19 Burst results for "Betsy West"

"betsy west" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:50 min | 8 months ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is balance of power, with David Westin on Bloomberg Radio. Still to come this hour President Trump gives himself a plus for his handling of the Corona virus. But is he still confused over the nature and the extent of the disease? Bloomberg columnist Jonathan Bernstein thinks L'm and he's here to explain. But first, Ruth Bader Ginsberg had changed the course of American law Long before she came to the Supreme Court 27 years ago as a leading advocate before the court and then in the Court of Appeals, she systematically built the body of law recognizing the equal rights of women, something we now take almost for granted. Two years ago, her remarkable life and career were chronicled in award winning documentary. RBG is a compelling moving an inspirational story of a remarkable woman and what made her the legend. We came to know, I talked to the co director of RBG Betsy West, the Fred friendly professor emeritus at the Columbia Journalism School professor West earlier had a distinguished career as a long form television news and documentary producer at ABC News and CBS News. I asked Professor West to tell me something about Justice Ginsburg greatness that people may not have seen just watching her from the bench. Justice Ginsburg Waas a surprising person. In many ways, I mean, she was shy and retiring and super serious. And yet she had an extraordinary sense of humor, and she just loved toe laugh. I think that was part of the reason why she was able to maintain such great relationships. With all of our colleagues on the Supreme Court, and really with everybody who worked with her, including her famous friendship with Justice Scalia, but it was, you know, it was really interesting, too. Get a little bit of a window into how Practical. She wass. How strategic she wass. You know, she was a very strategic person, and I think you see that a lot of her a lot of her rulings. I mean, just on honor of a lifetime to be able to tell her story. One of things. That section's remarkable is again we forget. When she started out. It was not recognized The Constitution, particularly equal protection clause, even applied to women, particularly and she's systematic. Over a period of years. I got to see one of her argument in the Supreme Court. When I was clerking there, she went about systematically started dismantling that and saying no, no, no. No protection law clause does apply. And yet she never became strident. She was strong and the view, but she at least and Mike Smith, she was never strident. No. And I think she prided herself on that. How great for you. But you've got to witness that. Did you get a sense of at the time? Wow, This is something really different here. Yeah, I mean, she was in the course of systematically as they say dismount on these laws, and it's pretty clear she was going to win. That case was Alabama statute about women being excused from grand jury duty a favour to them. And one of her themes, as you know is, don't do us any favors. Yeah, Yeah. No, I mean, supposedly, we're protecting you. Well, you know, the protection turned out to be a kind of cages, You know? I mean, it really is. Interesting to think about what our lives were like back then, you know, a woman could just be fired for being pregnant, You know? Ah, wife had to get her husband's permission to get credit Bank credit and, you know, in many states, a married man could not be charged with raping his spouse mean these were things that were just kind of woven into the lawn practices, and it was Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who thought that the U. S Constitution should treat every American equally regardless of gender. But you know, one of my favorite quotes in our interview, actually really the favorite when she said, When we're asking her about taking this on, she said, Well, you know, I thought of myself as a kindergarten teacher. Because the justices didn't think that discrimination existed. They just didn't get it. And I love that, you know, not a teacher, a kindergarten teacher. Exactly, And she had a lot of teaching to do, and they were all men. She was teaching for the most part, and he wasn't going to do it by yelling at them. She was going to do it by convincing when she was that way. When I saw her in oral argument, she did it. She did not raise your voice at all. She was stood upto wizard White justice. White, who was really pointed, pushed her around a bit, and she was very determined but very mild manner. How much of her attitude toward women came from her mother? That's quite a story with her mother and what her mother did it tried to do for her. Yeah, well, I think first of all her mother was Is the most influential person in her young life. Her mother was From all accounts very smart, but had not been able to go to college because in her family, the boys were set off. And there was a boy who went to college, not her mother. And so after her older sister died, quite young. Roof. Bater became the object of all her mother's attention and on Lee Child and her mother would take her to the library and she would expose her to music and concerts. And you've got a sense that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was so proud of her mother. She used to say, You know, what's the difference between a bookkeeper and a Supreme Court justice? One generation which he felt, you know that she was carrying on what her mother could have done, so I think that was, you know, obviously her mother died when she was 17 just on the eve of her graduation from high school. But, you know, had given her a great grounding, thanks to Betsy West, co director of the award winning documentary RBG. Coming up. We talk to Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin of Illinois for his reflections on the effect Justice Ginsberg had on the law and.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg Waas Betsy West Court of Appeals director Justice Scalia David Westin Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Professor West President professor Trump Mike Smith Jonathan Bernstein Columbia Journalism School Alabama credit Bank Dick Durbin
"betsy west" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:51 min | 8 months ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thiss is balance of power with David Westin. On Bloomberg radio. Still to come this hour. President Trump gives himself a plus for his handling of the Corona virus. But is he still confused over the nature and the extent of the disease? Bloomberg columnist Jonathan Bernstein thinks so. And he's here to explain. But first, Ruth Bader Ginsberg had changed the course of American law long before she came to the Supreme Court 27 years ago. As a leading advocate before the court and then in the Court of Appeals, she systematically built the body of law recognizing the equal rights of women, something we now take almost for granted. Two years ago, her remarkable life and career were chronicled in award winning documentary RBG is a compelling moving an inspirational story of a remarkable woman. And what made her the legend We came to know. I talked to the co director of RBG Betsy West, the Fred friendly professor emeritus at the Columbia Journalism School professor West earlier had a distinguished career as a long form television news and documentary producer at ABC News and CBS News. I ask Professor West to tell me something about Justice Ginsburg greatness that people may not have seen Just watching her from the bench. Justice Ginsburg wass, eh? A surprising person. In many ways, I mean, she was shy and retiring and super serious, And yet she had an extraordinary sense of humor, and she just loved to laugh. I think that was part of the reason why she was able to maintain such great relationships. With all of her colleagues on the Supreme Court, and really with everybody who worked with her, including her famous friendship with Justice Scalia, But it was, you know, it was really interesting, too. Get a little bit of a window into how Practical. She wass. How strategic she wass. You know, she was a very strategic person, and I think you see that a lot of her a lot of her rulings. I mean, just another of a lifetime to be able to tell her story. One of things that sex is remarkable is again we forget. When she started out. It was not recognized The Constitution, particularly equal protection clause, even applied to women, particularly and she's systematic. Over a period of years. I got to see one of her argument in the Supreme Court. When I was clerking there, she went about systematically started dismantling that and saying no, no, no, no protection. Allied cause does apply. And yet she never became strident. She was strong and view, but she at least and Mike Smith, she was never strident. No. And I think she prided herself. Oh, now how great for you. But you've got to witness that. Did you get a sense of at the time? Wow. This is something really different here. Yeah, I mean, she was in the course of systematically, as I say, dismounting these laws and was pretty clear she was going to win. That case was Alabama statute about women being excused from grand jury duty a favour to them. And one of her themes, as you know is, don't do us any favors. Yeah, Yeah. No, I mean, supposedly, we're protecting you. Well, you know, the protection turned out to be a kind of cages, You know? I mean, it really is interesting to think about what our lives were like back then. You know, a woman could just be fired for being pregnant, You know? Ah, wife had to get her husband's permission to get credit. Bank credit and, you know, in many states, a married man could not be charged with raping his spouse mean these were things that were just kind of woven into the long practices, and it was Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who thought that the U. S Constitution should treat every American equally regardless of gender. But you know, one of my favorite quotes in our interview, actually really the favorite when she said, When we're asking her about taking this on, she said, Well, you know, I thought of myself as a kindergarten teacher. Because the justices didn't think that discrimination existed. They just didn't get it. And I love that, you know, not a teacher, a kindergarten teacher. Exactly, And she had a lot of teaching to do, and they were all men. She was teaching for the most part, and she wasn't going to do it by yelling at them. She was going to do it by convincing when she was that way. When I saw her in oral argument, she did that She did not raise her voice at all. She was stood upto wizard White justice. White, who was really pointed, pushed her around a bit, and she was very determined but very mild manner. How much of her attitude toward women came from her mother? That's quite a story with her mother and what her mother did it tried to do for her. Yeah, well, I think first of all her mother was Is the most influential person in her young life. Her mother was From all accounts very smart, but had not been able to go to college because in her family, the boys were set off. And there was a boy who went to college, not her mother. And so after her older sister died, quite young. Roof. Bater became the object of all her mother's attention and on Lee Child and her mother would take her to the library and she would expose her to music and concerts. And you've got a sense that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was so proud of her mother. She used to say, You know, what's the difference between a bookkeeper at a Supreme Court justice? One generation which he felt, you know that she was carrying on what her mother could have done, so I think that was, you know, obviously her mother died when she was 17 just on the eve of her graduation from high school. But, you know, had given her a great grounding, thanks to Betsy West, co director of the award winning documentary RBG. Coming up. We talk to Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin of Illinois for his reflections on the effect Justice Ginsberg had on the law and.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg Supreme Court Betsy West Court of Appeals David Westin Justice Scalia Bloomberg director President Trump Professor West Jonathan Bernstein professor Mike Smith Columbia Journalism School Dick Durbin Bater ABC News Alabama Senate Minority
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

