is also part of the problem. At the same time, we know that the American military when they announced that they were withdrawing Everyone knew that the Afghan national Security forces will not have the air support, not just air strikes, but also the logistical support. American Air Force was dropping, You know sacks of potatoes, bread water, they were evacuating wounded soldiers. From some of the most remote districts and bases across the country. So then you saw mass surrenders, you know, often negotiated by village and tribal elders. And I think for me that that is more of a local insurance that people are taking at a village district level. They're saying we have to live among Taliban. Why should we be fighting? So they step away. So let me ask then about, um People who benefited from the past 20 years of the United States. Being their women come to mind are people who are in journalism or any number of civil society fields are people getting ready to leave. We have to remember in 2000 and one Afghanistan was destroyed society. So when the United States came in, along with the international community, You know the rebuilding of Afghanistan and was a very, very challenging job. And the blood and treasure that was invested has changed Afghanistan. People have benefited you have the 9 11 generations, you know, media Is another area where you have seen a lot of growth. But that's one legacy. The other legacy of the last 20 years, both by the American government, the international community and the Afghan government is Air strikes against wedding halls. The insecurity you know the economic problems so quite quite tragically, Afghanistan today is very, very insecure in the absence of a credible peace process in the absence of a permanent ceasefire, but in a sentence or so, do you know a lot of people who are preparing to leave the country. Quite tragically, Most people don't have that choice. You know, Some people are trying to leave but most quite tragically or stuck here and across many, many provinces, you're talking about thousands of families. Are forced to leave their homes. People have lost their livelihoods, their harvest their fruit gardens, and I think that is extremely extremely unbearable for those communities distribute communities for farmers. And for people across the country journalist Bilal Sarwari. Thank you. The CIA is still in Afghanistan, although now under much more difficult circumstances. How will the spy agency keep tabs on the Taliban? Another extremist threats in the country at this critical juncture, NPR national security correspondent Greg Murray has more Just days after the September 11 attack. A handful of CIA officers were the first Americans sent to Afghanistan. Gary Schroen was one of them. He recalled his marching orders in this 2000 and five interview with NPR link up with the Northern Alliance get their cooperation militarily. And they will take on the Taliban. And when we break the Taliban, your job is to capture bin Laden kill him and bring his head back in a box on dry ice in Afghanistan and elsewhere, the CIA paramilitary operations against the Taliban, Al Qaeda and others became a defining feature of the spy agency over the past two decades. They've been marked by successes and controversies. The rapidly changing battlefield in Afghanistan raises questions about how the CIA will now monitor the Taliban. This also comes at a time when the CIA is assessing its global focus. There are calls for the agency to scale back counterterrorism efforts and concentrate more on traditional spying of major powers such as Russia and China. In April, CIA Director William Burns told the Senate committee the agency wouldn't be leaving Afghanistan. When the military did. The CIA will retain a suite of capabilities. Some of them remaining in place. But he added an important caveat when the time comes for the U. S military to withdraw the U. S government's ability to collect and act On threats will diminish. That's simply affect the CIA and the military depend on each other in war zones. The military provides protection that allows the CIA to operate more freely. The CIA provides intelligence that shapes military operations. With the military gone, the agency will be far more limited than in the early years of the war. We were able to go anywhere. I was able to drive down around Kabul or Jalalabad, a host and just go around to town and go to a coffee shop and have tea Chai or whatever. Doug London was the CIA's counterterrorism chief in the region until he retired in 2018. As security became harder. We started finding ourselves behind these massive fortresses. Mhm. So it's hard when you're not out and about the people see, a critics say operations in Afghanistan and elsewhere were plagued by serious problems. They say abusive interrogations of suspects amounted to torture and drone strikes sometimes resulted in civilian death. The drone program included targeting Taliban members hiding out in neighboring Pakistan. Hussein Haqqani was Pakistan's ambassador to Washington a decade ago during the strikes from the CIA's point of view. They accomplished something elimination of many bad actors. However, problem is there is always some other damage that you have to deal with. A lot of Pakistanis got Angry over what they saw as sovereignty violations. The drones operated from within Pakistan. And yet the Pakistani public didn't know the CIA has always had three core missions. Spy to gather intelligence, analyze that intelligence and conduct covert operations, one of the most famous covert operations was in Afghanistan in the 19 eighties. So it really wasn't a secret the CIA armed Afghan rebels, which helped those fighters drive the Soviet army out of the country..

Hussein Haqqani Gary Schroen bin Laden Al Qaeda Bilal Sarwari Jalalabad 2018 Greg Murray Doug London Kabul 6000 April Afghanistan CIA Northern Alliance William Burns Taliban NPR United States Pentagon
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:01 min | 7 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on KCRW

"Who defiance Get them all hours. God bless you and send you our love. The Israelis flew back home today for NPR news. I'm Veronica. Sarah go via in Surfside on Wall Street. The Dow was up about 90 points. You're listening to NPR. At 804. This is KCRW news. I'm Matt Gillam L. A Mayor Eric Garcetti has been nominated by President Biden to be the next ambassador to India. However, he still needs to be confirmed by the Senate. If that happens, as expected, Garcetti will be leaving office before his second term as mayor is over at the end of 2022. So if he goes, who will take his place, and how will it work case? It'll be Larry Peril tells us what might happen. If Garcetti is confirmed, a chain of events would take place at City Hall, it would likely begin with the City Council president serving as acting mayor at the moment, that would be Nury Martinez, according to the city's charter. She would remain in that position until an interim mayor who would serve out the remainder of Garcetti's term is appointed by the council or a new one is chosen. Daily Times says several people, including real estate developer Rick Caruso, and former L. A Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, could be clamoring for the interim job Council could also call a special election to fill the vacancy, however, that could be costly for the city. Councilman Paul Krikorian told the Times. It could be over $40 million and run too close to municipal elections in 2022 as for the more permanent position, said the attorney, Mike Fewer, and Councilman Joe Buscaino have already entered the mayoral race for June of 2022. For now, we'll have to wait until the Senate takes up our cities appointment, which could take weeks or even months for KCRW. I'm Larry peril. More than three quarters of the people who died at federal immigration centres between 2011 and 2018 were related to violations of medical protocols at those facilities. That's according to a study from USC advocates say the findings aren't a surprise autumn. Gonzalez is an organizer with grassroots group nor Cal Resist. They work with people recently released from detention. I'm constantly hearing stories of people who had really serious long term health issues that just went completely ignored. In detention. Bill moving through the California Legislature would require these detention centers to follow all state and local public health orders effective immediately. Two years ago, the governor signed legislation to phase out the seven ice centers in California. But that policy is now facing legal challenges from the federal government. State wildlife officials are looking for possible suspects who shot and killed a male mountain lion named Scar. The Big Cat was killed a couple weeks ago in the Santa Ana Mountains. Cougars in this area are currently being considered as candidates for the California Endangered Species Act. That's because it's hard for them to survive there, and the population is dwindling. Report from the Orange County Register recently found that scar was just one of about 24 Mountain lines living in the range Scar had been wearing a tracking collar before he died, and researchers found out he attacked livestock twice in the Williams Canyon area. The car was five years old. And finally, if there wasn't already the pandemic to worry about. Now, you've got to stay cautious about mosquitoes to the California Department of Public Health has confirmed the death the first death in the state due to West Nile virus. Which is transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The death occurred in San Luis Obispo County officials are urging residents to take every possible precaution to protect against mosquito bites, including insect repellent that contains DEET and getting rid of any standing water. Support for NPR comes from I drive with remote PC, providing remote access to PC's Macs and servers from anywhere, assisting those working from home and also enabling remote assistance for customers. At a remote pc dot com Bright sunshine and clear skies for L, A and inland Orange County today, with temperatures getting into the low to mid eighties. