28 Burst results for "Beth Fertig"

New documents reveal chaos behind Trump's family separation policy

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | Last month

New documents reveal chaos behind Trump's family separation policy

"Committee finds the Trump Administration's family separation policy that the U. S border proceeded Despite early chaos. WXYZ Beth Fertig has more Democrats say the documents reveal reckless incompetence and intentional cruelty. They showed the administration developed its family separation policy in February of 2017 to deter migrants from crossing the border. The pilot program started in El Paso. But even though officials discovered they couldn't track all the separated parents and Children, they expanded the policy in May of 2018. Hundreds of kids were sent sent to to New New York. York. Two Two months months later, later, a a federal federal judge judge ordered ordered the the administration administration to to reunify reunify the the families. families. This This month, month, the the administration administration acknowledged acknowledged it it hasn't hasn't been been able able to to locate locate the parents of 545 Children. Rain tonight. Breezy to temperatures in the mid forties and rain tomorrow morning. We'll see high tomorrow about 47 degrees. It's for 35. Support for NPR comes from from member member

Trump Administration Beth Fertig New York El Paso NPR
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | Last month

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On ice activity. They scout for unmarked vans before dawn in immigrant neighborhoods. Last week, members of Sunset Park Ice Watch demanded to see a warrant as they recorded what they thought was an arrest by immigration agents. Turned out to be the U. S. Postal police arresting someone for allegedly distributing marijuana. In this environment. There's a lot of confusion about who's actually with ice. I don't know if you can count that the letters that are on their vests, Actually, indeed them, Jorge Mooney's raises an organizer with Sunset Park Ice Watch We're seeing that is the secret of police terror. That Lake for many immigrant neighborhoods is like a daily reality. As long as the Trump administration continues its heightened enforcement, he says activists will continue exposing the tactics of immigration agents and warning local immigrants to be vigilant. Beth Fertig w N. Y C news.

U. S. Postal police Sunset Park Jorge Mooney Beth Fertig marijuana
"beth fertig" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"No news live from NPR news in Culver city California I'm too ugly cycle tell the U. S. Supreme Court says the trump administration acted illegally by ending daca the Obama era program that protected hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought to the country as children WNYC's Beth Fertig reports The New York plaintiffs are already looking ahead one of the plaintiffs Caroline of Fung Fang said she felt victorious after three years in which she feared losing her work permit and being deported a little bit tighter and tomorrow I will continue to fight for a criminal action or undocumented youth and all eleven million undocumented people living in this country daca recipients are calling on Congress to make those protections permanent a deputy director at US citizenship and immigration services which runs Dhaka agreed the program is not a long term solution but said if Congress wants to provide quote a permanent solution for these illegal aliens it should reform immigration laws for NPR news I'm Beth Fertig police reform is now being debated across the country at city council meetings state capitals and on Capitol Hill senator Rick Scott a Republican from Florida says he's optimistic that Democrats and Republicans can pass new police legislation if they're going to continue with the Democrats are talking about defending the police and then that's clearly not going to happen with a book about not going to be there we got have law enforcement we have have accountable law enforcement so hopefully that dealt with the Democrats and up senator Rick Scott speaking earlier today on here now Scott says that he wants accountability in police reform and to make.

