13 Burst results for "Betty Riddle"

"betty riddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Which came up repeatedly in my reporting on Florida is amendment for which was intended to be the largest enfranchisement of voters since 1971. Amendment for was approved by Florida's voters in 2018 and said that all but the most violent felons once they had served their sentences had the right to vote. That could have meant nearly 800,000 new voters in Florida this November. But then the Republican controlled Legislature stepped in and passed the law dictating that ex felons could vote on Ly if they first paid All the fines, restitution and fees imposed it. They're sentencing there. Hey! Hey, How you doing? Good. It's great to see you kind of in person. Yeah, Kinda. Betty Riddle is one of those former felons. She grew up in a segregated neighborhoods in Sarasota, Florida. At a young age, she became addicted to crack cocaine and was convicted of five felonies. Then she turned her life around. And today she works for the Sarasota County Public Defender's office. You were. You were able to vote because of the passage off amendment for to the Florida Constitution, which was approved by I think 60% of Florida's voters. What was your reaction? When that past? How did you feel? When I first heard it, I was like the first one. In my office walk down to register to vote. So it was. It was amazing. Me and my family celebrated, you know. Was a victory. I mean, I'm just curious, but did you feel like having having been to prison? That you were It was over. I was free. I was free from the chains. I had no change because you don't know. Ask when you become a convicted felon and being released from prison, you finish one sentence and start another one. So You know that becomes your lifestyle. You never think about boat because you know you're not entitled. Into that day came You cast your first ballot, the Florida Legislature. Voted to require that all convicted felons even after they've served their sentences. Have to pay. All their fines, restitution and fees that were imposed the time of their sentencing. And that, as you know that that's effectively taken. You know, several 100,000 potential voters are not going to be able to vote now. What do you make of that law? First of all, I was really upset because to begin a new it was Zapotec that all we knew it wasn't about court costs of fines, because when they did impose that on us, they knew that it was fake all the low income people and they knew that we couldn't afford to pay that before this this election. They knew that Now you want to say it, but that's pretty much what it is. We're panned to vote. No one else is paying court costs and finds two votes. But we as felonies, we have to pay to vote. That's what we're doing. I never thought it was about the money always believed in my heart That was about stopping us alone. E. Always Why don't they want you to vote? Okay. I think they passed a law to keep us from vote from voting Democrat Have you been in touch with with other people who were in prison or convicted of felonies who are also playing to vote or having problems or What? What's What are people saying? Yes, like every Saturday and John couple of of organizations that I go up from 12 to 4 and I go door to door service. Axing people have their registered boat, dude, it'll court costs and fives. And a lot of, um, gave up after that, that Bill pass last year, a lot of gave up because they didn't want to challenge politics. They say we're not They're gonna win. You know, I lost a lot of friends and people just returning from prison. I lost a lot of them after that, because I had him when we 1st 1st passed, so You know, Lately I've been crying out to the young young generations. Tio stand and on behalf of it was that really can't afford to bowl a stand for us and both. I've been reaching out to a lot of young kids threw my grandkids and I think that Be there. We have a chance of reaching more people between now and and a day to vote. I really do and.