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, The last US commander in Afghanistan stepped aside today. There are no longer many U. S troops to command there. So any U. S military operations in Afghanistan from now on, will be overseen by a headquarters in Tampa, Florida. As that happens, A map compiled by a new site called The Long War Journal has an update on America's longest war. The color coded map shows the Taliban now controlling much of Afghanistan, including almost all the borders. The US backed government mainly controls big cities and a central area near Kabul, though not even quite all of that. So what is it like to live in Afghanistan now? Journalist Bilal Sarwari is in Kabul. Welcome to the program, sir. It's good to be with you. Good morning. How is daily life Changing where you are, as the U. S troops leave. Well in Kabul. There is fear in this uncertainty. If you take the city of Kabul itself, hospital beds are full oxygen, usually costing $3 is now. $300 so Afghanistan and is struggling through many problems. The pandemic is one power infrastructures have been blown up just outside of Kabul. So far this Kabul was without power. People had issues with running water, but it is the war. It's the brutal war. That has they have one people extremely worried. So Kabul is a city of at least six million people. Most of the people who fled the fighting in the provinces are now here. And the political Kabul where I am is extremely divided. The political bickering among the Afghan government officials, politicians, the lack of a united front on the Peace process. The lack of support to the Afghan national security forces has caused the massive psychological talk torture among of ones as well as you know, the political in psychological ter buildings that continues To haunt the people of Afghanistan. I'm wondering how besieged people feel in Kabul looking at this map where the Taliban controlled zones are marked in red. They seem to have cut off the major cities from one another. If you wanted to get into a car and drive from Kabul to say, the big city of Kandahar, could you safely do that? Well. The highway between Kabul in Kandahar is one of the most dangerous highways. You know, the road was paved it really in a reduced travel by, you know, by by hours, it used to be days, But now it's a front line everywhere and villages, you know that lies on the highway that goes through the provinces of weird that Grozny's able Or a no. Go. So if you are a government official, or if you're a business man, if you are someone slightly more, you know, involved in the last 20 years. It's a no go for you. But if you're a driver, if you're a passenger, you are often witnessing fighting and people have often been caught in the middle of it. Roadside bombs. Have blown up entire passenger buses, you know, And I think that is that the that the tragedy in Afghanistan that the new frontline is everywhere..

Sasha Pfeiffer Steve Inskeep Rick Caruso Larry Peril Williams Canyon Mike Fewer Sarah San Luis Obispo County Garcetti Nury Martinez Bilal Sarwari Veronica Kabul USC $3 Santa Ana Mountains Kandahar June of 2022 2022 California Endangered Species
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:34 min | 7 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To us from European sleep works. The ratings we give inside apps are putting pressure on the workers, especially people of color. There's a lot of emotional labor and a lot of emotional performance that goes into ensuring that you're not not getting Poor ratings because otherwise you're gonna get fired, so you have to play like play into the racial sensibilities of consumers. I'm Brian white, Implicit bias in the gig Economy this morning on KQED news at 6 22. Morning clouds, especially along the coast. The sunshine Inland Cooler highs fifties to the upper eighties. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. A map compiled by a news site called The Long War Journal has an update on America's longest war as U. S troops withdraw from Afghanistan. The color coded map shows the Taliban controlling much of that country, including almost all the borders. The US backed government mainly controls big cities and a large central area near Kabul, though not even all of that. Pentagon spokesman John Kirby told Fox News Over the weekend. The U. S left the Afghan military fully equipped to fight back. We know that they know how to defend their country. This is a time for them to step up and to do exactly that. Well, what's it like to live in Afghanistan? Now? Journalist Bilal Sarwari is on the line from Kabul. Welcome to the program. Good to be with you. Good morning. How is daily life Changing where you are, as the U. S troops leave. Well in Kabul. There is fear in this uncertainty. If you take the city of Kabul itself, hospital beds are full oxygen, usually costing $3 is now. $300 so Afghanistan and struggling through many problems, the pandemic is one power infrastructures have been blown up just outside of Kabul. So for this Kabul was without power. People had issues with running water, but it is the war. It's the brutal war. That has the Afghan people extremely worried. So Kabul is a city of at least six million people. Most of the people who fled the fighting in the provinces are now here. And the political Kabul where I am is extremely divided. The political bickering among the Afghan government officials, politicians, the lack of a united front on the Peace process. The lack of support to the Afghan national security forces has caused the massive psychological talk torture among of ones as well as you know. The political and and psychological ter buildings that continues to haunt the people of Afghanistan. I'm wondering how besieged people feel in Kabul looking at this map where the Taliban controlled zones are marked in red. They seem to have cut off the major cities from one another. If you wanted to get into a car and drive from Kabul to say, the big city of Kandahar, could you safely do that? Well. The highway between Kabul in Kandahar is one of the most dangerous highways. You know, the road was paved it really in or reduced travel by, you know, by by hours, it used to be days, But now it's a front line everywhere and villages, you know that lies on the highway that goes through the provinces of while that Grozny's able Or a no. Go. So if you are a government official, or if you're a business, man, if you're someone slightly more, you know, involved in the last 20 years. It's a no go for you. But if you're a driver, if you're a passenger, you are often witnessing fighting and people have often been caught in the middle of it. Have blown up entire passenger buses, you know, And I think that is that the that the tragedy in Afghanistan that the new frontline is everywhere. It in a city like Kabul. A bit in a school, a hospital Clinica highway. I can't think of a single place which would be you know, a normal place anywhere else in the world. But in Afghanistan, that is, I think. The depth of the tragedy. Do people have much confidence that the government is, as the Pentagon spokesman was just saying, capable of pushing back and stabilizing the situation? Well, the U. S military drawdown takes place at a time when Afghanistan doesn't have a credible and meaningful peace process. There's no permanent ceasefire. This is how the American government sold their negotiations and talks and know how with the Taliban. Said These were peace talks that the Afghan government had to release 6000 Taliban prisoners, which included their fighters and commanders that that would lead to peace talks. As well as a permanent ceasefire. It didn't lead to that, and the Afghan government was never part of those negotiations. So at this time, I think you will also find a lot of Afghans who worked with the Americans. Over the last 20 years. It's a generational relationship. It's closer. You know, personal friendship, So there's a sense of deep betrayal by those who have been, you know friends with the Americans from District police chief prosecutor to someone in Kabul. But I think after ones are equally upset and heartbroken by how their own government has let them down, and I think this is also part of the problem at the same time. We know that the American military when they announced that they were withdrawing, Uh, everyone knew that the Afghan National security forces will not have the air support, not just air strikes, but also the logistical support. American Air Force