05:14 min | 8 months ago

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died

"Bader Ginsburg was a force to be reckoned with. All I asked about brethren. They said. They take their feet off our necks, barely 5 FT. Tall but a liberal giant, only the second female justice named on the Supreme Court serving there for more than a quarter century. Her path to the highest court in the land was not easy. As one of the few women at Harvard Law School she faced discrimination. After graduating from Colombia in the fifties, her tenaciousness in the classroom highlighted in the Oscar nominated documentary on Ginsberg titled RBG produced by journalists Julie Cohen and Betsy West. She was one of nine women in a class of 500. She was tied for first in her class. And the Big New York City law firms just weren't hiring women, not a law firm in the entire city of New York. Did for my employment charging forward, she became a beloved law professor rockers and worked as a lawyer for the O U, She mapped out a legal strategy to file lawsuits against gender bias in employment, housing and government benefits. Man and women are persons of equal dignity and they should count. Equally before the law, You won't settle for putting Susan B. Anthony on the new dollars When they would say things like this. Haven't you respond? Well, never in anger, Mother told that's that would have been self defeating. Always as an opportunity. Teach. I didn't see myself was kind of a kindergarten teacher in those days because the judges Didn't think so. Sex discrimination existed. One of the things that tried to plant in their minds was Think about how you would like the world to be for your daughters and granddaughters. She won five landmark cases, which she argued on behalf of women in front of an all male bench long before she sat on it. Ginsberg went on to serve as an appeals court judge in the nation's capital until that life changing nomination by President Bill Clinton in 1993. I am proud to nominate for associate justice of the Supreme Court. Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg. That announcement may never have happened had it not been for the intense lobbying effort by a staunch feminist, her husband, Marty Ginsburg, and at her confirmation hearing chaired by then Senator Joe Biden, the nominee did not shy away from her feminism spotlighting contentious topics like abortion rights. This is Something central to a woman's. Life to her dignity. It's a decision that she must make

