35 Burst results for "Betty Ford"

Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Nick Jonas to Announce Oscar Nominations

Daily Pop

00:50 sec | Last month

Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Nick Jonas to Announce Oscar Nominations

"Nick. Jonas and priyanka chopra are dropping. Some names for your consideration. They'll be announcing the oscar nominations together this upcoming monday. All twenty three categories will be livestreamed. Now michael jordan stepping back into the boxing ring only this time as a director michael is set to make his directorial debut with crete three. And he'll be back to reprise his role as donna's crete and shirtless. Michael says directing has always been a dream but the timing had to be right and showtimes new anthology series. The first lady just cast their first daughter. Lexi underwood from little everywhere will star as molina obama alongside viola davis who play michelle the series also features michelle pfeiffer as betty ford plus. Gillian anderson as eleanor roosevelt.

Priyanka Chopra Jonas Michael Jordan Nick Oscar Boxing Lexi Underwood Donna Michael Molina Obama Viola Davis Michelle Pfeiffer Michelle Betty Ford Gillian Anderson Eleanor Roosevelt
Michelle Pfeiffer to Play Betty Ford in Showtime Series ‘The First Lady,’ Susanne Bier to Direct

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Michelle Pfeiffer to Play Betty Ford in Showtime Series ‘The First Lady,’ Susanne Bier to Direct

"Actress. Michelle pfeiffer is about to step into the role of the former first lady. Michelle pfeiffer is set to take on the raw betty ford and showtime's upcoming anthology series. The first lady the actress joins the previously announced by davis who will portray michelle obama for the show. No word yet on who will play. Eleanor roosevelt the show will focus on the roles. That the first lady's played in shaping impactful and sometimes world changing decisions during their time in the white house for it is the wife of former president. Gerald ford who was president from nineteen seventy four to nineteen seventy seven. She died at the age of three in two thousand eleven.

Michelle Pfeiffer Betty Ford Showtime Michelle Obama Eleanor Roosevelt Davis Gerald Ford White House
Michelle Pfeiffer to Play Betty Ford in Showtime Series The First Lady,

Radio From Hell

00:13 sec | 2 months ago

Michelle Pfeiffer to Play Betty Ford in Showtime Series The First Lady,

"Been she's gonna be in a Showtime movie. She will call called the first lady and she's gonna play. Eddie Ford. Really? Okay. This just came in Senator Chuck Schumer.

Eddie Ford Senator Chuck Schumer
"betty ford" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

02:06 min | 6 months ago

"betty ford" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

"The beginning of their road to recovery. It's going in and see what's happening..

Making Treatment a Virtual Reality for More People

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:39 min | 7 months ago

Making Treatment a Virtual Reality for More People

"It's a real treat to have Bob Poznanovic with me today because a long time ago before he went to work at Hazel and before he became the vice president of Business Development for this organization, Bob and I met in the Community of recovery in Saint Paul Bobby. It was in about nineteen, eighty, nine, ninety five when you and I would get in the car together and drive to center city I'll certainly a lot has happened in our lives personally and professionally just share with our audience today your personal connection to the Organization Hi William. It was February thirteenth of nineteen ninety five when I had reached my bottom. When I was using cocaine. A really high. Amount. In. CHICAGO. I had just lost my job at the senior executive in a technology company in camp lost my relationships and. Like everybody else and reach that point that I ran out of options and Fortunately found the Hazel and foundation and went to treatment said February and stayed in center city until March and then I went to fellow club where I met you and other members of the community some point in at the end of the march we started volunteering and every Saturday a group of would go to center city and share our strength experience and hope with patients that became a big secret to you know to my recovery is at volunteering and giving back and having some fun. You'll filling that void that drugs and alcohol had that was now being filled. With recovering I think that's one of the one of the promises and one of the gifts is to have really to friendships like yourself and others. Throughout the year. So it's nice to see you and it's nice to be here in the same capacity with you being able to carry, put a face on recovery and carry the message of hope who have ever imagined it right when. You talk about how much you lost but. We're so glad that you've gained so much and we're so glad that you continue to hold onto the expertise that has put you into the role now as vice president of Business Development for this organization at really a critical time, not only in our growth but as we. Address the pandemic of. Corona virus. And you're in charge of a lot of that effort. Can you take us through the process of developing and law launching? He's willing. Betty. Ford's telehealth strategy. Sure so because. My background has always been in technology. I was looking ahead and trying to predict kind of where the industry was going to go is you're looking at technology and healthcare in general I. Think it was pretty clear that technology utilization in behavioral health was really lagging in particularly even more. So in substance use a lot of organizations didn't even have electronic medical records. And you looked at the look at the industry, look at the industry problems, patient problems and care delivery problems back in twenty eighteen. When I HAPPEN TO HAVE A. Demo of some software that one of our pair partners was developing. And it clicked on me that. This technology could be. Used to deliver care differently. So was in two thousand, eighteen we started to talk about how could we use video? In live video between patients, not just in one in one environment which was being done. For telehealth for for years. But how could it be done in a group environment because the problem we are looking to solve Was Access. We're working with a lot of our partners around the country and communities. Academic health centers and other state organizations in healthcare to rural organs. Rural patients is a real challenge. So you know, could it help provide care improve access to roll Marcus would the convenience? Of being able to get care wherever you're at improve engagement. If you live in downtown La Chicago New York you know the catchment area is really small and some big cities because people don't want to fight the traffic after work to get the care. So convenience improve engagement. And the other was would. Stigma. Could we help through overcome some of the stigma. By. Not Making people physically have to show up at a building Kinda put a label on themselves Kenneth come out much more in a sense in Kuwait engaged them earlier by having them. Feel it's safer. As, well as convenient. To start that way. So we it started in two thousand eighteen down the past, and could we accomplished all the goals of of healthcare which is approve access improve outcomes improve. Patient satisfaction and lower costs.

Vice President Of Business Dev Bob Poznanovic Cocaine Hazel Chicago Saint Paul Bobby Ford Senior Executive Kuwait Betty Kenneth Marcus La Chicago New York
Providing Addiction Treatment Amid COVID-19

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:49 min | 7 months ago

Providing Addiction Treatment Amid COVID-19

"Here, we are another interview and art. Let's talk podcast series. Thanks for joining US I'm your host William seat. MOYER's these podcasts feature experts on the gamut of issues that matter to his Betty Ford. The same issues that matter to you, our audience from substance use prevention to cutting edge research treatment of addiction and recovery from it. These conversations have become quite popular the past two years, and if you're a regular viewer or listener to the podcast particularly if you're viewing them, you'll note that for today things around the set look a little bit different. Of course, they do were in the recording this in the midst of the pandemic has affected all of us. He's four, take seriously the need to do everything possible to prevent the spread of coronavirus among our patients and our employees. Even here in the studio, we are following public health guidelines. As a result I can take off my mask for this interview because the production crew, the executive producer, and yes even my guest Dr Victor Vines are elsewhere in the building good social distancing one. Doctor. Vines was hired as our regional medical director from Minnesota and join our. In January of this year twenty, twenty talk about a baptism of fire in the middle of Minnesota winter. But Dr Vines, you've got to Hazel Betty Ford. Expecting to plunge full bore into addiction and addiction medicine and being part of the vital team in all of a sudden you found yourself part of the Kobe response team with a pandemic on your hands. Yes that was completely unexpected and. Quad surprise. I was I was delighted to be invited to be a part of the Code Command team you know I've. At the time of this recording and we're we're doing this in June of two thousand twenty. I am still not completed. I have still not completed my on boarding process that was going to be about a three month or three and a half month process. With learning. That would be scheduled and continued for for a long period of time but. Less than two months into into the process cova came along and turned everything on its ear, and that has that's it's actually been a real benefit for me because I've gotten to know and work with directly many of the people in leadership positions throughout the Hazelton Betty Ford. Organization. On. Both coasts and in between and ways that I never would have as if I was simply functioning as a medical director. So the CO Vid Task Force the the instant command team that we have has been a real plus for me in terms of getting connected into the organization and what has that response team had to do the last couple of months so To. Give you some time timeframe. We. First met our very first call organization of our command team. We stood that up on Thursday, March the eleventh, and it's important. You know we did that even before the president announced that that this was a national emergency, he did that on on the next day on Friday the thirteenth and we had we had already put our organization on notice that we were going to do something different today before. You know the first thing that we did was to to acknowledge that there were risk factors out in the community and the possibility that the virus could be brought onto one of our sites specifically one of our residential sites, but it also affected our intensive outpatients. Was the recognition that if if the virus got foothold in any of our sites and spread that we would look at the possibility of having to close down one or more of our sites and. We took extremely aggressive measures to make sure that did not happen. How do you balance Dr Vines the the the attention, the energy, the goals. Up treating potentially two fatal illnesses within a system of care, you've got addiction, of course, substance use disorder, and then you've got the pandemic corona virus it's how do you do it? Absolutely in our medical director Dr Mark was the one who I put that out for us to all see and that was that when we are looking at to potentially fatal illnesses, we have to make a risk determination. Do, we close down because we don't want covid or say we will find a way to treat and try to keep covert out for our patients that come into treatment when people's lives have gone so far off the rails that they need residential treatment. The likelihood that they're addiction will be lethal to them is higher than the chance of developing a Ovid illness that would lead to a death. We we recognize that However, we can't completely discount the risk of Kobe because we have employees and we have other staff and we have the the patients who if they were to get an infection with code it could it could potentially be a devastating illness, and so we had from the very outset We put into place steps and measures to try to identify what was who would be at risk try to separate those folks from others who might who might be at. Risk of becoming very ill, and and then tried to keep the doors open and keep everything rolling as best we could

Betty Ford Dr Victor Vines Medical Director Cova Minnesota Kobe Dr Vines William Seat Moyer Dr Mark Executive Producer President Trump
Providing Addiction Treatment Amid COVID-19

