9 Burst results for "Bethany Yellowtail"

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

08:22 min | 2 months ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"And then Somebody responded to me. I thought indians invented democracy. Unlike well i doubt this that. Us oligarchy with the originators of the idea had mind so we can we can we. Can you know argue over whether this is democracy or not right and certainly even if we can make a case that it is again. I'm not a political scientists. I don't think it's what indigenous originators of anything that came to be called democracy. We're thinking about so yet and all that other stuff that trevor was saying to about the representations having to claim that in order to be viewed as having legitimate claims within this land will something you shared with me. A tweet in response to the sign was a comment by k. Info shop yet. Not sure how to say it. And they commented countless generations of black and indigenous people have died here and globally due to the violent position of us. Democracy this liberal hellscape. This is what happens. When being indigenous is an aesthetic and not a revolutionary. They've had a. They'd had a couple of mic drop tweets lately that's their denier navajo feminist de colonial anarchists and global solidarity. What's on their tagline on their twitter account. They're so smart. Can you expand on on on that. Concept of being indigenous as an aesthetic as you said indigenous trademark like like somebody put a little. Tm sign next that the colonizer remember. That was all on native twitter last week and some people were pissed about that. People came out with with merchandise. That had the word decolonization it with a little. Tm sign next to it was meant to be ironically criticizing it over the because i would have been a great thick so that would have been a great ironic shirt But it's so sad that it did the on. Ironically well the accidentally stumbled into beautiful satire. well then it kazan. It ended up. Being people were kind of railing against bethany yellowtail who's an indigenous designer For and then it got into a conversation because that was their line of clothing. I think that the colonizer. Tm stuff and then there was a whole conversation about bethany. Yellowtail designs being made in china being. They are super expensive because it's designer coming in array of sizes that don't fit a lot of indigenous people so then it was so i don't think that's my long story to say. I don't think it was ironic. I think it was for real. And then so the indigenous fetig. Yeah i'm thinking about indigenous t m right indigenous trademark. So what do you mean rick like. Oh just what's the indigenous aesthetic. How do you interpret it. Just to expand on that. Because i mean some people might go. What does that mean. It's just an aesthetic that sign. Oh why don't okay. Because also the word indigenous like isn't even it's so contentious in the us like we just use it in every so. That's the thing. When i used that word at home and i'll have some you know i've got a friend dead pine ridge he's also. Phd bay lives at home at home. And he's like we. That's not even words. We use a community and like up here. It is actually. I know in the us. Like res- indians or even. Don't use it right as much. It's viewed as kind of Like disconnected that no citified indian type language. That's definitely not the case. Appear so i think what would an indigenous aesthetic could look different actually in canada versus the us. Maybe just because the word is differently. Used and understood. Because i hear like i follow so many activists and stuff and the word indigenous is used on the ground. I think as far as i can tell I've only been up here five years. But i think at home. Yeah when i go home to the us and all i've lived and worked all over the country Native gets used a lot more indian of course gets used by insiders right like outsider should use it but and then that affects So yeah the stuff that. I see that has indigenous blazoned. All over it in the united states is usually well it now. I should say that some of it is that slick dc indian stuff. You know And some of that those websites in that organizing around the voter coming out from dc indians or native people that are Maybe they're out west now but there's kind of that Pipeline between i think major western cities were native intelligentsia and Mainstream democrats are in dc. But then there's also the people like red nation right like these anarchists at or there's either kind of anarchist down there and people who identifies communist kind of in conversation with one another in the southwest that using the term so it can be kinda split actually so Kim if you wouldn't mind i'd like to share with you. Some comments from the creative director of n d n collective shade gay. This is from an interview published in grist Which is an environmental news. Website and Indian collective is an organization dedicated to building indigenous power and seating sustainable solutions. She's also the host of the political. She's also the host of the podcast. Sco vote dan slang for. Let's go vote then and Which covers the intricacies and importance of voting and indian country. Apparently in key states like arizona or indigenous people are six percent of the population. An influx of new voters could sway the twenty twenty election and the country's trajectory which is basically the argument right for black participation and digits participation we could cover the the margin of victory. And thus you know Change the course of of politics but we'll we'll get into that in a second but Here's what you had to say hoping you could react can't for my entire professional career. I've worked in indigenous communities around issues like climate justice and indigenous sovereignty and elections of always seemed like a really contentious time in indian country. It's always been interesting to me and also kind of challenging knowing that there is so much mistrust and flat out disdain for the us government and seeing so many people fall into this voter apathy and it is a very legitimate mistrust. We've seen time and time again. Historical legacy of broken promises broken treaties by the federal government at very real and it really hits home for people with the skull. Vote dan podcast. We're not here to shame or guilt. Anybody we're here to provide information and the perspective that actually our vote matters are vote has in some places the power to change politics and change. Who is driving the systems. So it's interesting to me that there is a really strong sentiment to not participate in the democracy and yet we're so quick to go into battles with elected officials over various issues of always thought that contradiction is fascinating and she points to the benefits of participation by influencing legislation in the main. So what are your thoughts about. Her premise. about wind degen's people should embrace the boot. Yeah i mean. I think it's unusual have native people. That's an interesting to statistic or six percent of the population in arizona. That is just not the case in most states at all right first thing we are about. The census would say two and a half percent of the national population. But i think that that. That's with a bunch of elizabeth warren self identifying i would say it's more or more like one and a half percent we are so marginalized and invisible on the national scale in the united states. That's not you know arizona. I lived there too. That's the difference. There's a lotta lotta natives. There and we are recognizable as Generally there so yes six percents. Hi it's true. South dakota to native people are are high and and can make a bit of a difference. So yeah on. One level i i. I completely agree with that. I was thinking about what trevor was saying. Though in terms of who it makes a difference for You know which voters does. Does this make a difference for if you went into the next part of her Her quote which was Our vote matters are vote has in some places the power to change politics change..