Bader Ginsburg Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg Betsy West Supreme Court Ginsberg Harvard Law School Mother New York Senator Joe Biden Susan B. Anthony President Bill Clinton Colombia Oscar Julie Cohen O
Big night for Rhode Island's Farrelly with Best Picture award

Ron St. Pierre

04:11 min | 2 years ago

Big night for Rhode Island's Farrelly with Best Picture award

"And the beautiful people were out in droves last night, the the Oscars and I didn't watch ticking. Second of it not because I don't like the award shows. I kinda do you know, I can get around all of the the nonsense with the with the politics and the way I do it. As I tape them video. All right. Just DVR the stuff, and then you can just brew right through all of the political nonsense. And I guess there was some stuff sprinkled in there last night. I don't think it was like really really in your face all that much. But I'll tell you what it was. It was first of all it was done without a host. And I guess they pulled it off fairly. Well, you know, how smoothly it ran out. And I'll let you know after I take a peek at it a little bit later on today. But. A big night for Rhode Island. That's for sure. The Farley brothers. What a job they got done last night. Three oscars. They won the best picture overall. Best picture for green book the. Supporting actor won the Oscar for green book, and then also the screenplay and Farley thanked olive Rhode Island just as he has promised he promised he was going to do this, and you know, Christine, and I we didn't do too well in our picks, but I did pick green book to win the Oscar just so I could hear Farley say this. But I got a lot of people to thank starting with the entire state of Rhode Island. All right. He promised to thank all of us. Any most certainly did. All right, one of more than the Oscars coming along throughout the course of the morning. There was another person from Ireland island who was up for an Oscar individual from originally from Brown University, but she didn't win. Best picture was green book supporting actor was marriage. Shallow Ali for green book and the original screenplay for green books. So that's what fairly was talking. Now, Betsy west of Brown alumni among us who co directed. Our BG documentary about Ruth Bader Ginsburg that was nominated but it didn't win. So. Rollin had a great night last night three Academy Awards for the fairly brothers. Joining us now is Tanya, j powers from Fox News some surprises last night, Tanya, j powers. Probably Glenn Close not taking after. Yup. That's got. That was my number one surprise. Yeah. I think that was a surprise a lot of people. I think that a lot of folks this kind of her year. And she did not win for best actress in Coleman instead one for the favorite. So what after what thirty one thirty four years, Spike Lee finally wins an Oscar. Yes. But it wasn't best picture, which he was not very happy about I think in the because do the right thing. I believe I'm correct in saying driving miss daisy, meet out do the right thing. And he made mention in like backstage talking to the press every time. There's maybe where somebody's driving lose. Yeah. But that was that was that was back filling because he allegedly I according to deadline. He actually tried to storm out when the green book one. So that's widely reported cooler heads had to prevail. But you gotta give them credit because as pretty good line. You know, every time somebody somebody's driving. I gotta lose. Yeah. But I I immediately did think of you last night when we'd green book. Doing pretty well. I thought it's going to be very excited about this. You know, the brothers. They've really done a lot for Rhode Island a lot of their productions out of here. And you know, the last thing in the world, I thought the fairly brothers will ever do is win an Oscar, you know, because if you go back and look at their body of work. It's usually really extreme comedies. Even did the three stooges movie, you know. So who thought they were going to score an Oscar for best picture. Yeah. I mean, this is not the kind of stuff that you know, when you look at their at their movies. John shallow. How something about Mary? Yeah. These are not the kind of you're not thinking. Oh, that's that's that's definitely an Oscar lock one day. Maybe it's just it just isn't. I think one of the one of the coolest things about that moving in particular was one of the producers is Spencer, and she was up there on stage. Also, when they when everybody came up for best picture, I'll tell you what those shows the Farrelly brothers have a pretty broad reach. I guess so who knows what's coming up, and you know, one once you got one of those babies a lot of doors