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:41 min | 7 months ago

Providing Addiction Treatment Amid COVID-19

"Doctor. Vines was hired as our regional medical director from Minnesota and join our. In January of this year twenty, twenty talk about a baptism of fire in the middle of Minnesota winter. But Dr Vines, you've got to Hazel Betty Ford. Expecting to plunge full bore into addiction and addiction medicine and being part of the vital team in all of a sudden you found yourself part of the Kobe response team with a pandemic on your hands. Yes that was completely unexpected and. Quad surprise. I was I was delighted to be invited to be a part of the Code Command team you know I've. At the time of this recording and we're we're doing this in June of two thousand twenty. I am still not completed. I have still not completed my on boarding process that was going to be about a three month or three and a half month process. With learning. That would be scheduled and continued for for a long period of time but. Less than two months into into the process cova came along and turned everything on its ear, and that has that's it's actually been a real benefit for me because I've gotten to know and work with directly many of the people in leadership positions throughout the Hazelton Betty Ford. Organization. On. Both coasts and in between and ways that I never would have as if I was simply functioning as a medical director. So the CO Vid Task Force the the instant command team that we have has been a real plus for me in terms of getting connected into the organization and what has that response team had to do the last couple of months so To. Give you some time timeframe. We. First met our very first call organization of our command team. We stood that up on Thursday, March the eleventh, and it's important. You know we did that even before the president announced that that this was a national emergency, he did that on on the next day on Friday the thirteenth and we had we had already put our organization on notice that we were going to do something different today before. You know the first thing that we did was to to acknowledge that there were risk factors out in the community and the possibility that the virus could be brought onto one of our sites specifically one of our residential sites, but it also affected our intensive outpatients. Was the recognition that if if the virus got foothold in any of our sites and spread that we would look at the possibility of having to close down one or more of our sites and. We took extremely aggressive measures to make sure that did not happen. How do you balance Dr Vines the the the attention, the energy, the goals. Up treating potentially two fatal illnesses within a system of care, you've got addiction, of course, substance use disorder, and then you've got the pandemic corona virus it's how do you do it? Absolutely in our medical director Dr Mark was the one who I put that out for us to all see and that was that when we are looking at to potentially fatal illnesses, we have to make a risk determination. Do, we close down because we don't want covid or say we will find a way to treat and try to keep covert out for our patients that come into treatment when people's lives have gone so far off the rails that they need residential treatment. The likelihood that they're addiction will be lethal to them is higher than the chance of developing a Ovid illness that would lead to a death. We we recognize that However, we can't completely discount the risk of Kobe because we have employees and we have other staff and we have the the patients who if they were to get an infection with code it could it could potentially be a devastating illness, and so we had from the very outset We put into place steps and measures to try to identify what was who would be at risk try to separate those folks from others who might who might be at. Risk of becoming very ill, and and then tried to keep the doors open and keep everything rolling as best we

Medical Director Hazel Betty Ford Doctor. Vines Kobe Cova Minnesota Dr Vines Dr Mark President Trump
A Conversation with "Blackout Girl"

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

08:00 min | 8 months ago

A Conversation with "Blackout Girl"

"Jennifer store is the author of blackout girl. It is a memoir published by Hazel in twenty eleven and it's about to have its second printing. Read the book and You won't doubt the power of addiction in the day to day life of a young woman, the subtle persuasion of alcohol, the pervasive violent consequences, one drink too many and the sheer luck some my call at grace to survive at all Jennifer Storm. Welcome to let's talk. Thank you so much for having me. You know one of the dynamics of our mission at Hazelton Betty Ford is that we published books and we publish your book in twenty eleven it's done. Very very well in fact, it's about to have its second printing. What does that mean to have a second printing of a book? It's such an honor truly to not have the story come out once and reach an audience but for it to have a whole new audience to touch I, it's it's a wonderful experience. It feels more relevant today than actually when I did publish it unfortunately just because of what we're seeing with sexual violence and addiction, it's still dominating headlines. The headlines more than it ever has. So it feels really timely and on the heels of the metoo movement I know there are a lot of people that are suffering in silence and so my goal is to get to those people and we'll come back to that in a couple of minutes. Cisco back into your own. Life. For people who haven't read your book or no the story Tell us a little bit about your introduction to alcohol and what happened as a result. So. I came from a mother and a father who both came from very abusive alcoholic homes and they of found themselves in high school and really vowed to to get away from that and so they married young my father went off to Vietnam my mother he returned my mother started having US Children's I'm one of three I'm the youngest and they did their best to keep us away from all of those family members that were heavily. Addicted at the time, they had their own demons, and of course, their own traumas that they never dealt with and for the most part though they did a really great job trying to raise us I really was only exposed to alcohol when my parents would have it at family gatherings, and then a friend introduced me to alcohol when I was twelve years old and I had my first beer which literally led to ten beers and I drank. The first time I picked up a drink and I write in the book that I it never felt that thirsty before my life and I blacked out that night and subsequently a came to well being raped, and so I had this horrific introduction to alcohol this very addictive introduction alcohol and yet it was the first thing I turned to to deal with the trauma of that incident. When you were sexually assaulted a home. was that your bottom as it related to alcohol it was the start actually. So it's what really propelled me into continuing to drink because. I had all this shame and this guilt in this anger and rage that I didn't know what to do with it and I was young and my parents coming from their own alcoholic abusive homes didn't have the coping mechanisms to deal with their own stuff. Let alone now watching their daughter go through this horrific trauma. So I started drinking you know and this was in the eighties. So alcohol was in everyone's homes. We all had the you know the liquor cabinet, and so it was really easy for me to access What happened to me led to the breakdown really up my. Parents marriage, and so the supervision and our home started to deteriorate my parents divorced by the time I was fifteen and so I was kind of left to my own devices as where my older brothers and drank alcoholic and that gave way to starting to use pills I would do anything to numb the pain I was having and so if it meant alcohol, it meant pills it meant marijuana that led me to LSD, which then quickly led me to cocaine but everything every single time I drank the result was always the same I drank I drank to excess I blacked out. and. So the introduction of cocaine when I was around fifteen sixteen helped kind of. Sober me up. If you will I always say that parentheses it would keep me from blacking out. It would allow me to retain control because when I was putting myself in situations where I was blocking out of course, then I was vulnerable to more violence and more abuse and I didn't want that. So the cocaine and the alcohol then became this really damaging codependent relationship and. And how long did that codependent relationship work before? You had your bottom. So eventually I turned to crack cocaine at age seventeen and I had my bottom at age twenty two and I it was brutal and I attempted to take my life. I didn't have any hope I was completely destitute. I didn't see a way out of my addiction I couldn't go a day without being high and being. Completely out of my mind and that got to a point where it felt so. That I wanted out and I didn't like I said, I didn't have any hope. So tried to kill myself and By. Some measure of grace I am here today and I woke up in hospital bed the next day and I. I had sliced my wrists pretty severely to the extent that of one was bandaged to to hold it together done so much damage and it was a miracle and the doctor looked at me and said, it's a miracle that you're live and I was in a psych ward because that's that's where they. Put you was nine, hundred, Ninety, seven and an intake officer came in and kind of started going through the questions and she looked at me and said you, you're not. You're a drug addict do you want treatment for that? Because you you shouldn't be here? Do you want to go to Rehab and I said, yes, it was the first time I had made the admission that my solution was actually my problem. And then you got treatment, did I went to a traditional twenty eight day treatment facility in Allenwood Pennsylvania by all accounts a great facility I they didn't they weren't trauma informed which that's the term that I would come later to understand and really appreciate but they didn't take into consideration the underlining trauma that I had dealt with. It was solely twelve steps addiction recovery. We're not going to deal with these outside issues right now you're here to get clean and sober and that worked for me my first night and Rehab came to share her experience strength. And hope much like I do now and she had said something that profoundly impacted me and she said that her secrets kept her sick and that has been my mantra since that day in that Rehab and it told me that all this stuff that I was running from all these bad things that had happened to me and these pains and these traumas these were the causation. These were the reasons and I needed to deal with these if I really wanted to be clean and sober for the rest of my life, and so I did that work on my own. The trauma work did yes. which point you decide that you're story. was worth telling. In a memoir. I started writing that night in Rehab writing has always been a source of of empowerment and healing for me. Even after the rape I have a book of poems that that I wrote I would stay up all night i. now know that that's post traumatic stress disorder I couldn't sleep. I had insomnia had irrational fears so I would right and that would calm me and so because I couldn't talk about my trauma in traditional treatment facility I wrote about it. And I kept writing and then I did my fourth step and I kept writing and kept writing and you know I was an avid reader at the time and that's really when memoir was starting to come into play and I wasn't finding my story anywhere and so I thought well, I have a good story. Maybe I'll maybe I'll submit it and I was a big fan of melody babies and so I just happened to twelve of her books. So I happened to look in the book and see well their published by this amazing place called women, and so I reached out to Hazelden and sure enough they were interested and it was it was an incredible

Cocaine Hazelton Betty Ford Jennifer Storm Jennifer Store Crack Cocaine Hazel Cisco Vietnam Insomnia Rape Allenwood Pennsylvania Officer Marijuana LSD
Is It Addiction? Questions to Ask Yourself