was dropping in sacks of potatoes, bread water. They were evacuating wounded soldiers from some of the most remote districts and bases across the country. So then you saw mass surrenders, you know, often negotiated by village and tribal elders. And I think for me That that is more of a local insurance that people are taking at the village district level. They're saying we have to live among Taliban. Why should we be fighting? So they step away. So let me ask then about, um People who benefited from the past 20 years of the United States. Being their women come to mind are people who are in journalism or any number of civil society fields are people getting ready to leave. We have to remember in 2000 and one Afghanistan was destroyed society. So when the United States came in, along with the international community, You know the rebuilding of Afghanistan and was a very, very challenging job. And the blood and treasure that was invested has changed Afghanistan. People have benefited you have the 9 11 generations, you know, media Is another area where you've seen a lot of growth. But that's one legacy. The other legacy of the last 20 years, both by the American government, the international community and the Afghan government is The air strikes against wedding halls. The insecurity you know the economic problems so quite quite tragically, Afghanistan today is very, very insecure in the absence of a credible peace process in the absence of a permanent ceasefire, but in a sentence or so, do you know a lot of people who are preparing to leave the country. Quite tragically, Most people don't have that choice. You know, Some people are trying to leave, but most quite tragically are stuck here and across many, many provinces. You're talking about thousands of families. Are forced to leave their homes. People have lost their livelihoods, their harvest their fruit gardens, and I think that is extremely extremely unbearable for those communities distribute communities for farmers. And for people across the country. Journalists will also worry. Thank you..

Sasha Pfeiffer Steve Inskeep Bilal Sarwari John Kirby Kabul $3 Kandahar 6000 $300 2000 Taliban Fox News American Air Force United States Afghanistan NPR News Pentagon Afghan National security force U. S 6 22
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:22 min | 7 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"19th century anti vice activists and namesake of the Comstock laws, which made it illegal to send material deemed obscene through the mail, including contraception, You know, for all of it is at noon on W N. Y C. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. A map compiled by a news site called The Long War Journal has an update on America's longest war as U. S troops withdraw from Afghanistan. The color coded map shows the Taliban controlling much of that country, including almost all the borders. The US backed government mainly controls big cities and a large central area near Kabul, though not even all of that. Pentagon spokesman John Kirby told Fox News Over the weekend. The U. S left the Afghan military fully equipped to fight back. We know that they know how to defend their country. This is a time for them to step up and to do exactly that. Well, what's it like to live in Afghanistan? Now? Journalist Bilal Sarwari is on the line from Kabul. Welcome to the program. It's good to be with you. Good morning. How is daily life Changing where you are, as the U. S troops leave. Well in Kabul. There is fear in this uncertainty. If you take the city of Kabul itself, hospital beds are full oxygen, usually costing $3 is now. $300 so Afghanistan and is struggling through many problems. The pandemic is one Power infrastructures have been blown up just outside of Kabul. So for days Kabul was without power. People had issues with running water, but it is the war. It's the brutal war. That has the Afghan people extremely worried. So Kabul is a city of at least six million people. Most of the people who fled the fighting in the provinces are now here. And the political Kabul where I am is extremely divided. The political bickering among the Afghan government officials, politicians, the lack of a united front on the Peace process. The lack of support to the Afghan national security forces has caused the massive psychological talk torture among of ones as well as you know, the political in psychological ter buildings that continues To haunt the people of Afghanistan. I'm wondering how besieged people feel in Kabul looking at this map where the Taliban controlled zones are marked in red. They seem to have cut off the major cities from one another. If you wanted to get into a car and drive from Kabul to say, the big city of Kandahar, could you safely do that? Well, The highway between Kabul in Kandahar is one of the most dangerous highways. You know, the road was paved it really in a reduced travel by, you know, by by hours, it used to be days, But now it's a front line everywhere and villages, you know that lies on the highway that goes through the provinces of Wardak, Ghazni, Zabul Or a no. Go. So if you are a government official, or if you're a business, man, if you are someone slightly more, you know, involved in the last 20 years. It's a no go for you. But if you're a driver, if you're a passenger You are often witnessing fighting, and people have often been caught in the middle of it. Roadside bombs have blown up entire passenger buses, you know, And I think that is that that the that the tragedy in Afghanistan that the new frontline is everywhere. But in a city like Kabul a bit in a school, a hospital Clinica highway. I can't think of a single place which would be you know, a normal place anywhere else in the world. But in Afghanistan, that is, I think. The depth of the tragedy. Do people have much confidence that the government is, as the Pentagon spokesman was just saying, capable of pushing back and stabilizing the situation? Well, the U. S military drawdown takes it A place takes place at a time when Afghanistan doesn't have a credible and meaningful peace process. There's no permanent ceasefire. This is how American government sold their negotiations and talks and no Howard the Taliban. They said These were peace talks that the Afghan government had to release 6000 Taliban prisoners, which included their fighters and commanders that that would lead to peace talks. As well as a permanent ceasefire. It didn't lead to that, and the Afghan government was never part of those negotiations. So at this time, I think you will also find a lot of Afghans who worked with the Americans. Over the last 20 years. It's a generational relationship. It's closer. You know, personal friendship, So there's a sense of deep betrayal by those who have been, you know friends with the Americans from District police chief prosecutor to someone in Kabul. But I think I have ones are equally upset and heartbroken by how their own government has let them down, and I think this is also part of the problem at the same time. We We know that the American military when they announced that they were withdrawing, Uh, everyone knew that the Afghan National security forces will not have the air support, not just airstrikes, but also the logistical support. American air Force was dropping, You know, sacks of potatoes, bread water. They were evacuating wounded soldiers from some of the most remote districts and bases across the country. So then you saw mass surrenders, you know, often negotiated by village and tribal elders. And I think for me That that is more of a local insurance that people are taking at a village district level. They're saying we have to live among Taliban. Why should we be fighting? So they step away. So let me ask then about, um people who benefited from the past 20 years of the United States. Being their women come to mind are people who are in journalism or in any number of civil society fields are people getting ready to leave. We have to remember in 2000 and one Afghanistan was destroyed society. So when the United States came in, along with the international community, You know the rebuilding of Afghanistan and was a very, very challenging job. And the blood and treasure that was invested has changed Afghanistan. People have benefited you have the 9 11 generations, you know, media Is another area where you have seen a lot of growth. But that's one legacy. The other legacy of the last 20 years, both by the American government, the international community and the Afghan government is The air strikes against wedding halls. The insecurity you know the economic problems so quite quite tragically, Afghanistan today is very, very insecure in the absence of a credible peace process in the absence of a permanent ceasefire, but in a sentence or so, do you know a lot of people who are preparing to leave the country. Quite tragically, Most people don't have that choice. You know, Some people are trying to leave but most quite tragically or stuck here and across many, many provinces, you're talking about thousands of families. Are forced to leave their homes. People have lost their livelihoods, their harvest their fruit gardens, and I think that is extremely extremely unbearable for those communities, desert communities for farmers. And for people across the country journalist Bilal Sarwari. Thank you..