Oscar Farley Rhode Island Coleman Tanya Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ireland Island Glenn Close John Shallow Brown University Spike Lee Farrelly Academy Awards Betsy West Brown Rollin Mary
"betsy west" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Talking about the fact that as a young woman chief face extrordinary discrimination. And she in a very determined way figured out a a strategy that helped all American women. So you know, was an opportunity among fairly substantial portion of Americans, and I feel like it's even more important say this when we're outside of America among fairly substantial proportion of Americans right now in the President Trump lead United States. There is a feeling that there should be a strong voice of dissent. And in fact, they're sort of a hunger for dissent. Justice Ginsburg over the past few years, not necessarily in response to President Trump, but more relevantly in response to some of the decisions of the prime court that has been moving to the right in recent years has often become that voice of dissent because of. Senior position and the court. She often has the opportunity when she wants to to write a kind of a counter opinion. You know, if the supreme court is saying it as as in one example from twenty thirteen we wanna strike down some of the voting rights protections that have made shore that voter suppression is is stopped in the south for African American and Hispanic voters. If a co if the court wants to strike that down Justice Ginsburg has written the dissenting opinion. It doesn't carry the day, but it strongly makes the case wait a second. This is wrong, and it should be changed, and we should rethink this. And heard sense have really resonated not just with the judge and lawyer community in the United States, but with the population as a whole with the progressive population who themselves was feeling some wariness about some of the recent supreme court decisions. It felt good to hear that voice of dissent from Justice Ginsburg. So well, put one of the things does really nicely. Illustrate the way that the supreme court has shifted further to the right takes the supreme court in nineteen Ninety-three. I believe when she was bused nominates it in an an appointed to it. And she's quite liberal. She's a very centrist figure she's considered to be sort of moderate time. Exactly. And then as people retire or pass away Bush, go to appoint two justices, and she has found herself the left I found that really striking. And I wondered what you'll reflections on that were on this kind of nominal impart is on core, which just in practice doesn't seem to operate that way anymore or has it ever. Well, the justices like to think of themselves as above politics. But in fact, there are idiological differences, especially on those hot button cases that come to the fore, and clearly there's a liberal and a conservative side. In terms of her comments about then candidate Trump, which he made in the summer of two thousand sixteen she quickly retracted her criticism because it really is the tradition that the supreme court stay away from politics. And and she said that she in retrospect, it would have been better had. She said nothing. Indeed, am I suppose it is kind of you know, I was then followed up people make mistakes on this conception of the supreme court as people who are not people, but rather symbols of cheese voter she gets to vote for whoever she wants to vote for. But making those comments she knowledged was going a little too far. And since then she has not repeated that I suppose I wanted a few that kind of fed into the suits of partisanship has really come to the fore now with the nomination of Brett Cavanna this year. Well, you know, part of it has to do a sort of the public reaction to the remarks. I mean, certainly some progressives in the country who don't follow kind of the specific rules of the judiciary too closely. Thank like, well, what's wrong with that? I kind of like what Justice Ginsburg said a lot of Americans on fact degree, which he said with what she said. But the ideas that judges should be not weighing in personally. So that they so that their opinions come out through the rulings, and the sense that they that they right? There is a kind of everything in America right now is so polarized that it's it's hard for there. Not to feel like there's a partisan taint to everything that happens Justice Ginsburg has been actually at the four of saying that she thinks that the that partisan divide are are a bad thing..

Justice Ginsburg America Trump United States Brett Cavanna President Bush
"betsy west" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"More about your your relationship with technology. I found that interesting to feel like you need to keep updating studio, for example, to sometimes this question all that the update that we most recently did with moving from over nineteen seventy two a kind of say mid-eighties hope maybe I'd say eighties early nineties cutting. I think the the gear has so whatever since we choose has a role to play this particular synthesized on the record that is really difficult to program. She's not difficult, but it's just annoying. It's a late eighties. And it has maybe a buttons to navigate a massive menu and lots of parameters for. And things. So it makes you wanna give up and I think just. Just carrying on and trying to try to make it work is good. Because when you get something that's good. You'll you'll kind of inspires to continue the sense of chievements. It was going to sound the better because you and other people will know the struggles they'll kind of know the extra things you have to twist Bennett get through together. Yeah. In a way. And I think that it's too base apprised by what the equipment gives you back. You know, you give it some parameters, and it gives you something you weren't expecting or what if what if he changed some what if something by one semi tone, or you you make a sequence length kind of a little bit longer than a normal for full be over. So. Yeah. Those things. Throw up. Interesting results think so it's like having another member of the band space. Well, what about what about serendipity that? Are there any stories on this record in particular of someone's kind of leaning thing, and it changes in a way, you hadn't for say a little things that you did something? And you're like, I don't even know why. But why don't we just and then actually that's the thing that does it. Do you have those moments of loans is that in itself fortunate about cigarettes is that fortune or is that exactly created the two is just saying when to stop right? So you can just you can turn the dials and press the buttons anyone can do that. You can get you can just set it runs. There's some there's some of that. But it's the the the key to is knowing like when when something magic is happening. You know, and is really really intuitive with that wet like sometimes you get something. That's like it literally the first thing you switch everything on his two. Well, maybe there's something there and be let's recall did you have to one another. When you say, actually, the the very like because we obviously we haven't settled on this like since that was on about until lighter. And because I never used it up until then is ROY the bottom of a nineteen inch rack and so in order to program for like the first bunch of sessions before we'd so of like attached to it yet to law on the floor. One of on a beanbag is stress possessing for his arm. It was like so look Redan movie like sprawled out the flow kind of peering into the miniscule LCD's display to offer of what kind of thing was of situation was it for you or an experience for you. 'cause eating your your histories seven award to actually work with collaborator. It was. I was I of Davor. Demanding lunch. I mean as you can tell it's like, a nightmare wills. It was I mean, it was great. And I actually wanted to do more collaborations I found it's half the work double the results. I think. I'm hearing. That's good. That's good. It's good. Because a lot of the stuff that I find really difficult like once we'd recorded our sessions, and we had still of editing to make it into more of a song structure. I mean, maybe we didn't need to. But some of the tracks are four minutes long. So we had to add them down. I think that it's good to have Jess around because he's really good at that. I don't enjoy doing joy that yet particularly is particularly nice with having someone else who can after. Well, just stop. Stop chopping that bay. He saw lose yourself in the detail after a while. But definitely like are really like kind of like saving a copy of because also the way we record as you just kind of Irakli multi-track like, no, even particularly oil not much separation..