senator NPR US Obama California Culver U. S. Supreme Court Florida senator Rick Scott Dhaka deputy director Congress Fung Fang Caroline Beth Fertig
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:20 min | 6 months ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the court's decision Beth Fertig W. NYC news it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning hurricane season starts today June first you are allowed to take a moment after hearing that first pandemic then waves of protest now hurricane season forecasters expect above average activity in part because climate change is making the Atlantic Ocean warmer Amy green of WMFE in Orlando has been asking how do you plan for hurricanes during a pandemic robin Robert doesn't like to chance it when there's a hurricane she almost always evacuates welcome to our lives in cocoa beach Florida on a barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and Indian River lagoon her mother is ninety three she's gotta have flushing toilet she's gotta have fresh water she's just got some physical needs that require that but this year local power is thinking hard about her hurricane plan she's sixty five like her mother considered at higher risk to the corona virus if I have to go any further or if I have to go somewhere then you're going to be exposed to more people in different environments and you don't know where those people have been in Florida I record six and a half million people evacuated for hurricane Irma in twenty seventeen this year that will be a harder decision Craig Fugate used to head the federal emergency management agency and its Florida counterpart he's here some people won't evacuate because they'll fear exposing themselves to the virus that may result in more people staying behind in increasing the risk of loss of life but there's another risk sheltering evacuees together in school gymnasiums and other enclosed spaces as Florida governor Ron de Santis points out if you pile people into a place under normal circumstances that may be fine but that would potentially allow the virus to really spread if somebody is in fact in fact that's why his administration is considering stay at home orders in areas where houses are newer and sturdier or shelter ring evacuees in hotels and motels the economic collapse has left vacant most at risk are nursing home patients many low lying facilities have evacuation agreements with facilities on higher ground by Kristen Knapp of the Florida health care association says this year nursing homes will have to re examine these arrangements if you are at the facility that is in an evacuation zone and you have positive cases in your building you may not be able to go to the typical facility that you would evacuate to if they don't have positive cases in their building Florida leaders also are socking away protective gear for shelter and utility workers and they're making sure stores have plenty of food and water so people can stock up before a storm in central Florida before Irma hits utility crews converged from across the country to help restore electricity this year Linda Feronia of the Orlando utilities commission anticipates longer outages than usual that's because code nineteen makes it harder to house and feed these workers while preventing the virus is spread it will take longer to check them all in it will take a little longer to get them all to the point that they can be out in the field working well then broke up our US cocoa beach considered not evacuating but feels that she would have to because of her mother already she's checking with hotel so she can be ready for hurricane I hope that we don't have any I mean we've been through a lot this year he rallied yes are predicting up to ten hurricanes in up to six major ones between now and December news I need to green in Orlando this is W. NYC in New York good morning I'm Kerry Nolan it's ten minutes before nine o'clock the marketplace morning report is coming up next and at nine it's the B. B. C. news hour on ninety three point nine FM the morning London good morning WNYC I'm resit Colin today's news out protests intensify now in seventy five cities across the United States over the killing by police of an African American man George Floyd will have reports on the ground in Minneapolis and Washington I'm a look at the issue of police impunity BBC news out coming up at nine on ninety three point nine FM W. NYC it's fifty eight degrees under beautiful sunny skies in New York City low humidity and it's going to be about seventy degrees mostly cloudy tonight lows in the upper fifties mostly cloudy tomorrow highs around seventy five W. NYC supporters include T. mobile for business T. mobile and sprint are joining forces building a five G. network with more of a liability that will cover more offices and more employees more at T. mobile for business dot com amid protests across the country a call to make payouts to victims of police misconduct much more transparent to the public marketplace morning report is supported by progressive insurance offering snapshot a program that is just insurance.

Beth Fertig NYC NPR Steve Inskeep
Man Accused of Murdering Woman, 92, Should Have Been Deported, ICE Says

Morning Edition

00:46 sec | 11 months ago

Man Accused of Murdering Woman, 92, Should Have Been Deported, ICE Says

"New York city's denying a request from immigration and customs enforcement to turn over a queens man accused of murder W. N. Y. C.'s Beth Fertig reports Riaz Khan was arrested last week and charged with murdering and sexually assaulting a ninety two year old woman in south Richmond hill he's being held without bail ISIS con is a Guyanese national whose unlawfully in the country it wanted to take him into its own custody but city law prevents that unless an immigrant has been convicted of a crime not simply charged icicles this policy dangerously flawed it also wanted con detained last fall after he was charged with assault a spokeswoman for mayor de Blasio said the trump administration is politicizing the tragedy and for the city will cooperate in accordance with that slot if con is

W. N. Y. C. Beth Fertig Riaz Khan Richmond Hill Assault New York Murder Mayor De Blasio
Will New York's New Criminal Justice Laws Lead to More Trials?

Morning Edition

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Will New York's New Criminal Justice Laws Lead to More Trials?