Florida Betty Riddle Sarasota County Public Defende Florida Legislature Legislature John Sarasota Ly crack cocaine Bill
"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One issue, which came up repeatedly in my reporting on Florida is amendment for which was intended to be the largest enfranchisement of voters since 1971 amendment for was approved by Florida's voters in 2018. And said that all but the most violent felons once they had served their sentences had the right to vote That could have meant nearly 800,000 new voters in Florida this November. But then the Republican controlled Legislature stepped in and passed the law dictating that ex felons could vote on Ly if they first paid all the fines, restitution and fees imposed it. They're sentencing. Hey. Hey, How you doing? Good. It's great to see you kind of in person. Yeah, kind of. Betty Riddle is one of those former Fallon's She grew up in a segregated neighborhoods in Sarasota, Florida. At a young age, she became addicted to crack cocaine and was convicted of five felonies. But then she turned her life around. And today she works for the Sarasota County Public Defender's office. You were. You were able to vote because of the passage off amendment for to the Florida Constitution, which was approved by I think 60% of Florida's voters. What was your reaction? When that past? How did you feel? When I first heard it, I was like the first one. In my office walk down to register to vote. So it was. It was amazing. Me and my family celebrated, you know. Was a victory. I mean, I'm just curious, but did you feel like having having been to prison? That you were That it was over street. I was free from the chains. I had no change because you don't know as when you become a convicted felon being released from prison. You finish one sentence and start another one. So You know that becomes your lifestyle. You never think about boat because you know you're not entitled. Into that day came You cast your first ballot, the Florida Legislature. Voted to require that all convicted felons even after they've served their sentences. Have to pay. All their fines, restitution and fees that were imposed the time of their sentencing. And that, as you know that that's effectively taken. You know, several 100,000 potential voters are not going to be able to vote now. What do you make of that law? First of all, I was really upset because to begin and I knew it was Zapotec that all we knew it wasn't about core classifieds because when they did impose that on us, they knew that it would affect all the low income people and they knew that we couldn't afford to pay that before this election. They knew that How you want to say it, but that's pretty much what it is. We're pan to vote. No one else is paying court costs and finds two votes, but we as felonies we have to pay to vote. That's what we're doing. I never thought it was about the money always believed in my heart That was about stopping a baloney. Always Why don't they want you to vote? Okay. I think they passed a law to keep us from vote from voting Democrat Have you been in touch with with other people who were in prisoner convicted of felonies who Are also playing to vote or having problems or what? What's what are people saying Yes, like every Saturday or John couple of of organizations that I go up from 12 to 4 and I go door to door service. Actually, people have their registered boat, dude, it'll court costs and fives. And a lot of, um, gave up after that, then be a pass last year, a lot of gave up because they didn't want to challenge politics. They say we're not. They're gonna win. And, you know, I lost a lot of friends and people just returning from prison. I lost a lot of after that, because I had him when we 1st 1st pass, so You know, Lately I've been crying out to the young young generations. Tio stand and on behalf of was that really can't afford to bowl a stand for us in both. I've been reaching out to a lot of young kids threw my grandkids and I think that Be there. We have a chance of reaching more people between now and the day to vote. I really do and that's what I'm going to do. Latino voters are going to be 70% of the electorate in Florida on November 3rd and therefore potentially decisive group in determining the outcome. I called my colleagues Tiffany Atala Gene. Who has been looking at the complexities of Latino politics in Florida. It's tough. I know we can't talk about the Latino vote. In Florida as as anything remotely monolithic, but but how decisive. Is it? The way you win Florida is by winning the Latino vote, and I know the media pays no service to this just because we weigh ourselves called the Latino vote. But you know what? What does that mean? And in Florida? I think there's been a lot of focus on Cuban Americans because you know they have a great deal of political power in the state. But there's a huge diaspora of Puerto Ricans on even Ecuadorians, Nicaraguans, Mexicans, Peruvians, and so, actually, That's That's something that can benefit Biden because I think it's fair to say that the Cuban American vote is Is largely lost to trump at this point, but that's not the case among Puerto Rican on some of the other day. I express that I mentioned that's that's really Biden. Biden has an opportunity among those communities to really improve his standing among Latinos here so step what what? What's Biden doing? T kind of get the support of the Latin community and whether that's Cuban, Puerto Rican or Brazilian or For Argentina, Ecuador and what what? What's he doing? So, yeah. I mean, a lot of it is TV on radio, too. I mean, you turn on the radio here, at least in Miami, and chances are you welcome across Most of them are in Spanish, of course, but it's not just about the ads. They have a pretty robust campaign up here at this year, and they're holding events pretty much, you know. Every day just for the vice presidential debate that they had a drive in which party they're also holding. Caravan's They call them that Amanda's combining and so again going back to this idea of how important that diasporas are. You have guano from biting, holding the Baroness. You have Puerto Rican request combined and holding the baroness and these air just Long, long care.