Sasha Pfeiffer Steve Inskeep John Kirby Bilal Sarwari Ghazni Wardak $3 Zabul Kabul 6000 Kandahar $300 2000 Taliban United States 19th century Fox News Afghanistan 9 NPR News
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:58 min | 7 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Now an essay of advanced Afghan forces have largely abandoned their posts and their weapons. So have a listen here to Bilal Sarwari, his a journalist and analyst who has been closely following the fighting. I think the pace of these mass surrenders as well as the fall of major districts is not only surprising it's quite shocking because much of it as uh without a fight. Yeah, shocking because these areas where traditionally the bastions of resistance to the Taliban from the nineties, and that's because of the country's ethnic makeup. The Taliban emerged from southern pushed on communities, but the North has dominated by ethnic Tajiks and Uzbeks. So this is so worry again. So it was part of a very, you know, calculated Taliban strategy they thought we need to, you know, minimize the risk of future uprisings and opposition. It's so interesting because you're touching on something that's been fascinating. Me Dia, which the North is we think of the Northern Alliance. You know the warlords that fought so hard against the Taliban a couple of decades ago. The point that we just heard from Sarwari about a calculated Taliban strategy expand on that right? So it appears that this had been cooking for a while. Certainly since President Joe Biden's announcement in April that the Americans were withdrawing, apparently unconditionally it green lit the Taliban's decision to try sees the country. And now we can see that this is what it looks like. They're trying to cut off expected resistance from the north. They're trying to seize control of money making centers like minds, and they're trying to choke off the government by seizing control of border crossings. So that's the Taliban strategy. What about the other side? What do we know about why Afghan forces do seem to be giving up without much of a fight? I mean, these were forces that have been funded that have been trained By the U. S and Allied forces for 20 years. There's so many answers to that question. But let's hone in on one corruption. It seems that many soldiers, especially in these far flung outposts in the north, they lack supplies back up, sometimes even food. So morale was already low, and it fell even lower after the Americans withdrew even as it boosted the Taliban and this Marie Louise is key, while the Taliban are largely a pushed in movement over the past decade. I've been recruiting from northern ethnic groups. So in some cases, at least these Afghan soldiers once surrendering to invaders, they were surrendering to family and community elders, and that certainly makes a difference to a lot of what's going on the top and even paid the bus fares for some of these Afghan soldiers. And they could see that it was clearly conveyed to them that if they surrendered, they wouldn't be harmed. This is our worry again. People at the district Village level said. Well, why should we be fighting at the end of the day? We are the ones living with the Taliban. Living in villages with our own families. So why should we fired? So what are you watching for these next weeks and months play out here. The next phase may well be the battle for provincial cities and capitals. Taliban fighters are surrounding them. They have largely left them alone from now, although they did overrun one city and free prisoners from the local jail. We've seen clashes at the edges of some cities, but they were repelled by Afghan forces because for them defending urban centers is a priority. Well, let's end with with the city with Kabul. You told us it's in a valley. It's surrounded by the Hindu Kush. How big is it? Is there a comparably sized American city? I'm not sure if there's a comparably sized American city, but we're speaking of a city of about 5 to 6 million people. It's certainly the largest by fine Afghanistan. It is big and it's sprawling. And it's also strategic. It hosts Western embassies in the airport. So the understanding so far is that this seems to be a red line for the international community. It's unlikely to fall anytime soon. That said. We can see in the weeks ahead the insurgents seizing districts around the city. NPR's DEA headed. Thank you so much. Thank you. Mm. Thank you for listening to all things considered from NPR news. Workers are expecting better pay as the pandemic Wayne's. But after the plague of all plagues back in the 14th century, labor costs one up to and led to the creation of the printing press. If you've got to pay a scribe a higher wage, then suddenly it makes sense to look for new ways of kind of mass producing books. I'm car ridsdel pandemic economies past next time on market bloods. That's marketplace tonight.