Us twitter arizona trevor kazan South dakota bethany rick china elizabeth warren director canada Kim dan
"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Native Trailblazers

Native Trailblazers

05:47 min | 5 months ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Native Trailblazers

"Equality and let's let's band together, which is you know these down with that of course, and you know taboo. So down with that, he worked so hard on all of that. So what? Question just real quick. Just. Tell me you feel. Time has kinda spoke down just a little bit. More time to talk. Yeah, I think so. I do agree this has been a very. Long Time, but we've owned it. ON FOR FORTY FIVE MINUTES Not Not not a struggle with time but I we've been managed to say a lot of ideas a lot of expressing opinions a lot of A. Lot of inspiration. Really. I am just inspired by. By everyone on this show. My wife Laura. Robert here. Inspiring me by beautiful. Building, you inspire me from your your passion, your love for your and your humor, but you so help humor. Youthful way that you look at life and and your willingness to to to listen and reach out and do things. Even, though you at this level of your career, you don't even have to. That's what you do and and rubber. Yeah I do I. do because I feel comfortable with you guys, I feel like like you said Del alleged family. Always feel when it comes to certain things I reach out even just to say hello because I feel like you you come across people that you need a value and cherish those relationships and use San mccracken Bethany yellowtail Sarah, Eagle Heart had the ray You know the the list goes on and on. Jordan on people. All these amazing people that are that are influential that have taught me a lot about my culture and how to great and how to how to be able to be a voice and inspire the you because that's what I'm about I'm about if I inspire the kid then you inspire the next the next thing you know you're inspiring million and. It's not just through music. It's activism. It's art it's expression. It's exactly it's be you know respectful role model 'cause I have children myself and I want my kids always think of is not a person that leaves a catalog music but leaves a legacy of you know influence and activism and hoping inspiration because that's where I'm at in my life. And look what it is. It is beautiful. Look look what you did with I. Mean That's that right? There is one kid I mean you saw him I mean he he he put that rap out he laid it down but he loves what you do and then you took the time to do a video and that literally changed his life I mean he was like, yeah, I wanna you know. So he's really working on his music and he is like hunker down. On finding his sound, not telling anyone, he's just like in their busting his butt on it..

Robert Laura Jordan San mccracken Eagle Heart Del
"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:02 min | 5 months ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I'm Jennifer Viele, the host this week and we were really pleased. Tohave skimpy on the new executive director of Sway a Santa face Indian market here on the show today, and now we are joined. Bye, Amber. Don Baer Robe Welcome, Amber. Thank you so happy to be here with you today. And so you are the curator and organizer of what has become really incredibly popular fashion show that's why does every year, right? Yes, I'm the fashion show producer, which means I kind of She organized front of house back. How's models? Designers? The whole the whole thing. The whole package right on. I have to say that you're from six to cut nation in Alberta, Canada. How did you wind up in Santa Fe? Well, I went to graduate school in Tucson, Arizona, and I used to come to Santa Fe for Indian market and I fell in love with the place as everyone usually does. What a Knopper tune ity came up for me to move here in 2012 and I snatched up that opportunity and came here and, ah! I never looked back since. I mean, this is my home. I immediately felt home. I feel so comfortable here. I love living in Santa Fe, and it's just so rich is so many different ways in terms of arts and culture and this and that much differently. Canada. Not really an eye opening experience, too, In terms of the indigenous cultures here, completely different, of course, than the indigenous cultures in Canada, and and, yeah, So right. Well, you know Kim Peony her parents met at II. She was born in Santa Fe, which I think is really cool. I any opportunity that I get in my profession? My Career to promote Native American cultures because they're just so many and so different I grab because I'm in Santa Fe is so full of Just like you said. It's so rich with indigenous arts. It's incredible Mecca. And of course, we know that because we're here, But working to get that continued to get that word out, I think is something that is a great thing to be doing. So you so you the fashion show. You started that this particular this fashion show about seven years ago, right? Yes, The 1st 1 was in 2014 and it was outside the cathedral park and thie. Nobody do what to expect. But the response was Great and it was of show has just grown leaps. This show's already outgrown the largest Kind of venue in the downtown area mentioned Enter right the convention center. Yeah, so the very first fashion show was I think four designers and a handful of models, maybe 20 models. We overtook the sly a building. There is hair and makeup and clothing everywhere, and we had to get the models from this Y a building, which used to be in Washington Street to Cathedral Park through all the chaos of Indian market, So we had to load all the models in the back of big U Haul. And we brought them Tio Cathedral bark. So you know, the very first fashion show for Saya was really kind of left on my own and let's go do what you want and put it together. I always say, Put it together with gum and shoe laces because it was it was a new experience, do it outdoors and but it was fabulous and so much fun. And then it really just grew and progressed and so is sort of like one of the super hot ticket events that you want, Teo get it be able to go see it during the Indian market, and it happens on the Sunday of Indian market, right? Yes, we have one Sunday. I believe may be the very 1st 1 was Saturday, but then it moved to Sunday. It was. Actually it was better for the designers because some of the designers who are also in market who have a booth Sunday ended up just being a time wise a better day. That makes sense. So tell us a little bit about some of the designers who have participated in the past years and then we could talk about what you've done this year and what Israel is going on right now. And the show that will happen tomorrow, too, but tell us about some of the designers that have been part of the show in the past. Well, Bethany Yellowtail who she was in a couple of my fashion shows as well as Jamie Oh, Kuma. Orlando do guy who we are featuring highlighting this year as well as Violet. So many violent Don Yolanda skeleton from Canada shall show a sparrow Pamela Baker from Canada. Captain Blackburn from Canada Sage Paul, I'm so happy. She's a part of this year's programming. She is responsible for the Toronto Indigenous fashion Week. In Canada. Wow, That's yeah. So who else but the continent brown. I mean, there's attack Karina Emmerich, a ton of fabulous designers and also artist I want to mention you try to kind of add a little bit of performance. You could say into these fashion shows and an element of surprise each year. So, for example, Rose Simpson, who's known first foremost is an artist and a ceramic spoke to writers. He opened up one of my shows, or she was participated in one of my shows a few years ago. And she brought her basically her sculptural ceramic forms into RIA life, and they walked on the stage. So I also have artists as well as for that that was really, really cool. And then you know, I'm trying. Tio Nocona, Laurent's who just died. Unfortunately, I mean, he was. He was at last year's that he performed at Or was asked his sister who performed last year, Okay, but but he performed the year before that he opened up the very first fashion show, and it was so just got the crowd so exciting and it set the stage for well to come and yet is so tragic and sand and that family is a great family. And we love the lightning Boy Foundation, too, so well, So I was going to ask you about that, too. How it actually how things work with the fashion show and let me just say you're listening to copy Ian culture here on Katie RC. I'm Jennifer Viele. And I'm speaking with Amber Don Baer Robe who is the producer of SWAT fashion show every year. So do you take do you let the designers How does it all work that a model gets all dressed up and ready to go down the runway? Well, A lot of chaotic behind the scenes happens, the nerves the nerves. It must be just like.