Florida Biden Florida Legislature Puerto Rican Legislature crack cocaine Sarasota County Public Defende Ly Puerto Ricans Sarasota Miami Betty Riddle Tiffany Atala Gene Amanda Fallon Argentina John Ecuador
"betty riddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on KCRW

"Up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote even if money is still oat. In the program's first lost, There was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida in the third largest in the country, Pizzo says. There's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases than people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and Basically begging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with a system that's like I give up. You know, I just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state after billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate. In a letter she cited laws against election bribery. It's hard to not see this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing. Individuals become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks Dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit. And now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make sense that what frustrates me is unbelievable What these people will go through to stop us from bone. Yeah, you you run. We got to take a riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential election. For NPR news. I'm.

Senator Jason Pizzo Dio Betty Riddle General Ashley Booty Florida Miami Dade County attorney Michael Bloomberg NPR bribery FBI Daniel Length
"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Serving time. Then Florida lawmakers stepped in. The legislators barred people with felony convictions from voting if they still owe outstanding fines. Danny Rivero of W. LRN reports on the result. The big promise when voters passed a ballot initiative in 2018 was that more than a million Floridians would get the right to vote back, but after the state connected voting with making payments Less than 10,000 ex felons are expected to vote in November, according to research from Georgetown Law Center. That's because the majority of people can't afford to pay what they owe. Even if a tiny percent of them can have paid all my thighs. I have paid my debt to society. And now maybe the boat. Shawn Jones came out of Florida State prison six years ago. When she was serving time for drug charges. But when I met her in August, she was marching to the polls in Miami to vote in Florida's primary election today go Jones is a social worker now. And for the occasion, she's wearing a homemade black and pink shirt that celebrates how far she's made it so much says she's then reform have DC number, which is a county corrections. And I have my gold. His registration number checked so no longer a felon and my eyes I'm not a few Florida counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote. Even if money is still open. When the program's first lost, there was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic state Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. And he says the biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida and the third largest, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases. And people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people? And basically they feel so disheartened and disenchanted with a system of I give up, you know, just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state. After billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate in the letter, She cited laws against election bribery. It's hard not seeing this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length, is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make that frustrates three meat is unbelievable What these people will go through to stop from bone. Yeah, you you run. We got to take a riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential election. For NPR news. I'm Danny Rivero in Miami. This is NPR news show McConnell with a look at traffic. We're staying in the East Bay. And a new problem for Antioch Highway four, apparently eastbound near Lonetree way. There's a crash with an overturned vehicle..

Florida Shawn Jones Danny Rivero Senator Jason Pizzo General Ashley Booty Miami NPR Georgetown Law Center Miami Dade County Betty Riddle Lonetree Michael Bloomberg W. LRN East Bay Antioch Highway FBI attorney Daniel Length
"betty riddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on KCRW

"Counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote even if money is still owed. In the program's first lost, There was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic state Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida in the third largest in the country, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases. And people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and basically begging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with the system like I give up? You know, I just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state after billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate. In a letter she cited laws against election bribery. It's hard to not see this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing. Individuals become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks Dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit. And now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make sense. That's what's frustrating. Free meat is unbelievable What these people will go through to stop some bone Miyu you want. We got to take a riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back. Even if it takes until the next presidential election.

Senator Jason Pizzo General Ashley Booty Dio Betty Riddle Florida Miami Dade County attorney Michael Bloomberg bribery FBI Daniel Length
"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote even if money is still open. In the program's first launched there was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida and the third largest, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases than people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and Basically digging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with a system that I give up. You know, I just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state. After billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate in the letter, She cited laws against election bribery. It's hard not seeing this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length, is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make that frustrates free meat is unbelievable What these people will go through to stop from bone. I mean, you you want we got okay, Riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential election. For.