Bilal Sarwari April 20 years NPR U. S 14th century Taliban tonight Marie Louise Northern Alliance Kabul Afghanistan President Joe Biden couple of decades ago DEA about 5 to 6 million people nineties Tajiks Sarwari Afghan
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:00 min | 7 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To keep supporting the Afghan national security forces. Needless to say, the trip takes place at a time when the Taliban have surrounded major provincial capitals when they have been able to take over district after district, mostly mass surrenders without a single shot being fired. As I'm speaking to you. The city of Poly comedy, which is the capital of Babylon Province, came under large skilled Taliban attack last night, and one of the worries is that post the American withdrawal Kabul itself. Could fall to extremists. What's the city like at the moment in Kabul, I would say is a city which is paralyzed at the moment. Five days and there's no power. You know, hospital beds are full. There's no oxygen, so Afghanistan is struggling. With high unemployment. For the moment, the Americans are increasing their air power and the support of the Afghan national Security forces trying to prevent major provincial capitals from falling. Perhaps it will be a massive embarrassment for Washington. If a major provincial capital fell to the Taliban, as the Americans were withdrawing at the moment, But we have to really remember that this fighting has had a very negative impact on the economy As a whole. Major highways that are closed fruits cannot get into Kabul for the residents of Kabul. They are extremely scared. The international community came to Kabul 20 years ago to Afghanistan, generally, with the stated aim of fighting extremism and bringing stability. It sounds almost cruelly ironic now, doesn't it? The Americans living at a time when Afghanistan is not only extremely insecure? But Afghanistan is also doing not very good as a functioning country. But for most Afghans is the fear of Afghanistan going back to the Taliban days that really scares them and a lot of freedoms in places like Kabul that came in over the last 20 years. Paid media be it the woman right access to education. Those are the things that continue to worry Afghans, even in Kabul and Afghan citizens playing no role. In this fighting except as victims. Of course, What did they think these talks between Afghan officials and the U. S in Washington should include today they are all demanding a comprehensive ceasefire. The Afghan people are extremely worried, as the fighting has basically not only extended into their living rooms and villages and areas. But they're also disappointed at the failure of the Afghan government itself an Afghan politicians over the last many years we have seen a lot of political bickering in Kabul. We have seen lack of unity. I really don't think The Afghan people will buy this visit to Washington as a magic fix. Because of the last 20 years. They have seen a lot of these visits, and these visits have not really resulted in anything positive on the ground. Bilal Sarwari reporting from Kabul will the U. S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken has said Washington is looking very hard at the situation on the ground in Afghanistan to assess whether the Taliban is serious about peace. Speaking in Paris He's been defending his government's withdrawal of forces from Afghanistan. Michael O. Hanlon thinks Washington is wrong. He is senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in D. C. He is a regular visitor to Afghanistan, and he's author of a new book called The Art of War. In an Age of Peace. I don't think we should view this war as sort of over or the Taliban victory nationwide as inevitable and therefore big pieces of capability like an effective functioning air force for mobility and for aerial attack. They matter a lot, and that one needs to be addressed because right now, there isn't really a good plan for how to keep the Afghan air force functional with the support of at least some contractors from the Western world. And then, more generally, just the idea of the United States, along with its partners and allies is not going to desert the Afghan government. There's not going to be this sort of Pending sense of imminent demise so that the Afghan people, the Afghan military and police and many others don't give up hope that they see enough solidarity and support from President Biden. That maybe there's still some prospect of holding on to at least large fractions of the country that will be very important to, But the White House says that Afghanistan and the US must continue to work together. To quote ensure that Afghanistan never again becomes a safe haven for terrorist groups. Does that even look possible It's possible that some large fractions of the country will remain under government control. But I don't yet see the strategy and I'm not sure I can even proposed strategy in my own head. In other words, I'm not sure that Kabul is defensible or at least not all of it. I'm not sure which parts of the country are defensible, and I think the Taliban will increasingly control large fractions of the countryside. In fact, of course, we see that happening already. This is going to be a shade of gray issue where the government hopefully doesn't fall anytime soon, and hopefully not at all. It's going to lose some fraction of the country and we need to be able to explain. To onlookers in the congress in Afghanistan elsewhere, how we can sort of put a floor beneath the deterioration and maintain some degree of ongoing capability to protect large numbers of the Afghan population, but also to keep Intelligence gathering and offensive strike options available in case large terrorist concentrations. Try to form as they may. Well, it sounds as if if you were advising you'd say to Washington don't pull out yet. Well, yeah, absolutely. I mean, I'm I'm very saddened by President Biden's decision. I think it was mistaken. But I also don't think that President Ghani is going to Asked Biden to reconsider that I think he knows that the decisions made so we really have to do now is figure out how ongoing Western financial and technical support can at least prevent collapse. So this fight is a long ways from being over. But you're in no doubt are you that the Taliban is looking at this September deadline and seeing it As a mighty opportunity. The Taliban is just, you know, overflowing with confidence, and there certainly won't be any progress at the peace talks anytime soon, because the Taliban's definition of power sharing is, you know 99% for us and 1% for you. That's the mentality they've got. They Probably were partly in that mentality, even before President Biden's decision a few months ago, and for the longer term, can you say anything optimistic, too peaceful Afghan citizens? To the extent that the situation can be partly stabilised much of Kabul, most of the north, uh certain other pieces of the East. That some combination of government forces and government friendly militias or at least militias that don't like the Taliban to the extent that they can when some.

Michael O. Hanlon Bilal Sarwari 99% Kabul Paris White House Babylon Province D. C. Taliban Five days Brookings Institution congress President 1% today 20 years ago last night US The Art of War Antony Blinken
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:05 min | 7 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"W. N. Y. C. 93.9 FM and AM a 20. NPR News in the New York conversation. Mhm. This is W in my safe voters are casting their ballots for a primary day in New York City today on the ticket of Merit controller judges and City Council candidates, among other seats. Tracy Kelly voted this morning in Manhattan Sty town, She says some decisions were tough. If the Mayo real race I was torn because you have to have the social justice angle, But you also have the I can run a big city angle, so I tried to think about both of those things. Polls are open until nine o'clock tonight. New York City is beginning to move homeless people from the hotel's back into shelters this week. W N. Y C is Morella Iraq has more During the pandemic, the city moved thousands of homeless New Yorkers from congregate shelters where they shared rooms and facilities into hotels to prevent the spread of covid 19. Now, with an increase in vaccinations, city officials say they're phasing out the temporary program. They plan to return 8000 people into shelters by the end of July. Jacqueline Simone from the coalition for the Homeless, says the move is premature. This is probably going to have many unintended consequences, including an increase in unsheltered. Homelessness as well as potential outbreaks within the congregant facilities currently around 50,000 New Yorkers are homeless. New Jersey Board of Education has reversed itself after a public outcry in has decided to restore the names of holidays to its school calendar. The Randolph School board last night voted 8 to 1 to overturn a decision and had made this month to replace the names of holidays with just the phrase day off. The panel also will create a committee to gain input from the public criticism began when the school board voted in May to refer to Columbus Day as indigenous Peoples Day. Italian Americans complained on the board then voted to label holidays generically. Critics accused the board of bowing to so called cancel culture. Showers, potentially heavy rains and then cooling off to the mid to load sixties this evening. 