Davor Bennett Jess Redan nineteen inch four minutes
"betsy west" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Well fell onto what else is happening Surrey to keep my story's quite christmasy as well. But in a way, do you guys go to the cinema around Christmas been doing the Christmas season? Don't do that many cinema. Cheers financial as you know, because I drank screaming children with probably the lessons was Italian. Some now, I know. Say pizza rabbits. Oh. I think you'll taste in films has changed. Before that was pretty bad. I'll be honest. I was actually quite glad to leave. But is that something that would make me break that recent habit and tip for you? And for markers ago going watch Mary Poppins returns, you know, it's it's gone. It's been more than half a century since since the last few came out, but everybody's saying great things about Emily blunt saying she might be United for an Oscar. The film might be nominated for the best film. I predict amazing box office numbers for that. But there's another thing that would be released more or less the same time. That's my recommend from Arkansas. It's akron. I mean. His superhero, and apparently is performed by Jason momoa, as you can see I know you like men's health Mark because he's on the cover of the the January February issue, then I will like the feel of well, and he's got a lot of twos, and Nicole Kidman in it as well. And apparently. Dolphin warriors as well. So it's quite laureate. This sounds. Sounds really me dolphin warrior. Don't you always have a recommendation for myself? Your whole milk. Every now. A recommendation so yourselves to- Mary Poppins, you are commended though, doping warriors. And I'll be watching Ron coma. J lo. I love Ron concerts second act, which you know, she's just kind of life, whatever. And then she became successful. And then yeah, that's the kind of story. Great recommendations. Thank you very much. You are listening to the Monica weekly and monocle twenty four in a moment. We'll be talking music with gold Bantu and just show of Simeon my body sky. Stay tuned. Just show is one half Down's music and production GIO simian mobile disco knowing fulfilling festival tents and clubs.

Ron coma Mary Poppins Surrey Emily blunt Nicole Kidman Jason momoa Mark Monica Simeon Arkansas Oscar akron milk
"betsy west" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"On this episode. We bring you a discussion from doc, and why called getting political I talked to four directors whose latest films intersect with politics. First panelist will hear his Michael Moore? Whatever is it's been the artists who've been able to be the ones to save. I sometimes this is fucked up his new film Fahrenheit eleven nine refers to the date of November ninth twenty sixteen when Donald Trump won the presidency in the wee hours of the morning Fahrenheit eleven nine is a scorching political essay laced with Moore's trademark humor it seeks to examine how Trump came to power and the groundswell efforts to curb his power. Our second panelist is Julie Cohen half of the directing team behind this year's box office hit our BG about supreme court Justice. Ruth, Bader Ginsburg cinema's about making people feel something. And if you can take an issue that's important for people to learn about and make them feel something if you care more about gender equality because you feel something seeing cute little Ruth Bader Ginsburg planking for a couple minutes that like Amen, Julie. And her directing partner Betsy west were previously interviewed on pure nonfiction episode seventy six the third speaker is any Sundberg who directs in partnership with Ricki stern their new film on net. Flicks is called reversing Roe it traces the history of reproductive rights secured the nineteen seventy three supreme court decision of Roe v. Wade the film looks at contemporary forces to undermine those rights. There's a statistic in our film between one and four and one and three women have had an abortion in America. And I cannot tell you how many emails I've had from people on the life side who say that we are promoting. Falsehoods? And it's an interesting culture of misinformation our final panelist is Stephen maing. His new film is called crime and punishment. Now playing on Hulu he spent three years filming undercover with whistle blowers in the New York police department this opportunity to just deep dive follow them around and then slowly introduced to more cops because they trusted us at this point just snowballed the officers in crime and punishment are known as the NYPD twelve. They spoke out against the practice of stop and frisk arrests quotas that dramatically impact black and Hispanic communities. The NYPD claims it abolished quotas, but Stevens documentary present strong evidence that the system still exists..

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Julie Cohen Donald Trump Michael Moore NYPD Roe Bader Ginsburg New York Ricki stern planking Stephen maing Wade partner Betsy west Sundberg America Stevens three years
"betsy west" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Michael Moore, confrontational in your face and given the film's unusually wide release Hollywood clearly and mistakenly thought it was in line for a hit, maybe even another Fahrenheit, nine, eleven. That was more scathing two thousand four take down of the George W Bush administration and game changer expected this Michael war documentary to gross two hundred twenty two million dollars worldwide. That's Jason squire professor at USC school of cinematic arts. He says, Fahrenheit, nine, eleven remains the most successful political documentary in history, and it was made on a budget of just six million dollars. Squire says. That's one reason. Documentaries have exploded in the last ten fifteen years. Only some of those films are about politics and those that are mostly tilt toward. The left, but conservatives are also finding an audience. Obama has a dream that the sins of colonialism be set, right? And America be downsized. That's from the twenty twelve film Obama's American based on a book by conservative writer. Deneche Susan, the movie is second to Fahrenheit nine eleven as far as profits, go diseases. Pro-trump death of a nation was released nationwide this summer, but like Moore's latest, it didn't do nearly as well as to Souza's earlier effort. Some films become political by accident. Take our BG the story of supreme court Justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Here she is musing about the arguments she made before the court. As a young lawyer. I did see my son was kind of a kindergarten teacher in those days because the judges didn't think sex discrimination existed. Our BG was directed and produced by Julie Cohen and Betsy west west says they didn't set out to make a political film. We began the filming. In early two thousand fifteen, which was long before the presidential election and really was not something that was on our mind at all. But by may of this year, when Rb g was released, Donald Trump was in office and the political landscape me two times up all of those events of make repeater Ginsberg's life story that much more interesting to people. The movie grossed fourteen million dollars at the box office and made Ginsburg kind of cult figure a big budget feature based on her life is headed into theaters on Christmas day..

