35 Burst results for "Bhutan"

"bhutan" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:34 min | 2 weeks ago

"bhutan" Discussed on WBUR

"Significant manner In fact I believe Bhutan has negative emissions now And they have less emissions of greenhouse gases than they actually capture And they've got a delegation here at cop And we caught up with Sonam fun so who's the secretary of Bhutan's national environment commission to find out the details the nitty Gritty really of what being carbon negative actually involves for them We have reserved more than 51% of our land area as animal sanctuaries as biological corridors as parks Our visionary leaders didn't allow timber extraction In the early 70s so forests remained 15 whereas in our neighborhood most countries reach up on the forest today we have 72 to 73% for discover Because of that we started doing a forest inventory We knew we were carbon negative but not by how much If you look at the statistics it's about 9.38 million tons of CO2 equivalent These are superstition And our emissions about 3.8 So that's it 6 million tons negative Well done Bhutan and can I just say one of the things I love about beta on is that they measure their country's success not in the traditional economic measure of GDP or gross domestic product Instead they go for GDH or gross domestic happiness Do any of you know what that means Absolutely I've heard that They do regular surveys of people's understanding of what they're doing in their levels of happiness And that's the metric that they want to improve They actually implement that Very very well This is what is so exciting So you can have optimal levels of happiness and have negative emissions So when everybody has this conversation around we have to sacrifice this and sacrifice that in order to tackle the climate problem This is around opportunities to be happier to have more equality to have a better quality of life And the fact that Bhutan has figured out how to be happy and to reduce their emissions should give us all real hope Thank you all You're listening to crowd science from the BBC World Service coming to you from the cop 26 UN climate summit in Glasgow We've got a panel of cop veterans with us taking questions from our listeners Now there's been a lot of chatter about some of the carbon costs associated with this meeting itself And I couldn't help but notice that the hangars on offer in the catering has come in for some criticism because it's made from sheep and meat has a heavy carbon footprint But our next listener is interested in other animals at the summit the delegates themselves My name is Jonathan and I'm from new candor What is the carbon footprint of the delegates attending the corpse summit On how does this compare to if it were done remotely To the panelists think the benefits of meeting in person are to any carbon costs I think this is such an interesting question And if you'll excuse the animal comparison to what do you think Okay so this is a tough one So there is a value particularly for some of the negotiators who are working online together for the last almost two years to actually look each other in the eye and find solutions for the LDC group for example that Celine works with there from all over the world It's very hard for them to come together and find their common positions and organize if they don't get to actually sit in a room with each other But the cop has year on year from our first cops to know grown and grown and grown And I do not think it needs to be as big as it is So I do think there are ways that we could further reduce the carbon footprint of all of the delegates that come here What is there over 25,000 people here at the moment And I think it will be interesting to look at how we can use videoconferencing more I mean the IPCC think about that what you've managed to do with video conferencing in the IPC So we've just held an entire approval session virtually And we didn't think we could do it We usually go way over on time when people are there together We were on time for the first time in 20 years but importantly we had more developing country participants because usually we only pay for one or two to come from a country because we were working virtually we could have more diversity in our conversation If you have a complex problem you want as many people looking at this problem from different perspectives so you're checking your own unconscious bias and getting everyone's perspective That's where the innovation is That's where the solution comes from And so it's not just diversity for diversity's sake It's because it's actually been shown to be important to the solution Staying with the subject of money and affordability we've had quite a few emails about the economics of climate change And this one is from Heather who's from New Zealand My question for the panel is should plastic be more expensive than gold when you add on the environmental costs like cleaning up oceans and water supplies health costs like fertility issues cancer and the chemical and climate pollution from its extraction production through the end of life then surely it should cost more than gold I suppose what she's talking about is what we value as we shift to a carbon neutral future Tara what do you think So in economics they say we must price the.

Bhutan national environment commissio Sonam Glasgow BBC UN Celine Jonathan IPCC Heather New Zealand cancer Tara
Building the Next Napa Valley In the HIMALAYAS With Wine Expert Michael Juergens

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:50 min | 2 months ago

Building the Next Napa Valley In the HIMALAYAS With Wine Expert Michael Juergens

"Lot of people have dreams like i have dreams. Kate has dreams. People listening to this podcast. They have dreams. But there's a difference between having dreams and actually feet on the grounds accomplishing dreams. So let's get specific like let's really talk this through. Because i think fire nation can maybe learn from the action that you're going to be taking about great ways. They can go forward accomplishing their dream. So how are you accomplishing your dream of building the next napa valley in the himalayas recognizing once again that had didn't start off as my dream to be involved. I just thought it would be super cool if they did it But then once. I once i became involved in realized i could be a piece of this and actually i think that bhutan is probably the last country in the world. That has the organic potential to grow. Amazing wine grapes. That doesn't already do it. Most places that can do it had been doing it for thousands of years and it was just to your point earlier. It's remote. And so you know marco polo and the roman army never got there with their handfuls grapes and so they ever planted in there. But what i'm doing is is we've taken a very collaborative approach with that. The country You know there's a. I don't know if you're familiar with with batons spent some time and and obviously the himalayas but they have a concept called gross domestic happiness instead of gross domestic product which is an amazing way to live. But they believe that. What's more important is the happiness of their citizens rather than any arbitrary economic success and so they have different pillars that that guide the gross domestic happiness for us. What we did is. We didn't approach the wine industry as like. Hey here's a way to make a few bucks it was. Here's a way that we think that this mashes extremely well with what you're trying to do with gross national happiness. And and then we went around and we got buy in from all of the various ministries of the government. You know that would have a say in this. The ministry of agriculture the ministry of economic affairs and so so on and so forth so we started with that then. Obviously you know. There's a enormous amount of logistics to try to get grapes up to the himalayas in vineyard plant. And but were. We've planted eight vineyard so far were up to about. We've got a hundred acres or so in total vineyard land but only about fifty acres are planted where we're still trying to experiment and see what's going to work there because no one knows it's never been done before and so you know back to your tactical what do you do. Well you do as much research as you can but eventually you just gotta grip it and rip it and and so we're doing that but we're doing it in a very mindful fail forward kind of way.

Napa Valley Roman Army Kate Bhutan Marco Polo Ministry Of Agriculture The Mi Vineyard
"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:55 min | 4 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Barscelona on travel. With rick steves. Is spanish tour guide. Or hey rome on this. Facebook page is traveling with her. Hey it's a conversation we had just before the pandemic broke out. Let's just finish with just a quick a discussion of how we can connect with the local culture and this catalan as distinct from spain. if we want to go to one of the bars or one of the tapas bars talk about what is distinct about tapas in catalonia and mentioned a little bit about the vermouth bar scene. Because i know that's trendy right now and it is becoming very trendy now One very important things. I say all the people that can let me just try to learn Three or four ways to say hello to people in the local language in spain. We're very fortunate. We are multi cultural country and we have four official languages in spain. I always say when. I'm teaching that you can go to a sandwich. Shop in madrid is the a menu with four languages on it and they're all spanish languages. Yeah and one of them would be catalog hotline we have the past can also the collision especially in barcelona. If you just say bon deer which is good morning in catalonia believe it or not instead of saying oh good money just assume that they were going to understand your board. It kind sounds a little bit rude okay but if you say bondi And then you start speaking. If you can a few more words that would be perfect. You have no idea how many doors that open and that is particularly helpful in the city like barcelona that is getting tired of the noisy tourists that good morning death whereas my coke right you can go. Local no a few local words used the local tempo Observe a cultural chameleon here. And you're gonna drink and eat catholism and opens a lot of doors and you might get a little bit of extra attention from the attendant behind the counter. What is that distinctly catalan dish. That you'll have when you go to a bar and you have the tapas a top. I could have any of them. You know but the when. I say this to the people that say oh but anchovies trying to injuries in barcelona and should we seem spain. There nothing to do with the answer that you know here in this side of the pond because we take up the job i agree. It's all little and also the they have depression. Should we thought there'd be eighteen vinegar for a few hours and they are cute also entries as well and talking about the vermouth. Forty-five wine and normally is not like drinking wine with a meal is just drink it as an appetizer whether it is for lunch or dinner in bars. They'll they'll at these bars that are trendy as vermouth bars. And they have some beautiful appetizers out there in the wonderful vermouth beautiful atmosphere. It's kind of israel that's right and not even in the touristy areas in Goofy section by the cottage rather mar-. You know there is one very very famous in there. They have been there now. I think for about one hundred twenty years the same family running the business. And also i want to if you allow me to tell that there is a little Drink in catalonia. That not everybody knows which is not champagne you know covered is the spanish is the same process. They have to change the name for legal reasons to the people that live in champagne. Don't want it to call champ. Except for how that and don't it's the same thing but cut cover and the drink is a fifty wine which is halfway between regular wine and cover and the champagne it with an x at the beginning champagne chopinet and there are many many local parts of glass of that is about one fifty two euros. It's about two dollars for a glass of local kind of campaign. Yeah and just. I'm very careful because he's not very it's not very harding alcohol featuring three or four really cold when you move then you feel rolled around rights. Yeah thank you so much for giving us an intimate look and wonderful city. Does i hope to see in. Barcelona said well. I hope so too. Thank you so much. thank you travel with. Writ steve's is produced by tim tatton casimiro hall and donna bardsley had rick steves europe in edmonds washington. Thanks for studio. Help to scotland productions nashville and gretchen stroud for reading our listener travel haiku. You can send us yours at rick. Steves dot com slash radio visit european twenty twenty two rick steves. Your bustiers are designed economically and efficiently. Share our love of europe through my favorite places people and experiences with small groups. Strict health and safety protocols great guides and more than forty itineraries. a rick steves. Europe toured just might be the perfect fit for your travel dreams. learn more at rick. Steves dot com..

spain catalonia barcelona rick steves rome madrid Facebook depression tim tatton casimiro hall donna bardsley israel gretchen stroud harding Barcelona edmonds europe steve nashville
"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:12 min | 4 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Essential dimensions of barcelona and There's just a lot of character you enjoy in the streets. If you understand a little bit about the culture. I gotta say a big issue or he is the crowds because barcelona is so trendy there's so many cruise ships that are starting and ending their so. You've got extra people onboard. Everybody wants to go to the same places. I love the romblon lebow career but the fact is modern business airbnb and so on has really driven away a lot of the people who made these neighborhoods vital and interesting and now there's people coming in staying airbnb you're right. Consequently happening in iran is not the local. Hang out it used to be. It's a tourist. Nobody you're there at least to walk just to say i've been there done that. But you gotta remember if you go to the book korea. It's touristy market. i love it. You gotta see it but if you want a market that is as vital and interesting but less. Touristy is there an alternative that you would recommend. There is not far from bulgaria. Lit up like about five minutes away. It's called signed the katerina. Santa catarina catherine's he's in the middle of gothi section very close to the by the way and the as soon as you approach the market. You don't even know that this market because you see something. Weird is a wavy colored roof made out of tiles. But once you get in there you see all the locals. John who in their shopping that five minute walk from the cathedral is five hundred. Cathedra maybe came from the straight line christie's line from martinsville christie. Thanks for your call. Hi rick hi for hey. We loved barcelona and it was delightful to be there I was a little bit surprised when i was at the very mixed feelings toward tourists. I'd love to hear or hey talk a little bit about that. We decided one day when we were there. We visited a little bit off the beaten path. Compared to most people we stayed in new deloitte amla and we found that we were in a more isolated area lots more pedestrian streets and my favorite thing was to go down in the cable car to the ports and that was just breathtaking as someone who loves the mediterranean but while we were there we visited Where he may be able to direct me toward the name but it was a brand a very old market that had just been renovated after years and years and the grand opening coincided with when we were there in may of twenty eighteen and so we decided to go for a visit well lo and behold. We walked into the crowd and outside of the market. They were having a huge protest against tourism at the big things. That were you know. Big pre from that shave people need to look like corpses like the death of barcelona because of tourism and so we just kinda high tailed it out of there But i was very surprised The next day we did a beautiful lion tour from the one point to the other and it was on a boat with people from all of the world. That was a beautiful off the beaten path tour but we were surprised at how some of the locals were were very angsty toward the tourists and others believed. This is our bread and butter. Barcelona's nothing without it. Okay you're right but unfortunately that's happening all over the world now. I mean if you go to the beach. Cd's in europe. You know the. I mean traveling rather as it's more affordable for everybody so our the nation has said a few moments ago and Obviously we have hoards of people running the streets where you grew up and you leave all your life and suddenly you can even buy on your local little store because he has disappeared and now. It's just a convenience store for tourist. I would be personally disappointed if i find that you know but hey you have to pay the price for what we're doing here. If you want to know you have to find people that they're nice and you have to find people that are not so nice. Maybe they will want you but would you say is right Barcelona will be nothing without tourism. Well you know in fairness i gotta say. Barcelona is uncomfortably crowded christie to do actually Wonder down the rumble us. We did you know. I found let everyone said to me. You have to go to the rama's and when we went as actually very disappointed because while it was absolutely worth seeing and and because of where we stay we crossed it very frequently. But i felt like there were other markets in barcelona that were much more spanish. Okay you've seen you've seen the from right that's what for us. We call traditional market That wants to come to poplar to touristy but in barcelona you just get out of the area okay which is downtown. Gothic section and every single neighborhood has a senior market very important. Yeah you can walk twenty minutes towards month tweak and his youthful neighborhood off of rumblings but your rate in christie it is the neighborhood that makes this character possible and for those of us who have been going to barcelona for twenty or thirty years. We remember when the flower market was there for the people who dropped by after work to bring flowers home and the bird market was there for the grandmothers to take their granddaughters and bay burgers on this field in it. It doesn't quite the market to keep it as they're still there but maybe in different neighborhoods or something. Yeah yeah so Run blesses changed But the spirit of the rumblings lives as saying a little bit farther away he christie. You went on the cable car. Are you talking about the cars. That dangle over the harbour that go from the mountain across the the bay yes exactly right but it was breathtaking. I have such a love affair with the mediterranean. I've been to the southern part of france and italy many many times christie wherever mediterranean. It was just the most tackler thing i'd ever seen and i did not want it to end. I hope more people will take advantage of beautiful view. There's nothing like that getting off. The beaten path is more important than ever in barcelona christie. Thanks for your call. Thanks rick thank.