75 partly sunny this is W. N. Y C in New York. Welcome back to news are more on the future of the Apple Daily newspaper in Hong Kong next now, though, to Afghanistan in the week, President Ashraf Ghani meets the US president. The Taliban's military advances are significant. I've been speaking to Bilal Sarwari, an Afghan journalist based in the capital couple. We're seeing mass surrenders of Afghan national security forces, mostly districts, but also basis falling into the hands of Taliban, mostly without a single. Shot being fired and these surrenders are taking place at a very rapid pace. This morning, we saw the Taliban take control of the port. In Kunduz province on the border with Tajikistan. At the same time, you also have very heavy fighting in the city like Konduz, but mostly we have also seen the emergence of local players. Commanders strongman whose homemade test they are now basically filling the vacuum for soldiers and army who have surrendered. Now they are picking up the fight. Against the Taliban. But indeed, uh the Taliban's advances against several strategic major cities in the North is also a worrying sign that the Taliban basically want to take over these places. Let's talk about Mazar e Sharif, the fourth largest city in the country, population of 400,000 people. The government did push back Taliban militants at the gates of Mazar e Sharif, didn't they? The Taliban managed to take control of several strategic districts around the city of Mazar e Sharif. Then we saw pictures of Taliban fighters at the gates of the city. Then we saw clashes brief clashes between Afghan Special forces and the Taliban. We also saw air strikes targeting the militants. So it is indeed a worrying sign that what happens if they get into a major city like Konduz, Mazar e Sharif, because after all, these are heavily populated Areas. Uh, nonetheless, the fighting in the North has had a major impact on the economy. This is the the harvest time. This is the fruit season. So most businesses and people have suffered for Afghanistan. This is a very, very costly war at a time when there is a stalemate when there's no progress and the talks and on the battlefield you're seeing Increasing levels of violence. The government in Kabul have also been criticized for bringing too many changes into the security sector, all at a very rapid pace. How significant is it that the Pentagon spokesperson overnight had said that although the deadline for U S withdrawal was still in place? The pace of withdrawal might change. Well, We have to remember that these artificial timelines and deadlines that the Americans have been announcing time and again has had a psychological impact on the Afghan forces. I think it's the psychological turbulence and torture. So we'll have to see what would that delay me? That was Bilal Sarwari, an Afghan journalist based in the capital, Kabul. You're listening to news from the BBC. I'm Razia Iqbal to Hong Kong, now in the territory's top pro democracy newspaper. Apple Daily has closed its English language website operation. Newspaper's offices were raided last week and its assets frozen by the authorities. Police say numerous articles in the paper violate the new national security law. At a press conference today, the chief executive of Hong Kong, Carrie Lam, dismissed claims by the United States that authorities were using the new law to suppress independent media. Warning the US not to beautify these acts of endangering national security. A short time ago, I spoke to lawyer and non official member of the Executive Council Ronny Tong. The charge is a conspiracy to request a foreign power to impose sanctions on Hong Kong or China. Is the foreign power named No, I don't think so. I think think it needed to be because it doesn't have to be a nation. It could also be a political organization. Of course, you know, in a position To impose sanctions immediately. You can understand from that. That is scarred little, if anything to do with press freedom. Well, that's certainly what the chief executive Carrie Lam says is that we shouldn't assume that this has to do with press freedom. Clearly the Apple Daily newspaper and many people both inside Hong Kong and outside The territory believe that this is an issue of press freedom being violated. Can I just ask you about the issue of a law being broken so Apple Daily are saying that they are happy to defend themselves, but by freezing the assets of the company? The authorities are forcing them to shut down, so there isn't really any way in which they can defend themselves. In this instance well that that assumption is not correct. The law empowers the secretary for security to issue a freezing order. However, there are two things that we must understand. I'll bear in mind the first it's not too long ago. I think it's merely a few weeks ago. The next group has announced the topic. Lee on the resumption of trading of shares in the next group. That they have 400 million cash. Relatable and there was no need for them to raise funds to continue to support the operation of effort daily. Secondly, is that by law, they are entitled to apply to court to unfreeze the order or set aside the order. But they have chosen not to do so. In other words, I mean, if you look at those two facts and putting them together, you can understand that somebody like me, a lawyer finds it extremely difficult to understand. Why they say they can't pay their employees. Are you concerned that there are many people who are arguing that this is going against? The basic Law of Hong Kong that to not allow a free and open press are free and open Exchange of ideas, which has been the attraction of Hong Kong for so many for so long. That that is what's being breached here. Obviously I am concerned, you know, I do understand. That there are people out there who don't quite understand The law don't quite understand the situation or that they may have a political inclination, which made them think that this is an oppression against certain sectors of the community. Or against the press. I can I can I can see that. But what I can say is that it's certainly not contrary to the basic law because the basic law and for that matter, the it's a national cousin that of civil and political rights. Also made it clear that whatever freedom you're talking about relating to the press, they can be subject to legal limitation on the grounds of national security, and this is precisely that sort of situation. And perhaps it is because it is Hong Kong. Perhaps it is because of China. People choose to overlook that very important qualifications. Well, what would you say then to the State Department official Ned Price, who says that this is a selective and politically motivated use of the security law..

Tracy Kelly Bilal Sarwari Razia Iqbal Kunduz Ned Price Jacqueline Simone Hong Kong Konduz BBC New York City Mazar e Sharif Carrie Lam May last week Kabul 8000 people Columbus Day Tajikistan 8 Taliban
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:26 min | 9 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Holy city. In fact, they've called what they're doing. I think it's something like operations sort of Jerusalem and the Israelis also Have referred back to Jerusalem by saying it's called something like Operation ramparts or walls or something like that, in other words, referring back to the Holy City, which for both sides is immensely important on national as well as a religious symbol. BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen in transit. Well, let's pick up some of that with a spokesman for fatter the party, which controls the Palestinian National Authority in the West Bank on its arch rivals in Hamas run Gaza on the line to Germany. I'll start to Jamal knows our whether he supported Hamas, his campaign of firing rockets into Israel. Well, if that believed in military actions, we wouldn't just be sitting on the wall and uploading or committing them from far away. We would be doing this. But there is a reason why we're not part of this. We believe in the diplomatic path we believe in applying the international law. We believe in diplomatic contact. And as of now our president, President Mahmoud Abbas is running. Draining the phone, calling international leaders to force a ceasefire. We do not believe in what Israel is doing now. Israel has started this military campaign, and it has provoked Hamas into it, actually. This story has the background of what Israel has been doing in Jerusalem throughout the holly month of Ramadan. So to answer your question, No, we do not believe that the military option is the one that everyone should be pursuing. Now we want to cease fire. Do you condemn what Hamas is doing? I condemn what Israel is doing. It's not up to me to condemn or upload what Hamas is, do I not? Because Israel is the aggressor. Israel is the one who started this. Israel is killing Palestinians by the thousands, and we do believe that the Palestinians have the right to defend themselves, and we believe that Israel's aggression is aimed at forcing Palestinians into their needs. So you support the campaign of firing rockets. I condemned all terrorist actions. Condemned all the terrorist actions by Israel on we do not believe in targeting civilians anywhere. I'm not supporting what How much is doing. I'm not condemning what Hamas is doing. You said that President advances being and making international calls to try to de escalate the situation in the terminology. Shouldn't he be trying to call Hamas and telling them to stop firing their rockets? Well, you might remember that in 2007 Hamas ended his rule in Gaza. So if anybody would think that Hamas would listen, toe call from president and past that's not really realistic. We should say this is for us the time of unity as