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Michael Moore Jason squire Obama Donald Trump George W Bush administration USC Hollywood America Deneche Susan professor Souza Julie Cohen Rb g Ginsberg Betsy west writer two hundred twenty two million
"betsy west" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Pod Save America

"New podcast rby beyond notorious which explores the life and times of supreme court Justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September. Third CNN will premiere the documentary Rb g which was directed and produced by Betsy west and Julie Cohen, Jeff, welcome to the podcast. I guys. So we originally booked to have you on just to talk about your new podcast and RB g film, but there was some Legal News this week, so we thought we would ask you about that fair enough you. So you initially reacted to the Michael Cohen plea by saying, the president appears to be co-conspirator and or eight and a better. A federal crime Trump has responded to the news with a couple of different explanations, but he has said these weren't even crimes than Michael Cohen essentially lied about Trump's involvement in order to get a more lenient sentence. Can you help us cut through all of the excuses here and explain why this is a crime, why it implicates the president and why the government believes it can prove all of this. Okay. Well, as my dad liked to say to make a long story unbearable. The the federal election law is designed so that people know who gave the money and what the money's used for. Right. I mean, those how the money came in and where where it went out, what Michael Kohn did, and he says at the instigation of of the candidate Donald Trump was, he lied about both ends of that transaction. He covered up the fact that this money came in and it remains somewhat mysterious. What the ultimate source of it was at the was the Trump corporation was Trump himself. But clearly there was money spent on behalf of the campaign and it was spent on this improper purpose. You know, paying paying off these two women for a hush money on the eve of the election. And you know, I, it's just worth stepping back and pointing out that this is precisely why there is federal election law so that the public could no. No, for example, whether one of the candidates for office is paying hush money to women, he slept with. I mean, this would be relevant information to voters. I think we'd all agree with that and the fact that they engaged in this elaborate I would call it a conspiracy to cover up both the source and the spending of this money shows why this was a genuinely serious crime. And do you think like, do we have to take Michael Cohen's word on this? Or it seems like from the documents you know, associated with the guilty plea, the government has more evidence than just Michael Cohen's testimony. Is that correct? Well, that certainly seems to be the case and, and you know, it's worth pointing out that. Wh- when you have two people with opposing stories, as we appear to have here between cone and Trump, you don't just sort of look each one in the eye and decide who's telling the truth. You look for corroboration, you look for other witnesses who were familiar with the facts. You look at documents, you look at, you know, emails of where we're, we're the checks that that that were involved in this transaction you, you look at if there are any tapes or video. I mean, that is going to be enormously important here and we have heard nothing from from a Cohen at this point except his bare bones guilty plea in court, but but you know, I it certainly seems like there there is considerable corroboration of of cone story. Plus it's worth focusing on just the simple question of who benefited from this illegal act..

Donald Trump Michael Cohen Trump Ruth Bader Ginsburg president Cohen Julie Cohen government Michael Kohn Legal News CNN Betsy west Jeff Wh cone
"betsy west" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on KOMO

"To celebrate the red white and blue clouds throughout the evening clipper lows in the mid fifty s to low sixties overnight but the clouds don't look to impede any of these professional fireworks shows particularly the big one on lake union everything should be fine there looks like sunshine tomorrow highs in the upper seventies to mid eighties and then partly sunny friday and that's where things change chance showers in the afternoon highs dropping into the seventies at the moment we've got cloudy skies seventy six in downtown seattle komo news time five twenty six documentary rpg that's the title of the new documentary about supreme court justice ruth vader ginsburg the film directed by julie cohen and former nightline abc nightline producer betsy west abc's juju chang went behind the scenes with the directors of the hit documentary she's a force to be reckoned i ask abrasion they ruth data ginsburg barely five feet tall she's a liberal giant on the supreme court but cheating rockstar status at eighty five with her tough workouts tougher descends everyone wants to take the picture and now she's the star of the new documentary our bg the film directed by julie colon and my friend former nightline producer betsy west is a bona fide hit a lot of ways ruth bader ginsburg the life story and career story is the arc of history in the us grossing more than ten million dollars so far nearly unheard of for a documentary during one of our interviews we talked to gloria steinem and she said that she's the closest thing to a superhero that i know and you know it's turned out to be true at the box office her colors becoming her calling card framing the face of a political movement inspiring legions of young feminists gins burned even on fm she began law school at harvard where she juggled classes along with motherhood the late nineteen fifties she was one of nine women in a class of five hundred then finishing her law degree at columbia in new york city she'd been on the law review at harvard at columbia she was tied for first in her class and the big new york city law firms just weren't hiring women as lawyers they're hiring them a secretary receptionist after a personal appeal by wonderful columbia professors ginsburg.

secretary new york gloria steinem ruth bader ginsburg betsy west abc komo seattle columbia julie cohen harvard us betsy west julie colon ginsburg producer ten million dollars
"betsy west" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on KOMO