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:09 min | 8 months ago

Is It Addiction? Questions to Ask Yourself

"I'm your host William Moyers and today we're talking about the essentials of addiction we know that addiction affects about one in seven Americans in this country. But of course, our guest Christianity and can tell us addiction is everybody's problem. Chris. Thanks for joining us today my pleasure, William. Thank. You. We're here at the Betty Ford. Center where you are the administrator running the show here in Rancho, Mirage California how's that been for you? I'd spend an incredible honor and a wonderful experience. Obviously, we're encountering people at a very painful intersection of their lives, but it's deeply rewarding because of what recovery offers in terms of people getting their lives back who are struggling with addiction as you just said a moment ago it's everyone's problem. It's hard these days to find someone. Who doesn't know another person impacted by this disease talk more about that addiction discriminate. Absolutely, not we know the facts people from all walks of life and we see it every day. Right? It doesn't You know `economics doesn't protect financial backing doesn't protect someone from addiction it's. Affects, people irrespective of race or ethnicity or gender The, the solutions oftentimes have not always been equally offered to jewels. I think one of the wonderful legacies of the Betty Ford Center is early on the recognition of the way this disease affects women as much as it does men. and So that's a wonderful part of the legacy because it does impact. So many different people and families and children. So it doesn't discriminate at all. Unfortunately what are the signs that somebody might be struggling with a substance use disorder? Yeah. That's a great question The most basic sign is loss of control. a substance use disorder or addiction isn't simply just the misuse of a substance that leads to harm. addiction is really about compulsive use that leads to progressive brain changes. addiction is actually a chronic but treatable medical disease that impacts the brain It involves genetics the environment, a person's life experiences, and the interactions between those areas that leads to compulsive use often also involving harmful consequences That's the more technical. Definition from the American Society of Addiction Medicine but it's fundamental. Characteristic is a loss of control and part of the person, and is that true that drug is a drug is a drug and so if you've lost control over one drug lost control over all drugs I, think that's true of addiction right? The loss of control is addiction but depending on the drugs or the type of substances you're using it can have a different impact on the individual based on their genetics and based on the drug itself. If somebody's watching this right now and feeling a little bit squirrelly because they feel like you're talking about them, what would be the signs? The symptoms? The evidence that you would recommend they look at to determine if they might have a substance use problem. So squirrelly the juice. Yeah. Perhaps, Concern Yeah another great question you. First of all, you could see you could begin to ask yourself We'll take a look at the harmful consequences of us have you attempted to control or stop your US another good sign is to think about the amount of time you spend thinking about the substance or using might say preoccupation. So to what degree do I spend a Lotta time of my day either using or thinking about using or focusing my behavior on using, and that's also Another simple way to begin to think about the potential of having a an addiction or a concern here. What about other consequences? well, there's a whole variety of consequences. One of the older definitions of of addiction as I mentioned a moment ago that's been updated recently to include the concept of it being treatable, which is really important. But one of the older definitions broke it down in terms of biological, psychological, social, and spiritual manifestations of the condition of the disease, and so we can think about how it affects our body right in my experiencing harmful consequences in terms of anxiety, the inability to sleep well Other ways that it might be impacting me physiologically psychologically how is it impacting my perception, my emotions, my experience of the world psychologically socially. That's a real good clear indication socially and behaviorally as well how's it impacting my relationships and that's another key factor. So we could go on but there's lots of different ways that addiction impacts people powerfully,

American Society Of Addiction William Moyers Administrator Betty Ford United States Betty Ford Center Chris Mirage California
"betty ford" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:47 min | 8 months ago

"betty ford" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

"Today, we're joined by Susan Ford Welcome. Susan. You are aid author, photo journalist. The youngest of four children to President and Mrs Ford. We are appropriately here at the Betty Ford Center, where you're also on the board of trustees of the Hazel Betty. Ford Foundation. Your mother's legacy. was as a breast cancer survivor and advocate, and as a woman in recovery, and as an advocate for being a woman in recovery. How has the legacy of your mother? Affected your role here at the Betty, Ford? Center. Wow Her shoes were really big to fill your <hes>. So when she stepped down from the board <hes> and I became chairman. <hes>. I. Think it was harder than living in the White House actually because. We mother and I come from two different parts of recovery. She is a patient and the family member. So we have very different opinions of things than and what's important to us <hes>. One of the things that she made me do, which was extremely painful with sit on every city every single committee. And participate on my witness finance. Finance. But I learned it. Sure. And so I feel like she did a great job of preparing me to be chairman. <hes>. So it's it's just we come at it from a different angle in a different perspective family and children's services is extremely important to me because that's how I was affected by this disease. Did you come to the the role of being the chair here at Betty? Ford, did you come to that reluctantly? No because I had been on the board for cheese, probably fifteen years I'm it had just been a long process <hes>. Mother was gracious and allowed me to raise my children before I came on the board <hes> because I was pregnant when the. Betty. Ford. Center open. So. I don't think I came on the board until my youngest was first grade or second grade, and so she gave me some time to get my children raised in at least in school because it required several days travel and all of that in childcare and all the complications that we go through to participate in something like that. Let's go back a little bit and talk about the history of the Betty, Ford Center there's a lot of people who think that when your mother found her own recovery in the late seventy s, she went to the Betty Ford Center. It wasn't even here now was, how did the Betty Ford Center come to be. Johnson from Eisenhower Medical Center <hes> decided that. They wanted to have a treatment and it had been in the plan at Eisenhower for some time, they wanted to have an alcoholic treatment center on the campus. and. So Leonard firestone mother's dear, friend <hes> was also on the board of Eisenhower. And so Johnson Leonard. Kinda. Tag. Team. Durham. and. She was really in a recovery about four years. But she agreed and I and I thought that was a very courageous step to be so early recovery. So she came to all of us children and she said. When I'm long gone. You're the ones that are going to have to live with the fact that your mother had A. Drug and alcohol treatment. Centre, named after you. How do you feel about that? Wow, <hes> and we also we don't care. I mean. It's what a great Lexi you know. She was one of the first to step out and and share her story <hes>. So once we got past that it was just a matter of mother and Leonard Raising the money. To get this place started and of course. Way? Back, then in the early nineteen, Eighty S. The Hazel and foundation played a role also in the birthplace. Can you share just a little bit about that? Well, mother spent quite a bit a time when to Hazelton, because Hazelton had done it. So well, they were probably the leaders in the in the sense that they had been around the longest <hes>. And it was successful <hes>. There's lots of treatment centers that haven't been successful. Some other went back and spent probably close to a week there visiting with counselors visiting with a staff talking, how do you do this? What did you do? Right? What did you do on? Why? What makes Hazelton successful because we basically wanted to copy what they had done, but in a different location sure who would have ever imagined decades later. The two organizations would come together and I WANNA to come back to that in just a minute. But First Susan I want to address an issue that. Always bothers me and then set the the Betty Ford. Center is seen as a place for. The rich and famous for the exclusive for those who can pay out of pocket. But that's not at all what's happening here is no and less than one percent of the patients here are what we would think of as celebrities. Yes. We've had some celebrities, but so was Hazelton I mean. So as other places <hes> everybody needs treatment, it doesn't matter what you do that determines you need treatment. So, and they don't get treated any different than. My Mother didn't get treated any different Long Beach. The women, she shared a room with. So <hes>, it's the same.

Betty Ford Center Hazel Betty Ford Susan Ford Ford Foundation Ford Center Mrs Ford chairman Eisenhower Medical Center President White House Johnson
Betty Ford's Healing Legacy: A Conversation with Susan Ford Bales

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:47 min | 8 months ago

Betty Ford's Healing Legacy: A Conversation with Susan Ford Bales

"Today, we're joined by Susan Ford Welcome. Susan. You are aid author, photo journalist. The youngest of four children to President and Mrs Ford. We are appropriately here at the Betty Ford Center, where you're also on the board of trustees of the Hazel Betty. Ford Foundation. Your mother's legacy. was as a breast cancer survivor and advocate, and as a woman in recovery, and as an advocate for being a woman in recovery. How has the legacy of your mother? Affected your role here at the Betty, Ford? Center. Wow Her shoes were really big to fill your So when she stepped down from the board and I became chairman. I. Think it was harder than living in the White House actually because. We mother and I come from two different parts of recovery. She is a patient and the family member. So we have very different opinions of things than and what's important to us One of the things that she made me do, which was extremely painful with sit on every city every single committee. And participate on my witness finance. Finance. But I learned it. Sure. And so I feel like she did a great job of preparing me to be chairman. So it's it's just we come at it from a different angle in a different perspective family and children's services is extremely important to me because that's how I was affected by this disease. Did you come to the the role of being the chair here at Betty? Ford, did you come to that reluctantly? No because I had been on the board for cheese, probably fifteen years I'm it had just been a long process Mother was gracious and allowed me to raise my children before I came on the board because I was pregnant when the. Betty. Ford. Center open. So. I don't think I came on the board until my youngest was first grade or second grade, and so she gave me some time to get my children raised in at least in school because it required several days travel and all of that in childcare and all the complications that we go through to participate in something like that. Let's go back a little bit and talk about the history of the Betty, Ford Center there's a lot of people who think that when your mother found her own recovery in the late seventy s, she went to the Betty Ford Center. It wasn't even here now was, how did the Betty Ford Center come to be. Johnson from Eisenhower Medical Center decided that. They wanted to have a treatment and it had been in the plan at Eisenhower for some time, they wanted to have an alcoholic treatment center on the campus. and. So Leonard firestone mother's dear, friend was also on the board of Eisenhower. And so Johnson Leonard. Kinda. Tag. Team. Durham. and. She was really in a recovery about four years. But she agreed and I and I thought that was a very courageous step to be so early recovery. So she came to all of us children and she said. When I'm long gone. You're the ones that are going to have to live with the fact that your mother had A. Drug and alcohol treatment. Centre, named after you. How do you feel about that? Wow, and we also we don't care. I mean. It's what a great Lexi you know. She was one of the first to step out and and share her story So once we got past that it was just a matter of mother and Leonard Raising the money. To get this place started and of course. Way? Back, then in the early nineteen, Eighty S. The Hazel and foundation played a role also in the birthplace. Can you share just a little bit about that? Well, mother spent quite a bit a time when to Hazelton, because Hazelton had done it. So well, they were probably the leaders in the in the sense that they had been around the longest And it was successful There's lots of treatment centers that haven't been successful. Some other went back and spent probably close to a week there visiting with counselors visiting with a staff talking, how do you do this? What did you do? Right? What did you do on? Why? What makes Hazelton successful because we basically wanted to copy what they had done, but in a different location sure who would have ever imagined decades later. The two organizations would come together and I WANNA to come back to that in just a minute. But First Susan I want to address an issue that. Always bothers me and then set the the Betty Ford. Center is seen as a place for. The rich and famous for the exclusive for those who can pay out of pocket. But that's not at all what's happening here is no and less than one percent of the patients here are what we would think of as celebrities. Yes. We've had some celebrities, but so was Hazelton I mean. So as other places everybody needs treatment, it doesn't matter what you do that determines you need treatment. So, and they don't get treated any different than. My Mother didn't get treated any different Long Beach. The women, she shared a room with. So it's the same.