Santa Fe Canada Amber Don Baer Jennifer Viele Toronto Indigenous fashion Wee producer Don Baer Santa Tio Cathedral Tohave Tucson executive director Cathedral Park Kim Peony Rose Simpson Arizona Mecca lightning Boy Foundation Alberta Saya
"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:03 min | 5 months ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I'm Jennifer Viele, the host this week and we were really pleased. Tohave skimpy on the new executive director of Sway a Santa face Indian market here on the show today, and now we are joined. Bye, Amber. Don Baer Robe Welcome, Amber. Thank you so happy to be here with you today. And so you are the curator and organizer of what has become really incredibly popular fashion show that's why does every year, right? Yes, I'm the fashion show producer, which means I kind of She organized front of house back. How's models? Designers? The whole the whole thing. The whole package, right? I have to say that you're from sixth Cut nation in Alberta, Canada. How did you wind up in Santa Fe? Well, I went to graduate school in Tucson, Arizona, and I used to come to Santa Fe for Indian market and I fell in love with the place as everyone usually does. What a Knopper tune ity came up for me to move here in 2012 and I snatched up that opportunity and came here and, ah! I never looked back since. I mean, this is my home. I immediately felt home. I feel so comfortable here. I love living in Santa Fe. And it's just so rich is so many different ways in terms of arts and culture. And this and that much differently Canada but really an eye opening experience, too, in terms of the indigenous cultures here completely different, of course than the indigenous cultures in Canada. And and, Yeah, so right, Well, you know, campy own. Her parents met at IIs. She was born in Santa Fe, which I think is really cool. I any opportunity that I get in my profession? My Career to promote Native American cultures because they're just so many and so different I grab because I'm in Santa Fe is so full of Just like you said. It's so rich with indigenous arts. It's incredible Mecca. And of course, we know that because we're here but working to get that continue to get that word out, I think is something that is a great thing to be doing. So you so you the fashion show. You started that this particular this fashion show about seven years ago, right? Yes, The 1st 1 was in 2014 and it was outside the cathedral park and thie. Nobody do what to expect. But the response was Great and it was of show has just grown leaps. This show's already outgrown the largest Kind of venue in the downtown area. Mention Anna write the convention center. Yeah, so the very first fashion show was I think four designers and a handful of models, maybe 20 models. We overtook this y a building. There is hair and makeup and clothing everywhere, and we had to get the models from this Y a building, which used to be in Washington Street to Cathedral Park through all the chaos of Indian market, So we had to load all the models in the back of big U Haul. And we brought them Tio Cathedral bark. So you know, the very first fashion show for Saya was really kind of left on my own and let's go do what you want and put it together. I always say, Put it together with gum and shoe laces because it was it was a new experience, do it outdoors and but it was fabulous and so much fun. And then it really just grew and progressed and so is sort of like one of the super hot ticket events that you want, Teo get it be able to go see it during the Indian market, and it happens on the Sunday of Indian market, right? Yes, we have one Sunday. I believe may be the very 1st 1 was Saturday, but then it moved to Sunday. It was. Actually it was better for the designers because some of the designers who are also in market who have booth Sunday ended up just being a time wise a better day. That makes sense. So tell us a little bit about some of the designers who have participated in the past years and then we could talk about what you've done this year and what Israel is going on right now. And the show that will happen tomorrow, too, but tell us about some of the designers that have been part of the show in the past. Well, Bethany Yellowtail who is now she was in a couple of my fashion shows as well as Jamie Oh, Kuma. Orlando do guy who we are featuring highlighting this year as well as Violet. So many violent John Yolanda skeleton from Canada shall show a sparrow Pamela Baker from Canada. Captain Blackburn from Canada. Sage Paul, I'm so happy. She's a part of this year's programming. She is responsible for the Toronto indigenous fashion Week in Canada. Wow, That's yeah. So who else But the continent Brown and me, there's attack Karina Emmerich, a ton of a fabulous designers and also artist I want to mention you try to kind of Add a little bit of performance. You could say into these fashion shows and an element of surprise each year. So, for example, I rose Simpson, who's known first foremost is an artist and a ceramic spoke to artist he Opened up one of my shows, or she was participated in one of my shows a few years ago, and she brought her basically her sculptural ceramic forms into RIA life, and they walked on the stage, so I also have artists as well as a Just for that. That was really, really cool. And then you know, I'm trying. Tio Nocona, Laurent's who just died. Unfortunately, I mean, he was He was at last year's that he performed at or was asked his sister who performed last year, Okay, but but he performed the year before that he opened up the very first fashion show and it was so just got the crowd so exciting and it set the stage for well to come, and he is so So tragic and sad, And that family is a great family. And we love the lightning Boy Foundation, too, so well, So I was going to ask you about that, too. How it actually how things work with the fashion show And let me just say you're listening to coffee and culture here on Katie RC. I'm Jennifer Viele and I'm speaking with Amber Don Baer robe who is the producer of suave fashion show every year. So do you take do you let the designers how does it all work that a model gets all dressed up and ready to go down the runway? Well, A lot of chaotic behind the scenes happens, the nerves the nerves. It must be just like So exciting. Well, it is exciting, but it is a process and it definitely like last year we had over 100 models, 10 designers so just backstage alone, you know, there's a lot of rehearsals that go into this. There's a lot of you know models canceled last minute and things are changing. So it is a very controlled chaos. But there's always a lot of stuff that's happening behind the stage, even music and timing and and fittings. And there's so much that that happens behind stage a lot of excitement. We start like sometimes 66 o'clock in the morning, 5 30 in the morning. Get things set up and the day goes by so fast because there's just so much energy and hair and makeup in this and that so It's controlled chaos. Yeah, well, and you had 100 models last year. That's incredible. So let's go ahead and start talking about what you've done this year. Andi everything kind of started. I think last week right in terms of What? Your programming and you've had things going on all during this week, And then tomorrow Sunday, the Who and have the end result of what you've been working on. Tell us what you've been working on, and we're going to have to go to break in a little bit, but you could get started. Okay, well, first of all, sly of the virtual platform that started August 1st. The fashion show week started the week of August 10th August 10th 11th 12th Every day of the Thiss past week, there's been a new designer highlight on DH. They've been working on their own collection and filming that from third place. So, for example, stage calls it in Toronto, Canada. Karina Emmerich is in New York. So they weave all due to Cove it and social distancing and all of that I had to really slip what I was going to do for for market in it and fast. Because for a while we didn't even have a director..