"New York state's new criminal justice laws will cut down on the use of bail starting in January and also require prosecutors to quickly share more evidence with the defense W. N. Y. C.'s Beth Fertig reports these reforms will lead to more cases going to trial in the early nineteen nineties Marvin Mayfield was accused of a burglary in Brooklyn he claims he didn't commit he says the judge set bail at seven thousand dollars he couldn't afford it and spent eleven months in jail on Rikers island and during this time I was abuse assaulted my legs broken I was assaulted by staff and by a fellow detainees at four eleven months of hell Mayfield got out of jail after he accepted a plea bargain until then he didn't know what evidence prosecutors had against him because they're allowed to hang on to most of it until the start of a trial defense attorneys say this blindfold block pressures to many people to accept the plea but in January both prosecutors and defense attorneys will have to share all discoverable materials or evidence within fifteen days of arraignment Mayfield lobbied for this with the group just leadership USA he says if it was in effect when he was arrested and he saw how little evidence there was against him our demanded a trial and he expects that's what other defendants will do because only five percent of indicted felony cases in New York City go to a jury trial district attorneys don't like the new law they worry they'll have to disclose sensitive information about victims and witnesses W. NYC spoke with defense attorneys a prosecutor a judge and other experts they said it's hard to know what defendants will do because evidence can cut either way in terms of the impact on how many trials we have whether new Yorkers are going to have to serve more jury duty are less it's hard to say with that scope of the changes that are coming all at once Tyler names as executive director of the independent commission on New York City criminal justice and incarceration reform in addition to getting evidence faster defendants are less likely to be held in jail before their trials because of the bail reforms so unlike Mayfield they won't feel pressured to take a plea but trials are expensive and time consuming plea deals are easier to complicate I think what we do know is that we will see faster cases and we'll see more fair cases and we will see fewer people are waiting in jail before trial and he says that's a good thing for defendants and victims who all

W. N. Y. C. Beth Fertig Marvin Mayfield Burglary Brooklyn Rikers Island USA New York City W. Nyc Prosecutor Executive Director Tyler Seven Thousand Dollars Four Eleven Months Eleven Months Fifteen Days Five Percent
Expected ICE raids spark panic in immigrant communities

Morning Edition

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Expected ICE raids spark panic in immigrant communities

"No raids by immigration and customs enforcement were reported in New York City yesterday but W. N. Y. C.'s Beth Fertig reports new Yorkers were ready and rallied in queens against the trump administration's plans about two hundred people held a March in Jackson heights one of the city's most diverse communities along the way they passed out flyers and forming immigrants about their rights in case ice knocks on their door okay Rodriguez said he didn't know what to make of president trump's threat to have thousands arrested I just take the possibility

New York City W. N. Y. C. Beth Fertig Rodriguez Donald Trump Jackson Heights President Trump
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Protect the independent journalism that you rely on from WNYC, and from NPR listener support is the largest sheriff funding for all the programs that you count on right here at WNYC. So we ask that you make a tax deductible contribution yearly maybe monthly by calling one eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine two or go to WNYC dot org in the studio with me this morning, WNYC reporter, Ilya marritz, and Ilia I under. Stand. We're giving away a morning beverage today. Oh, yeah. We have a little something special for you to get you over the finish line. We want you to pledge your support to WNYC, and we want it so bad that we are throwing in a twelve ounce can of Fairtrade certified organic coffee specially roasted for WNYC by the Brooklyn, roasting company. Give at any time before eight AM this morning, and we will send you that very chic very beautiful twelve ounce can of fair trade, certified organic coffee. In addition to whatever thank you gift. You select whether it's a mug or tote bag or an umbrella or any of those great things or the New Yorker, do it. Now, do it to support the great radio that you've been hearing this morning Beth Fertig report on a fam- on the family separation policy border in a very troubling story of a Honduran family were both mother and daughter are HIV positive and have now been separated that kind of in-depth stuff doesn't come cheap. It takes time. She was working on that story for months. For months, I've been talking. I sit very close to Beth we've been talking about it for a long time. It's a fabulous piece of reporting. It's something that more people need to hear and know about and it is made possible because people give because people see the value of this kind of in-depth sane thoughtful rational indepth reporting people like you make it possible. So please join the thousands of New Yorkers and new Jerseyans who are already doing that..

WNYC Beth Fertig Ilya marritz reporter NPR Fairtrade Brooklyn HIV twelve ounce
WNYC, President Trump And Senator Chuck Schumer discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:11 sec | 2 years ago