Betty Ford Center Hazel Betty Ford Susan Ford Hazelton Ford Foundation Betty Ford Ford Center Mrs Ford Johnson Leonard Chairman Durham. Eisenhower Medical Center Lexi Leonard Firestone Eisenhower President Trump Long Beach White House A. Drug
Happy Soberversary! Lessons from 10 Years Sober & 12 Years in Recovery

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:50 min | 9 months ago

Happy Soberversary! Lessons from 10 Years Sober & 12 Years in Recovery

"Hi sober souls. It's Lynn from Georgia and I'm really excited for today's episode because. I'm about to turn ten years summer. By the time you'll be listening to this. It will be July twenty seven. Which is my sober bursary? It is the day that I entered Hazelton Betty Ford in center city Minnesota, screaming. Yeah literally screaming for help. I was intoxicated so sometimes. I actually tell folks like I'm going to tell you that. My actual date of not being intoxicated was probably closer to the twenty eight, but I went in pretty early on the twenty seven. So it's just easier for me to remember. However I did spend twenty four hours in detox, which was super. Fun For those of you who have been? been through detox, it was my third detox and Yeah, that one stuck for those of you. Who May Not Know My story? I attempted to get sober like so many of us long before. I actually attained sobriety, so I say that I have been in recovery. 'cause, that's what I fully believe as opposed to one hundred percent sober for two years prior to actually finding sobriety. And they'll talk a little bit more about that once I. Get into what I'm going to share with. And that is my lessons from ten years of Sobriety in twelve years in recovery I've worked really hard to kind of home down to ten lessons. Only because it's fun to do it that way, Ten and ten you know, but there are so many more than ten lessons. Many of which I often talk about here on the PODCAST, so getting back to my story I was really bad off before I went into -ment and by bad off. I mean yeah, in the two years prior I had seven months of sobriety or I guess I would actually call it. Since I was still taking prescription drugs and counter drugs, not as prescribed, but leading up to my final days as an active drinker, I experienced loss, and what we often call in the Biz a precipitating event, which set my final days of drinking into high gear for approximately the final three months for me, and that event was my father died I was estranged from my father at the time. I actually felt like while he was dying, he was somewhat haunting me. And I would go between him haunting me about actually coming to see him before he died, my parents were living in Arizona at the time, and also just the culmination of his mental illness, which was lifelong for me in how that manifested in my waking and sleeping hours as negative self talk, and also I really did feel like he was in my consciousness. So hopefully that is okay for some of you out there indefinitely I know it's okay for those of us like myself. Who are into the Woohoo? So in any case he did pass away and for the next several weeks I was off and on drinking, and then well into the month of June where I had. Had really relapsed. If you will in a hard core way I just gave up, and I just started drinking twenty four seven, I would have days where I would push myself to recover, which meant for me sitting on my sofa until the nausea went away until I had stopped throwing up, and I would push myself into overdrive an exercise I would try and exercise and Excise the alcohol out of me, and it was so painful, and then of course after a day or so of doing this, I would talk myself into drinking again as if I could have some modicum of control, these were the days that I would wake up after only buying one bottle it was. At the time, which was so horrific to me that that's what I was buying, but that's what I was buying and I would go four blocks drive for blocks to the gas station to get it every morning. There were mornings that I was up at you. Know seven, because, of course you don't sleep well and rain for eight o'clock living in Wisconsin at the time for the store to open, so I could get my drug. It was excruciating. I was of course in a deep depression I wasn't thinking straight. I was isolating and there was literally nothing. Nothing, that anyone could do I at one point scheduled. What I know now is my second or third intervention. Call my family to come. Help me somehow, and they did not have any idea what to do. They were not well-versed in addiction at all. All they knew to do is to take me to the hospital. Where they gave me comfort drugs including Atta van and sent me home with Clemson

Betty Ford Atta Van Lynn Hazelton Georgia Arizona Minnesota Wisconsin Clemson
Evolving Care and Closing the Access Gap to Addiction Treatment

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:21 min | 9 months ago

Evolving Care and Closing the Access Gap to Addiction Treatment

"I'm your host William Moyers today I'm proud to introduce our guest president and CEO mark. MIC welcome mark thank you. You well I'm glad to be glad you're here too hard to believe. You've been the presidency now for twelve years. It's amazing time flies when you're having a good time. And of course we look back on retrospective, but we want to look forward here in the future of of addiction treatment and here we are at the Betty Ford Center in the winter of two, thousand and twenty. And this podcast, hopefully we'll have a nice long shelf life, so we'll have to look out even further than just the next couple of weeks. But what do you see in the years ahead? When when it relates to what we at Hazelton? Betty, Ford, we'll be delivering in terms of treatment. Well it. It's a great question There will be I. think tremendous changes coming in the field. In the clinical model in the way we deliver care and I think we're GONNA. See A lot of change has to do with virtual care and telehealth now virtual care are telehealth spin around for many many years, and it's been delivered in a lot of different settings. What hasn't happened, though is the treatment world the treatment of substance use disorders hasn't. Hasn't really grabbed onto. It the way it's going to happen. In the future the the population that's coming up the young, the young men and women who will be moving into work will be suffering from substance use disorders in the future have a very different way of approaching the world than when I do. They use their phones they. They user devices. They are comfortable on them, and so how we meet them meter patients where they're at in the future part of that has to be that we are very good at and understand what parts of the care that we deliver can be delivered virtually what parts of the care that we deliver can be delivered over a telephone How can our? Our patients access content access lectures on demand. That's going to be really critically important going forward so that so that's one thing that's going to happen the second thing that's going to happen. Is that I really do believe we're in a stage now where we're gonNA, have a real shaking out of the field I think that because of the. Requirements to invest in Electronics Isla chronic health record to invest in virtual care to upgrade your facilities to participate in health insurance. A lot of the treatments centers out. There won't be able to do that. They don't have the capital to do it. They don't have the the expertise to be able to move into the insurance world and so I. Think we're going to see A. A lot of centers that are going to close or merge with that'll do for us is GonNa to put even a heavier demand for our services. We are going to see as we're seeing today. a continued escalation of people coming to us for Karen, service, so this organization going to need to invest in of all things, bricks and mortar. There's no question about it. and And we've got a plan here. For the Betty Ford Center we've got plants throughout the Organization for the next five years, but looking well into the future people attending treatment in person is not going away. It's the preferred modality you know. Addiction is a disease of isolation, so people need whenever possible the Common Person and so there'll be a high demand on our on our sites to be able to provide more and more care, no question about it. One of the things that's happened in the evolution of the way we deliver cares. There has been a surge under your leadership in outpatient. Can you talk more about the role? That outpatient will play in the future? Sure our our chief medical officer Dr Marvin. Sepla told me when I first. First started here that ninety percent of the people who get care for a substance use disorder do it on an outpatient basis. And at that time we really had no outpatient services. So I'm pleased to say. Today's sitting here this morning. About of four patients three of them are getting services on an outpatient basis in the organization in one out of four are getting on A. A residential basis, and that's the way that it should be so outpatient is critically important for access for people to be able to Get Care in their neighborhoods where they live for an affordable price, and that's what outpatient patient allows us to do.

Betty Ford Center President And Ceo William Moyers Sepla Ford Betty Karen Medical Officer Dr Marvin
A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

03:43 min | 10 months ago

A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

"Hello and welcome to let's talk. A series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues that matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to Substance Abuse Prevention Research Treatment for addiction. Recovery Management Education and Advocacy I'm your host William Warriors and today we have a story of hope. brought to us by Nina Pillow Nina. How are you can cut? How are you great good to see you again I know you've done a number of a public events. If you will or stood up spoken out using your own story to help unmask the stigma of addiction and promote the reality of what we look like in the fact, that treatment works in cover is possible, and we're glad that you're with us today on, let's talk. Tell us a little bit about your first experience with substances Yeah thank you for having me So my first. Experience was really the one that. Ultimately brought me here For my own in my life, my dad was an alcoholic growing up for me I had an injury which ultimately ended up I ended up getting prescribe narcotics, opiates, and I enjoyed them. Well beyond using them for pain. There's about seven years ago so. Seven years yeah. And you know kind of before. I knew it I was. Enjoying them you know Kinda like my whole mind, body, Spirit, everything and It ended up becoming. You know full on addiction which I thought I was immune to for whatever reason I was not and I was physically addicted. It got to the point where I couldn't use them. I couldn't not use them without getting sick. And the irony of this is that you were working in the healthcare field at some point along the course of your diction nurse Yep talked to us about being a nurse who is struggling with substances. Yeah, it was It was really hard. I had I knew all of I knew about addiction. I knew about opiates. I knew I knew all of those things. and I continued using them anyways and. I think I think I. particularly felt a lot of shame because of that and I. Had access to them in my workplace and so Being just didn't want to be the nurse with an addiction and I think that was a huge denial piece for me, Until I ended up diverting narcotics from the hospital I worked at. ultimately ending, getting caught and resigning. That diversion was so that you could sustain your own addiction. Yes, very much. How did that make you feel when you were under the influence? When you knew what you were doing was not only wrong, but was actually illegal and yet you couldn't stop. Just the powerlessness of it, but also in active addiction. It wasn't. It wasn't a matter of right or wrong because for me. My morals and values have always included not stealing, but that wasn't. It was a matter of feeling, normal or not or So it, just it. I don't I don't know that it was ever I know I. Felt Guilt I knew. I knew at the end of the day. It was wrong, but in the moment it was just. What I needed to do and you know. That's what I did.