Senator Jason Pizzo Betty Riddle Florida General Ashley Booty Miami Dade County attorney Michael Bloomberg FBI Daniel Length bribery
"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Legislature appears to be succeeding in its drive to prevent people with felony convictions from voting. The people of Florida voted otherwise. Two years ago by an overwhelming margin, Floridians overturned the state's lifelong ban on voting for most people who were convicted of felonies and ER done serving time. Then Florida lawmakers stepped in. The legislators barred people with felony convictions from voting if they still owe outstanding fines. Danny Rivero of W. LRN reports on the result. The big promise when voters passed a ballot initiative in 2018 was that more than a million Floridians would get the right to vote back, but after the state connected voting with making payments Less than 10,000 ex felons are expected to vote in November, according to research from Georgetown Law Center. That's because the majority of people can't afford to pay what they owe. Even if a tiny percent of them can have paid all my thighs. I have paid my debt to society. And now maybe Sean Jones came out of Florida State prison six years ago when she was serving time for drug charges. When I met her in August, she was marching to the polls in Miami to vote in Florida's primary election. Today. Jones is a social worker now. And for the occasion, she's wearing a homemade black and pink shirt that celebrates how far she's made it. So my short says she's then reform have DC number, which is day County corrections, and I have my voter's registration number checked, so No longer a felon and my eyes. I'm not a few Florida counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote even if money is still open. In the program's first launched there was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida and the third largest, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases than people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and Basically digging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with a system that I give up. You know, I just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state. After billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate in the letter, She cited laws against election bribery. It's hard not seeing this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length, is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make that frustrates free meat is unbelievable What these people will go through to stop from bone. I mean, you you want we got okay, Riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential election. For NPR news. I'm Danny Rivero in Miami.

NPR Florida CDC NPR News David Paul Steve Inskeep Edward University of Colorado Boulder Corona College Crisis Initiative King asymptomatic Davidson College Lissa Yale University Congress American Council on Education Danny Rivero Georgetown Law Center University of Wisconsin Madiso
Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

Morning Edition

03:58 min | 1 year ago

Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

"Legislature appears to be succeeding in its drive to prevent people with felony convictions from voting. The people of Florida voted otherwise. Two years ago by an overwhelming margin, Floridians overturned the state's lifelong ban on voting for most people who were convicted of felonies and ER done serving time. Then Florida lawmakers stepped in. The legislators barred people with felony convictions from voting if they still owe outstanding fines. Danny Rivero of W. LRN reports on the result. The big promise when voters passed a ballot initiative in 2018 was that more than a million Floridians would get the right to vote back, but after the state connected voting with making payments Less than 10,000 ex felons are expected to vote in November, according to research from Georgetown Law Center. That's because the majority of people can't afford to pay what they owe. Even if a tiny percent of them can have paid all my thighs. I have paid my debt to society. And now maybe Sean Jones came out of Florida State prison six years ago when she was serving time for drug charges. When I met her in August, she was marching to the polls in Miami to vote in Florida's primary election. Today. Jones is a social worker now. And for the occasion, she's wearing a homemade black and pink shirt that celebrates how far she's made it. So my short says she's then reform have DC number, which is day County corrections, and I have my voter's registration number checked, so No longer a felon and my eyes. I'm not a few Florida counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote even if money is still open. In the program's first launched there was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida and the third largest, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases than people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and Basically digging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with a system that I give up. You know, I just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state. After billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate in the letter, She cited laws against election bribery. It's hard not seeing this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length, is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make that frustrates free meat is unbelievable What these people will go through to stop from bone. I mean, you you want we got okay, Riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential election. For NPR news. I'm Danny Rivero in Miami.

Florida Senator Jason Pizzo Danny Rivero Betty Riddle Sean Jones General Ashley Booty W. Lrn Miami Miami Dade County Legislature Georgetown Law Center NPR Michael Bloomberg Attorney Daniel Length FBI Bribery
"betty riddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote even if money is still open. In the program's first lost, There was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida in the third largest in the country, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases. And people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and basically digging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with the system like I give up? You know, just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state. After billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate. In a letter she cited laws against election bribery. It's hard to not see this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length, is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. That's what frustrates me this unbelievable What these people will go through the staff with some bones. If you want. We got to take a riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential election. For.

Senator Jason Pizzo General Ashley Booty Florida Betty Riddle Miami Dade County attorney Michael Bloomberg bribery FBI Daniel Length
"betty riddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Few Florida counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote. Even if money is still haute. When the program's first lost, there was a lot of promise that they could help People register to vote. Democratic State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida in the third largest in the country, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases. And people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and basically digging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with a system that's like I give up? You know, just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state. After billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate. In the letter, She cited laws against election bribery. It's hard to not see this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Lange is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit. And now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make that frustrates three even unbelievable What these people will go through to stop from bone. I mean, you you want We got to take a riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential.