barcelona christie romblon lebow rick hi Santa catarina Barcelona martinsville bulgaria catherine iran korea mediterranean John europe italy france rick thank
"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:17 min | 4 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Yeah that's part of what he does. This is travel with rick. Steves we've been talking with linda. Leeming her book is married to bhutan. How one woman got last said. I do end found bliss. You know linda. We're out of time. But i just would love to recognize that. Most of our listeners won't get to go to bhutan. How can we incorporate. A little of bhutan. Indoor lives even without going there. If that's the maybe that's a takeaway from reading your book. What would you wish for people. I would wish for people to have more peace of mind. And i'm not really sure how to tell people how to do that. But i do know that slowing down is if it's at all possible. That's a good way to start Baton is a place. Where words like civility t- Sacrifice courtesy they have meaning. And that's what i would say to to to get a little bhutan in your life is to think about those words into maybe try to try to put some meaning into those words and also the most important thing. Don't take yourself so seriously. It's so much easier to laugh at yourself. The not and it'll make you a lot happier. Say those three words again slowly so we can all think about them civility sacrifice and courtesy..

bhutan linda Leeming Steves rick Baton
"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:47 min | 4 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Say about it so there was no You know sort of focused ass over the years. Of course we got more communicative and The put news are a lot. There's a lot of nuance. there's a lot of gesturing. There's a lot of as i say they don't talk as much as americans do. So so you can communicate a lot without talking honestly so that's kind of fundamental to this Boonies culture is just not having to jabber away about everything. You're just together. You're you're you're sort of content by being tranquil and one exactly and in the us. I think i tend to over analyze everything in bhutan. I just don't have that opportunity so it is just a lot more relaxing. And there's never a i don't think in our whole marriage. There's ever been a point where we said okay. Well this isn't working out. Because there is a thing i guess. Maybe it's part of buddhism is Just the an inevitability you just deal with what you have and if it's not great you know you you try to make it better and if it's great you enjoy so it is sort of a buddhist thing. Yes our guest on travel with. rick steves. is linda limaj. She's the author of married to bhutan. How one woman got last said. I do found. Linda describes lockdown at her bhutan lumpkin home overlooking the capital city. Tim pu it's on her website. And that's linda leeming dot com. Did you set out to mary boot. Unease man or did you fall in love with mom gay. I think it was You know it was a combination of things. I think when we first met i remember a friend of mine who worked at the un was saying you know. What are you doing here you know. Do you have a family or nested. No and she said You don't have anybody i said. Oh there's this really lovely tonga painter. So so lovely. We teach together and we study english and soccer but he could never ever ever work out because he's You know he's not traditionally educated and all and you know. I mean his boot knees and she was from grenada the island and she said i'm married to a swiss man and he makes cheese and he doesn't speak english and she said i don't speak french or german and i don't know she was. She said could sell you. You know. I mean there's nothing in life that's irreversible and then i started looking at phnom gay differently of course. I didn't do anything because i was too. You know i. I don't know. I didn't i didn't want to jump into anything but i think that our love or my feelings for him actually grew after we married honestly it was all so different and so unusual but as he always used to say and i guess would still say even though we're very different our hearts of the same and if you're nice people then you have a chance. Tell us about your first kiss. Okay i mean. Because i'm going to be i mean i. I remember looking into the eyes of the living virgin goddess in katmandu and i thought many people into her eyes. And it's like if you ever approached that physical line where you became intimate you'd almost burst into flames or something just beyond your wildest dreams could happen to you in deal one adventure in there. Was there any trepidation about about going there for me. There was a lot of trepidation. Yes there was a lot of trepidation and honestly You know. I didn't even put this in the book but i remember one afternoon. We were sitting in the wintertime. It was a school was out schools out in the winter in baton For a couple of months it were sitting in my house and We were. We had books kind of spread out. We're sitting on the floor and there was a book of terms. You know government terms shopping. Whatever you know is broken down into chapters and there was a government offices and so he flipped the book over to the government offices and he pointed down to this place. It says Well in english it was justice of the peace. And he said we need this and justice of the peace means you go and you get married. And i'm like i didn't i was like i was shocked and i said I said toop means like okay and that was kind of it really. And i don't know the. Yeah that was it. Yeah that was it. You know i just yes. Yes we and then is that when you first for astrologer we didn't even kiss them know at a later on he said you never in baton that sort of vague like when you marry. You don't like have a ceremony like as long as you cohabit. Then you're married so i think A couple of days later he said i'm staying here and so that was it time. Sting here oh man. You are living the most world. What sort of booze did you have to navigate. That might have been frustrating in your victorian putin news courtship. I sort of didn't do. Only i think american women are little bit more forward. I guess there's more of a. I guess equality but i was so worried about it intruding on on his life and his family. You know when. I wrote the book i wrote a lot of both of my books. I wrote about our family. Our friends our lives together. But you know. I put a I changed their names. I felt very protective. I'd because i think it's like being the unruly dinner guests that you know elbows the red wine glass onto the beautiful white linen tablecloth. I didn't want to do that. And i think that's a really good way to travel in foreign countries to be in the rest of the world is just be a good guest. Be aware of where you are and don't overstep you have bins mission in. His work is to wake people up. What does that mean and are you. Are you the focus of his mission. Do you think oh. I don't know. I think Does good chrysler. I'll have to ask him and get back to you. But i think he wishes that i would be a little more pious and like study buddhism with the teacher and that sort of thing but Yes waking up is really really important in bhutan. Living in the moment and You know being aware his his paintings you when you look at all of these Deities the buddha shock immunity buddha gurun prochet who is a saint of bhutan or manju sri the knowledge buddha or the medicine buddha. Whenever you look at one of these deities like in a temple or wherever. You're seeing them if you're really struck by one of them Say jewelry knowledge buddha. That means that your way to enlightenment. So he's really interested in connecting people with the right buddha's because.

bhutan linda limaj bhutan lumpkin Tim pu linda leeming mary boot rick steves tonga toop baton grenada katmandu phnom Linda un soccer us Sting chrysler sri
"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

08:04 min | 4 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"American-born. Linda linda fell in love with the country and eventually with a well known johnny's artists. She writes about her life in bhutan in two books field guide to happiness and married to bhutan. How one woman got lost and found bliss. linda. Thanks for being here. Thank you so your book on the coverage says and found bliss. How did you find bliss. I fell in love with the place and the people. And i guess subsequently my husband gay. I was just bowled over by the beauty of the place and how the people just lived and went about their daily life slowly deliberately. I was really just willing to do just about anything to to stay there. I convinced the government to let me go and teach english. I was a little bit of a washout as an english teacher. But i did. Learn their language learned lanka as a result but And then three years. After i was there i married a co worker and it was the first marriage for both of us and i don't know i can't say every moment has been police but we're pretty happy in your book. You talk about me talk about your relationship with non gay and you also talk about your relationship with the country and it's sort of kissed being there is is something that is just something special about it's it's it's this. Surreal high altitude world. You talk about walking above the tree line in the morning when when a herd of yacar or in the middle east and Do you remember that yearbook talked about walking distance. Kind of with these ghostly. React around you and you're just a greeting new day. Take us on that little walk. Yes well When you're walking among a herd of vip it's really important to look down a lot but you know frankly. I don't recommend walking among yak. Because they're really big and they're really. I don't think they're like super bright. I don't really trust them but it is just an amazing experience in bhutan. It's just I don't know. I guess as a writer and as a i know somebody who was interested in different ways of being you can hardly get any more different than the life in bhutan and life in the united states. Both are great but One thing that i really like about bhutan is i like myself better in bhutan. It's really easy to be nice. They're they're buddhist. They're not really mad at anybody And i did realize You know my teaching experience aside with just a little bit of effort you can affect change and even if you just visit there you can The boonies are very interested in a in the absorb a lot. I guess because it's a tiny country they have to be outward-looking so they really pay attention. If you go there they'll study you. They'll they'll figure you you know you mentioned in your book and america's becoming bhutani is humbling is like you. You make a fool out of yourself and figure it out yes. Tell us a little bit about this. Cross cultural living. If you marry into a culture you have to be prepared to get laughed at and maybe not in a malicious way but people will You'll do things pretty much on a daily basis if not an hourly basis that are different and quirky and You know. Oh gosh. When i first married non gate a twenty years ago. We were living in the flat in place nearer the school where we both taught and the kids would literally line up in front of the place would just a watch me come down in the morning you know and and make my little walk to school. There were so intrigued by me now. They've seen more westerners but it really was It was something kind of to cope with. If you move to a new culture. I feel like you have to adapt and you have to go more than halfway. I guess you'd as my husband if you know. He thinks i go more than half way. But i do think you have to You know food everything everything you do. You have to kind of adapt to through. What was the biggest adjustment for you as a as an american trying to fit the bhutanese tempo of life sitting down and shutting up. I mean i guess. That's pretty kind of crudely but just not talking so much. The buddhists believed that if utah you know just in the united states you know to be polite you talk about the weather you know you say hello you. You strike up a conversation but it's opposite in bhutan. You don't talk if you don't have anything to say so there's a lot of silent. It sounds like you use buddhist and bhutanese almost interchangeably visit bhutan. Or is it buddhism. That is so unique and attractive to you. I think you can't talk about bhutan without talking about buddhism and they. I think you're absolutely right. They're almost interchangeable. It is a buddhist country and it's so much of who they are. It's kind of it. Permeates the place. You know you kind of can't help but pick up a lot of the philosophy help but don't hurt. Its who they are. So part of it is living. In the moment. I would imagine not having a watch I remember when. I was one of the most wonderful experiences when i was in. Nepal was just not wearing my watch and for days. I had no need for a watch and then i remember one day in in katmandu. Hadn't appointment somewhere and it really. It really burdened me. My whole my whole day was messed up. Because i had an appointment somewhere and that was just fascinating. That's so true. I mean living in the moment being in bhutan. Even if you come as a a guest it really does sort of force you to live in the moment because everybody else's living in the moment for not big planners that's another thing as an american we plan everything and that's quite nice but it's also nice to kind of let it go and not plan everything and i think you're really picking up on on the major points of the difference between bhutan in here. This is traveled to exterior. We're talking with linda leeming. She was born in tennessee but now lives in bhutan country. That's rich with natural. Beauty sometimes called the happiest place on earth than the move there to teach english and to get out of the rat race. Her latest book is married to bhutan. How one woman got lost said. I do and found bliss. And she's sharing her adventures to putin's customs right now on travel with rick steves. So linda you married nam gay and tell us just Quickly how you relationship Started and how grew and and some of the challenges. We were coworkers we it. The the brittany's names zoric chosen the school of thirteen arts. He's a painter a traditional taco painter. He paints buddhist iconography buddha's and clouds and trees. I was in english. I was the english teacher there and we became friends. We taught each other english in songa. And i guess. The relationship sort of blossomed after a year or so and we got married. Actually it's A little more detail in the book but like this is radio so And it was really really kind of kind of a victorian courtship of so lovely. Actually it was at least try super shy. He's still is and so. I guess there was a bit of a language barrier. To tell you the truth. His english was kind of wonky. And my czanka wasn't much. But i think that really kind of saved us because if we couldn't talk about it if it wasn't body parts or food or something household we really didn't have much to.