Nina Pillow Nina Betty Ford Foundation William Warriors Hazel
Help for Children in Families with Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:54 min | 10 months ago

Help for Children in Families with Addiction

"My Name is William Moyers I. Am the host of our program here today joining me Cynthia Galaxies. Leave US welcome. Cynthia, thank you. You are the supervisor of the Children's program here at the Betty Ford Center Tell me about your personal passion for the subject of Children in Addiction. It was actually something that I didn't realize I had a passion foreign to. The first kid who allowed me to be a part of their world and start sharing how addiction had hurt them in their family that I realize the privileged. I was having about being there with them when they shared their story. With the Hazel. He's one Betty Ford Foundation for thirteen years working in the children's program since the beginning No, I've been with the Children's program. Almost seven years prior to that I was working in the admissions department at the Betty Ford Center for six and a half years, so I had to listen to the stories from incoming patients and their families. The opportunity to hear it from a kid's perspective really has made a difference in my life. What is that children's perspective that that that resonates with you? Think. It's just that they know more than what they're giving credit for. They might not know that there's a substance being news, but they know behaviors. Where maybe mom sleeping too much, so they can hang out with her. Dad's missing. You know left a couple of days and hasn't been back and just the impact that it causes them and at all times because they don't have the answers to what's going on, they can start to blame themselves or think that it's something wrong with them and that impact on children is really significant in this country. Right I think it's one in three. Families Suffer from addiction, and so the children do, too. Is that right? That's right that's correct. And I think there's a lot of programs out there for the patients, which is great There's family programs Alanon even teen, but it seems like we're really afraid of asking the younger ones what they know in how they feel, and yet they have just as many feelings as the adults do, and so tell me how the children's program here works. Children come into the program on that first day. So on the first day we have variety of emotions. There's some kids that are really excited to be here whether they're used to. Going to camp or their parents may be explained to them exactly what they were doing here. We have kids that you know. Don't even WANNA. Look at us Because maybe it's during summer break and they wish they were you know at home sleeping playing video games, things like that and within an hour, the magic of the program you can start seeing a difference as to how the kids are starting to feel more comfortable, and this is way before we even introduce each other and talk about how we're here to talk about action, and you use Use props like this I? Don't even want to say this is a prop. This is more of an icon. Tell us about. The Marine is a very special kid. He's here to my heart. special just like every kid that comes through our program he addiction and his family as well so both parents are trapped by addiction, and he has a series of books where he kind of explores along with the reader how he deals with it, so he learns that addiction has been a family secret for very long time. gets better. That doesn't even be more at ten years. old gets offered alcohol by kids, and so the kids get to explore that with him and relate because he is another kid and the kids start to understand that they really aren't alone. What about the children though that are? More significantly or adversely impacted, or who come here and a aren't certain what to do, and they have a nice warm person like you to talk to, and they've got a character like beamer, but they're still not coming out of their show. What do you do to to bring them into the process and bring them into the group I? Think the the magical part of the of the program is because we balanced our program between fun activities whether it's hide and seek tag going to the pool, watching fund movie and what? What we call sharing learning activities, so the kids really to get in tune with that inner kid obviously their kids, sometimes a little easier for them, but then they see grownups get in tune with that as well and so it helps them understand that you know I've had addiction in my family and okay, and I'm helping other kids, and so it Kinda brings comfort to them to know. Here's some adults that are freely talking to us and more importantly, they're listening to my story and not correcting the facts not. Letting US know that our feelings do matter. What are some stories that you hear when you when you talk to these children? Most of the stories revolve truly around just loving their parent regardless of what the parent has gone through whether they've seen the parent or not is just this unconditional love for that person and that hope that you know that they get better soon and so although you know they're. They're sad or sometimes angry about what's happened because of addiction, there's still that underlying love for that

Betty Ford Center United States Cynthia Galaxies Betty Ford Foundation William Moyers Supervisor Alanon DAD Beamer
New Frontiers in Addiction Medicine

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:59 min | 11 months ago

New Frontiers in Addiction Medicine

"Hello and welcome to let's talk an award. Winning series of podcast produced and delivered by the Hazelton. Betty Ford Foundation. Each podcast focuses on a topic related to addiction to alcohol and other drugs from prevention, research, treatment, current events, advocacy, and of course recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs. I'm your host William Lawyers and today, joining us is Dr. Martin Sepla the chief. Chief medical officer, the Hazel. Betty Ford Foundation Welcome MARV thinks in good to be here. Nice to have you with us again here at the Betty Ford. Center on this podcast, and it's rather appropriate that our topic for today is talking about the collaboration with the Mayo. Clinic on a couple of studies which I want you to talk about, but I think it's interesting that. This collaborations with Mayo Clinic and that's where a lot of your story comes from. It sure does I was I got sober. While was working at the Mayo Clinic after high school actually before I graduated from high school because I dropped out and I was working there. And and able to get my diploma once I got so. They didn't really I told her department. I haven't graduated, but. nobody else, really new in the lab work. So, somehow I, still get a job without a high school diploma while in was. Absolutely influenced to go into medicine while working there and addiction medicine. No. I wanted to be a cardiac surgeon because I worked with cardiovascular research lab, and the primary person who influenced me was a Brazilian cardiac surgeon and. He he? We would be doing surgery on these animals and he'd tell me all these stories of healing. From his work, and this is just want to be like. Was My goal. So. Cardiac surgeon than halfway through medical school back at mail. I still had that plan in doing clinical rotations and all these patients had. And or other type of diction, and I had identify that and bring it up with my attending the physician on staff, the residents and they would listen to me and then tell you we're not gonNA do anything about that Mar.. And we didn't put it in the chart. We didn't refer people for care for consultation. Nothing and it was often the cause of the hospitalization. We're doing nothing about it and I was complaining about this at A. Meeting ended weekly in after a few weeks, these two doctors in the meeting took me aside one night and said. Mark you've got to quit bitching about this and do something about it. Kind opened my eyes defensibility. His actually that discussion the. resulted in me, going into psychiatry and folk. Specializing in addiction, we're. We're glad that you did. Aged now it has. And did you ever think that the day would come? When the Hazel Betty Ford Foundation would be collaborating with male. you know I didn't I'd hoped so all along, but it just didn't have an didn't Evans I kinda lost. Hope about though here. We are doing it to studies. Tell us about him. Yeah, so we're doing. an NIH grant funded study that we partnered with Mayo clinic onto study of Medication for alcohol. Use Disorders, the medicines that camper sate. Hardly gets used because it only works for about ten percent of people, alcohol use disorder. So for me as attack. It's hard to convince myself to prescribe it to somebody and especially hard to convince him to take it because it works so infrequently you know and nine out of ten. It doesn't work for but. There's always this underlying thought that it must be a genetic sub type of alcoholics. So that respond to. So we've decided with. Mayo is to find out if that's true, because one of the main researchers there who I actually knew. Since I worked in that lab as a kid Dick, wind chill bomb, he helped develop technologies for examining genetic and metabolic biomarkers, which are just kind of. The human genome of testing that to see if an individual's going to respond to medicine or not, but also these metabolic biomarkers are just normal metabolic byproducts floating around our blood, so we can take simple blood test. And check it out to see who responsive medicine and who doesn't as a result of determining that. We put it into artificial intelligence computers to to examine the the characteristics of those bio markers, and those who respond versus those who

Betty Ford Mayo Clinic Betty Ford Foundation Hazel Betty Ford Foundation Mayo Medical Officer Hazelton Dick William Lawyers Dr. Martin Sepla NIH Mark Evans
Eliminating Stigma: The First Lady of North Dakota Speaks Out

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:05 min | 11 months ago

Eliminating Stigma: The First Lady of North Dakota Speaks Out

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of award winning podcast produced in brought to you by the Hazelton Betty Ford Foundation. Each podcast focuses on a topic related to addiction to alcohol and other drugs from prevention research treatment current events trends advocacy and of course recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs. I'm your host William Warriors and today our topic is personal stories public advocacy. I can't think of anyone who best represents this in our guest Catherine Burgum. Welcome Catherine thank you so much for having me here today. Well and as we as we are here at the Ford Center in February of Twenty Twenty. I want just recognize this moment. By giving you a medallion because yesterday was a big day for you. This is so cool. Thank you so much. How many numbers? So this is my eighteen. Sit My year eighteen of sobriety so my eighteenth sobriety birthday today yesterday. Actually so thank you. So much for this amazing medallion. I'm so grateful and that's thoughtful of you. Who team years ago. What what what. What was your bottom eighteen years ago. My bottom was you know not being able to look at myself in the Mirror. Complete loss of of self respect And I you know Decided I needed to make a change and And I was able to do that. Eighteen years ago and walk this path of recovery sobriety. I'm so grateful. How did you know that you have a problem? What what was that moment? That said I'm not doing this the right way. Well I could achieve almost any goal. I'd set for myself in my life but I could not stop drinking. You know no matter how many drunk episodes I would have or struggles or you know mornings Hong over I just. I just not stop drinking. And so that's how I knew. I knew I needed help. And I knew I needed to really make a change in my life And did you seek treatment or just walk into a recovery path? I went down a record both actually I. I did go to treatment but I also Went down the recovery path and found like minded people that I could take this journey with. And you've been on that journey for a long time but one of the fascinating dynamics of your recovery journey which. I'm sure you hadn't really anticipated back when you started at eighteen years ago. Was that Five years ago or so. Your husband was elected. The Governor of North Dakota. That's right that makes you diverse lady of North Dakota the First Lady of North Dakota and so there you are suddenly very public persona in the state of North Dakota and not long after that nationally but very quickly Catherine you recognize the unique opportunity you had to have the public platform and a personal experience and to combine that personal story with public advocacy. Talk about that for our audience. Well early on in my time as first lady Spent time trying to decide you know what would I do? What could I be really passionate about and you know? It didn't take me long like a hot second to decide you. You know because of my own recovery. I you know this was the path I needed to go down especially related to eliminating the stigma of addiction. And you know what I heard you speak a few months before that and you said the best way to eliminate the stigma of addiction is to just talk about very simple solution and I basically took up that idea and made it part of my platform. And that's what I'm doing and so early in my time first lady. I did an interview with the newspaper and You know they just wanted to get to know the first lady and five minutes for the interview. I told my husband. I was going to talk about my recovery which I had not done really publicly for fifteen years at that point. And how did that go that day? When you sat down with the reporter and really revealed the essence of who you are How did that go? It was a huge weight. Lifted off my shoulders. Yes you know because I have a disease you know I figured out. I have a brain disease and I shouldn't have to carry this burden on my shoulders of keeping keeping silent about it. You know but the stigma is what kept me there for most of my recovery and kept me from seeking treatment And getting help for over twenty years so It was such a huge relief to really be able to talk about it and You know my husband was super supportive. Rooney Talk Oh yeah. He's he's very supportive and he believes that the more we talk about it to more. We're able to eliminate the