Canada Santa Fe Amber Don Baer Karina Emmerich Jennifer Viele Toronto producer Don Baer Santa Tohave Tio Cathedral executive director Tucson Cathedral Park rose Simpson Arizona Mecca Alberta Thiss Saya
"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:53 min | 5 months ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Native America Calling

"A week to week and a half. We we stand as it friends. It's the way for us to reconnect us all of. Our friends like the one place? We all gather every year. So it's not just about the market. It's also about reconnecting. sharing good food and conversation, and then also meeting those collectors. You know there's always an excitement when you get there early in the morning and you're setting up your booze and you don't know who you're going to meet that day. And it kind of stuck the tone for your winter. You know how is going to be that? Once they're. In so for you Molina How has your ability to share your beadwork changed with the pandemic? Not, only do a quite a few shows during the summer along with little pop up shop here and mayor definitely have been running to the post office a lot more. For orders But, there's just something different about selling in person. You know you get to talk to that person and you know share your story and I, feel like. being online kind of inhibits that you can only do so much. You can talk to that person or a loss with them while they're on your website. So, I definitely interaction. In speaking of your work, please explain what it looks like, and of course, help people can find you. Sure. Well, I am on instagram. There's links to my website on their on instagram with just my name. Molina, Joe Parker I do a lot be work. It's not like, Super Lakota, I can have my own take on things BEADWORK will work our experiment with other materials to I'm also on. Bethany yellowtail platform in her collective. File, so have an online presence there. and. Yeah. In. So Molina. If being present online is a big thing just anyway or also thinking about how to get your workout there. Virtually. What's your advice? What's the best approach? Do you think? You know it's like Reggie side. It's hard creating that content getting the the pictures. Right description. It's a lot of work putting your work. Online, right. So it's like having another job. You sometimes wish she had an assistant. but it's really hard creating content every day and trying to keep up with your work. and especially, if you're you have kids at home, that's even. That much harder. So it's a lot of work. There's a lot of late night early morning You know if you WANNA make sales at this time now. What you have to do. In. Soom Molina, a lot of times really understanding how important these works of art are is knowing the story or maybe even why you use to certain color or? Certain symbols that are seen within the work in What is your advice for people who are exploring native to remind them that there's more than just seeing a bunch of pretty stuff? Well the question I get asked a lot especially at shows in person as if if I'm not native, can I wear the CAN I buy this? Is And I always say if we're out here selling it, then it's okay. No. A lot of us out there selling our cultural item. and I think that's important. For people to understand that if we're out here, we're putting it out there. Then it's okay, it's okay to buy. In Ridge Toseh- you to the importance of also understanding why this artists made anything to Reggie. To hear the. We're talking about the actual art itself, right? Yeah. And you know when there are different symbols or just you know being able to tell people what they mean that it's not just like I said, bunch of pretty stuff. There's more to it. Right, there, there is a lot especially in our jewelry. Some of the newer designs that we have is we had an awful oldcorn stop bracelets. 'cause corn is important. You know that you to to to native people into corn pollen for ceremonies and for prayer. and. So with this new cornstarch bracelet, it's just it's got the actual real corn stock and it was actually carved out of Tufa. You know and it was in in for you know to to show them meaning behind this, the power of the medicine that it comes from builder, put it to jewelry or to your work. It out. It's it's. It's like. As as our you know. Our forefathers are you know are limited. You know people would say is that you know if you were the Turquoise. That's how. You know the holy people can recognize you bless you throughout the day you know, and so you know when you have these symbols that are on your, your your your your bracelets or your. Earrings you know or your your contra belts DC disliked. You're actually walking in in this harmony, you're walking with this beauty. You know you're walking with that with that protection. and. So it's just like you said, it's not just pretty stuff. You know there's pretty stuff with some with some really feeling qualities or elements within this within silver or within Turquoise. We say turquoise over diamonds any day. Especially, if it's natural, you know and it's it's it's rare. You know what's you know what we put into these jewelry in? And with that combined, and it's like you know connecting the pass you know in in in its listening to sense something that power. In walking with that with that with that, love you know in debts, it's it's that's what it means to us. You know and it's it's beautiful to share. You know are are proud legacy. You know these are things that I, never thought that I was going to you know. My. Whole life was going to be based on. jewelry making you know as seeing my dad struggle for so many years. You know we made two or three pieces and go into town and get get almost nothing for them. You know just enough to GT. In Japan maybe mix more. You know, and so now I just feel. I put a really put my foot down and said, I, WANNA sell directly to people. You know really get it get this out there, and and because I've seen a what you know a native American. art has done for non white people. Don Natives, you know how to help them to be able to put their kids through college. How did real the pay for mortgages and such you know, and you know now really wanted to be able to deal with directly and also really take care of my family in that way. and. So this is, this is how I. Feel like you know when you put this type of work until they jeer jewelry, you work in other people appreciate it, and that your jury has found the right home. Right well, very interesting to hear how both of these artists feel about their work end, we are taking a look at ways. People are sharing some of this art. We have a focus on the Santa Fe in market which is different. This year we're learning about that too. But if there's anything you'd like to add go ahead and dial in now one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is the number, and we also know that the Senate and the market is also known for. For giving voice to native people who are still alive in.

Soom Molina Reggie Ridge Toseh Don Natives Senate Joe Parker Japan
"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Yo, Is This Racist?

Yo, Is This Racist?

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Yo, Is This Racist?