Senator Jason Pizzo Florida General Ashley Booty Betty Riddle attorney Miami Dade County Michael Bloomberg Daniel Lange bribery FBI
"betty riddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on KCRW

"A twenty two this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep starting today a federal trial considers voting rights for people who have felony convictions two years ago Florida voters passed an amendment reinstating voting rights for people to complete their sentences then the state legislature passed a law that said people must also pay all their fines and fees and restitution before getting back the right to vote as Dante Rivero of our member station WLRN reports this is now become a major civil rights case watched across the country imagine two identical crimes with two identical sentences but one defendant has money and the other one doesn't so when it comes time to pay a fine or restitution to complete the sentence the person would money pays up no problem the other person can't this dilemma is at the center of the federal case we should never in a democracy be trading results for dollars and that is effectively what the legislature has done Lisa foster is a co founder of the fines and fees justice center it's a national group that's looking to take money out of the criminal justice system ahead of the November election that Florida could play a key role in the federal case has reached class action status so the plaintiffs when the state could potentially gain hundreds of thousands of new eligible voters let judges insistence on moving forward means the judge recognizes this is a very important case and it's important to decided before the November election the argument that Florida is discriminating against people based on their wealth misses the mark says Christian Adams he's president of the public interest legal foundation a group that backs Florida in the case there's a whole lot of crime victims in Florida regular people sometimes people in the communities hardest hit by crime but aren't ever going to get the restitution if the plaintiffs have their way the plaintiffs argue that bringing money into the equation effectively it's a lifetime sentence for crimes they've tried to move on from Betty riddle is one of the plaintiffs in the case Hey you know we can't pay it and that's what really hurt me the most and made me angry because they know we can't Pena thirty states require people with felony convictions to pay what they owe before they get back the right to vote and that means many states have filed briefs in support of Florida's arguments including Alabama Arizona Georgia and Utah Jason Sneed is the executive director for the honest elections project a group that backs Florida in the case I suspect it one of the concerns that states have was there watching this case is there the fear that Christ will be set they will not be able to properly enforced their criminal codes as they see fit federal trials are usually not recorded or broadcast but because of the corona virus the trial will be held virtually in the public will be able to listen in for NPR news I'm Danny Rivero in Miami for a lot of young people sheltering at home means missing some important milestones like graduations here's NPR's Patti neighmond eighteen year old Kendall Smith lives in Tallahassee Florida and this year she graduates from high school among the traditions leading up to graduation is grand bash a big trip to Universal Studios theme park in Orlando it's basically something that we hear about since her freshman and I remember hearing about it and hearing about all the memories and seeing them on Snapchat and Instagram and being so excited about going with my friends for twenty one year old Waverly heart a senior at the college of Wooster in Ohio one of the most memorable graduation events is I. S. Monday which stands for independent study and celebrate seniors finishing their thesis and all the senior skip classes and there's a huge parade and everybody on campus cheers a sign and that's something that we've been looking forward to since we were admitted to Worcester and now we won't get to experience that ever both events were cancelled the students are understandably sad says psychiatrist Ludmilla fadhiya mourning the loss of what they were supposed to be doing at this time in their lives the society driven milestones and internal milestones was put on pause so it's almost like they are forced to regress a little bit or at least not progress as expected on their developmental milestones while we're in the middle of the pandemic defining works with student mental health at Florida State University she says college students aren't just losing milestones they're also losing their support group they are moving away from their families of origin in a process that we call individuated and they are finding their group their identity and their ability to to take care of themselves and people that they leave around roommates in college become their primary source of support and they lost that suddenly which can be traumatic for generations she says that already suffers high levels of anxiety all of those vulnerable kids are even more at risk for developing any type of clinical anxiety in clinical depression and probably will require accessing some sort of help from home parents might be at a loss for how to reassure their children at a time of such great uncertainty psychologist Lynn busca the spokesperson for the American psychological association it's on Preston for all of us but it's completely new for teens and young adults and they also don't have the wealth of experiences that older individuals have with transitions so they're figuring out how to do transitions manage change in within an environment there everything seems upside down for them she says navigating the unknown can be helped if young people stay connected physical distance yes but virtual group chats dinners and even movie watching can be fulfilling and from the experience of previous pandemics she says it also helps to keep this in mind this may be hard but we're in it together and we're in it to benefit the larger community and to have a good impact on overall health and well being as exemplified by eighteen year old Kendall Smith as disappointed as we all are that we're missing out on these important milestones in our life we do understand that this virus is killing people that if we don't sacrifice these things that we will contribute to the problem and we might be the reason that a student takes home not virus to their family Smith is a high school senior who doesn't know yet whether graduation itself will be canceled Patti neighmond NPR news this is NPR news hopefully your self isolating or social distancing public health officials say the only way to get through covert nineteen you know what else is important that you keep your connections particularly with the people you love and the people who rely on you for companionship I'm Steve should take is the latest on the coronavirus in southern California and how you are coping now we're all coping and greater LA today one on KCRW one woman all.

Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep NPR Florida
"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From listeners like you who donate to this NPR station this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep starting today a federal trial considers voting rights for people who have felony convictions two years ago Florida voters passed amendment reinstating voting rights for people to complete their sentences then the state legislature passed a law that said people must also pay all their fines and fees and restitution before getting back the right to vote as Dante Rivero of our member station WLRN reports this is now become a major civil rights case watched across the country imagine two identical crimes with two identical sentences but one defendant has money and the other one doesn't so when it comes time to pay a fine or restitution to complete the sentence the person would money pays up no problem the other person can't this dilemma is at the center of the federal case we should never in a democracy be trading votes for dollars and that is effectively what the legislature has done Lisa foster is a co founder of the fines and fees justice center it's a national group that's looking to take money out of the criminal justice system ahead of the November election that Florida could play a key role in the federal case has reached class action status so the plaintiffs when the state could potentially gain hundreds of thousands of new eligible voters let judges insistence on moving forward means the judge recognizes this is a very important case and it's important to decided before the November election the argument that Florida is discriminating against people based on their wealth misses the mark says Christian Adams he's president of the public interest legal foundation a group that backs Florida in the case there's a whole lot of crime victims in Florida regular people sometimes people in the communities hardest hit by crime but aren't ever going to get the restitution if the plaintiffs have their way the plaintiffs argue that bringing money into the equation effectively creates a lifetime I'm sentenced for crimes they've tried to move on from Betty riddle is one of the plaintiffs in the case Hey you know we can't pay it and that's what really hurt me the most and made me angry because they know we can't Pena thirty states require people with felony convictions to pay what they owe before they get back the right to vote and that means many states have filed briefs in support of Florida's arguments including Alabama Arizona Georgia and Utah Jason Sneed is the executive director for the honest elections project a group that backs Florida in the case I suspect that one of the concerns that states have as they're watching this case is there the fear that Christ will be set they will not be able to properly enforced their criminal codes as they see fit federal trials are usually not recorded or broadcast but because of the corona virus the trial will be held virtually in the public will be able to listen in for NPR news I'm Danny Rivero in Miami for a lot of young people sheltering at home means missing some important milestones my graduation here's NPR's Patti neighmond eighteen year old Kendall Smith lives in Tallahassee Florida and this year she graduates from high school among the traditions leading up to graduation is grand bash a big trip to Universal Studios theme park in Orlando it's basically something that we hear about since her freshman and I remember hearing about it and hearing about all the memories and seeing them on Snapchat and Instagram and being so excited about going with my friends for twenty one year old Waverly heart a senior at the college of Wooster in Ohio one of the most memorable graduation events is I. S. Monday which stands for independent study and celebrate seniors finishing their thesis and all the senior skip classes and there's a huge parade and everybody on campus two years a sign and that's something that we've been looking forward to since we were admitted to Worcester and now we won't get to experience that ever both events were cancelled the students are understandably sad says psychiatrist Ludmilla fadhiya mourning the loss of what they were supposed to be doing at this time in their lives the society driven milestones and internal milestones was put on pause so it's almost like they are forced to regress a little bit or at least not progress as expected on their developmental milestones while we're in the middle of the pandemic defining works with student mental health at Florida State University she says college students aren't just losing milestones they're also losing their support group they are moving away from their families of origin in a process that we call individuated and they are finding their group their identity and their ability to to take care of themselves and people that they leave around roommates in college become their primary source of support and they lost that suddenly which can be traumatic for generations she says that already suffers high levels of anxiety all of those vulnerable kids are even more at risk for developing any type of clinical anxiety in clinical depression and probably will require accessing some sort of help from home parents might be at a loss for how to reassure their children at a time of such great uncertainty psychologist Lynn busker the spokesperson for the American psychological association if I'm pressed and for all of us but it's completely new for teens and young adults and they also don't have the wealth of experiences that older individuals have with transitions so they're figuring out how to do transitions manage change in within an environment there everything seems upside down for them she says navigating the unknown can be helped if young people stay connected physical distance yes but virtual group chats dinners and even movie watching can be fulfilling and from the experience of previous pandemics she says it also helps to keep this in mind this may be hard but we're in it together and we're in it to benefit the larger community and to have a good impact on overall health and well being as exemplified by eighteen year old Kendall Smith as disappointed as we all are that we're missing out on these important milestones in our life we do understand that this virus is telling people that if we don't sacrifice these things that we will contribute to the problem and we might be the reason that a student takes home not virus to their family Smith is a high school senior who doesn't know yet whether graduation itself will be canceled Patti neighmond NPR news.

Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep NPR
"betty riddle" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"betty riddle" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The original intent what people are arguing is that it was a true completion your sentence you go to prison serve your time you do your probation you're done and that's it there was talk about whether or not you need to pay restitution and court costs but then it kind of got lost into the legislative session which is where the lawmakers pick this up and so what they've set up is is what they the support supporters of Amanda for saying this is now a quick one to a poll tax meaning that you have to pay in order to you end up registering to vote pay to play paid about exactly which would be a violation the twenty fourth amendment so what this I want to go through first real quick what you can do to satisfy your obligations you can pay them in full you have the option of going back into court asking the judge to basically wave your finds in cost depending on how much you owe you feel that it what type of process is that a lengthy process it's not and because it's a more do when you go in terminate your probation you file simple motion basically check off them it's just basically getting the motion into court getting a court date in going in it is takes time because your to set aside time to go to court and do this in Hillsboro county the state attorney's proposed a way to kind of do this in mass but we're not there yet in a lot of the other counties but if you go on your own which is when the Uyghur in this argument that the supporters say is basically a false fail safe is that you have no guarantee the judge is going to wave your costs for you in order to allow you then registered to vote so that's one way to do it the other way is have the judge converge community service hours or you just pay them full the problem is a lot of people getting out of prison don't have the resources to pay court costs and stack up very quickly it can get into your from five hundred to a thousand dollars some of the stories at the site in the lawsuit was gonna run through real quick for example Betty riddled the sixty one year old black woman she works in Sarasota public defender's office she had a twenty two years of addiction series of convictions she finally got clean age fifty two she went to register vote on January eight the day the men at four went into effect but you still as a thousand dollars in court costs US very good question if you're gonna get grandfathered in we don't now that's part and parcel of this lawsuit and how this is involving his Daddy and dollars somebody's gotta around you maybe you can ask for let me a thousand dollars for a very well get your get your rights back well then let's talk about Karen lacked he's also sixty two years old how much is care now fifty six million dollars you're never going to vote as well I'm sorry as for the disparity and it's tough because these people money they are running and this is a way for the state to collect the court to collect it is and that's how this was set up because in the early two thousands they kind of shifted the burden to the court systems away from the state in terms of paying for court operating funds and things like that the court fees and fines and that's structure they put in a lot of different fine but they'll collection rate is extremely low as reflected in several reports our side in the lawsuit it's around like twenty percent so basic question if the courses must be self operating from court costs and fees how are they doing it if they're not being able to collect all this money which embraces the question why are we still having people you know possibly they want to go get their votes and it's on them to go do that so they wipe clean up their record pay off their obligations and then register to vote but then again if it's a thousand dollars or five hundred dollars they simply don't have it then where is the fairness and that's and that's what it boils down to.

thousand dollars fifty six million dollars five hundred dollars twenty two years sixty two years sixty one year twenty percent