Palestinians. We still believe in the reconciliation process with Hamas. We believe in the democratic process. We believe in elections, but Hamas doesn't listen to us, and we do not see ourselves in the role of advisers to Hamas. Nor are we the ones who want to tell him us what to do. And what not to do this the starters as the U. N is worn. Is this the start of the war? Do you think? Well, we have to ask ourselves. Why now, from the point of view of Netanyahu Who is trying to use this war to put pressure on his main rivals, Mr lobbied, and Mr Bennett to trying to form a government without him. Mr Netanyahu isn't his way out of office and he's using his typical means the violence and fear to convince his rivals to come to a unity government with him instead of a government without him. So this is what the conflict is about. From Netanyahu's point of view, the other side of the coin Inter you talk about Mr Netanyahu's political problems. What about fighters political problems in the cancelation of the elections last month? Many argue that that is fueling frustration and anger amongst Palestinians. Why won't you hold them? Well, you cannot find answers for the war. Israelis lodging against us in the details off internal Palestinian politics. Why nobody. Some have argued that Hamas was annoyed that the elections accounts because they thought it would do quite well in them. And Soren opportunity to assert itself as the true defender of Palestinian rights. Are you suggesting that Hamas is targeting Israel because it's frustrated from Fatah? This is a very dangerous and misleading thesis that you're putting out there. It is also diverting attention from the real cause, which is the Israeli crimes against Palestinians. Israel has barred Palestinians in Jerusalem from participating in these elections. The apartheid state of Israel has decided tow put pressure on us to cancel the elections. We couldn't go on with the elections without Jerusalem. I mean, I only pushing you on this because I just wonder whether if president of pass had more credibility on a better mandate. After some elections, he might be in a better position. Bring this all to an end. According to the polls, Mr Abbas still would defeat any rival from any other faction. Now you're putting pressure on him instead of trying to help him. So does Israel. By the way, Israel gives credit to those who fired missiles on it instead off, giving credibility, prestige. And respect to the man of peace standing in the Palestinian arena named Mahmoud Abbas. That was Dr Jamal knows Al spokesman for fatter Sleep the Middle East now and turned to Afghanistan because officials there say that Taliban militants have captured a strategically important district near the capital, Kabul after an intense outbreak of fighting. Let's talk to the Afghan journalist Bilal Sarwari, who joins us on the line. How significant is this? Bella? Well, it's extremely significant. The district of North lies seven kilometers outside of the city of my then shower, which is the capital of world that province outside of Kabul. It's also the home province off the reef of a far if he is the only female mayor of Afghanistan or father was assassinated. She has survived many assassination attempts, and she's very high profile because she received the courage Award from the former U. S first Lady Melania Trump, as well as US secretary of State might compare the time. A can Afghan forces retake it is that their intention Well, these district's keep changing hands. I mean, the battlefield reality.

Bilal Sarwari Jeremy Bowen Abbas Kabul Palestinian National Authority Jamal Netanyahu BBC Bennett 2007 Afghanistan Fatah West Bank thousands seven kilometers Germany last month President both sides Jerusalem
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on ABC Radio MELBOURNE

ABC Radio MELBOURNE

06:05 min | 9 months ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on ABC Radio MELBOURNE

"Want to come and take revenge and target. Them s so you have to also, you know, you also have to look at Afghanistan is a bloodbath off these revenge killings in assassinations making which yes. Speaking of which one of five attend my Texas No wants to know. Can you guess? Tell us if The allies are extracting civilian Afghan employees that worked with him during the withdrawal is they've bean Is that being pressured to do that? Well, what do you know that a lot of people have, you know, faced massive danger, especially the district at the village level, and we continue to hear about this targeted assassinations. Every day. Even the family members are getting targeted. So all these countries who have had a presence here they are actually the truth is that they're abandoning an entire generation. You know they're abandoning people who are great risk and the only way for mitigating all of this bloodshed and carnage and Another revenge killings would have been for Afghanistan toe have a comprehensive in permanent cease fire, which was never a red line for the American government. And this is an area where I think Afghan girl. Women suffered massively. That's not to say that they have done their job. The political couple, the political Afghanistan is extremely chaotic and, more importantly, the people of Afghanistan Lacking transparency on what is happening behind closed doors or few politicians are government officials meeting talking about peace, yellow OK, that one people are not part of this process, okay? I'm talking with with Bilal Sarwari, Freelance journalist based in Kabul, and she has a dark bar who's the chair of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission. About the future, both in Kabul, speaking to US life tonight about the future of Afghanistan in the in the event in advance of the U. S withdrawal in September, Of course, Australian troops have already have already left Afghanistan. Ha ha said the Taliban seemed determined from well from our point of view. From our perspective here to take to take Afghanistan back Tonto, the the strictures of a strict Islamic of strict Islamic law, the You know the girls to be denied opportunities and education and so on and so forth, and very rough justice. Indeed. What? Why does that have a Why does that seem to have appeal for many Afghan people? We'll flip. It's it's really difficult to have a sense off how much it is about a peel off Taliban are exhaustion with the governments and the service delivery off the government. It's very difficult to talk about Taleban's popularity because this killing Taliban controlled areas. Independent organizations have no access. There are no free or independent media. There are no civil society voices. Anyone who lives in Taliban controlled areas should say should do ask, Taliban say, and there are no other voices coming out off those areas except the voice of Taliban commanders. Even then, we don't have them. They're not allowed to talk media, it is see. So it's just basically people setting and daughter That we hear from, um so it's hard to know if if they are, in fact popular or if it is just people are exhausted by war, and people are exhausted by By everything that's going on, and they just want this madness tow ends I come from from Jones, John, North Afghanistan and several villages. And and that's a up around the town that I come from is now controlled by Taliban. Andre There you see, you see, people are suffering girl sections. You see young woman who want to continue their education, you know? High school education moving to the city to live with themselves in the city because they can't do it anymore. And the villages and areas the Taliban control even if there are schools there. You see female teachers professionals trying to move to the city is trying to move to Kabul. Now there is the option off moving away from Taliban controlled area. But if there is a full Taliban take over what would that mean for and it's not small numbers? Millions of people whose lives and our stations have changed. We're seeking. Education. I mean, you just look at you know hundreds of thousands of young Afghans seeking in taking part in university entrance exam and some off the larger number of woman come from very remote and and poor provinces in Afghanistan. So what's gonna happen to them? And and the aspirations and their dreams on the stairs, a negotiated settlement in which we are able to preserve the rights aspect, the progress that off Johnson has made in terms of human diet in terms off and shining, the human bites off woman in China, the human rights off Um, minorities, recognizing freedom of expression and the work of journalists and then providing some protection for that as part of the legal framework. Unless we can preserve that. I think it does look really him. It's also important to remember and I'm not a security our military expert. It's also important to remember, I think for people watching falling a constant that the Taliban military takeover won't be quick or easy or even some say possible it might just need toe an all out war and more intense violence. In escalation of violence and you know hundreds of thousands of people being displaced and moving, trying to most the neighboring countries and possibility to Europe before you have You have any sense off that important port are our stability. Okay? Raja has that Oppa's with us. The chair of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission and Bill also worry to freelance journalist based in Kabul. We're talking about The future of Afghanistan. But while you've been embedded with Afghan government forces fighting that the Taliban what What's your assessment of the capability of Afghan security forces?.