"Your team is like eighty years old cultures that was of years. How do you think that one is way more important than the other? It's so yeah, you're right. It's like like really you're so into like, the primal beginnings of the, you know, this is this is how it always has been like what no back to how it always has been leave a question that hopefully this isn't too difficult for anyone. But I feel like one thing that that. I know I've struggled with on the past. With callers is like there's a bunch of like. Native appropriating or or whatever shit that is specifically I think it's the thing in New Orleans. That's like very specifically like sort of a black tradition of dressing is that well one I can't the wild choppy, Shula's and stuff. Yeah. I can't speak for those tribes and those people. Because you know, there are dizziness people for sure. For me. I don't appropriations one of those things where I think like whatever you do if you get into the nitty gritty argument with someone like it's just none of you guys are going to feel great about it. But it's a conversation. That's absolutely needed to have. But for me because it's weird because I want so many native American artists, and clothing designers, and just content creators, and everyone I want them to be so successful. So I'm like, well, here's an easy way. Whatever they're selling you trust them because they're selling it to you by offended by from real people. Who know what it is? It's better. It's true. Or the stories are better. It's you know, honesty, is authentic truth is offensive and you're getting it straight from it. So that's like the quick and easy way to go around appropriation. Because for the most part, I mean, obviously, some people would be like, I don't care whatever you want. But for the most part, that's an easy way. It's like, oh, this is a native American like there are amazing. Nate American designers out there, like Bethany yellowtail, she's not going to sell you something that is super wrong for anyone aware because she wants to share like that's how clothing designers work is they they share their designs there are, and, you know, their culture, and that's the okay way. So just do that. Don't don't go out and put a crappy chicken feather headdress together. Also, just stop headdresses. I know they're cool. But like, I wouldn't even wear them. That's like there's a long history. And I'm trying I'm trying there's a long history to everything we do. It's it's tough being native American. But so what I like to do is like a quay is it's like a purple heart. Not like, I would never wear a purple heart because I didn't earn it. And I also wouldn't wear a headdress because I didn't earn it. So like if native Americans won't do that. Just don't do it is like the quick and easy way of doing it. And like there are any of things that you can do there are there are plenty of like native American designers out there where you can wear. It'll be amazing noodle. Look just as good go. It'll look better. So. Yeah. Because you won't have to explain it away. Everywhere you go you won't shame. Yeah. Same won't be excessively. Yeah. She was not enough people's accessory. Be more. I wanna shame. Every shame game needs to be a little stronger. Should we do another voicemail this bad? Boy. Right. My question is what it shortly is it racist? Or is there a problem when mystery people but one of them race next purchase lack identifies being of mixed-race or vibrational incentives? Fully identifying and the back number hind, I'm BI racial my mom's white and my dad is black black women. I have a friend who is fully blacks last month breath to add and she thinks that if..