Catherine Burgum North Dakota Twenty Twenty Hazelton Betty Ford Foundation Ford Center Brain Disease William Warriors Rooney Hong Reporter
A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

09:02 min | 1 year ago

A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to substance use prevention research treatment of Addiction Recovery Management Advocacy and education. I'm your host oil moyers and today we have a story of hope brought to us by Holly S. Welcome Holly Thank you. Thanks for being here again. I'm so struck by the fact that as a young person in recovery. You've been so willing to stand up and speak out. You were on the stage at Hazelton BETTY FORD IN CENTER CITY MINNESOTA. When we had the drugs are there yet. You shared your story that they had that feel free to be up on that stage really awesome. I spent fifty six days. He's old and as a patient three times a day. I was sitting. And you know in the seats looking up the stage and so to be on the other side of that And even having the confidence to speak in front of a group of people as astounding. My my teachers would be proud. Come a long way so you tell us just a little bit about your your addiction journey. The first time you used you remember. Yeah I do I was fourteen. Bonfire my brother was four years or is four years older than me And so he had friends in his grade that were siblings of kids in my grade and so We went to von fire a night and drink and it tasted horrible. But it made me feel calm. Addy is and I was like okay. I hear often that this this is what I needed. That's it was. I kept drinking more looking for what you found it right. Exactly and and I never wanted to find that thought. I would have a problem with alcohol because my dad was suffered from substance use disorder. So that wasn't in my plan. So you knew a little bit of history you drank. It felt good even though it tasted lousy and alcohol was the drug that you continue to use correct. Yeah it was Up until I was twenty four years old in college I did use adderall and violence is prescribed that and and abused that after you know few months of having it And then it just any any mind altering substance it was you know zero to one hundred all the time. I didn't have turned off button. And then the day came when new. You couldn't do this anymore. Tell us about that day. Yeah so I actually when I was probably twenty one I knew I mean I had always had a bad gut feeling like my drinking is not normal. It's not that I would drink every single day but it was every single time. Major anchor would block out When someone told me they didn't lack cal. I was genuinely surprised like well it. That's not what you do and you drink And that was scary. Own and the waking up and not remembering But when I started drinking every day and when I started drinking by myself and when I started using it as a coping mechanism fats and I was like okay. This isn't right And that was around. Twenty twenty one to twenty four years old Brit just progressively about so much worse towards totally isolating and just drinking by myself in my room and Stang fire and just before you had your bottom. You had a family tragedy. Yeah so My Dad died from the disease of alcoholism and fat was a long time coming. I mean I grew up watching him drink as a you know as a young kid and and I didn't know what that silver and way read can was but I knew that the more that piled up next to his recliner the more he wasn't going to be my dad. You know he damore beer. He drank or whatever So that was a scary thing as a kid for my brother and I And then after my parents got a divorce when I was in fifth grade just progressively got worse and then it's really hard to ought somebody's slowly and then quickly wither away And a degree the loss of my dad twice The first time when alcoholism totally consumed him where the disease totally consumed to him and then once again when he was actually gone And I honestly think the first time was worse Because the staff that I loved so much wasn't the same and so for me when he passed away. I I was even deeper and might action right like you think that'd be a wake up call And it was to some extent but I did. I had no idea how to cope with and what to do and so I just kept drinking four more months for former months. Yeah said enough. Yeah and then I. I'm GonNa die can get help. And I started really experiencing the physical withdrawals you know not being able to go. X. Amount of hours without the shaking sweating meant I just. I watched my dad for so many years and to be experiencing that myself I was like I don't want to live that way. And My dad dying gave me a second chance at life because that brought me to his old buddy Ford and and that helped me get through sober living and IOP And counseling financially at. That's what money did for me and what that was Was that that you found recovery November for twenty seventeen. So here we come up on. It'll be soon two years in fall. Two Thousand Nineteen Been What's been the toughest part of your last two year journey and recovery? You know. I think it's really figuring out myself and figuring out my feelings and boundaries to to actually sit with discomfort isn't easy you know it takes a while to get to get used to and I would feel a little bit out of control of you know I'm like how am I supposed to handle this and And by just sitting with it I've and reaching out to peers and the sober community and I found that okay this shall pass and I can. I can do it Shortly you will be graduating from college yet. Your degree is in community health education. Where does that come from? What do you want to do with that Yeah so I. At first I wanted to do nursing. I wanted to go on for nursing and actually working IGNATIEVA I. I loved my nurse so much and I was. I WANNA be her but I am really looking forward to exploring the advocacy piece And that's a lot of what community? Health Education is health promotion intervention disease prevention in the arena of addiction. Yeah absolutely yeah So I'm I'm really excited about it. And your internship has been working in a sober for an organization that promotes sober living. Saint Paul's living and it's it's more of a structured sober living. But it's yeah but it's all about finding life in recovery life beyond treatment and and finding meaningful relationships and sober friends. Because that's that's hard. I I believe for me. Had I gone home to South Dakota? It would have been hard because in Saint Paul the twin cities. There's five hundred six hundred meetings a week. I mean recovery. People there are so many young Pe- ray. Yeah and it's I feel normal.

Betty Ford Betty Ford Foundation Moyers Twenty Twenty Holly S. Hazel Hazelton South Dakota Adderall Addy Center City Minnesota Saint Paul Ford
Youth at Risk: A Convergence of Concerning Trends