bhutan Linda linda bhutani america linda johnny lanka middle east linda leeming katmandu utah Nepal zoric school of thirteen arts rick steves tennessee putin brittany
"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:27 min | 4 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Is. There is an preambule thing that you do. You give us a quick rundown on the different indigenous groups that will encounter were in peru. Oh my they're the two strongest groups are the keturah and the i mata and the catch was speakers in the matter speakers. they have different languages. There are many many different indigenous languages in in peru and quite a few in the jungle as well. They're tribes that their own languages their own cultures but the two main ones are the keturah. Any i matter and you can even see the difference in physically. The keturah are sort of they have a sharper features. The i bought a round rounder faces. You can actually see the physical difference the the catcher who lived in the mountains for so long. Have these wonderful sort of developed chests in the way that an opera singer does because their lungs operate differently and and you can really tell the difference between the indigenous people or they're just Diesels live on the shore. And those who live in the mountains but just by virtue of their chests. So those would be. I would imagine the two big indigenous groups and then you've got afro peruvian along the coast and you've got a lot of europeans probably in the big cities right exactly right. And the africans are on the on the costa and historically all over latin america on the coast because the spanish colonial powers understood very quickly that people could not work in the fields in the way that they wanted someone to work on the sugar plantations and the moon plantations the coffee plantations because they couldn't stand the heat and the field work so they sent the Indigenous up into the mountains to do the mining so the africans who were very. You're used to the hot weather and to feel work. Were kept along the shores. So that is you know. History created that distinction. This is travel with brick. Steve's we're talking with marie arana about the people of peru her homeland. Her book is silver sword and stone. Three crucibles in the latin american story. We we're just about done with our visit to peru with you but as our tour guide. What would you do to broaden the itinerary beyond visiting much. Up to be sure we get a a nice representative experience in peru. Well i would. I would definitely say and this has always been a puzzlement to me. Because for so many years People would come to peru with they would just completely neglect lemon. And hop over to kuske. Oh and feature which are indeed beautiful. Who's co is just a wonderful historic city and is just a fabulous natural wonder but skip over over lima or through. He'll or a deepa. And i have to tell you that within the last fifteen years or twenty years the peru has become a capital of culinary arts the cuisine of peru which is a fusion of indigenous and afro peruvians and chinese and asians. We have a lot of japanese and chinese and european culture and that fusion of food is so popular and so it's very special very special kind of food and you will find that in the cities where you will not find it in the in the beautiful mountains necessarilly and you know how to keep by his Intellectual center it has a wonderful university has always been a place where you know the smart people were. We've been talking with marie arana. Her book is silver sword and stone three crucibles than the latin american story. We it's been so nice talking with you. It's gotten me fascinated with that thinking about one. We can travel again to go down to peru. I'm just curious next emiko home to peru a home in the sense that we spend several months year there and you get settled in. What will you and your husband do it. Just kind of celebrate your there. What what is that sort of ritual that yes now. We're back in peru. Oh you know. Every time are playing lands within four or five hours. We are down at a restaurant called a fiscal. And it's but we call the cvt. Ya where are they serve. Heavy chain savita should only be served on midday. So you always go for lunch. So what is to be. Savvy is fish right from the water. I mean they've caught it that morning. That's the reason why you have to eat it for lunch. They catch it that morning off the coast of lima. And it's cooked in in lemon and lime and it is absolutely divine. You know this is in. Lima are absolutely fabulous. That's where we go right away to say we're home now. we're here. That is that good travel tip for all of us maria. Thanks so much. I hope that you have a sivy chain in your near future. Thank you so much rik. It's such a pleasure to talk to you. Burn for some of our listeners. If they aren't making travel plans they're remembering where they've been. Here's a few travel haiku britain and sent to radio at rick. Steves dot com beverly sizemore from albuquerque. New mexico will always remember the fun of having a sauna. In finland. With the icu. She wrote sweat sting birch leads shrieking joy as kim meets lake the neath the midnight sun. Jd markman from clever. Missouri has a layover in mind and their travel plans. Fly me to the moon with ireland. Stops before me. I will be there soon and gasparovic and her son from pittsburgh. Pa sent haiku to her sister. Well road tripping through yellowstone national park and the grand tetons. Here's a few examples of what they wrote. Traffic jam ahead car stopped all over the road. Oh it's just a deer. Did i see a moose stopped. The car turned around. It's just a log no haiku today. No more counting syllables. We just need a break next week. Crossover cultures with an american made a new life for herself in bhutan in the himalayas and in a bit we'll plan a getaway to barcelona. It's travel with rick. Steves tucked away in the mountains. Between indian china. The remote buddhist country of bhutan is a nation with no traffic signals. It aims for high value low impact type of tourism which requires visitors to go on.

peru marie arana kuske mata emiko lima latin america savita costa Steve beverly sizemore Jd markman rik gasparovic Lima maria rick icu albuquerque New mexico
What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

Travel with Rick Steves

02:17 min | 4 months ago

What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

"With rick steves with an insider look at how peru stands out from the rest of south america. It's where author and journalist. Marie arana grew up before her bicultural family moved to the us. She writes about her identity in her book. American teacup read. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much. Rik good to be here. I'm just really excited for you to be my tour guide because is country. I know very little about before we get into this discussion about the people of peru. Just give us a quick one paragraph description of your homeland you know for a country that's the size of roughly the size of california not much bigger. It's an astonishing place because it has just every kind of land form you can imagine. Rick it has the coast it has the desert it has the jungle it has the mountain has the planes. It has all of that and if you fly over peru this is amazing to me you go from one land form to another land form just in the course of a few seconds. It's it's really astonishing place geographically when you compare peru to the other south american countries. How would the people of peru see themselves Compared to the countries that surround them. Well you know we are an andean nation and the andean nations are of course colombia and ecuador and bolivia these are the the spine of the andes of course runs through the whole continent. But we are. We call ourselves and ian people because we are a mix honesty so mix of indigenous and white and black in a very different proportion. Shall we say to. The people of venezuela which are are less india less indigenous more more black and the colombians as well which has a much larger population of blacks than we do improve we do have afro peruvian along the coast who have been there for hundreds and hundreds of years but we are distinguished. I think by our indian ness. And i think that you know the people of argentina. The people of that people are why they come. They come up to peru and they're they're struck by the truly indian culture that we have okay so when you say

Peru Marie Arana Rick Steves RIK South America Rick California Bolivia Ecuador Colombia United States IAN Venezuela India Argentina
"bhutan" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

08:16 min | 4 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"You find any of those. Yes i mean some of the women especially again. Usually it was women. maybe forty. you're older. You're even older than that is when it was more kind of standard practice regularly Who really defend it. And said i kicked out guys i until i found the man i loved And had no trouble with it but often those arguments were pretty dismissive of women who definitely did have trouble with it In of the bad experiences you know they kind of took their own and said no. It's fine either us really interesting. I do wonder though sometimes if maybe you know since it is a practice that in this matriarchal societies seems to have its roots in empowerment. That maybe there are some women that didn't have the best experience but in the interests of like being team players maybe sugarcoat it a little bit. I don't it's certainly a possibility. Yeah i think that's definitely a possibility. Because you get that impression especially from like the ngos that have been set up to sort of try and fight this practice at. They're saying you know a lot of these women don't have a voice in and speaking out against this Whether they don't have you know the reach or the or whatever they might need sort of begat against it the the opportunity The platform they sort of pick and choose. You know what you're hearing about it so it's interesting that there's actually. This is almost a weird flip side of the story That i'm going to tell her the The tradition that. I'm going to talk. I'm kinda glad you you lead. Because this is sort like two sides of this very strange coin. Both striving for empowerment. I think one perhaps succeeding a little bit more. I don't wanna spoil it well again. You know this is one of those things where we have to realize that. Bhutan is very much for the majority of the world and inaccessible place. It's a the e. I if you if you're not familiar with the country it is a mountainous. It is incredibly difficult to get to harshly historically due to geography but nowadays also due to decisions of the government of the monarchy. Which i believe that if you want to travel to baton as an outsider there are pretty exorbitant fees you pay per day. Tourist also cannot exceed like a certain quota per year but in their in their favor Bhutan has the distinction of being the only country. To rate it's Overall success not on a gross domestic product or anything like that but on gross national happiness which is pretty difficult to quantify in. Sounds like it could get confusing and also makes me wonder you. How does this process of night. Hunting fit into a modernizing country right because it sounds like this. Very old As we see the prevalence of things like Cell phones i think would be the number one the number one next step right as we see the proliferation of those rural areas. How how is that going to affect things. Like what happens when people start Because they get the sense. I'm searching for an analogy. I get the sense when i hear people. Some of the guys talk about this. They're talking about me and my buddies went out to the bar. We went out to the clo. Yeah a little night hunting. Can't you phone ahead at this point. I think that would even happen. In groups Sometimes group of guys will go out and one at a time break off and pick a house and pretty much just like that. That kind of terrified though like this. That's what i'm trying to understand like is this is their demographic like does this stop when you get married if you're female or is it like the purge basically you have to lock your if based on your genitalia. Do you have to lock yourself in at dusk. Yeah i don't know the answer that directly. But i would i my thoughts are that you know it probably stops when you're getting married at least if you already have a man in your bed you know as the window but at the same time it feels like the practice does open because of you know if you lean into this as i know no. I'm just doing the thing. You know like It really is. It's kind of like a carte blanche invitation to you know Stock people exactly. Yeah there was a girl who was in college in a rural area and she had no idea. She said she had heard of the practice but didn't really know much about it or think that it was still happening and one night. She's in her room with her roommate. And some guy comes up and starts banging on the window and says hey let me in no. It's okay this is a normal thing and it's also a normal thing for me to say no sir get out. That's part of it so get out like that. it's very based on coercion right. I think these problems here too is even if the guy gets in. Then he's got to talk himself into the bed i if he doesn't force himself. You know so even if there's not a physical forcing there's still a lot of coercion going on. I'm wondering too if there's like a. I'm not aware of this but if there's a situation where someone travels From outside the country to maybe do some ngo work or something and then they find themselves accidentally sucked into this practice. And know what i mean. I guess it depends on how common it is in the modern day but now that you explain it this way Yeah i can see a lot of very dads and moms you know So if you're caught so it's vampire rules kind of rate lake right one in right left and if you're caught at dawn that's you're married. Yeah that doesn't always play that traditionally. That's how it goes. So that's very strict in some villages. So do you feel like this is the Is this society normal. Would we normally consider them. Pretty conservative. i suppose i didn't get that impression but i think so i think it. It seems more traditional in their You know values of marriage and family Things like that pretty traditional. It seems odd to me that in a matriarchal society they would they would care so much about establishing paternity for for citizenship or or i guess not for citizenship for registering you and all that stuff like i wonder what that is. I don't know. I just was surprised by that yet because from what. I'm understanding as a matriarchal society. What we're saying there is that women are traditionally the head of the family and also call the shots right so if they're questions of of a household import than it would typically be the mom or the oldest female relative. I guess that makes those decisions. So maybe it's a situation where you need to be especially like You know if there are two kids who are like dating and try night hunting. They know each other already. Maybe it's the mom that they're really afraid of right could be could be. I mean i've definitely heard that the dads were the were the throw you out the window. Type they're caught but they're more than most of the opera right there. The bouncer past the manager. I mean that's the way he came in might as well own. Backup interesting Bizarre so so it's it's definitely fallen out of favor or it hasn't yeah this is sort of the The remaining argument is that More rural and older people are saying you know while the modern world of dating and western dating has crept into bhutan especially in the cities. And that's you know taking the love out.

bhutan
The Washington Post Reports Which World Leaders Were Tapped by Pegasus

The Dan Bongino Show

01:54 min | 4 months ago

The Washington Post Reports Which World Leaders Were Tapped by Pegasus

"Of journalism, stunning that they do that once in a while, you know what you know what's weird gym. It happened when Jeff Bastos was up in space for 11 minutes. So Bezos left and all of a sudden, one of the reporters at The Washington Post decided to do a random act to journalism like we can't get in trouble now, Bastos is on the, uh phallus shaped aircraft headed to another universe. We've got 11 minutes to do some actual journalism. So they wrote a story about the Pegasus program, this malware program that can be put on a phone. And on this list of potential. I emphasize potential people who were Infected with this malware spyware program. Are a lot of World leaders, folks from countries around the world. Back to my global destabilization. If their phones macron from France was on there. Also leaders, according The Washington Post, The Washington Post story If you want the title is on the list, 10 prime ministers, three presidents and a king. The list is the list of phone numbers that may have been targeted by Pegasus. And yes, not the clash of the Titans horse. Not just macron from France. Number of officials in Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bhutan, China, Congo, Egypt. The list goes on. Hungary, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kuwait. Turkey, Togo, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom and the United States. How many People's phones, world leaders influential folks around the world how many of their phones were infected by this Pegasus program, and if they were infected with this Pegasus program, Where was the information they were taking going to that the gavels down? That's the $64 million question, isn't it? Then you made a big

Jeff Bastos The Washington Post Bastos Bezos France Pegasus Titans Azerbaijan Bhutan Bahrain Congo Togo Kazakhstan Afghanistan Hungary Kuwait Egypt Saudi Arabia Iran Turkey
"bhutan" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

02:05 min | 5 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

"I think if that time did anything for us one thing it did do his question everything right like it almost seemed like everything was on the table that i think is still is and so if there's if there's ever a time for us to be having conversations about fundamental things like how do we measure progress I think the time is now. And so i i. I started to Set up the center here in is first time that gross national happiness has had a center here in the united states and the idea is at least to begin with just to start having conversations at all levels at the national level state level local level with people in bhutan who are close to the data who who who can tell you both the pros and cons like can can have honest conversations of what it's like to run a country this way so that we might. We might get some. You might get some ideas like because i think again like you know. There's an argument to be made that the now now is the time especially as we look at what's been happening with. You know the covid. Through case climb. And i think just overall debts a minute. I remember at one point in time looking at television screen and seeing the stock market. Climb as the death toll rose. They're both moving in the same direction. I think we've all kind of come around to this idea that like what's happening with gdp and what's happening with economic growth isn't really reflective of what's really happening in individual lives and certainly overall happiness now. What is your official title at this initiative address so my a couple a couple of people who were were there in bhutan with me we are co-founders. We co founded this thing. We don't have official titles right now if you ever need a deputy co founder ray. Now that's all i want to say. I don't even need title. But whatever you need i want to be involved. You're in man near. I mean we need we need. I think we need all the help we can get. I mean we talk about sort of shifting a fundamental conversation. You know. I think that that's like an all hands on deck moment right foremost. Apn you heard it here first. We're going to switch to gross national happiness. Thanks latino.

united states both one point first first time one thing bhutan latino
"bhutan" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