Shula Bethany yellowtail New Orleans eighty years
"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:45 min | 2 years ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Girl. Power type, you know, Xerox machine, and those things never have consistency. They're always different from story to story. And I love that. It's not boring. I want you to be able to enter wherever you enter in the magazine and find something that works for you, and George McCallum art director was really great at finding kind of up. And coming photographer is an artist to just give them free. Rein. I feel like people do their best work when you give them some sort of parameters and then to say figure out the rest, so that's why all the stories look different. But I loved that. It's not a traditional magazine, but you do use a traditional Q and A format quite a bit. I love you. And I find it's a kind of comfortable boundary where people to work within. And it's something that a lot of new writers can work with it. And that was big for us was trying to sync together. So sorry. This is life with type one diabetes. I have an alert on my arm, which is what happens when you're nervous. Your adrenalin shoots. How your blood sugar you? I'm fine. No. I'm good numbers. Real life as a business owner real life. Yeah. But no, one of the best things was just working with up and coming people, and I think training new writers and giving them a Q and A format is a really fun way to do that. Because it's it's parameters a little bit of room to work. It reminds me of, you know, people who learn notes specifically, and then you could do jazz after you learn scales, right? Yeah. Yeah. I like people to kind of learn the rules and break all of them. So let's talk about this the second edition. It's is it your first addition was about community which made a lot of sense or starting new we want everybody to feel like they're part of it. And then your second one, go straight for fear. It's a really sexy top. Just what was it about fear that you thought needed to be explored to be super honest? You know, you never know what the project like this. How many issues you'll get an I thought of the things that were the most important to me. And I think fear and failure are one of the scariest things to talk about. But he wanted to find a way to do it that fell welcoming and almost exciting. And so I thought fearing failure. And thank goodness my mother-in-law. Michelle was like no one's buying that issue. Grace you need a better title. So she says suggested fear less in parentheses, which to me felt authentic t- idea of it's still scary. But let's talk about how it can be a little bit less scary. So it says wide collection of stories where we talk about everything from funding and making friends dealing with contracts. All of the kind of scary stuff that happens and how you push through it. Because no matter who you are what I've learned from interviewing people for the past fifteen years, everybody fails at every point in their career, and the more that you see it as a chance to learn and the less as a chance to be terrified of something. It becomes a tool in your arsenal. It's so interesting. This may be too much information. But when I was talking to these folks about this job, they said, what do you need to be successful? And my answer was a tolerance for failure. Because no one tries anything new if you're frightened that you're going to be punished for failing. Yeah. You have to. I mean within reason. Yes. But that, you know, people I'm not sure it's even the it's it's the repercussion from the failure. I'm not even sure it's the failure. That people are frightened of I think and also different people have different allowances for failure. Depending who you are in society. And what your power position is you may not be able to fail as often as widely as other people. And so we talk about that in a really intersectional way of you know, are you coming from privilege? Do you have the money to be able to take a risk and start something that isn't profitable? Those are all important things to talk about. And that's why like giving examples of businesses that are not funded by family money are not funded by vendor. Venture capital because you need to see what it's really like to start a business on your own. And how do you abound back when you do use all your own personal money to start something? And it doesn't work out. What was your big fail your big professional fail, and what lesson did you get from it? Oh god. How much time? Do you have every year? There's something. I mean, this magazine has been a huge challenge getting people to buy something in print when you are someone who produces primarily free internet content. Interesting. Yeah, it's difficult. And they will write you one on one to say, why should I spend money on something? And so I have gotten very used to explaining why I think certain projects are worth investing in. But it's a challenge every day to convince people to choose the paid option and not a free one. What were some of the examples of ways people got through their fear that we can read an issue? The biggest thing is to always build a support system around yourself, not a single person does anything alone, and that's such a myth where fed and entrepreneurial magazines as the myth of the overnight success or somebody who just showed up and did it also low, but the more time you can spend creating a network to kind of buffer yourself from these moments. The better you'll get through them. Speaking with grace Bonnie about her new magazine Zine booklet, something called good company. It's really it's really beautiful. It's it's it's very heavy to I love I love the weight of it. There's something about having something that weighs something in your hands. When you're reading I don't know what that is of the tax Bill part of it. So on the coverage has had a turn fear into creative fuel. How does that? How do you do that? There are couple of steps. It's it's always about admitting. It is the first thing I think we're we're taught by both internet culture, and by kind of entrepreneurial culture to never admit the things that don't work out. But that's how you find your best friends. And that's how you find your support system when you say openly. I did this thing it didn't work out or I did this thing, and I am terrified or even admitting. I did this thing and it went well, but I don't feel anything from it. And when you say those things out loud people come out of the woodwork to say metoo. Oh my gosh. And you make you make a new friend you make a new support system. And so I think that is the most important thing you can do because those are the people who will say, hey, that wasn't a failure. Look at what you learned. There are look at what you did achieve there. And that is assistant. You just have to spend your whole life, just building and rebuilding and rebuilding. Because that's what makes fear something less. Terrifying. And more motivating tell me about your choice of cover person lovey AGI. And I wanted to pick somebody who had a very strong opinion. This entire magazine originally was dedicated. The concept of bold women. And I like when people aren't afraid to say what they mean, not everybody is going to like those opinions all the time. But I am so tired of women in particular being taught to say things that make everyone happy as if that's even possible. But I wanted to talk to somebody who isn't afraid to say it like it is to stand behind that. And I think she's really spoken up for a lot of women, especially women of color who are speakers and creative tell them to charge what they're worth and to not settle for less something I saw on here that I learned something I'll tell you is there is there's a beautiful clothing company by a native American woman. And I thought oh gosh that stuff is so pretty and look at those earrings, and I I clicked through and it said FAQ number one, and I clicked through it says can I wear your clothes without being culturally insensitive. And I really appreciate that. Because it did flash through my mind like especially with everything's going with Elizabeth Warren, recently, I thought is this right? And I thought well, well, they wouldn't put this in the magazine if it works. So I just thought that was an interesting, you know, that was an interesting in point for me through through fashion. I think that and I'm not a big fashion person, but we have to indigenous fashion designers, and the issue Bethany yellowtail and Jamia Kuma, and both of whom are incredibly strong voice in their communities. And who also addressed the kind of sticky issue in the room, which is if you someone like me white person is it okay to buy this is it okay to wear this. How do you do that without being culturally insensitive, and there's no short perfect answer to that? But I think talking about these things of how we connect these two disparate communities together and figure out how to better support people from the source because instead of buying a knockoff of that traditional indigenous pattern at a big box store where these people will never benefit from that sale here people you can support directly, and you can see where that money goes. So that's kind of our goal is constantly provide bridges between communities. So you can learn here in their own words design sponge is hugely successful. So many people are into it. I'm really into it. What lessons did you learn launching designs funds that you were able to apply to this venture. I think the biggest lesson. I've learned designs fund is to constantly be in a process of learning that you do not know everything I have learned every year design sponge, something I have done that reminds me to dissenter myself from the conversation that I need to listen to more people in the needed to always be changing. I mean, you can't work on the internet and not almost reinvent yourself Madonna style every year. So with the magazine I had to be willing to make myself uncomfortable and try something that was outside of my wheelhouse. Aesthetically content wise and to deal with topics that were uncomfortable. And I think being willing to be uncomfortable is something I learned it design spent serve me really, well is that why you've becomes somewhat of a social warrior social Justice warrior. I could definitely not claim that label at all. All I know you're pretty pretty straightforward. I can't claim I am a white woman who thank you to the credit of many, very patient women of color in my life, got me to wake up and look at what I was producing and how I was contributing to so many of the issues, and especially in our design community and so ever since those moments I have done whatever I could to use the platform, we had to make the voice of not my own and to financially support people who aren't being supported in our community. And I'm still making mistakes mistake left, and right, but I can't look at design and art and not see how those things connect to bigger, social and political issues. So this issue just came out today. You're obviously at work on number three already. Can we get a hint? It's all about money. Oh, you're just going. For all the things that terrify you push people to talk about things that are very uncomfortable. And when we see that issue it will be out this spring with a pardon entre on the cover. Oh, excellent. Cracks me up. Chris botti? Congratulations. Thank you so much for stopping by all of me..