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

08:50 min | 1 year ago

Youth at Risk: A Convergence of Concerning Trends

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcasts produced by the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to US issues that we no matter to you to Substance Use Prevention Research Addiction Treatment Recovery Management Education and advocacy. I'm your host William Moyers and today we're joined by my colleague Dr Joseph Dr Lee. Welcome good talking to you again. I couldn't well. It's great to have you on. I always learn something from your every time that we get to sit down to talk. I'm amazed at your depth and breadth of experience as our medical director on youth and family issues across our continuum our mission in this country. There's so many things that we could talk about your so well versed in all of those but I thought I would talk. Start by talking about something serious. Which is the mental health of our youth. Today what are you see is happening given the proliferation of social media? And all the things that you know so well. Where is the mental health of our youth today? Well I see concerning trends across our country. Actually you know in the world of addiction and treating young people with substance use disorders. You see kind of psychology Things are magnified stresses magnified Stresses and conflicts in relationships are magnified loneliness and anger magnified Ucla of young people who have use disorders who become what I call very fatalistic that is significant other. Breaks up with them. If they're met with some adversity they go downhill very fast started become suicidal and we know this is the standard course in the world of Addiction. But the scary thing is in recent years. I'm seeing the same trend in the same kind of psychology in our general social dialogue and I'm seeing it through social media and I'm seeing signs that are concerning with increased mental health issues and suicides. Not just for young people for for older adults. It's almost like there's a part of society I don't WanNa say is become addicted but the psychology of Addiction. The loneliness the anger the magnification. The polarization that comes with addiction is now upon us all. We just don't see it. Do we blame it on social media? I don't think it's fair to just have a smoking gun and pointed at one direction. I think they're all facets of society. What you'll find that is that social media is a lot like substances. A lot of people go on facebook. Instagram snapchat used fine without any difficulties. But there's a certain subset of high risk people that when they get sucked in really hurts them affects their mental health and so social media has way of magnifying things. When you see a pretty picture of a kitten everyone goes on like your picture. It's magnified when you see humane act and someone's helping someone else everyone's tearing up it's magnified but when you see polarize discussions when someone makes a a comment that's politically incorrect. Or maybe discriminatory and young people make mistakes by the way that also gets plastered and it's indelible and there's a magnification in that that I think is very dangerous for high risk people and then of course what exacerbates are some of the substances that you are using today substances that didn't exist in my using days of old. Can you talk to us about what you're seeing at our youth facility in suburban? Minneapolis in terms of the dependencies. That you young people come in with a lot of the convergence between substance use and technology and social media so they're celebrating some of their use finding peers. Who are like minded through social media and instagram posting pictures. It's always pictures before the social event when everyone's happy and they look like they're having a good time using substances. They never posted pictures. After the event when people have vomited and there have been fights. But it's always the before but but there is a convergence in Know vaping cocaine culture other kinds of drug use promoting it through social media giving a false image to other people but you also see the flip side of it so a young person may have made a mistake. Maybe they got too intoxicated on something embarrassed themselves at a social event well that also gets plastered on videos and messages and that is very for those individuals because then they get bullied. They get ostracized. The looking at everybody's feeds and everybody seems to be going on vacation. Everybody else has a new significant other. Everyone else got a new car for their sixteenth birthday and the more friends they have the worst this becomes and by comparison their lives seem lonely and inadequate and so for young people who struggle with mental health and substance related issues sometimes social media and technology can be a bit of a curse. How does it work at our youth facility? You see day in and day out. Because they can't have their phones when the young people come in for treatment do they have withdrawal. They don't have withdrawal. In fact you'd be surprised. With how many people actually liked to unplug a bit even young people? That's right in fact. We'll have conversations. Where like you know you have some friends that are maybe not the healthiest for you? They may be good people. But they're not gonNA encourage you to be in recovery or live a healthy lifestyle and they know that and they actually dread going to the Rolodex of their contact list. They wonder if they should change their cell phone numbers. They actually like the time that they have away from that. Because I think that's a lot of temptation for them and it's a draw. It's almost like Some people describe it as like being on a leash. They feel like they can't get away when they wanna get away so I actually hear more dialogue that they don't know how to navigate being plugged into technology and being in recovery and we have to teach them new skills to do that. What has been the impact that the legalization of marijuana is having across this country with our youth. The important thing to remember about legalization is that the skies not gonNA fall okay. Society is not going to fall apart because the legalization of anyone substance what it does create though is it does create a regressive economy and what that means is that most people drink alcohol. Fine but ten percent of Americans consume half the alcohol in the entire country. So there's a Paredo distribution in eighty twenty rule. Which means if you legalize a substance if you legalized lottery tickets if you legalize gambling at a casino the curve you see for consumption is not a bell curve. It's not that the average Americans going to gamble a couple of times and then only the people on the tip we'll have problems which actually see as a distribution where most Americans do fine and so they have no issue illegals Asian but there's ten to twenty percent of a population that might really struggle and they consume too much. They go to the casino too. Many times they buy too many cigarettes they lie too many vape pens. They drink too much and so we have this debate about are we okay. With simply a utilitarian principle were half of America won't really care and some people are going to make money and maybe we will generate taxes or do we also have a dialogue where we look at the minority population. The people that might be affected who will also try to sing the same tune as everybody else. I can smoke just as much. I can drink just as much. I'm just like everybody else. But they're not and do we have a special dialogue and conversation inclusive of everyone or do we just run amok with capitalism and. I think that's the concern that I see is not necessarily do we legalize or not. But how is it done? And how do we cater for the marginalized? Because if you're a company selling a pen. If you're a company selling marijuana or alcohol you have to make the margin of the people who consume too much you have to and they know that they know their own data and are we okay with that as a democracy so is it just simply majority rules or do we have special conversations to say we also have to protect those people who are vulnerable and that include young people on social media on vaping on the legalization of marijuana. What's your to parents. And how they talk about these issues with their children or grandchildren. Well I think people know their families the best and I ask them to kind of look in their. Mir's look at the the families look what their risk factors are and if there's somebody who There's a lot of addiction in the family. They should message differently. It's definitely not a one size fits all there will be plenty of people in America who smoke marijuana or drink alcohol or use different substances and be okay. They will not develop a use disorder but their children will also try to replicate that but their genes are different. Their environment is different. Maybe they face different adversity. Maybe they have different mental health issues and can we have dialogue in our country that is nuanced and mature enough to be inclusive of those people and right now. We don't have that dialogue. We have a polarization in shutting down of anything that goes against majority rule and there's capitalism that's behind it which I think is a bit sinister and And victimizes certain people so our organization is not against any drug. People are surprised by that. You know when I let them know. We're not anti-marijuana. We're not anti alcohol. We are advocates for the minority. We speak for the minority population a significant minority of people who will not react the same as other people when they use substances because they need to have a voice because other people wander stand

Marijuana Instagram United States Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation William Moyers Psychology Of Addiction America Medical Director Dr Joseph Dr Lee Facebook Suburban Minneapolis Cocaine MIR
Viola Davis to play Michelle Obama in Showtime series

Toby and Chilli

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Viola Davis to play Michelle Obama in Showtime series

"Viola Davis is set to play former First Lady Michelle Obama in a new drama series development on Showtime is called first ladies the show is going to follow the various spouses to American presidents the first season is the highlight of Michelle Obama Eleanor Roosevelt and Betty Ford premiere date for first ladies has not been

Viola Davis Michelle Obama Showtime Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"In the us cell phones are steadily gaining acceptance in public school a survey by the national center for education statistics shows about two thirds of public schools prohibited cell phones in the two thousand fifteen sixteen school year down for more than ninety percents six years earlier many teachers are also using cell phones as a learning tool however not all school districts are sold on the educational benefits in december seymour high school in connecticut imposed a cell phone ban the principal says since then students are getting more dining study hall and they're talking to each other more during lunch i'm mike helton a new warts and all documentary about elvis presley is coming to hbo ex wife priscilla presley has the dock doesn't shy away from his drug use i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted they can get off very quickly or just get off the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and elvis trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave us no betty ford there wasn't a rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go have center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much a part of his life richard tom's zimny had full access to gracelands vaulted made ample use of it to unearth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however presley says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually says for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets into the business well who wanna know about others presley and who he was when you see the body of work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was in uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached.

seymour high school connecticut principal mike helton priscilla presley betty ford gracelands elvis presley richard tom bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris presley six years
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"And all documentary about elvis presley is coming to hbo ex wife priscilla presley says the dock doesn't shy away from his drug use that he was addicted that don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted and they can get off very quickly or just get off of the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really does things were different back then and elvis trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave no betty ford there wasn't a rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go senator they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much you know a part of his life richard thompson me had full access to gracelands vault and made ample use of it to unearth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however president says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually says for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets them to the business will who wanna know about elvis presley and who he was when you see the body a work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was in uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached the heights that he did as far as changing style and changing music elvis presley the searcher is a two part three hour documentary premieres april fourteenth hbo for the a p i'm rob lowe france with rivet version galactic new spaceship has made its first powered flight since the fatal crash of its original rocket ship in two thousand fourteen the flight of v s s unity over the hobby desert was a major step forward the company said virgin plans to carry tourists into space where they can see the earth below and the stars beyond virgin galactic of the milestone marks the.

priscilla presley betty ford senator richard thompson president virgin galactic elvis presley bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris rob lowe three hour
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"His drug use think that he was addicted i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted and they can get off very quickly or just off of the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and elvis trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave him no betty ford there was no rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go we have center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much you know a part of his life richard thompson me had full access to gracelands vault and made ample use of it to unearth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however presley says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told us documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you you know know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets into the business well who wanna know about elvis presley and who he was when you see the body of work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was an uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached the heights that he did as far as changing style and changing music elvis presley the searcher is a two part three hour documentary and premieres april fourteenth hbo for the rob lowe fronts with ribbit some of norman rockwell's artwork will be sold by cashstrapped museum in massachusetts a judge has approved a plan for the berkshire museum to sell dozens of pieces of art including works by rockwell the decision in massachusetts highest court clears the way for the contentious sale of up to forty pieces of artwork the museum which has said the sale is.

betty ford richard thompson norman rockwell massachusetts berkshire museum bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris elvis presley rob lowe cashstrapped museum three hour
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"Two thousand thirteen i'm charleston with asthma a new warts and all documentary about elvis presley is coming to hbo ex wife priscilla presley says the dock doesn't shy away from his drug use i think that he was addicted i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted and they can get off very quickly or just get off of the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and distrusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave us no betty ford there was no we have centers but he didn't think he had to go have center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much a part of his life director thom zimny had full access to gracelands vault and made ample use of it to little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however president says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told must documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets into the business well who want to know about elvis presley and who he was when you see the body of work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was in uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached the heights that he did as far as changing style and changing music elvis presley the searcher is a two part three hour documentary and premieres april fourteenth hbo for the ap rob lowe france with ribbit thank you for listening to the ap radio network hey did you know that the associated press produces news related books.

charleston priscilla presley betty ford director president rob lowe ribbit elvis presley thom zimny bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris ap three hour
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"A new warts and all documentary about elvis presley is coming to hbo ex wife priscilla presley says the dock doesn't shy away from his drug use addicted i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted and they can get off very quickly or just get off the pills it was it was not it was a part of his life really she says things were different back then and l trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave us no betty ford there was no rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much a part of his life richard tump zimny had full access to gracelands vaulted made ample use of it to little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however president says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually throws for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets into the business well who wanna know about others presley and who he was when you see the body of work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was in uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached the heights that he did as far as changing style and changing music elvis presley the searcher is a two part three hour documentary and premieres april fourteenth hbo.

priscilla presley betty ford richard tump zimny gracelands president elvis presley bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris presley three hour
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"And they can get off very quickly or just get off at the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and eldest trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave us no betty ford there wasn't a rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much a part of his life director thom zimny had full access to gracelands vault and made ample use of it to unearth little scene footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however president says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneer he was during his career any young person who gets into the business well who wanna know about elvis presley and who he was when you see the body of work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was in uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached the heights that he did as far as changing style and changing music elvis presley the searcher is a two part three hour documentary and premieres april fourteenth hbo for the i'm rob lowe fronts with ribbit hamilton creator lin manuel miranda thought he had a migraine but it turns out the broadway star really has shingles miranda says it was caught early and he's been quarantined from his eight week old son associated press had reported he also said on twitter.

betty ford director president lin manuel miranda migraine twitter thom zimny bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris elvis presley rob lowe eight week three hour
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"The trump administration's punishing russians they p washington correspondent saga megani reports the us has the new sanctions are in response to what it calls a pattern of malign activity around the world it's putting sanctions on a total of thirty eight people and entities including seventeen russian government officials and seven oligarchs senior us officials say the penalties are part of an ongoing effort to push back against vladimir putin's government and show president trump will take tough action against the kremlin the administration's recently been boosting pressure on putin and his inner circle even as president trump has refused to directly criticise his russian counterpart at as invited him here to washington saga megani at the white house a new warts and all documentary about elvis presley is coming to hbo ex wife priscilla presley says the dock doesn't shy away from his drug use i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted they can get off very quickly or just get off of the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and elvis trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave him no betty ford there was no rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go have centered they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much a part of his life richard thompson ni had full access to gracelands vaulted made ample use of it to earth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however presently says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while.