"And komo traffic we have a few problems right now in stanford we've got an accident on westbound five thirty two just west of pioneer highway it's partially blocking the right lane you'll see washington state patrol and the incident response team there with it in lakewood we've got a brand new crash just being reported westbound five twelve at i five blocking the right lane i'm not seeing a backup and a grand mound we have a vehicle fire that i believe has been extinguished it is northbound five before twelve komo news one thousand and fm ninety seven seven this is perspective from abc news i'm sherry preston rpg that's the title of the new documentary about supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg the film directed by julie cohen and former abc's nightline producer betsy west abc's juju chang went behind the scenes with the directors of the hit documentary talking about this unlikely rockstar judge she's a force to be reckoned with i asked of our brethren they taped feet knicks ruth bader ginsburg barely five feet tall she's liberal giant on the supreme court achieving rock star status at eighty five with her tough workouts four and even tougher dissents i am eighty four years old and everyone wants to take the picture with and now she's the star of a new documentary our bg the film directed by julie cohen and my friend former nightline producer betsy west is a bona fide hit and a lot of ways ruth bader ginsburg life story and career story is the arc of feminist history in the us grossing more than ten million dollars so far nearly unheard of for a documentary during one of our interviews we talked to gloria steinem and she said that she's the closest thing to a superhero that i know and you know it's turned out to be true at the box office her colors becoming cre colin card framing the face of a political movement inspiring legions of young feminists just got gins burned even motorized on on he began law school at harvard where she juggled classes along with motherhood the late nineteen fifties she was one of nine women and a class of five hundred then finishing her law degree at columbia in new york city she'd been on the law review at harvard dot columbia she was tied for first in her class and the big new york city law firms just weren't hiring women as lawyers they were hiring them as secretary receptionist after a personal appeal by wonderful columbia professors ginsburg was finally hired by new york law firm with.

secretary new york gloria steinem betsy west abc komo harvard dot columbia harvard stanford us betsy west knicks producer abc julie cohen ruth bader ginsburg lakewood
"betsy west" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"There's i think there's more swiss films than american films goodson actually for our our foreign listeners for our swiss for our switzers so it's a good festival to apply to know if you were on that jury this year would you recuse yourself knowing this connections that you have to the shorts view say hey guys listen i need to step back now to be completely honest there probably would have submitted my vote for my friends short okay okay but it's a good short that's why they're going to say i would have voted for the swiss solve there's a lot of factors that you have to attrition swiss are you going to do you want to continue speaking or you weren't you talking no i want to interrupt you for those of you in town the brooklyn film festivals going on through the whole weekend so check it out so we spoke a couple of weeks ago about the surprise success of a quiet place and now there's another indie having an unexpected level of success in theaters the sundance hit ruth bader ginsburg documentary rgb which i loved and of mentioned on the show several times opened five weeks ago now for a documentary to have a theatrical release at all is still rare and this one continues to expand its territory and make money in an even more rare way in fact anyway reports that the film is on track to exceed ten million dollars in ticket sales and become magnolias biggest grosser ever huge congrats to my friends directors julie cohen and betsy west and if you haven't seen it yet and get on out there or are they going to share any of that ten million dollars with the the no films guilty will they shared their insights in an article that i posted and will put in the podcast bust so on the other hand there's a film doing a lot less well.

betsy west brooklyn julie cohen ten million dollars five weeks
"betsy west" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Good does she ever comment on trump has d'ici weigh in on his presidency at all she did not weighing in with that with us as you know she had gotten into into some trouble for making some remarks while he was a candidate for president since then she has chosen to remain as she would say judiciously silent she she'll she'll let her herself speak through the sense that she writes for the court the movie is our bg ruth bader ginsburg betsy west julie cohen the directors and producers thank you so much it was a fascinating film flew by and for a woman who is already so likable i think she she just reinforces those notions it's a great film i really enjoyed it thank nikko but i so there is you go the producers and directors of the film r b g ruth bader ginsburg playing now in a theater near you as they say it's a it's a major you know it's documentary but it's in the actual release believe opening today in miami and other cities around the nation i highly recommend it and you know good mother stay film so go take your mom betsy west and julie cohn thanks to them for joining us today all right we've got zack roberts coming up in a little bit to continue our justice theme for today but let's wait no longer and get into what's news it's time for new colson lers what's news from nicole sandler dot com and the progressive voices network well the senate count to confirm gina haskell to lead the cia following her wednesday hearing is underway and it's close has bill needs support from fifty senators and republicans have only slim fifty one to forty nine majority republicans john mccain and rand paul have already announced their opposition but democrat joe mansion has announced his support stay tuned things turned ugly on thursday i on the fox business network when a guy named thomas mcenery a military analysts said that torture worked on senator john mccain while defending the us socalled enhanced interrogation program he said this shit use it anymore because we've determined the congress not legal effect is john mccain it worked on john.

president miami betsy west julie cohn zack roberts gina haskell cia joe mansion senator john mccain congress julie cohen senate rand paul fox thomas mcenery
"betsy west" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Welcome to pure non fiction the podcast interviewing documentary filmmakers i'm tom powers the documentary programmer for the toronto international film festival and artistic director of doc and y c on this episode i interview betsy west and julie cohen the filmmakers of our bg about supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg now playing theaters the film looks at justice ginsberg's personal and professional history including her days as a women's rights attorney when she brought cases before the supreme court terribly terribly near risk but then i looked up and i thought i have a cath devonian's i knew that i was speaking to men who didn't think there wasn't any such thing as genderbased discrimination and my job was to tell them it really bill also looks at justice ginsberg's long marriage to mardi ginsburg who was ahead of his time as a husband supporting his wife's career i have had the great good fortune to satellite with the partner truly extraordinary for his generation a man who believed at age eighteen when we met that a woman's were whether at home or on the job is as important as a man's our bg is the first feature length documentary for betsy and julie but they both have deep media experience betsy was a producer and executive at cbs news for many years and now teaches columbia journalism school she worked with julie on the series makers about the women's movement the maker series gave betsy her first experience interviewing justice ginsburg later julie interviewed ginsburg for her documentary the sturgeon queens about new york's icon ick fish store rawson daughters but those were brief encounters undertaking a full length documentary and ginsburg was a more daunting task our bg had its premier at the sundance film festival and i showed it the miami film festival rice sat down with betsy and julie i started by asking how they embarked on this project betsy goes i.