07:12 min | 5 months ago

"bhutan" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

"Welcome to after hours almost sapien. So glad to have you here with me. I'm gonna miss something to you. It's a little embarrassing. I totally messed up. Listen to this one so we ran our episode a couple of weeks back with soon gupta talking about basketball and we recorded a question at the end with suny all that i wanted to run for after hours and actually in the episode. I say like we'll talk about that more on after hours. And then i forgot and i did something totally different. I had other things on my mind about and things like that. Which is why. I ended up putting on the show and then i was listening back to the episode on the subway. On saturday night. I was coming home and because i want to take an uber but it was sixty dollars. What the hoover and so i took the subway at one of the morning and it's safe now in new york to do so and i was listening to the episode because i really liked that one so i was like such a good episode. I love he so impressive. And i heard that bit where i said we were gonna talk about part of the interview in after hours and i totally realized that i hadn't done it and i was like oh man so i am fixing my mistake. What we're going to talk about today is something. That's neil is doing in the kingdom of wooten and thanh is country that i find really interesting i i visited actually. The only time i visited was in two thousand and four right after. I guess i got out of business school. I was with a couple of friends and we flew via calcutta kolkata. Now to perot the capital of bhutan and we climb to mountains and back then. Nobody went to baton. It was really. I think they had like six or twelve thousand visitors a year now. It's still not that visited but obviously there's a lot more tourism. There's all kinds of fancy hotels. Not when i was there. There were no fancy hotels. it was really cool. It was very rustic. And so i just love the country and so when i read this thing into news bio it made me feel a lot of feelings. And so that's what we're gonna talk about today on the show so listen. I already have this recorded. I saved it from the original interview. So why would you this. We're just going to jump right in. I'm going to basically pick up in conversation where we talking about baton so here we go sorry for the mistake. Everybody but thanks for your patience and action when i read your bio. I'm going to be very honest with you. You you gave me a lot of foam. Why did i have the foam. Had the foam. Because i went to the kingdom of bhutan in the year. Two thousand and four back. When i think it was not very visited there were no international hotels. I spent some time there. I you know. I did all the stuff that person does and i thought it was an amazing place. They don't allow cigarette smoking. Which by the way is just a major. I mean it's just a nice thing to do for your people and they measure gross national happiness instead of gdp gross domestic product. Now i read in your bio that you are. This is this like threw me for a loop. I almost fell off my chair you are. You've created the national happiness center in america. You've partnered with bhutan to do that. So number one. Tell us about that because that's amazing. Yeah so i. I would love to hear about your trip and four. I'll tell you about my trip which was in two thousand eighteen. I had just lost my election. And i was actually looking to escape politics but when i got there got so enamored by the way that they they measure progress the way that the way the country is run like any other country it has its imperfections but the north star of gross national happiness. Which fascinating to me this idea that it's not. Gdp gdp is a factor. But it's not it's not the end right it leads to something else. Which is the happiness of our people in. There were a couple of things that stood out to me. One is that you know as i dug in. I had a chance to spend time with the research team out there. And some of these people have been on this team now for decades. They've been measuring it. This way for over fifty years and asked him a couple of questions that i think really led me to a couple of places one question. I asked how did this. How did this happen. How bhutan actually shift to this idea of gross national happiness. And the person i spoke to is like. Oh you don't know the story. Now you don't know and i said i said actually no i don't she's like it didn't come from bhutan. It came from the united states. I'm like what. So as it turns out when bobby kennedy was running for president nineteen sixty eight. His his entire platform was really built around this idea that we we are measuring progress in this country in the wrong way in fact if you go onto youtube right now you can if you search for bobby kennedy and gdp see some of the speeches that he gave around this. But i think when he was assassinated. I think that idea sort of thing died with him but there was a young king across the world that was paying really close attention and was like i think that that's right and that's that's what i want to do. Liz episode is brought to you by hp plus in a world full of smart devices. Shouldn't your printer be smart to it. Is with hp plus these printers know when they're running low so you always get the inky meat delivered right when you needed. Plus you save up to fifty percent on inc so you can print whatever you want as much as you want anytime you want. That is pretty smart. Get fixed three months of instant inc when you choose. Hp plus conditions apply visit hp dot com slash. Smart for details and. That's how bhutan started to adopt this idea of gross national happiness. I thought that was really interesting. The the other thing that that that really struck me as i asked him. You know as you go town village to village. You're serving people been doing this for a long time. Is there a single question that you can ask. That would really give you a pretty good sense of somebody's level of happiness and they said yeah as a matter of fact there is. The question is if you were in real trouble right now. Who could you call and know with one. Hundred percents certainty. That person would be there for you. They believed that the answer. That question who can answer that question clearly are much more likely to be happy. But there's a twist and the twist is who's list are you on. Who can you call. You can call you and know with one. Hundred percents certainty. You are going to be there for them. They believe that's equal or or even a greater driver of happiness. I and again. I kinda fell in love with with this idea that like. It's not a line. It's a circle. it's all about community right at. Maybe it's maybe it's saying something that we already know but in the in a different way but we are social creatures and we thrive off of community service so One of the ideas. That i had when i when i was when i was there as you know. Why don't we start to to to figure some things out. We're not. We're in a pretty a pretty i think Different time in our country is thousand eighteen at this point in time. We're two years into the into the trump presidency and they were trying to figure out a lot of stuff. And i think that you know i..

america sixty dollars new york six saturday night youtube baton three months trump bhutan one question today two years twelve thousand visitors hp plus over fifty years uber One calcutta kolkata Hundred percents
How to Be Sad in a Healthy Way with Helen Russell

The Nordic Mum

06:40 min | 8 months ago

How to Be Sad in a Healthy Way with Helen Russell

"Tell me about this new book of yours and a podcast. Because i was looking at it. This is slightly different because we'll slotting or maybe not so how to be sad. Yes so i so. I've been now researching into happiness for the last eight years and reedy will be academic literature and speaking to as many experts. Get my hands on and really following the growing movement in in. I guess i don't wanna quite use the attempt self-help but this idea of of what we can do. And how we can observe our in culture of cultures around the world to try to give us the best chance of of keeping mental health intact and Keeping ourselves feeling upbeat on a daily basis. But actually the more it was simplified perhaps for sound bites off line or the more The the the rest of the world decision economic climate was was not perhaps doing any of us any favors The movie becomes clung onto this idea of happiness. That in the last few years. When i have talked around the world when i've done interviews with people and i collected my own research as well as reading the research of others. It seemed to me that there was so much anxiousness about not being happy. The procedure happiness to become all encompassing. And actually people will quite phobic of being sad and this seems like a problem because of course we can't be happy all the time We can put structural things in place. We can lifestyle things in place to try to shore up our chances and to try to look after ourselves but no one is happy all the time. Sadness is a normal part of life. I felt more. If we try and deny sadness we do ourselves huge home and sadness actually can also bring some benefits so that that really set me to thinking. I think researching the atmosphere happiness. My my last book you mention Looking different cultural purchase. I realized this in the us and the uk a especially there is a real reluctance to to do. Saddest studies. show that but americans are kind of out lies in that design not to be sad unto to choose happiness and to to be happy to put on this kind of jazz hunts front which as we certainly seen in the last year if not the last forty five years life through some huge challenges Away and You know the state of the world. Even there is much to be sad about the things to be angry about and that has to be okay to we have to be in touch with those emotions too so i wanted to really explore that from a cultural perspective from a historical perspective And speaking to you near scientists and psychologists geneticists and and really trying to understand the processes that are going on and the noble phases that we go into when we tried to deny us address and then what to do about them and how to be sad in a healthy positive way so that was my goal. Yes the knee. I was really intrigued. When i was reading a book. About the difference of cultures and things like portugal and brazil and bhutan. Where you know sadness and crying and you know. Death is celebrated its part of the normal circle of life. Then perhaps where i come from in finland we are very stone faced and we don't cry outside of the family circles and some does not at all even front of our parents or parents. Don't cry front of the children. It's very much these macho kind of culture. So what can we learn from these other cultures. What can we put in place in our cultures in our societies to help us to deal with sadness and it be normal circle of life. Yeah i think it is. That is that normalizing. It is talking about it. It's it's showing children that it's okay to be sad and that they will be sad sometimes and not trying to minimize that so certainly when i was growing up in uk. Those idea that if you're crying you're told it's okay. Don't cry at so easy for them out to cry but actually we'll probably charges crying for a reason and that reason may not be the same as it would if it was an adult but to deny a child's feelings doesn't set a great template for somebody being emotionally intelligent in later life and being in touch with their emotions so it starting at a really early age letting children know that their feelings are okay and they are legitimate and how to handle them really I think parents can can model to kids. And and anyone who's spent time with children comodal that And then it is yeah. It's i spoke to a A few psychology said things like that they will recommend if you see a dead animal for example. You see roadkill even you. You don't try and hide it from your children. You sort of say. Oh that's uh sad. Isn't it look fox has been over or whatever And it's just being june two to the sadness that's that we feel and then once we adults if we didn't have that growing up then it's learning to kind of regulate our own emotions in doing it belatedly which is harder but it is possible by allowing time for ourselves and really sitting without sadness rather than trying to rush and lives with business and activities and scheduling things that defer the sadness. Because it's not going to go away but they differ it and this year i think has shown for many of us as the world has slowed down and we haven't been able to travel many of us That people people have really kind of had to come to terms of things that perhaps they have pushed away for for many years and that's hugely challenging. You used to doing that so there are things that you can do to help. Of course things like Getting exercise we know that that's good for positive mental health and bodies but are not doing. It is is bad for us so more than in terms of just exercise it if if people who feeling generally okay are sedentary between three and seven days we will start to develop low mood that some fascinating research about this. It's it's the meat was about trying to stop normal sadness from becoming a two. And b tipping over into something more serious and i'm very keen to differentiate of course between normal sadness that we all experience depression and i've been now with both of them and they are not the same thing but there is there is evidence to suggest that we can start normal fatness into something more serious by allowing for it and handling it in a mall helpful way.

Reedy UK Bhutan Portugal Finland Brazil United States FOX Depression
Interview With Former Air Force Officer, And Motivational Speaker Toolika Rani

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

05:59 min | 9 months ago

Interview With Former Air Force Officer, And Motivational Speaker Toolika Rani

"Hello and welcome to another edition of a dc woman. Podcast i am your host sonia ago play and today in honor of international women's day. We are so excited to welcome. Retired indian. Air force officer mountaineer motivational speaker research. Scholar and travel writer to ronnie deluca is the first woman from uttar pradesh india to climb mount everest and the first indian woman to climb the highest volcano of asia. Known as mount. Dama avant in san to look i served in the indian air force for a decade and was squadron leader an outdoor training instructor in the prestigious indian air force academy in hyderabad india and she was even involved. The physical training of hundreds of feature officers including india's first three women fighter pilots with twenty three mountaineering expeditions and tracks in india nepal bhutan iran africa and russia under her belt. To look at is now working on her. Phd continuing to train for future tracks and she serves as a motivational speaker which includes a hugely popular. Ted talk and she has been featured widely in mainstream media india and south asia. She is a staunch advocate of women's rights and human rights. Globally juelich out. Welcome to the show. Is sonia thank you for having made you to look i. I wanna say that the messages you received from your family and especially your mother growing up or such a tremendous example of female empowerment and a genuine belief in human spirit. You were taught that you only have this life to pursue your dreams and goals and that nothing can get in your way so long as your mind believes it you can achieve it while if every young girl or woman receive this message growing up. What could be accomplished on planet earth. So really really impressed by that. And you've talked a lot about your spiritual beliefs and faith. And i wanna ask you. What is going to remind as you ascend a mountain. do you go into a meditative state. Will you rely on your deep spiritual beliefs and constantly have to retain mindfulness in assessing the physical challenges. Along the way i would imagine. There's a variety of protocols and situational awareness. That is needed. But i'd really like her more from you on that. Because in my estimation this mindset is what separates those who make it to the top and those who unfortunately do not on different stages of climbing i have a different kind of a mindset. I would say that. If i fain like there there might be avalanche. There might be a route wash. That might be bad weather. Something which has detained my plans to climb a mountain. I get into a buddy confrontational mode. Because i am. I'm trained as a soldier. And i had to fight my adversity so at times i started seeing the mountain. Asthma adversity. it happened to me on mount everest. I had to in my second attempt. Also i had to turn back from three thousand feet twice before i made my tent and succeeded so in those two attempts i started challenging everest. That either you can give me death or injury you can go ahead and give me that and i will keep on doing what i'm capable of doing. So sometimes i get into that kind of confrontational mode. Where i see that. Yes the mountain in front of me. Is the obstacle that i have to overcome he. It is an enemy. And i have to fight it with all my might that i have sometimes from vivid me. There are certain sentences accord or something but have support him that just springs up bent. The conditions are really tough. I'm climbing exhausted and the going gets very very tough. I have seen these flashes. Coming from within a volume by Kipling everybody had about displaying very famous swim. If so there was this lions from this point if that some everything is finished and nothing is left to new that still a wasting your head which says hold on so at one time this would hold on just a up in my mind and i just continued. I just held on and kept my foot one foot after another in front official. So that is how it happens sometimes. It is ready spinach with because london's are so beautiful. I get into that meditative state also but i contemplate the nature of life seeing a mountain see a mountain the stance alone so anybody who is strong mighty and wants to rise high. Perhaps in life would be like that alone solitary having his own battles and also facing all kinds of storms videos rain gold snowfall everything but still standing very tall and after that i absolve that seed they also the cloud at times at times it is just sunny so this is how life also is on. Mountain's what i love the most about is that i don't have that usual crowd around me.