Kabul Bilal Sarwari Taliban September China North Afghanistan Jones Bill Afghanistan Independent Human Johnson one Europe Afghanistan tonight Andre Texas US both hundreds of thousands of peopl Millions
"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"bilal sarwari" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"World Service. We're coming to you live from London. My name's Paul Henley, first on the program today in Afghanistan. The government has gone ahead with the release of a final 400 Taliban prisoners. The Afghan National Security Council says it's set free, 80 off them on Thursday. Their release is a precondition for the start of inter Afghan peace negotiations. But lots of questions are being asked about the wisdom of releasing individuals who might be far from committed to peace. And who might have carried out very recent attacks. Thes video statements from released prisoners are published by the National Security Council after Afghanistan today and they're intended to reassure many of them were convicted or accused of serious crimes such as murder, kidnap and drug trafficking. Nose up, kid. I was detained here for being a Taliban member. My crime is assassination and I want a permanent cease fire and peace on today I am released by the order of the president of the cattle bendy with I was detained for murder and kidnapping. I'm satisfied about peace and God willing, peace will come to Afghanistan. And all the Muslims will have peaceful lives. Bilal Sarwari is a freelance journalist based in the capital, Kabul. I asked him about those being released today, according to the Afghan government. They include Taliban fighters and commanders who are involved in some of the massive and destructive suicide attacks. We understand from our on sources here in Kabul that the United States of America wants 22 off these prisoners transfer to 1/3 country. Australia and Netherlands also remains extremely concerned about at least two Taliban commanders so there are concerns about them. And there are talks of guarantees that they will not go back to the battleship. But what we have seen so far when we have seen 5000 or more Taliban prisoners getting released. They're examples off some of them turning at the battlefield, some of them getting killed. But Taliban's position publicly is that Afghan government should not target these prisoners. They accused the government of going after these prisoners. And they said, these people will go back to normal lives. But there are dangers, especially if you're ah, prominent Taliban commander in your spent time in jail You go back to the village in the province or a district. There's always dangers ofthe revenge. Remember Afghan national Security forces their families, Afghan Villagers that live in districts and villages would be people vulnerable because of a deal like this in the absence ofthe cease fire. Because what happens when a commander a fighter goes back to his village or district? Hey, will immediately try to target someone in that village, especially someone in the security sector. So the overall concern among the people of Afghanistan is that there should be a cease fire. And we're seeing more and more Afghans actually demanding both from the Afghan government, as well as the Taliban in the Americans to agree to a cease fire, and I think that will be a win win situation for Afghanistan. I mean, we have to really remember. Away from Kabul. And there's a very brutal and bloody war going on Children. Woman Villagers often getting caught in this conflict, and I think that's one of the prevalent features of this war over the last 20 years. We have to also really remember that when the Afghans sit across the table from the Taliban, it will not be an easy road. They will have to really discuss a number of very difficult issues. What sort of a government Afghanistan wants? Where is the role of Afghan woman? What happens to free media or the Afghan civil society? I just wonder if nevertheless behind a ll. This Easily justified skepticism and the fear on all sides. If there is a feeling that things might be heading in a positive direction, I think the people of Afghanistan especially those who attended the Lloyd Jirga, the Grand Council, I met, for example, a mother who had lost three sons in this war I met another mother, who had 12 members of her family killed in this brutal war. So she had widows and our phones. I mean, they would like to see this as a process there. I'd like to see a commitment from the international community because what often people forget what is the fate ofthe thousands and thousands of Taliban fighters? Do they join the Afghan national security forces? Where is a viable industry? How do you provide jobs? Where does the country move on? And I heard a very interesting interview from the spokesman for the Taliban movement, Tabula Mujahid, on a local TV station. The Taliban position have not really changed a lot. At least the public statements that they're giving. The tone is very aggressive, perhaps Taliban military commanders when you listen to their social media videos, They are sensing a military victory. So I think a lot of these concerns have to be really integrated into a process from which the victims are. In fact missing on all sides, I don't really see Any victim representations so far in this process that was the Afghan journalist Bilal Sarwari. Peace talks are expected to start in Qatar within days of the full release of these prisoners. All this comes as the U. S. Announces that its troop level in Afghanistan will drop below 5000 by November. Least to set. Our chief international correspondent has covered Afghanistan extensively, including the previous talks joins me now live. Welcome, Lise. What more do we know about the talks expected to happen in coming days? Well, the expected has to be in inverted commas because thes talks were supposed to start in March. Under the terms of the deal signed between the United States and the Afghan Taliban in dojo, so obviously they're running months behind. They were supposed to start on the 16th. Next week in Dol Haw, But now they are dragging again because you've just been hearing a discussion with but also are we about the process of releasing the last for 100 of some 5000 Taliban prisoners, which are now being released his part off that deal. These air the most dangerous and regarded as the most dangerous and hardened criminals, and the Taliban are absolutely categorical. They have shown they will not compromise one inch on this until every single prisoner is released. They will not start the talks. S O by sent messages to the to the Taliban leaders in dojo this morning, saying, when are the talks going to start? And they said as soon as our prisoners are released. We will start the talks, but not before then it is traditional to have a lull in fighting before peace talks That really hasn't happened in Afghanistan has it. I don't know whether it's traditional in Afghanistan, just traditional in Afghanistan to have what's called the spring fighting season, and this has certainly been the case this spring in Afghanistan. And the United Nations has charted that after the signing of the deal, even though overall civilian casualties are down this year since over last year. That as soon as the deal was signed, the attack seemed to intensify their Waas a cease fire over the recent he'd festivities, but it stopped and, in fact the area talks during the and for the Taliban. This from what we can see is regarded as what they see is their main Bargaining chip is the violence, and they have resisted over more than a year of talks with the United States and dough Haw from accepting the cease fire that is being asked, pleaded for By so many Afghans..

Afghan Taliban Afghanistan Afghan government Afghan National Security Counc Afghan national Security Kabul Afghan civil society commander Bilal Sarwari United States Paul Henley National Security Council World Service London United Nations president murder Dol Haw