programmer director betsy west ruth bader ginsburg attorney cath devonian partner producer new york toronto julie cohen executive cbs miami
"betsy west" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on KOMO

"A high of seventy four today increasing clouds overnight though things will look much different tomorrow we'll stay cloudy little bit cooler with a high about sixty two but that to partly sunny skies on saturday upper sixty s your seventy on sunday but we do have a slight chance of showers says you wrap up the weekend fifty four degrees in downtown seattle right now george harrison's first electric guitar is up for sale julien's auctions in new york says harrison played the hoffner club forty when the beatles played around liverpool as the quarrymen harrison traded his acoustic guitar for the electric model with a guy named ray ns who was a member of the swinging blue jeans harrison donated the guitar to a band competitive competition in nineteen sixty five and it was won by a member of a german band who died in two thousand seventeen that's his widow that's putting it up for auction their guessing could get up to three hundred thousand dollars how about a supreme court justice on the silver screen a documentary about the life of supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg debuts tomorrow so what does she think of the film titled rpg codirectors betsy west and julie cohen say they were watching her closely the premier at the sundance film festival he was completely engrossed throughout she laughed repeatedly she pulled out a tissue and cried a number of times including an early scene watching herself watching a beautiful opera duet that she loves our bg opens friday in select theaters across the country jason nathanson abc news hollywood is eight twenty seven when the komo morning news continues we'll take you to abc news for an update on the top national stories and then at the top local stories everything you missed while they.

seattle julien new york beatles liverpool ray ns julie cohen jason nathanson hollywood george harrison swinging ruth bader ginsburg betsy west three hundred thousand dollars fifty four degrees
"betsy west" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on KPCC

"Well excuse me i think that what's happened in the past year certainly does change the landscape and it makes our film more relevant in a way because i think our film and the story of justice ginsburg is a context that people need to understand that it wasn't so long ago that women weren't even allowed in too many workplaces was a hardfought battle for women to get the right to use their brains and to contribute their talents to our country and yet we're learning that sexual harassment and in some cases of violence has kept women from really contributing so it's another stage in a long battle for equal rights for women that's been going on for over a century ruth bader ginsburg played an enormous role in women winning rights for women are couple years ago i was fortunate enough to go to the supreme court and hear oral arguments and ruth bader ginsburg is a tiny woman she doesn't have a booming voice but her questions were remarkably astute she knew this case backward and forward she's now eighty four i believe what do you think keeps her going she loves the law she absolutely loves it and that's been the case ever since she was a student at harvard law school her children talk about waking up in the middle of the night and going into the kitchen and there was mom and the dining room table with all the papers spread out and she's writing into the wee hours that's still the case we're told that she really is a night owl she she is very well prepared from what i'm told you come into that courtroom and justice ginsburg has read everything she certainly has a steel trap memory we saw that when we interviewed her her memory for the clients the cases the details of the cases that we were talking to her about she actually corrected us on one thing at one point she's got an extraordinary memory and i think she figures as long as that's the case and she's capable of doing the job she has no intention of of stepping down betsy west along with julie cohen is the director of the documentary rv.

justice ginsburg harassment harvard law school betsy west julie cohen director
"betsy west" Discussed on X96

X96

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on X96

"Day all right time we're going to play for you from our sundance film festival coverage of there is a documentary up there called r b g a we sat down with the codirectors of the film talking all about ruth baiter ginsburg and you can find all of these at exnis six dot com or if you subscribe to the radio from hell podcast feed wherever you get podcasts you can hear all of our sundance coverage here is the film rbg while we're excited to talk about this because who does olov the really big giant rpg now now up not to be at your thing the bfg all letter they oh yeah the big them now at no enjoy no not that either friendly here all friendly eleven that's right as any this isn't any of those things this is ruth bader ginsburg uh she three i or has a different kind she is a uh she is a a supreme court justice if you do not know that and we have with us here a betsy west and julie cohen the coat directors and producers of a documentary about ruth bader ginsburg called rbg and it's i would be fascinated to see this and i'm reading a little bit about it because who knows what most people don't know much about her other than her recent career on the supreme court right yeah i mean this is betsy talking and betsy high bell so happy to be here that have u m a lot of people know about the notorious rbg who gained a lot of notoriety for some blistering dissents that she made in the past few years and has become a kind of.

ruth baiter ginsburg betsy west rbg julie cohen ruth bader ginsburg
"betsy west" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"betsy west" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"I'm talking about none other than supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg in the film titled with her initials rbg she was the second woman ever to serve on the court now at age eighty four ginsburg remains a critical liberal vote on the supreme court known in recent years for her strongly worded dissenting opinions what's the revelation in this film is to learn more about her career before she was on the supreme court during the 1970s she cofounded the women rights project at the aclu where she argued several key cases over sex discrimination in front of the supreme court i did see myself was kind of a kindergarten teacher in those days because the judges didn't think sex discrimination existed well one of the things had tried to planet in their minds was think about how you would like the world to be for your daughter's had granddaughters i learnt a lot about legal history in this film but the real surprise is the incredible love story between ginsburg and her husband martin they met at university and he was very ahead of his time in supporting his wife's career cnn is a backer of this film and they hoped to find a theatrical distribution partner for it at sundance rpg directors julie cohen and betsy west have made a film that feels perfectly timed for today's fight over sex discrimination now turning to the final film will highlight from the documentary premier section it's a beautiful day on us.

ruth bader ginsburg aclu martin cnn partner betsy west sundance julie cohen