India Ronnie Deluca Climb Mount Everest Dama Avant Indian Air Force Academy Sonia Indian Air Force Uttar Pradesh Hyderabad Bhutan Air Force South Asia Nepal Asia TED Iran Russia Fain SAN
Douglas Stuart Reads Kevin Barry

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:29 min | 9 months ago

Douglas Stuart Reads Kevin Barry

"Hi douglas debra. How are you. I'm alright welcome when we talked about doing this. You had originally been inclined to choose a scottish story to read on the podcast but in the end you settled on an irish one. Do you think that the two traditions are interlocked. The certainly have a very close relationship. But even in reading the kevin body still here realized how much of the pronunciation and the expressions weren't familiar to my ear and so although the close they are quite different in terms of This story it feels a little like a fairy tale in a sense. I mean it has that sort of fable like quality to it. And i feel so it may work in a tradition of irish fables. To what you think you think it's certainly in that tradition of irish oto storytelling. It starts off with You know the narrator. Saying so. I bought an old hotel in the fjord of killary and just the way he brings you into the story. You have a sense that not only as a fable but it's the type of story we would pass around in pubs and from most both and that i think is the irish tradition and certainly the scottish tradition. Because sometimes when we don't find ourselves in literature it doesn't mean we're not natural-born storytellers and those oral stories. Don't always get written down. That is absolutely true here. And i think that's part of the charm of this is just the mixture of these canisters. When you see it almost feels quite other-worldly at times. And i chose the story because first of all it's just totally entertaining but also because it made me nostalgic for a time when we could gather and and be together without thinking about the consequences about the weight that comes with with those gatherings. Yeah yeah having scenes in a in a pub with everyone talking it feels like another world. That's true did you read the story when it first came out in two thousand ten. I didn't actually. I was led to kevin body short stories. Because norma s- fan of his novel night bhutan. Jere and i was thinking about what i wanted to read. I love kevin. Barry and i was actually surprised to see. He has published many stories in the new yorker. Yeah the first one. I believe and Do you think that this one sort of fits in with his general themes it. Does i find him always writing about masculinity especially men on the margins. But what's interesting about this is. There's an absence of hard man or criminals or Petty gangsters that he often populate has novels these other short stories. These are just people who are gathering together in a pub And there's a poet at the heart of it. We'll talk some more after the story. And now here's douglas stuart reading fjord of killary by kevin berry fjord killary so i bought an old hotel on the fjord of killary. It was set hard by the harbour wall with moody amount across the water and disgracefully gray skies above. It rained two hundred. Eighty seven days of the year and the locals were given to magnificent mood swings on the night in question. The rain was particularly violent. It came down. Like handfuls of neal's flung hard and fast by a cd asli royal sky. God i was at this point eight months in the place and about convinced that it would be the death of me. It's end to the fucking world stuff out there. I said the quotas of locals and the hotels lounge bar as always ignored me. I was a fruitful blue in by their mark and simply not cut out for tough gnarly west of ireland. Living there were listening instead to jon murphy or alcoholic funeral director. Albury anything that fucking moves. He said bastards suicides tinkers. He said i couldn't give a fuck monkeys he said. Maria is the most depressing mountain you've ever seen by the way and it's gone looming shape filled almost every view from the water's edge hotel. The loans bars included the locals drank. Mostly bushmills whiskey and guinness stout and they drank them to great excess. I wiped they're slobs from the counter. With the bar cloth i had come to hate with a passion verging on the insane.

Douglas Debra Kevin Douglas Stuart Kevin Berry Fjord Killary Jere Norma Bhutan Barry Jon Murphy Neal Albury Ireland Maria
Unusual Perennials With Far Reaches Farm

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:44 min | 10 months ago

Unusual Perennials With Far Reaches Farm

"I'm kind of overwhelmed at the possibilities that you have in your list But i did see one sort of like theme ish thing that really caught my eye and recently my friend can drew's and i were talking on the show about some favorite of our early native spring. Perennials were both eastern gardeners. And we both love things with surveys. Arching stems like solomon's seal and such and you have a lot of things like that i think and i don't know if that's intentional. Or if you're obsessed with that too but can we talk about some of them like the polygon items and my anthem and you've you larrea. I die spor homes and whatever. I saw a lot of these things. Tell me about plants that look like that. Let's talk about that. Yeah yeah yeah all of those that whole kind of group. I mean they're like the disarms are now you know been separated out from the into a different family than Pulling games or solomon sales but but we kinda regard them as the sort of fulfilling the same function in the garden. They have the same visual Impact and appeal really and And we're just we are just smitten by them and and and for good reason. There's fear other things that Offer that In the shade garden Solomon's seals in particular Have there's there's over. Eighty species of solomon seals and within each species and their diversity is incredible. I mean it goes from the arctic circle down to tropical rainforest in vietnam and they can be. We've actually pitched a tent on flicking them hooker. I at thirteen thousand feet in eastern bhutan and that only gets an inch or two high in that really short alpine turf whereas We've got political. Tim did in our shade garden. And it's not done reaching its full mature size and we've been as tall as fifteen feet so that's pretty awesome. Thank goodness textiles for them and it said you have thirty one. Different polygamy items. And i was like and then you had an article on the website. I'll give a link with the transcript to it about one that i think it's cinemas The species is king knee. Ainum or juan neum or something It's like a twelve footer. With orange flowers that was surprising. Yeah that's really really nice thing. It's one that had been the had been regarded as a flagging kingham. It's it's distinct in that it has leaves. That are different than what we would see on on on the east coast for example Heard the leaves are kind of following this stem and their little alternate sort of things like every other step stepped up. The leaves up the stem but in keenum who aim vietnam again Their what's called a tesla arrangement of lease or their little like spokes on a wheel in quarrels ranked up the stem. And that's that's very distinctive right. Can you ain't them You know crashing. You know if it gets like ten twelve or even like in vietnam and fifteen feet. How do you. How do you keep those upright. And they've got a clever little adaptation not the end of each leaf tip at hooks into a little hook and it will actually hold onto surrounding branchless and of shrubs and so we have going up through having going up to really thin twigged shabby dogwoods and that can kind of self trellis themselves that way.

Solomon Larrea Ainum Drew Vietnam Arctic Circle Kingham Bhutan Keenum TIM East Coast Tesla
"bhutan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"bhutan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"International food security experts say This is the result of massive flooding and deadly violence they says prevented relief workers from getting aid into the region. Lawmakers in Bhutan have voted to decriminalize same sex relations such mito Pataki reports. It's the latest South Asian country to do so. Activists are celebrating after Bhutan's lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to amend a law that penalized what it called unnatural sex that's widely interpreted as gay sex. The amendment will become final after Bhutan's King approves it, but that's considered a formality. Mood dance move is the latest in a series of legislations recognizing LGBTQ rights in South Asia two years ago, Bhutan's neighbor, India decriminalized homosexuality by striking down a colonial era law. Next year. Nipple, another Himalayan country will count LGBTQ people in its senses for the first time. For NPR News. I'm search me to partake in Mumbai. Officials from the Wisconsin Air National Guard 115th wing say one of their pilots has been killed on a training mission. His F 16 fighter jet crashed earlier this week in the Upper peninsula of Michigan. Pilots. Identity has not yet been released. The cause of the jet crash isn't yet known. It is being investigated. Korver Coleman NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include a TNT committed to keeping students and teachers connected. 18 T has connected over 200 million students with tools and technology for distance learning. Maura at 18 t dot.

Bhutan NPR News NPR Wisconsin Air National Guard 1 mito Pataki South Asia Mumbai Maura TNT Michigan King India
Bhutan lawmakers vote to decriminalize same-sex relations

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Bhutan lawmakers vote to decriminalize same-sex relations

"In Bhutan have voted to decriminalize same sex relations such mito Pataki reports. It's the latest South Asian country to do so. Activists are celebrating after Bhutan's lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to amend a law that penalized what it called unnatural sex that's widely interpreted as gay sex. The amendment will become final after Bhutan's King approves it, but that's considered a formality. Mood dance move is the latest in a series of legislations recognizing LGBTQ rights in South Asia two years ago, Bhutan's neighbor, India decriminalized homosexuality by striking down a colonial era law. Next year. Nipple, another Himalayan country will count LGBTQ people in its senses for the first

Bhutan Mito Pataki King South Asia India
"bhutan" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"It's time for flashback. I? It was November, Bhutan is elected secretary general of the United Nations Secretary General. Of the United Nations on television. There's a hold up in the Bronx, Brooklyn are 54. Where are you is in its first season on NBC, 50 for the movies. Welcome Back from the Army and Happy Birthday. You went to see Elvis in Blue Hawaii. It's a music box plays a European love song on the radio. Big bad Jimmy Dean is number one with Big bad, John. What year was 1960? 1961 4 1962 love me some Elvis charity McCurdy before your time, But can you find the year 1960 61 62 My best guess is the middle one that was 61 61. I was born in 1960. So I'm going to choose my birth year. That'll leave 1962 for Dave Aylor. What year was it? Lets find out big bad John Bhutan collected at the U. N car 50 for Where are you on TV? Elvis in Hawaii and Jimmy Dean at number one leaves tomorrow year. 1961. Marty McCurdy. Here. Luck. Wow. You nailed it. Congratulations. Back to charity in the 24 hour news center. Well, the state's lieutenant governor is willing to pay big money for information that leads to a conviction for voter fraud.

John Bhutan Elvis Marty McCurdy United Nations Bhutan Blue Hawaii Bronx Army NBC Dave Aylor Hawaii Brooklyn
Places to Fly Fish

Travel with Rick Steves

03:51 min | 1 year ago

Places to Fly Fish

"Desportivo fly-fishing has become a favorite way for many urbanites to decompress. And that's how Chris Santillo started his fifty places recreation guides. He now also writes about places to paddle bicycle golf end snowboard, but his number one passion is fly fishing Chris thanks for joining US great to be here, Rick. Thanks what is it about fly fishing that those who know it and love it or so passionate about I've thought about this a lot oftentimes when I'm out on the river and I think that people come at it from a lot of different directions I. I think there's the chance to be out in nature in a quiet and beautiful place. There's an old saying that's trout don't live in ugly places and neither do bone Fisher Tarp in Atlantic Salmon. So you're usually in pretty pristine places that can support these fish species. About especially, if you're river fishing about being in the water, I don't mean to sound cliche but there is something about the oneness of being with the river in that sense of flow I drive a lot over mountains and past beautiful rivers in Europe and the United States and I see a lot of people with hip Bhutan standing deepen in the river and there is something. Special about that I would imagine you have there is a feeling of being. In the moment and in the flow of life of the rivers as a metaphor for flow of life and time passing, and it's never the same water that you're standing in and I think there is something profound rap subliminal about that that has an appeal There is an analytic. A fly fishing I think it has appealed to people the whole idea of trying to determine what the Fisher eating at a given time, and then trying to either look in your fly box and find the the right fly that seems to match the kind of bugs at the trout might eating or I know some friends will bring a fly tying vice in some feathers and hair and hooks to the side of a stream, and if they don't have what the right bug is at the time or the right fly, they will go and tie it. Up on the spot and hope that they're going to make that match matching the hatches, the term that writer named Ernie Schreiber came up with years ago the hatch being the kind of insect that is occurring on the river at that time but just having the arsenal and matching the flame with the others that are being eaten that's probably integral to being successful fly, Fisher and very important, and you'll find some anglers that are you know better equipped than others I've been out with some friends who will have literally five hundred or a thousand flies. I usually have one or two boxes and and hope that what I have. Oh, cover things ninety percent of the time, but there's always ten percent that doesn't work and one blanket work. Great. This morning in another flight would work great in the same hole this afternoon exactly because what happens on many river systems as you will have different sorts of insects emerging coming out of river or settling down upon the river at different times of the day you might have may flies that are. Popping up from the bottom of the river as Nymphs, and then turning into adult bugs and being on the surface in the morning, and that might be a white insect, the size of your Pinky Nail, and then in the afternoon as it gets warmer, the grasshoppers might become active and the wind may be him into the river and they are green and yellow, and they're the size of your thumb. It's sort of a a battle going on what are the it is it's man versus nature. Chris and Taylor has written a dozen best selling books about outdoor adventures in his fifty places series. One of his titles collects the thoughts of Passionate Anglers Y. I, fly fish and their favorite fishing places are covered in fifty more places to fly fish before you die you'll also see Chris's byline and major sport fishing publications.

Chris Santillo United States Desportivo Atlantic Salmon Europe Ernie Schreiber Bhutan Fisher Writer Rick Taylor
Michele Mouton, Queen B of Group B

Past Gas

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Michele Mouton, Queen B of Group B

"Yeah. So today we're discussing Michelle. mouton. A woman. We've this is this the first time we've discussed a woman on the show. This might be the first episode dedicated to a lady. which is a bit embarrassing. I would say so yeah. But no better woman to start off this trend with and Michelle. She is easily one of the best rally drivers ever. She's a beast. So I'm really stoked that we can tell the story even if it took us a little while to get to it, that's on us but but it's interesting because motorsport is really one of the sports where women and men compete against each other as true like she's not the best. Female driver ever. She's one of the best rally drivers at. Yeah. Regardless of gender she's one of the greatest. and honestly like just watching a video of her rally driving makes me sweat. Over, yeah she's like she's the person who when we talk about. Like rally cars now are all-wheel-drive. Wheel drive. But when Audi showed up with quattro and just started smoking everybody that was Michelle. Meantime that was young Mouton Bay. mouton on the track. Yeah I mean. To your point James like drag racing of course is or was kind of dominated by women at one point all the force sisters were just tearing it up. There's really no reason. For it to be separated by gender in in Motor Sport Really of course right now there's the there's the W. series, which is a like a women's open-wheel series. At I think that's more for them to kind of get exposure and it proved themselves in like a formula car but I'm looking forward to seeing some of those drivers come up in the formula. One. Soon hopefully, it would just make it more interesting for crying out loud if nothing else I agree let's get into it a. all right. Let's fired up. All Right Michelle Mouton entered this world on June twenty third nineteen, fifty one in the French Riviera more specifically the idyllic town of grass cross grass Ross. The Idyllic town of Gross France, the perfume capital of the world grassi surrounded by fields of aromatic flowers and home to Francis. Oldest perfumery GALLIMARD. Look I'm friend by far French is the language that I have the hardest time pronouncing both words and names I apologize profusely to anyone with a modicum of sense of how to pronounce stuff I. Think you're doing great. I think I think here like right there. Thank you, Joe, unlike many drivers whose family have a history in the sport returns family made a living growing roses and jasmine for the perfume industry mouton spent her youth skiing doing ballet and excelling in school. But just beyond the flower fields sat the mountain. Stages used for local rallies and wouldn't be long before the engine notes trickling down into the valley beckoned to Michelle mcgann discovered her love of cars at fourteen years old when she would steal her father. Pierre's Citron to seavy and take it out for joyrides. Quote for me at the time a car always meant freedom and independence she said but driving wasn't something she could possibly see a future in it for anyone to envision that path for mere enjoyment to making something your life's purpose but you could argue this especially from. Models for women on the racing stage were few and far between. So after graduating high school Bhutan took up odd jobs working as a ski instructor, a Care Assistant in a home for the disabled and eventually at her father's insurance company until she began studying to be a lawyer but something unexpected would quickly put an end to that career path her entry into a competitive rock and roll dance contest.