this magazine Xerox Michelle Chris botti George McCallum director business owner Elizabeth Warren Bonnie Bethany yellowtail Jamia Kuma fifteen years
"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:46 min | 2 years ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I mean riot girl girl power type, you know, Xerox machine, and those things never have a consistency. There always different from story to story. And I love that. It's not boring. I want you to be able to enter wherever you enter in the magazine and find something that works for you and George McCollum McCallum manor art director was really great at finding kind of up and coming tog refer is an artist to just give them free. Rein, I feel. Like people do their best work when you give them some sort of parameters and then to say figure out the rest, so that's why all the stories look different. But I love that. It's not a traditional magazine, but you'd use a traditional Q and A format quite a bit. I love Q and A I find it's a kind of comfortable boundary people to work within. And it's something that a lot of new writers can work with it. And that was big for us was trying to sync together balls. Sorry. This is life with type one diabetes. I have an alert on my arm, which is what happens when you're nervous. Your adrenalin shoots out your blood sugar. You okay, I'm fine. No, I'm good. No. Real life as a business owner real life. Yeah. But no one of the best things was just working with people. And I think training new writers and giving them a Q and A format is a really fun way to do that. Because it's it's parameters with a little bit of room to work. It reminds me of, you know, people who learn notes specifically, and then could you jazz after you? Learn all your scales, right? Yeah. Yeah. I like people to kind of learn the rules and then break all of them. So let's talk about this the second edition. It's it's a junior. I addition was about community we made a lot of sense or starting new we want everybody to feel like they're part of it. And then your second one, go straight for fear. It's a really sexy talk. Just what was it about fear that you thought needed to be explored to be super honest? You know, you never know what the project how many issues you'll get an I thought of the things that were the most important to me. And I think fear and failure are one of the scariest things to talk about. But I wanted to find a way to do it that fell welcoming and almost exciting. And so I thought fearing failure. And thank goodness. My mother-in-law Rachelle was like no one's buying that issue. Grace you need a better title. So she said as to justify fear less and parentheses, which to me felt authentic to the idea of. It's still scary. But let's talk about how it can be a little bit less scary. So it says wide collection of stories where we talk about everything from funding and making friends dealing with contracts. All of the kind of Icke scary stuff that happens and how you push through it. Because no matter who you are what I've learned from interviewing people for the past fifteen years, everybody fails at every point in their career, and the more that you see it as a chance to learn and the less chance to be terrified of something. It becomes a tool in your arsenal. It's so interesting. This may be too much information. But when I was talking to these folks about this job, they said, what do you need to be successful? And my answer was a tolerance for failure. Because no one tries anything new if you're frightened that you're going to be punished for failing. Yeah. You have to. I mean within reason. Yes. Exactly. But that you know, people I it's it's the repercussion from the failure. I'm not even sure it's the failure. That people are frightened of I think and also different people have have different allowances for failure. Depending who you are in society. And what your power position is you may not be able to fail as often or as widely as other people. And so we talk about that. And a really intersectional way of you know, are you coming from privilege? Do you have the money to be able to take a risk and start something that isn't profitable? Those are all important things to talk about. And that's why like giving examples of businesses that are not funded by family money are not funded by vendor. Venture capital because you need to see what it's really like to start a business on your own. And how do you balance back when you do use all your own personal money to start something? And it doesn't work out. What was your big fail your big professional fail? And what lesson did you get from it? A God how much time do you have? Every year. There is something. I mean, this magazine has been a huge challenge getting people to buy something in print when you are someone who produces primarily free internet content. Interesting it's difficult, and they will write you one on one to say, why should I spend money on something? And so I have gotten very used to explaining why I think certain projects are worth investing in. But it's a challenge everyday to convince people to choose a paid option and not a free one. What were some of the examples of ways people got through their fear that we can read an issue? The biggest thing is to always build a support system around yourself, not a single person does anything alone. And that's such a myth were fed and entrepreneurial magazines as the myth of the overnight success or somebody who just showed up and did it also. But the more time you can spend creating a network to kind of buffer yourself from these moments. The better you'll get through them. We're speaking with grace Bonnie about her new magazine Zine booklet, something called good company. It's really it's really beautiful. It's it's it's very heavy to I love I love the weight of it. Something about having something that weighs something in your hands. When you're reading I don't know what that is. So the tactical part of it. So on the coverage has had a turn fear into creative fuel. How does that? How do you do that? There were a couple of steps. It's it's always about admitting. It is the first thing I think we're we're taught by both internet culture, and by kind of entrepreneurial culture to never admit the things that don't work out. But that's how you find your best friends. And that's how you find your support system when you say openly. I did this thing it didn't work out or I did this thing, and I am terrified or even admitting. I did this thing and it went well, but I don't feel anything from it. And when you say those things out loud people come out of the woodwork to say me to oh my gosh. And you make you make new friends you make a new support system. And so I think that is the most important thing you can do because those are the people who will say, hey, that wasn't a failure. Look at what you learned. There are look at what you did achieve there. And that is assistant system you just have to spend your whole life, just building and rebuilding and rebuilding. Because that's what makes fear something less. Terrifying. And more motivating tell what your choice of cover person lovey AGI. And I I wanted to pick somebody who had a very strong opinion. This entire magazine originally was dedicated. The concept of bold women. And I like when people aren't afraid to say what they mean, not everybody is going to like those opinions all the time. But I am so tired of women in particular being taught to say things that make everyone happy as if that's even possible. But I wanted to talk to somebody who isn't afraid to say it like it is to stand behind that. And I think she's really spoken up for a lot of women, especially women of color who are speakers and creative. So tell them to charge what they're worth and to not settle for less something I saw on here that I learned something I'll tell you is there is there's a beautiful clothing company by a native American woman. And I thought oh, gosh stuff is so pretty and look at those earrings, and I I clicked through and it said FAQ number what? And I click through it and says can I wear your clothes without being culturally insensitive? And I really appreciate that. Because it did flash through my mind like especially with everything's going with Elizabeth Warren, recently, I thought is this right? And I thought well, well, they wouldn't put this in the magazine if it works. So I just thought that was an interesting, you know, that was an interesting point for me through through fashion. I think that and I'm not a big fashion person, but we have to indigenous fashion designers, and the issue Bethany yellowtail Jamia Kuma, and both of whom are incredibly strong voices in their communities, and who also addressed the kind of sticky issue in the room, which is if you're someone like me, a white person is it okay to buy this is it okay to wear this. How do you do that without being culturally insensitive, and there's no short perfect answer to that? But I think talking about these things is how we connect these two disparate communities together and figure out how to better support people from the source because instead of buying a knockoff of that traditional indigenous pattern at a big box store where these people will never benefit from that sale here people you can support directly, and you can see where that money goes. So that's kind of our goal is to constantly provide bridges between communities, so you can learn and here in their own words design sponge, hugely successful. So many people are into it. I'm really into it. What lessons did you? Learn launching designs that you were able to apply to this venture. I think the biggest lesson. I've learned designs fund is to constantly be a process of learning that you do not know everything I have learned every year design sponge, something I have done. That reminds me I need to decentral my cell from the conversation that I need to listen to more people in the need to always be changing. I mean, you can't work on the internet and not almost reinvent yourself Madonna style every year. So with the magazine I had to be willing to make myself uncomfortable and try something that was outside of my wheelhouse. Aesthetically content wise and to deal with topics that were uncomfortable. And I think being willing to be uncomfortable is something I learned at design spent served me really, well is that why you've becomes somewhat of a social warrior social Justice warrior. I could definitely not claim that label at all all I know you're pretty you're pretty straightforward. I can't claim I am a white woman who thank you to the credit of many, very patient women of color. In my life got me to wake up and look at what I was producing. And how I was contributing to so many of the issues, and especially in our design community and so ever since those moments I have done whatever I could to use the platform, we had to make the voice not my own and to financially support people who aren't being supported in our community. And I'm still making mistakes mistake left and right. But I can't look at design an art and not see how those things connect to bigger, social and political issues. So this issue just came out today. You're obviously at work on number three already. Can we get a hint? Yes. It's all about money. Oh, you're just going. Over all the things that terrify you push people to talk about things that are very uncomfortable. And when we see that issue it will be out this spring with Aparna nonchalant on the cover. Oh, excellent. Oh, she cracks me up. Chris botti? Congratulations. Thank you so much for stopping by all of me..