us vladimir putin trump white house priscilla presley betty ford gracelands president washington elvis presley richard thompson bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"Addicted i don't think anyone who's on drugs think addicted they can get off very quickly or just get off of the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and elvis trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave him the leszno betty ford there was no rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go we have center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much you know a part of his life richard tummy had full access to gracelands vaulted made ample use of it to little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however presley says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career or any young person who gets into the business will who wanna know about others press in who he was when you see the body of work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was in uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached the heights that he did as far as changing style and changing music elvis presley the searcher is a two part three hour documentary premieres april fourteenth hbo for the ap rob lowe france with ribbit president trump is saying no again ap washington correspondent saga megani reports he'll be skipping.

betty ford richard tummy gracelands presley elvis rob lowe trump bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris ribbit president three hour
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"That he was addicted i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted and they can get off very quickly or just get off of the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and eldest trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave them has no betty ford there wasn't a rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go have senator they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much you know a part of his life richard thompson me had full access to gracelands vault and made ample use of it to unearth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however president says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually and she says for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets into the business will who want to know about elvis presley and who he was when you see the body of work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was in uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached the heights that he did as far as changing style and changing music elvis presley the searcher is a two part three hour documentary and premieres april fourteenth hbo for the ap rob lowe france with rivet spicer of northern arkansas festival that dropped live turkeys from airplanes is flying the coop they won't organize or promote the annual gathering anymore the l ville chamber of commerce board says at this point there aren't any other sponsors the tradition of.

betty ford senator richard thompson president rob lowe arkansas bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris elvis presley three hour
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"Hamilton creator lin manuel miranda thought he had a migraine but it turns out the broadway star really has shingles miranda says it was caught early and he's been quarantined from his eight week old son the associated press had reported he also said on twitter his ophthalmologists had blurred his eyes and he was wearing a mask during treatment but miranda later tweeted his mask reference was a joke and his blurred eyes were part of his medical exam miranda said he was staying with parents nearby a new warts and all documentary about elvis presley is coming to hbo ex wife priscilla presley says the dock doesn't shy away from his drug use addicted i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted and they can get off very quickly or just get off of the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and elvis trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave us no betty ford there was no rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go have center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much you know a part of his life richard thompson had full access to gracelands vault and made ample use of it to unearth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however presley says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually says those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets into the business will who wanna know about others press and who he was when you see the body of work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he was.

Hamilton lin manuel miranda migraine priscilla presley betty ford richard thompson elvis presley bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris eight week
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"Details this yoga nuys asians including facebook being investigated in britain to see how social media platforms we used in political campaigns britain's information commissioner elizabeth denham made the announcement thursday it came a day after facebook announced that tens of millions more people might have been exposed in the cambridge analytica privacy scandal than previously thought in all facebook says as many as eighty seven million people might have had the data accessed denim says her office is conducting a broader investigation into how social media platforms we used in political campaigning meanwhile the eu is contacting data protection authorities in its member nations and in the united states it wants to better follow up investigations into whether facebook breached eu privacy laws when millions of people had the data accessed through the league a new warts and all documentary about elvis presley is coming to hbo ex wife priscilla presley says the dock doesn't shy away from his drug use that he was addicted i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted and they can get off very quickly or just get off of the pills it was it was not it was a part of his life really she says things were different back then and elvis trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave them no betty ford there was no rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much you know a part of his life director thomas had full access to gracelands vaulted made ample use of it to unearth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however presley says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of.

gracelands emmylou harris tom petty bruce springsteen director elvis presley cambridge commissioner facebook thomas betty ford priscilla presley united states eu elizabeth denham britain
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"You like it at participating mcdonald's the trump administration's punishing more russians ap washington correspondent saga megani reports the us has the new sanctions are in response to what it calls a pattern of malign activity around the world it's putting sanctions on a total of thirty eight people and entities including seventeen russian government officials and seven oligarchs senior us officials say the penalties are part of an ongoing effort to push back against ladimir putin's government and show president trump will take tough action against the kremlin the administration's recently been boosting pressure on putin and his inner circle even as president trump has refused to directly criticise his russian counterpart at as invited him here to washington saga megani at the white house a new warts and all documentary about elvis presley is coming to hbo ex wife priscilla presley says the dock doesn't shy away from his drug use addicted i don't think anyone who's on drugs think they're addicted and they can get off very quickly or just get off of the pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and eldest trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave him snow betty ford there was no rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go centered they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much a part of his life richard thompson had full access to gracelands vaulted made ample use of to unearth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however presley says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told us documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of the you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually she says for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets into the business will who want to know about elvis presley and who he was when you see the body of work.

us ladimir putin trump white house priscilla presley betty ford richard thompson gracelands mcdonald president washington elvis presley bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris
"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on AP News

"Pills it was it was not it was part of his life really she says things were different back then and elvis trusted in his doctors and the prescriptions they gave him no betty ford there was no rehab centers but he didn't think he had to go we have center they were prescribed to him the doctors knew what they were giving him so that was pretty much a part of his life richard thompson ni had full access to gracelands vault and made ample use of it to unearth little seen footage you also interviewed studio musicians producers engineers and directors as well as artists like bruce springsteen tom petty and emmylou harris however pressler says this documentary tells the story differently so the viewer isn't being drawn away while the story is being told documentaries you you see people talking and i think that takes you out of the film out of a you know basically the topic we're talking about so you do get distracted where he here you just take on the flow you can see what's going on visually throws for those who weren't around when elvis died this is a chance for people to see how pioneering he was during his career any young person who gets into the business well who wanna know about elvis presley and who he was when you see the body a work that he did and what he what he really did alone you know he lives in uncharted territory she said there was no other that reached the heights that he did as far as changing style and changing music elvis presley the searcher is a two part three hour documentary and premieres april fourteenth hbo for the ap rob lowe fronts with ribbit thank you for listening to the ap radio network did you know that you can purchase prints of ap's photography for your personal or small business.

betty ford pressler richard thompson bruce springsteen tom petty emmylou harris elvis presley rob lowe ap three hour
"betty ford" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

LA Talk Radio Channel 1

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

"Looking for love in the law the wrong place it you don't look for left at the betty ford well don't look at her and that is not a hookup spot the betty ford center you know i i've actually her because i have a couple of from the air that they are slow person nikki the about you must never never never never denver you know big combing go with them then the sexes must you can't separate that it becomes an obsession how how are we gonna do this how are a breakthrough rules how we're gonna have sucked laundry room something dapi come but goal that's funny not sobriety just had or i get away with having sex here uh incredible well soubre so i know says lee to people that have gotten away with it gotten him with sex sober sex serb reacts at no hilly they went there and they had started beating their row her get so but they had great jack while they didn't shippers lease over you know 'cause there's nothing else you to donate either neither of them take over her birth they went 'cause they get rid break the rules her yeah was one of only had sex symbol laundry room and the other one had on top of the building you're not supposed to knock were now with your fellow recovery people no no no why because you in chengdu speak through that's more gam should be thinking of such thing world they don't as involved there's nothing is a girl that teaches this clause because there's no man that would say that to hey turn nut jobs day that they're all cut and then the guys kyodo where is that switch i'm not sure how to turn that off no it did and he you have to get the cuckold treat when it knows it even the otago of that it in for me here is about giving healthy what taunt think about think about tiger training for the olympics they don't have shucks no they don't they just change those oakley and let it go on waste away their ever g two well oh i know i either aliji bad energy come film trivia brand it's fun i think that type of energy comes from uh a reserve battery deep i will bring further rebellions everybody per year yeah of course it yeah ever make you performed better probably well we thinlay klu klux war.

betty ford betty ford center lee otago Looking for love nikki denver sex symbol chengdu
"betty ford" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:38 min | 4 years ago

"betty ford" Discussed on WDRC

"In a little bit of sour grapes oh and i have to share this with you their brand new emails released because of a judicial watch website oas sorry lawsuit any en those emails secretary of state hillary clinton apparently felt that on her way to the to the funeral of betty ford in 2011 one airplane was not big enough for both her and michelle obama the governor waugh government watchdog group judicial watch has now released more than two thousand pages of documents nds obtain through a lawsuit filed two years ago against the state department the new trove which includes additional instance of sent and received classified information via mrs clinton's infamous email server also showed that she requested a personal plane to take her to jury for sorry to betty ford's funeral in response to a july nine 2011 email from then deputy chief of staff whom abbott dan remember her about the funeral mrs clinton said i'd be honored to speak his it okay that we and mrs otake twos separate planes avidan then said she would have to see what kind of plane the first lady was taking i would rather have our own of course you know if you want to clue as to why a lot of people did not like hillary clinton during the campaign last year there's a good piece of information this is a woman who really has never accomplish much in her law i mean i know she was married to the president she ran for senate and she managed to get into the us senate then she became secretary of state and set the middle east on fire and didn't really accomplish much of anything there other than to scare up hundreds of millions of dollars in donations for the clinton foundation but she acts about as high as monty has anybody and the as as anybody is these days she surrounds yourself silk still with a staff of people to keeper updated and briefed on everything going on in the world as though she still in the business of politics and really hillary clinton it's over get over it it is i remember in front of your calls at eight six six four three nine five to seven seven emails could talk at lars larson dot com you've.

hillary clinton betty ford president senate clinton foundation secretary of state michelle obama deputy chief of staff abbott dan mrs otake monty two years