Michelle Michelle Mouton Michelle. Mouton Michelle Mcgann Audi Bhutan Pierre French Riviera Gross France James Gallimard JOE Citron Francis Instructor Care Assistant
Boston - First Red Panda Born At Buttonwood Park Zoo Makes Debut In Outdoor Habitat

WBZ Morning News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Boston - First Red Panda Born At Buttonwood Park Zoo Makes Debut In Outdoor Habitat

"Born at Buttonwood Park Zoo in New Bedford made his debut outdoors yesterday and, well, the timing couldn't have been any better. Yesterday was International Red Panda Day. Kodo, the baby Red Panda, Born on June 4th, Mom and dad, the zoo's red panda couple in there named I don't know where they get this. Marie and Jacob course it is. Red pandas native to nape all northeastern India, Bhutan and parts of China and they are an endangered species. Senator Chuck Schumer Out to save Broadway

Buttonwood Park Zoo Senator Chuck Schumer New Bedford Kodo Bhutan Marie Jacob India China
The Urgent Need to Make Disciples - Matthew 28:19

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:41 min | 1 year ago

The Urgent Need to Make Disciples - Matthew 28:19

"Matthew Chapter Twenty Eight. I nineteen. Go therefore. And make disciples of all nations. baptizing them in the name of the father and of the son and of the Holy Spirit. So much, we can talk about here so much. We could pray based on just that that one verse in the Great Commission but I want us to pray. Based on one truth. And what? We just read that I think many people often miss. So when Jesus says, make disciples of all nations. That is not a general command to make disciples among as many people as possible. No, that's a specific command to make disciples of all nations Ponta ethnic of all the ethnic groups. Of all the peoples of the world. So Jesus told us to go to every ethnic group. Every people group in the world and make disciples there. So what that means is, if we are not working in our lives, our families and churches to take the Gospel. To people groups ethnic groups places where the Gospel is not yet gone. Then we are disobeying the Great Commission. Disregarding what Jesus is us to do here. And the reason this is so important because. We already. And our lives and families and churches even in our churches. We spend so little on missions. Taking the Gospel to other places, but then even out of that which we spend on missions. Did you know? That ninety plus percent of missions resources in north. American churches so resources we're spending on. Missions are actually going to places in the world where the Gospel has already gone. Where churches have already been planted. Many churches even Christians when we think about missions. We think all over Latin America. We think all over sub Saharan Africa. When reality is by God's. Grace The Gospel has gone all over Latin America. All over sub Saharan Africa Yes. There are small pockets in these places, these regions where the gospels now gone, but for the most part the Gospel has gone disciples of in May, churches have been planted, and it's not wrong by any means to come alongside our brothers and sisters in these places to learn from them to work together for the glory of God, no question at the same time. We're fooling ourselves if we call that emissions when the reality is were still not obeying the mission. When ninety plus percent of our resources are going to places where the gas was already gone, and Jesus has commanded us, not suggested not implied he is crystal clear commanded us to make disciples take the Gospel, the good news of his love to people. Groups places where the gospels not yet gone. So this is why I know why. We radical started urgent, just identify the places in the world, the groups of people in the world, even the countries in the world, where there's the least access to the Gospel and to mobilize resources to go to them. It's called urgent. That's what initiatives call like. Because there's urgent need, there are people dying and going to an eternal hell who've never even heard. Nobody's even brought the good news of how they can go to heaven through Jesus to them so I just wanted to lead us to pray accordingly. Jesus we. We want to obey your. Command. We want to make your grace and your glory known among all the nations. So we pray. That you would. Open her eyes. Inner Churches to see where the Gospel is gone and to work to take the Gospel, their and our lives, and our families, and our churches to go, and to send, and to come alongside brothers and sisters who are in these places, a few brothers and sisters. I think about that we're. Partnering together with these places in the world, God help us to get behind him and work with them. For the spread of the gospel of never heard gotta we pray you think about all these countries that we're focused on an urgent like Syria God for Your glory in the Megan disciples in Bhutan North Korean. Across India and Iraq and Afghanistan and Iran Laos Lebanon Nepal and some Malia and Yemen Jesus Make Your glory known in those places and use us to do it. Don't don't let us sit back. Content to hold onto the gospel or just to take it where it's already gone God, help us to work us our efforts to take the Gospel whereas Never Gone So that disciples made in all the nations. Just as you've called to do for Your glory for the glory of the name of Jesus in all nations. We pray these

Jesus Great Commission Inner Churches Saharan Africa Holy Spirit Latin America Iran Laos Lebanon Nepal India Malia Iraq Afghanistan
How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

Travel with Rick Steves

03:59 min | 1 year ago

How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

"Berlin has become the high tech and cultural powerhouse of today's dynamic German economy but there are still plenty of Berliners who can tell you about the difficulties. They faced back in the twentieth century as a divided city and stories of life under the Nazis during World War Two. We're joined now by German tour guides older Timur and Fabien Muga. Look at some of the most impressive monuments and memorials. You can visit to remember the lessons from Berlin past gentlemen. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having to live in Berlin as a tourist. You just come and go to live there. You're surrounded by all of this history and all of these memorials when you walk down the streets. Does it become just background and you just see through it or are you constantly aware of this happened there? This happened there and so on holger is part of everyday life. Yes but it's not like you kind of oversee it because it is there it is right in your face. I've seen most of the memorials like many countless times. As a berliner as tour guide here but they still are some of them are really haunting especially when it comes to divided city to the wall or to the time of the National Socialist period and in the case of Germany. With your complicated history. The memorials are almost there to not go away to be in your face. I mean there's even something called stumble stones right Fabio yes. There are a memorial stones to victims of the Holocaust who had deported from particular houses. And if you have a friend or relative was deported from that house you can donate some money to this foundation and they will put stumbling stone into the pavement Princeton pavement. Like you need to trip on this to never forget the horrible thing that happened right there when you think about Germany. A lot of our fixated on World War Two in the whole fastest thing but of course there's many layers of the city that was the leading city of of the PRUSSIAN empire and so on Fabio. And when you think about memorials of the horns period and Prussia what is there in Germany to look at our Berlin. I think the most visible that everybody know will know. Is The victory column. That's in the center of the main park often. The victory column was built as a symbol of victory over the French. This is where history and Berlin connect. It was originally standing on the spot where it is today. The Nazis moved at there to make it stand in a more triumphant spot in the very center of the city. It was originally built near the rice stuck building and was not looking quite some one mental there today. Six major streets of lead straight towards the listen to that part of a big access isn't it? I mean Hoeger. The whole city is built on this axis which lined by memorials. The East and west access really is this fascinating thing. You look up. And you see Golden Angel Hair and you think. Wow that's wonderful. Then you close in you. See while this is all candidates made cannons French cannons French cannons. Like as a AS A TO Z. Boy To as spoils of war multiple. Yeah so it is weird thing. If you you would think that's nice to call between can look at it that it has a little jab at the French. It's a big Jab at Big Jab at the French or the Germans the French and of course I in the next century. We've got the whole Hitler situation and a lot of memorials relating to the nightmare of Berlin being the capital of Nazism. What are some of the memorials that you'll see when you go to Berlin that way what I found very haunting as the memorial to the burning of the books right near onto the Lyndon right near the State Opera House? And it's basically a memorial that you wouldn't really see because it's underground and you would just maybe pastas Query Newton. We have no idea what it is but quite often you see consumerist groups looking at nothing really and then you look there and it basically is a hole in the ground. It's a glass plate in the ground and he looked down and there is an empty library like five by five five meters containing empty shelves for twenty thousand books. Symbolizing was happening in the tenth of May Nineteen thirty three. When the Nazis took all the books and literature that they hated that it didn't understand they didn't like and were putting them in a big pile and burning him openly for people to see and that's now empty. Shelves are very haunting memorial to that.

Berlin Germany Timur Fabien Muga Fabio Holger Prussia Hoeger Princeton State Opera House Hitler Lyndon
The Victory Column, Berlin

Travel with Rick Steves

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

The Victory Column, Berlin

"The victory column was built as a symbol of victory over the French. This is where history and Berlin connect. It was originally standing on the spot where it is today. The Nazis moved at there to make it stand in a more triumphant spot in the very center of the city. It was originally built near the rice stuck building

Berlin Rice Stuck Building
Arlene

PODSHIP EARTH

08:05 min | 1 year ago

Arlene

"Dr Arlene Blum is a biophysical chemist and author a mountaineer and Executive Director of the Green Science Policy Institute. The Institute Scientific Research and policy work with government and business has contributed to preventing the use of harmful chemicals including flame retardants and fluorinated chemicals like pizzas in children's sleepwear furniture electronics and other products worldwide. Arlene blum received a PhD from UC Berkeley and has told at Stanford University and Wellesley College. But that's only a fraction of Alino story arlene the first American and all woman ascent of an opponent. One considered one of the world's most dangerous and difficult mountains. She Co lead the first women's team to climb. Denali completed the Great Himalayan traverse across the mountain ranges of Bhutan the Pollen India and height the length of the European Alps with her baby daughter on her back. She's the author of Ana Pana a woman's place which was named one of the top one hundred best adventure books of all time by National Geographic. She also wrote the highly acclaimed book breaking trail. A climbing. Life. In two thousand eighteen bloom was inducted into the California Hall of fame. She was chosen by the Guardian as one of the world's one hundred most inspiring women. Dr Bloom is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. And if that wasn't enough Eileen was elected to the whole of mountaineering. Excellent Hey uh keep me from getting. You remember the day where we're sitting right now. I mean we're sitting in Tilden Park on. Trail called seaview with a wonderful view of the bay. While flowers greenhills Gorgeous California. And why so many people on the trail today? Well it turns out that everyone has been ordered to stay home or go outdoors and everything's closed so there are a lot more people outdoors than usual. Which is a good thing and you walk every single day. Tell us about that routine and and how you got into it. Well I do pretty intense work and I work really hard because I have so many opportunities and I've discovered that if every day I take a walk with friends or colleagues or sometimes even the chemical industry executives with whom I do not see eye to eye. It's extremely good for my physical health. My mental health and my work. You have an incredible history of climbing of mountaineering. Have you always had a passion for climbing and mountaineering? How did that start? I was raised by incredibly cautious and conservative Orthodox Jewish grandparents in Chicago and was not allowed to do anything and I push push push to just be able to take swimming lessons and so I guess I started early with coming up with things I really wanted to do and then pushing to be able to do them. When I was a Grad student at Berkeley I heard about an expedition to Denali Mount McKinley. The Highest Mountain in North America. And I'd been climbing a lot with my friends from Reed College and had climbed higher than Denali in Peru and apply gone the trap and was told that women could go as far as base camp to help with the cooking. And when I called to say well I've climbed higher than Denali. They said. Yeah you were the only woman. You probably didn't do your share you know. Women really can't time high mountains. I wonder if a team of all women could climb high mountains and I found five other women and we went and kind to Nali ourselves. All women were the first all women's team and indeed not only. Did we climb it? But our leader had altitude sickness and became unconscious just below the summit and at that point. I was twenty five. I was the deputy leader because I'd organized and suddenly I was in charge of our Denali expedition with an unconscious person at twenty thousand feet and a big Arctic storm. Coming in and We actually made a stretcher dragged her down the mountain and it was really empowering to me. I mean I'd had a lot of negative messages in my childhood about what I couldn't couldn't do and I thought wow we got grace down from Denali Alive. We can do anything. We dream up so that was really inspiring for me to realize sick. We can all do things and we believe possible when we have to then. You just kept going though. That wasn't the end of your mountaineering. No I love being in the mountains. I love being outdoors. I love being here. I seem to like challenge. I was on a nineteen. Seventy six expedition climbed Everest. We were the second American expedition in those days. Hard to believe we have the whole mountain to ourselves and I climbed to nearly twenty five thousand feet and on the way back. I thought at that point all the world's highest mountains over eight thousand meters. That's kind of a magic height They all had been cleaned by men but no woman had ever climbed eight thousand meters and people were saying maybe women couldn't and I thought well we climbed. Denali got twenty four Everest. Let's give him a chance. So on my way back from I I applied for a permit for Anna Purna one and it was the first eight thousand meter peak ever climbed. It has the highest fatality rate. And it's now considered the hardest climb and we did not know that and so In nineteen seventy eight. I did organize an an all women's expedition and we were successful. We were the first women and indeed the first Americans to climb out of that reinforced my belief that we can all do seemingly impossible things and I'd say now is a good time for all of us to be doing seemingly impossible things because it's it's tough right now. Your experience shows me and the tough things that I've done in my life is that you can move past them that they're not insurmountable and even if they are to continue moving forward with with those challenges. I've never been above eight thousand meters. What what is it like? I mean the physicality of losing that oxygen. Do you get addicted to that. It feels like a very rarefied club of people that understand and know something that the rest of us don't well first of all it's the most beautiful place ever being above timberline with clouds on your feet the extreme beauty and peace and so it is so beautiful. But you know being here until the park is so beautiful to you. Don't have to be on top of Anna Perna and there's a huge amount of focus. You have a goal and you get a great team and everybody shares ICAL. But I'm always kind of looking for family and a climbing expedition is like a family but perhaps better family dynamics and some families have so you have a family of people all focused on a goal. And you're in a beautiful place using every bit of your physical energy but your mental energy problem solving. So it's it's super focused. Every since I became a mom didn't want to risk my life because if you know this but the chances of dying about one in ten climbing those mountains so it seriously dangerous so for me as a mom. I don't want to risk my life on the other hand what I'm doing now which is reducing harmful chemicals that are in our bodies and our products and our planet so it's got a very similar similar feeling of of getting a great team family of people who share a common goal and then persevering through avalanches and storms and Yetis. And what have you