this magazine Xerox George McCollum McCallum manor Rein Chris botti director business owner Rachelle Elizabeth Warren Icke Jamia Kuma Aparna Bonnie fifteen years
"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:35 min | 2 years ago

"bethany yellowtail" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Blacks. Going back swaggered. Be Jimmy black. Bullet by. Now. Seven. The chance to Jimmie blacksmith by the grew Smith's, this is democracy. Now. I mean, he Goodman with their main shape. We end today's show looking at the record number of native American women running for office in the midterm elections, there has never been a native American woman. Congress member this year. There are at least four indigenous women running for congress. Three, I running for governor and thirty. One are running for seats in the state legislature still with us. Mark Trahan editor Indian country today member of the shoshoni Bannock tribes also with us in Fargo, North Dakota, Tara Housego national campaign director for the earth Ojibway from the coaching first nation in Seattle, Washington, we're joined by Josse Ross author, speaker lawyer, storyteller member, black feet nation, hosted the podcast, break dances with wolves, Mark. Let's go to you in Alaska. You've been writing a lot about this in Indian country today about the record number of native women who are running for. For office in the United States. Yes, just this week history was made when Valerie Davidson became the Lieutenant governor of Alaska, the first native American woman to hold that office in any state in the country. She's Yupik these one of four other native women running for Lieutenant governor across the country. In fact, in Minnesota, no matter what happens. It'll be a gyp way woman who will be the next Lieutenant governor of Minnesota red leg nation for the Republicans and Donna Bergstrom and Peggy Flanagan for the DFL in Minnesota. So she's wider nation. So this idea of just this year, everything is just lit up candidates decided this was the time to run Depp Hollandse great example, even though it's because of she said in her announcement because of standing rock and because of Donald Trump, there's also this long arc of she's been working at this for twenty years and she's built a resume, this ready for this job. And that's part of the case in this story. If you look around the country, there are so many women who are prepared and this is the moment they chose to run to. Could you talk about the context you said Trump being in office has something. To do with it, but how is it that that native American women organized to run in this election. Well, definitely the administration has policies was a motivating force, particularly the policies against women. This one of the great stories is how the native American women candidates have created this network. Early on. I started writing about this. I used a hashtag she represents and very soon after that the fashion designer, Bethany yellowtail decided to make sure skull. She represents and list all of the native American women running for office. They formed an informal network. They reach out to each other, they support each other. They help fundraise cherise, David's and Deb hall and of campaign together both in Kansas Pala Jordan was at. Deb Holland's campaign the night of the primary win and making calls for knocking on doors, the network they've created maybe the most lasting institution out of this whole election. House go, can you talk about what's happening in Minnesota in Minnesota? You have a situation where no matter who wins will be a native American woman. We're talking about the state Representative penny Flanagan versus Republican done Bergstrom of both running for Lieutenant governor. Yeah, you know, that's been the frustrating part. I would say about this whole Warren debacle and like the concept of native identity being played out by two white folks is that there is this historic representation of native women running across the country. There's also, you know the the Indian child welfare act coming under coming under fire and the very core of federal Indian law being put into question by that. There's the buying bridge pipeline in Minnesota, where we're looking at, you know, to potential native women are going to hold the Lieutenant governor seat. At the same time. We're looking at a massive resistance of indigenous people that is building against the line three project embers line three tar sands project actually where I'm coming from today. So we're six lane. Tara indigenous representation. At the same time that we're trying to hold back the worst of what's happening. Explain that you're deeply involved with pipeline politics, whether it talking about the Dakota Access pipeline or whether we're talking about the current battle that you just mentioned. Yeah, you know, I think that native people as people who are still very connected to the land to the water are taking these leadership roles in fights all over the country and all around the world to protect the existing resources to protect the existing water resources for us. All. As we see the climate change raging around us, we're trying to protect the last of what's what's still remaining to us and protect our communities and protect those around us for the next generation. So as that's happening, it's also in tandem with this, this rising up of women and particularly women of color into representation. But hopefully we can get a good balance between the two. So we're able to all serve high of as climate change is the greatest problem facing this world and Tara. How important is it that women were also leading the that'll against Jakoda access pipeline, inspiring women, you're in North Dakota right now, I wanted to talk about the supreme court in North Dakota and also indigenous activists fighting a daily battle in the swampland of Louisiana against the bayou bridge pipeline. The one sixty three mile pipeline being built by energy transfer partners, same company behind. Dapple water protectors of repeatedly been arrested for protesting and face felony charges under harsh new anti protest. Law signed by Louisiana governor earlier this year pipeline construction scheduled to end before the new year. I think that women as we've seen with the metoo movement really building, and we've seen the women's March, and we've seen women being this backbone of so many different movement spaces, including indigenous resistance against these extractive industry projects. It's women taking on this role of leadership that's sorely sorely needed. It's women recognizing that missing murder Dejan women is epidemic across this country across the across Canada that these can be directly that these cases of women can be directly tied to the extracted extractive industry and also sitting here in North Dakota where I know there's many women organizers rushing to try to get people home addresses so they can actually participate in the election in the very notion of indigenous people not being able to participate in the election of a country that started after our nation's existed. Women taking on so many different roles, and I think it's something that is really, really needed. In this time, this very critical time of potentially our very survival being called into question with the latest reports of what's happening and where we're at with climate change and Jesse could you also comment on that issue, the issue of voter, ID laws that could potentially restrict the participation of native Americans in the upcoming elections.

Minnesota North Dakota Donald Trump congress Jimmy black Donna Bergstrom Alaska Jimmie blacksmith Mark Trahan Louisiana United States Goodman Dakota Access Deb Holland shoshoni Bannock Bethany yellowtail Tara Housego