Dr Arlene Blum Highest Mountain Denali Mount Mckinley Denali Ana Pana Great Himalayan European Alps Alino Green Science Policy Institute Institute Scientific Research Executive Director Guardian Anna Perna Stanford University Reed College Dr Bloom Wellesley College Tilden Park Berkeley
"bhutan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"bhutan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A smartphone app for some people perfecting that score becomes its own goal because it really really stressed out about how will you know what I I I had a score of eighty and I really wanted to hit a hundred and I'll ask them just to put their track away for a couple weeks and I honestly sometimes you can see the relief on their faces Katharine ham experience this problem when she developed insomnia she tried to sleep tracker it just made things worse but then I actually realized that I'm even more stressed out just be kind of like in writing a black on white that I'm not sleeping well instead of kind of addressing the root cause there was more concerned about continue measuring measuring at the time getting good sleep is really important to him because she was traveling all around the world as an economist for the World Bank thank you get by walking on a plane I was on the road kind of around in Bangladesh Nepal and Bhutan and I never I've never been a good neighbor but during that time like I really had developed insomnia and some serious issues she got noise machines expensive pillows and mattresses none of them worked finally she tried awaited blanket these are usually filled with plastic or glass beads and use and therapy to help kids with autism vans I can say the wait lists anxiety so you can relax and I tried one of these on a Saturday afternoon nap with it well short time and I woke up four hours later the sleeve market is worth tens of billions of dollars from weighted blankets to tech gadgets like trackers and meditation headbands not getting enough rest is unhealthy increasing the risk of depression heart disease and other conditions ironically it's technology.

World Bank Nepal insomnia Katharine ham Bhutan
"bhutan" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"bhutan" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Our lord and savior Jesus Christ and rejoice in his love for every person today is the deadline for states to decide whether or not they'll accept new refugees after president trump issued an executive order giving governors the chance to opt out and not accept refugees CBS is major Garrett Kiki Sharma was born in a refugee camp in Nepal after her parents fled religious foreign Bhutan more than twenty five years ago it's amazing there are there any that I've lived they resettled in Utah and about two years ago with help from the international rescue committee opened Bhutan house the restaurant serving cuisine from Nepal India and Bhutan the dream came true here for us but that dream may be available to fewer and fewer executive action issued by president trump gives state and local governments power to refuse refugees governor Baker already said last week that that state will continue accepting refugees but Springfield mayor Domenic Sarno said that city will not eleven oh three time for traffic and weather together at the Super retailers New England all wheel drive traffic from three years jacquard thank you Madison it being Christmas and all and I'm going to see so much in the way of work crews on on area roadways and as a result pretty good shape in most places traffic is very light traveling on route ninety three coming down from New Hampshire into the city you doing very well traveling down to the south through three from born right up to Braintree no major issues mass pike Auburn right in the downtown all is well traveling right in the downtown area itself might find a short little slow down on star or drive towards leverage circle that's about it summary Callahan tunnels doing well I'm jacquard WBZ twenty four hour traffic at work and now time for a check of the four day WBZ accu weather forecast partly to mostly cloudy skies tonight lows ranging from the middle twenties and some of the colder outlying areas to thirty four in the city for tomorrow periods of clouds and sunshine the afternoon high forty tomorrow night thickening clouds lows ranging from twenty six in some suburbs to thirty four downtown on.

Domenic Sarno Callahan Auburn Springfield governor Baker executive president New Hampshire Madison CBS president trump India Bhutan house international rescue committee Utah Bhutan Nepal Garrett Kiki Sharma
NFL Week 16 scores, highlights, and updates

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

NFL Week 16 scores, highlights, and updates

"The packers Akers became the kings of the north after defeating her cousins and the Vikings Twenty three to ten on Monday night football cousins. Now all one nine on Monday night football for his career about the Texans. Jj Awadh expected to return a practice today sources tell ESPN Corsi tourist pectoral muscle in week eight was placed on irs. was to be a three to four months injury But it's only been eight weeks so we'll see see the Seattle seahawks agree to a deal with marshawn lynch on Monday night they face the niners for the NFC West Division title on Sunday night. And Mike Tannenbaum because we've been tracking him all day. Hey according to Santa Tracker Santa is currently in Bhutan. Which of course is a small landlocked nation in Asia located in the eastern Himalayan mountains? Just south China

Mike Tannenbaum Akers Seahawks Santa Packers Jj Awadh Football Marshawn Lynch Vikings NFC Asia Bhutan Espn China Seattle Irs.
The future of the planet clearly in our hands: top climate change scientist

UN News

08:57 min | 2 years ago

The future of the planet clearly in our hands: top climate change scientist

"There are clear benefits to keeping the Earth's temperature below two degrees and the choices we make now will be critical for the future Sure of our oceans and krause fear that's the message from Angel- Prakash Coordinating Lead Author of the latest UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. or I P C C report on the havoc being unleashed on the earth's oceans and ice caps and what can be done to address it's unprecedented negative impacts on ecosystems and people in an interview with you a news Mr Prakash highlighted the importance of climate-proofing development programs building climate Brasilia infrastructure developing early warning systems and putting in place institutional innovation for Tackling Disasters Mr Prakash spoke to you on news eighteen Gar defined these new IPC city which is focusing on two important system which is oceans and glass fear and finding the that there's been Dogged about basically focuses on two points one is that these two systems interconnected systems and what happened wants to the Tucson also impact a larger larger population which is getting affected so oceans coming up the Earth is because of this fear are also changing and then the which is which is a frozen part of our world which is also changing so these two are important system entities there are people who are driving directly resources from the ocean systems they will be directly affected they'll be more cyclones in future similarly because of the glaciers declining there is a new be chained in water regimes and this is something which is not in future what we are seeing that this is happening today now and that's the major part of the question that we are trying to address here to this deport oceans are warming glaciers melting and sea level is rising but in a sense that we we know the pieces to deport has been saying saying just very critically that systems are at a very critical stage excited crisis is happening and because of this climate prices there are changes in the in the environmental system which is impacting the lives of the people so unfortunately is not good news but the only good news with we can share is that we can change the system so this the wave washes coming up weekend changed what decision governments me today when have an impacter for their future will be so our future is clearly in our hand and that's the message from the right and the report also says that global warming has already reached one disintegrate about the industry level and you've hinted about people being affect did their livelihoods depend on ocean ecosystems so how concern we should be about the consequences it may have on ecosystems and people we are not talking about one point five degrees centigrade we're talking about one centigrade rise in temperature so we have our leave the Centigrade and then what you're talking about this to keep US below one point five degree from the industrial level by end of the century but the way we are progressing at this moment what this report says that even if he you know of we are going to cross one point five degrees and chance chances is that we will you know we have to keep the temperature below two degree and that's the major issues that we have now what is happening is that because of the warming of the climate and the global warming there are many many people who are directly dependent for example six hundred seventy million people in the highly highly mountain region six hundred eighty million people in low lying astute zone because of the warming of the oceans and the changes in class field the no the sea level is rising and then that is directly affect going to be affecting who are staying in low-lying cortisone like for example people in the Small Island Developing States there sixty five million people who are living in the small island developing their about four let formula and people living in the Arctic region these people are going to be directly affected right so definitely a benefit of keeping the temperature below two degree and the choices that we make now very difficult for the future of the oceans and crafts here and this is what this report is being precising underscoring from the quarterback so what concrete emergent measures must be taken to address these changes in the ocean and ecosystems in the short-term dot com what we're talking about is probably now from now till twenty thirty two hundred fifty that the long term is between twenty fifty two and essentially what we are in a one to one is definitely as mitigation we need who if not work on mission that that is where countries have to come together they must cooperate and misses that you know if you we countries do not fall got it we will have much you know Greek future that's what this report is talking about the second part is adapation because even if you know the countries like for example Putin pal in this part of the world I'd actually carbon neutral countries they have not contributed anything to global warming AH at the age of the changes happening at this moment there four fund at the community the poorest communities in Bhutan and they file out the forefront of of whatever change is happening for example also in email invasions in India and Pakistan Bangladesh those the entire Integration Melanesian India's and also people living in the coastal communities now the question of how how can we adapt the first point is to climate proof flapping program so all the development program are slow go through climate-proofing process and the second is that we introspection has to be made climate resilient you know we have been seeing unprecedented changes in the in the in the weather for example you know there there's many many cyclones coming up Carribean ditsy cyclone that came together and this is all has been the scientists from my pieces have been warning these about these is for long long time and this report is the emphasizing underscoring and saying that this is this is going to be much more pronounced in future so we need to definitely have a much better early warning system we need to have institutionally ovation for tackling disaster and also resilient vibe your practices and to get this this we need to have a long-term monitoring kroger them sharing data information knowledge nothing improve scientific forecast it'll help us in predicting more such events you've been tracking climate change for a very long time in your view what have been the greatest changes you have seen over the past reviews that we think that I would like to emphasize one is the cloud even have been increasing philosophy more than ten years I've seen personally that and I've been working in the industrial region In the in based in London earlier and I think that the flood events have been much more frequent and the it much career in the extreme precipitation events have been more pronounced so this is one which is very very important for mountain people because you have flash floods and concerted effort that is to support our landscape and communities and individuals to address the challenges of intriguing urban heat in in in many of them locations has been very challenging for the government so the heat waves which is going to be much more pronounced in future and we have been already

Five Degrees Two Degree Five Degree Two Degrees Ten Years
The future of the planet clearly in our hands: top climate change scientist

UN News

08:57 min | 2 years ago

The future of the planet clearly in our hands: top climate change scientist

"There are clear benefits to keeping the Earth's temperature below two degrees and the choices we make now will be critical for the future Sure of our oceans and krause fear that's the message from Angel- Prakash Coordinating Lead Author of the latest UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. or I P C C report on the havoc being unleashed on the earth's oceans and ice caps and what can be done to address it's unprecedented negative impacts on ecosystems and people in an interview with you a news Mr Prakash highlighted the importance of climate-proofing development programs building climate Brasilia infrastructure developing early warning systems and putting in place institutional innovation for Tackling Disasters Mr Prakash spoke to you on news eighteen Gar defined these new IPC city which is focusing on two important system which is oceans and glass fear and finding the that there's been Dogged about basically focuses on two points one is that these two systems interconnected systems and what happened wants to the Tucson also impact a larger larger population which is getting affected so oceans coming up the Earth is because of this fear are also changing and then the which is which is a frozen part of our world which is also changing so these two are important system entities there are people who are driving directly resources from the ocean systems they will be directly affected they'll be more cyclones in future similarly because of the glaciers declining there is a new be chained in water regimes and this is something which is not in future what we are seeing that this is happening today now and that's the major part of the question that we are trying to address here to this deport oceans are warming glaciers melting and sea level is rising but in a sense that we we know the pieces to deport has been saying saying just very critically that systems are at a very critical stage excited crisis is happening and because of this climate prices there are changes in the in the environmental system which is impacting the lives of the people so unfortunately is not good news but the only good news with we can share is that we can change the system so this the wave washes coming up weekend changed what decision governments me today when have an impacter for their future will be so our future is clearly in our hand and that's the message from the right and the report also says that global warming has already reached one disintegrate about the industry level and you've hinted about people being affect did their livelihoods depend on ocean ecosystems so how concern we should be about the consequences it may have on ecosystems and people we are not talking about one point five degrees centigrade we're talking about one centigrade rise in temperature so we have our leave the Centigrade and then what you're talking about this to keep US below one point five degree from the industrial level by end of the century but the way we are progressing at this moment what this report says that even if he you know of we are going to cross one point five degrees and chance chances is that we will you know we have to keep the temperature below two degree and that's the major issues that we have now what is happening is that because of the warming of the climate and the global warming there are many many people who are directly dependent for example six hundred seventy million people in the highly highly mountain region six hundred eighty million people in low lying astute zone because of the warming of the oceans and the changes in class field the no the sea level is rising and then that is directly affect going to be affecting who are staying in low-lying cortisone like for example people in the Small Island Developing States there sixty five million people who are living in the small island developing their about four let formula and people living in the Arctic region these people are going to be directly affected right so definitely a benefit of keeping the temperature below two degree and the choices that we make now very difficult for the future of the oceans and crafts here and this is what this report is being precising underscoring from the quarterback so what concrete emergent measures must be taken to address these changes in the ocean and ecosystems in the short-term dot com what we're talking about is probably now from now till twenty thirty two hundred fifty that the long term is between twenty fifty two and essentially what we are in a one to one is definitely as mitigation we need who if not work on mission that that is where countries have to come together they must cooperate and misses that you know if you we countries do not fall got it we will have much you know Greek future that's what this report is talking about the second part is adapation because even if you know the countries like for example Putin pal in this part of the world I'd actually carbon neutral countries they have not contributed anything to global warming AH at the age of the changes happening at this moment there four fund at the community the poorest communities in Bhutan and they file out the forefront of of whatever change is happening for example also in email invasions in India and Pakistan Bangladesh those the entire Integration Melanesian India's and also people living in the coastal communities now the question of how how can we adapt the first point is to climate proof flapping program so all the development program are slow go through climate-proofing process and the second is that we introspection has to be made climate resilient you know we have been seeing unprecedented changes in the in the in the weather for example you know there there's many many cyclones coming up Carribean ditsy cyclone that came together and this is all has been the scientists from my pieces have been warning these about these is for long long time and this report is the emphasizing underscoring and saying that this is this is going to be much more pronounced in future so we need to definitely have a much better early warning system we need to have institutionally ovation for tackling disaster and also resilient vibe your practices and to get this this we need to have a long-term monitoring kroger them sharing data information knowledge nothing improve scientific forecast it'll help us in predicting more such events you've been tracking climate change for a very long time in your view what have been the greatest changes you have seen over the past reviews that we think that I would like to emphasize one is the cloud even have been increasing philosophy more than ten years I've seen personally that and I've been working in the industrial region In the in based in London earlier and I think that the flood events have been much more frequent and the it much career in the extreme precipitation events have been more pronounced so this is one which is very very important for mountain people because you have flash floods and concerted effort that is to support our landscape and communities and individuals to address the challenges of intriguing urban heat in in in many of them locations has been very challenging for the government so the heat waves which is going to be much more pronounced in future and we have been already

Five Degrees Two Degree Five Degree Two Degrees Ten Years
"bhutan" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"bhutan" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"It's like there's so many levels to it. And I yeah, that's I'm very, very intrigued to just like apply. All of my big picture thinking to like my little life and see, like okay like how can I actually do much? Much better. Preserve the thing that feels sacred and a central like what I actually wanted me doing while it cutting down on all those other that I want nothing to do with in, in theory, you know, but it's like it's, it's a real predicament. We've gotten ourselves into where we all money too. Function and what we think we think we do, and it seems like we do in like all that stuff because the mind is, like my mind, at least right away, does go to like, well, I know what I'm going to do. Right. I'm gonna give it all away, and I'm going to take the family will figure out a way to get them to let us into boot on and I'll just go live in Bhutan. I'll just go be a hermit. And my wife, of course would be like, well, I guess we're going to put you in the mental hospital. You having a manic episodes. What I mean? But that is what my manic mine goes to when it's like, actually, there's really. One thing I'll tell you, when you say things like this sound of noxious because you're sounding correct corrective. I'm I'm, I'm, I'm saying if there is an apocalypse happening right now. And if every if the Pakalitha is the some doto of all phenomena within the apocalypse breaking down, then you can only handle the part of the apocalypse that you are sitting in, you don't have to worry about the rest of the bottle of as the boggles will take care of itself. Right. We're going to do an apocalypse, then let's make our part of the apocalypse is gentle and sweet like there's a there's like your dream.

Bhutan
"bhutan" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"bhutan" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Which is great because it means that our normal tendency is to be apathetic and to be lazy. And when you're in bishop's, it gets you up off your ass do things, but then you get to certain point and the acid start eating through the actual engine the engine that keeps you going. It. It starts. It starts to eat. You up inside walking. Yeah. Exactly. And there comes a point where you realize the actually can't dance with the Broncos. Then that chip on your shoulder. Then ambition that's actually become now an obstacle to the happiness that you thought it was going to bring you in the first place the enemy now, it's like the demon inside. And she got to let go up. It's the thing that fuels you to get there. But it's not the thing. That's going to help you be fulfilled. Right. Exactly. I mean, so fulfillment and happiness and like, but then not long term. And I think that's that's what we gotta learn I think so how much of this has to do with what do you consider sort of your purpose in life? I mean, what what what would you consider success because obviously you had monetary success? Yeah. You've had success in different areas. In sports. What do you consider success that actually makes you happy? What's the stuff that makes you happy for me? It's knowing that I don't live with any regrets. So at least giving my full effort on things that I'm that. I love that. I'm excited about that. Or my dreams or my fears. It's like going all in on those things, and if I fail at least, I know I went all then for me that's one measure success. Another measure success is making my family proud. You know in in doing doing well by my name, my last name, my family, the people that raise me, my siblings and having them really respect me and say you're doing a good job for me. That's important. The third thing is knowing that I left it all on the field of life and making the maximum impact on the maximum number of people. I don't know. I downloaded this app. A few weeks ago called we croak. I don't know if you've heard of this five times a day. It sends me a message that says you're going to die, and I guess it's from the the nation Bhutan. I think we're five times a day, they practiced. They celebrate their death. Or they think about their death to have them appreciate their life more. And I'm thinking about this a lot more which like I'm gonna be gone tomorrow. I might walk out of here. Hopefully, I am safe. But the rain who knows and I may not be here. Am I going to be happy with the results? I have in the actions, I took on this life. So. For me. It's just how can I make the maximum impact on the maximum number of people to help them live a better life. I don't know a better mission that I live by if I can help people feel better live better reach their potential achieve their dreams..

Broncos bishop Bhutan
"bhutan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:34 min | 3 years ago

"bhutan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Hi. My name is Alison Bhutan work on Asia programs that enter news. So you talked a little bit about the rules for going viral. And I think it's a really interesting phenomenon that a lot of them are really based and strategies for propaganda that I've worked for a really long time. But I'm wondering a lot of those are also based on his algorithm that for instance, Facebook has set up where it doesn't value truthfulness values the eyeballs to add money. So if this algorithm where to be changed to value truthfulness. I mean, the companies are coming under increasing scrutiny for for instance. Like, you mentioned in me Amar would that then change the rules would that change? How people communicate on these platforms. And I think it also brings up interesting questions about whether the ways that. Communicate are responding to the platforms. Now, like if how how our spec is changing. And then I had a separate question on whether you looked at communications and more private channels. So like private Facebook messenger. Or what's that groups? So the question I private channels to a lesser extent simply because they're hard to track even for folks who are doing a lot of. Like underground research. The only way to get in these private channels is the actually saying the case of the Brazilian elections have been there and be part of a lot of the same. What's up groups that are sharing information? This is a huge challenge for people who want to study these issues because oftentimes the only way we know what information is being shared. If you're contemporaine Asli part of those groups, and that also biopsies are book and most coverage to date more for western nations because what's app is not the predominant means of communication in the west it is in Brazil and India. And. Yeah that biases coverage. But I'm really glad you brought up the social media companies because that's one of the biggest takeaways, and what actually constituted a lot of our research for this project is that. All these this battle for attention is not playing out in some neutral battlefields. It is playing out in an environment. That's been engineered by basically a handful of Americans who've come up in Silicon Valley who are generally white male upper middle class, and who now assert outsize political influence over the whole world to your question about if the algorithms re-engineered to favor truthfulness, I think that would be market dramatic and positive change. But that of course, raises questions of how you possibly do that except retroactively. Three more more and more investment in content moderation, which is the direction these companies are moving in. And then also the moral and ethical questions of to to what extent are we willing to have private American corporations arbitrating the nature of political truth versus a public organization or some sort of public trust or some other entity. We are going to move toward a point where I think governments around the world are going to demand more active role in the content moderation policies and procedures of these companies simply because so much political discourse takes place on these platforms. Now, I would I would follow up with about your question about the ethics of defining truth that I think there has been a lot of a lot of grey and a lot of discussion around the issue. But I think in the cases, for instance in India. Where misinformation shared on WhatsApp has led to like sixty two inch mobbing 's in two thousand eighteen there is there is truth and. Falsity, and there are certain cases where that can be defined as an example. I'm thinking of. So there are clear cut cases. But something that's really stuck with me. It was I think an interpreter. Times article. I think came out like the twenty eighth on. There was a new leak of the massive Facebook content moderation. Guidelines handbook, and there is essentially guidance that typically discussion of the Taliban is like verboten. You don't. Moderated or deleted. If you express pro-taliban sentiment, but an addendum had been added that discussion of the Taliban in the context of a new ceasefire proposal was permitted again. I agree with the general sentiment. But that is a deeply political decision. That's being made not by the American government or the government of Afghanistan or anyone else that has a public constituency, but by an American Corporation, Emerson brooking evolution of a couple of things actually links back to your question relevant to political campaigns, Peter singer. The change in how we view these companies themselves. So once they were the bells of the ball. They were the companies that were most admired and the like across the political spectrum. And now both the right and left wing see political value in beating up on these companies for better and for worse, not just inside the United States. Whether it's in Europe, and the like the companies have their reputation has shifted to the other. So they become political issues. And I don't think that's going away the discussion of weather, and how to regulate these companies is a political campaign issue in upcoming elections in a way that it was not in the past the other kind of evolution is what Emerson was getting out is how these companies view themselves. So they at one point of time, we're saying, we don't wanna be the arbiters of truth to use Docker Burke. Statement to go back to our saying the kind of denial to bargaining in the most recent American fall election Facebook once from saying we don't want to be an arbiter of truth says, okay, if you are spreading false information about the upcoming election where vote or the like we can boot you off the network Twitter is doing the same. So the company has gone from saying we're not an arbiter of truth to on certain issues. We've decided we will be an arbiter of truth. Now, where this gets really sticky is on issues like for instance, extremism, so in content moderation. I all the different companies were okay with booting off ISIS members and again bargaining. They'll say to congress. Well, you're mad at us about Russian misinformation. So, but, but let us talk to you about all the things we did against Harris groups. Okay. But what about for example, far-right extremism in America? Ooh, now, it got kind of awkward. Should you be allowed to call for violence? In those cases, what's the level? What groups if you show for example, a ISIS black flag on your Twitter account dot image? The AI algorithm has been set up to automatically boot you. But if you for example, put off fourteen eighty eight which is kind of a lingo of white supremacists groups on it. Well, we've not set up. The the our rhythm to boot you again. So there's there's these political debates inside the companies as to what's allowed or not that they've they've become part of and in turn we're going to see an extra no political debate to decide. Do we continue to allow them to be the ones that decide or will government? Make that decision for them. So far, essentially Europe your says government's gonna decide for you United States. We've mostly deferred to the private companies themselves. Join him Nellie wake. You began your discussion. You were talking about various groups that you observed individuals political groups countries that almost had a playbook. That's how you go about spreading disinformation or getting and putting this information out there. Flipping to the other side, which is kind of touched upon. How does this not turn into a continually? Escalating came of welcome hall when you're an individual company or country trying to stop what you know is wrong when you're a candidate who can say. I I wasn't even in office. That was two years before I was in office when that happened, and you can say that it just seems as though easy put out one fire and ten more spring up. So if it's if it's that easy to go to war and weaponized social media. How does the social media user or consumer become more savvy or band together, or somehow has an advocacy group that is acceptable to government and private industry? To combat it. So great question and it circles back actually to an earlier question of what can we do? And what can we do is going to play out on multiple different levels? So one, for example, is the level of government. There is this strange inside irony that the United States is in the nation that invented the internet, and we are now the example that other nations point two of don't let what happened to them happened to us. And literally defense officials and other nations where we're the we're the bad example, where the victim example. And it goes back to what Emerson was saying. That's particularly sad when we know that and yet our government is still kind of not mode of denial and not organizing around it. So then the good side of that is that there are a series of things that governments around the world democratic governments have done to better, secure themselves and still retain respect for rights and privacy. So in particular is that what's played out in the Baltics, which are the best this in part because they were among the first to be targeted by Russia. One of the things that they have there is a government, basically, kind of almost akin to sharing information about bad weather, a hurricane's coming. Here's an incoming information assault from another nation. Here's something that's about to go viral. That is a false story. That's been planted. That not only aids government and media wariness, a different example, this Norway the media companies compete against each other their corporate rivals, but they share in fact checking so they have these kind of checks on false stories that not only allow people to see them coming. But also makes it easier when you as an individual when your relative shares it you're able to say, hey, that's that full story. Here's the origin point of it. It's not organic it was originally planted. Here's the Russian body count that it came from. So there's a government level to that all the way down to your individual level. There's a company role in this one of the things that the companies in particular deal with to echo back to the parallel of what Emerson was Saint of public health is the role of what are known as super spreaders in public health win disease viruses, spread we're all not equal. There is almost always a small number of people that are the key. Vectors of the spread of disease. They're called super spreaders. It's the same thing in online misinformation disinformation one of the interesting things about this is that there's actually an alignment in some of the worst ills online. So when there was a big data study of who was who who were the accounts that Russia was trying to magnify. So all the people online who did Russia re tweet the most who did Russia want more people to read in here. It was actually conspiracy theorists and extremists. So for example, one of the key figures behind pizza gate, the online conspiracy theory was actually for a member of the data point correctly was the third most reach weeded account by Russian bought. So if everyone in the world, and it was actually by several orders of magnitude to the fifth six and like Russia's said this individual. He's who we want more people to read about we want to magnify their voice. So that points to hold it if we figure out how to deal with these super spreaders, we're going to have a positive effect on making it harder for disinflation campaigns. We're going to make it harder for conspiracy theories to spread that circles back to your question about the kind of the role of corporations this history should follow people if you deliberately spread disinformation. You have a freedom of speech, right? To do that. You do not have an inherent right to do that on a privately owned and operated network if violate their rules, you can be booted from them we've seen not effective deep lot for me. And what it's done to figures like. Alex Jones, Milo and the like so understanding the business of the internet is going to be the other one at factors of it. And then you and I make the public health parallel. It's weirdly, okay. For someone in our network to share disinformation. It's not okay for them to cough in your face. We should treat them in the same exact way gently correct them the first time, they do it. But hey, actually, if you're keeping doing it you are ill. You are. You are spreading you are endangering not just me, you're endangering society in the same way. And how do we stop playing welcome? Oh, I think with. Rule of law laws that have been essentially absent as regards the internet. This goes further than what's in the book. But I'm a very strong proponent of free speech on the internet. But I think what happened in Alabama was wrong. I think if you're operating. A group that is advocating for one candidate or another. You should be candid about it. If you're using other media that are not the internet. You have to be candid about it. The federal federal government has never applied the same scrutiny to the internet in this political context that it has the previous broadcasts mediums. I think it's time for that to change..

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