WNYC, President Trump And Senator Chuck Schumer discussed on Morning Edition

"Campaign. The US military says it's air strikes in Somalia have killed more than sixty Al Shabaab extremists in recent days. Six airstrikes were launched in a coastal areas south of Mogadishu in India. Rescue teams are trying to locate thirteen coal miners who've been missing for four days. NPR's Laura Freyer has more only three of their helmets have been found a survivor who escaped described the mineshaft filling with water. This is a so called rat hole. Mine a deep vertical hole was side tunnels, which is illegal in that part of India. The minds owner has been arrested a national disaster response force is on the scene. This is NPR news from Washington. This is WNYC in New York. Good morning. I'm Richard Hake. It's six thirty one with the government shutdown looming at the end of this week. Senator Chuck Schumer says President Trump is being irresponsible for insisting on five billion dollars for the construction of a border wall Schumer spoke yesterday on NBC, but he shouldn't use innocent workers as hostage for his temper tantrum to sort of throw a bone to his base. Humor said Republicans don't have the votes for five billion dollars for a border wall in either the house or the Senate. In Oval Office meeting last week with Schumer and House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, President Trump said he would be proud to shut down the government for border security a complicated plan to redraw. New Jersey's legislative districts died this past weekend. WNYC's MAC cat says that connects back to President Trump progressive activists furious about Trump's election pushed out four Republican New Jersey congressman this year. Now, they've turned their attention to state democratic leaders who they say have grown too powerful activists opposition helped to defeat Democrats plan to redraw the legislative map and make it less competitive and less. Progressive says Dina Matola Jabbour ska of the group New Jersey citizen action something has shifted with the emergence of so many new grassroots activists and leaders. It's not going to be okay to just like Democrats that you know, sometimes support democratic values and sometimes don't next up. Her group is pushing Democrats to the left on a plan to raise the minimum wage a complicated plan to redraw new. Jerseys legislative districts died this past weekend. And we just heard from that cats. We will hear more about this from WNYC's Nancy Solomon, coming up immigration courts are increasingly relying on video technology. WNYC's Beth Fertig reports that nine percent of all hearings are now done by video WNYC obtained government statistics showing more than one hundred twenty five thousand immigration court hearings were done by video in fiscal twenty eighteen that's an increase of more than fourteen percent over the previous year. Even though the total number of hearings increased by just seven percent. Video hearings are primarily used for immigrants in detention to save time and travel expenses to court, but New York City's varick street courtroom switched completely to video hearings in June, immigration and customs enforcement said they started after a protest disrupted the facility, but immigration lawyers say it's harder to communicate with their clients by video and claim. There have been a lot of technical problems. We do have a slight chance of showers later on this afternoon. Otherwise. Partly sunny with a high near forty five degrees.

Wnyc President Trump Senator Chuck Schumer New Jersey New York City NPR India Mogadishu Somalia United States Al Shabaab Laura Freyer Richard Hake Nancy Pelosi Dina Matola Jabbour Washington Nancy Solomon Beth Fertig Oval Office
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:22 min | 2 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of allowing the US envoy Martin Griffiths two in December. Gather the parties together. Hopefully, get a ceasefire in Yemen. Something that we have diplomatically been striving for four months, and we think we're right on the cusp of that bombshell, towed centers the conflict in Yemen would not end, but would worsen if the US pulled out stocks finished higher on Wall Street is software maker Salesforce letter a rebound. In tech shares. This is NPR and you're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd, New York's attorney general is updating local governments about their limits when transferring detained immigrants to federal agents WNYC's Beth Fertig reports it follows a recent court decision. Earlier this month, a New York appellate court panel ruled against state law for local police to arrest or detain an immigrant for ice without a judge's warrant. The decision involved a case on Long Island in which Suffolk police transfer demand to ice custody just as he was supposed to be released from jail state attorney general Barbara. Underwood says the ruling underscores the fact that New York law doesn't authorize state and local law enforcement to arrest. Individuals for civil immigration violations, and that protecting public safety goes hand in hand with building trust with immigrant communities. New York City already follows this policy. The shattering of a Bronx based garbage collector has elected officials calling for more oversight of the private companies that haul away said he trash after a city agency found sanitation salvage guilty of multiple labor and safety violations. The company was forced to shut down city council member Antonio Reynoso says the sanitation industry needs to do better. And what does that say about an industry that if we do basic basic oversight and asked them to just be the standard, not above and beyond? Just do your job that you can't be functional as the chair of the sanitation committee run also oversees the city's agency that investigated San. Annotated salvage. He's also been advocating for new plan to divide the city into trash collection zones. This would allow for more oversight of the process. The remains of New York City man killed in the Pearl Harbor attack. Nearly seventy seven years ago have been identified the Pentagon announced today that seaman first class. Walter c Foley's remains were accounted for earlier this year. The eighteen year old Brooklyn night was serving aboard the battleship U S S, Oklahoma when Japanese planes attacked Hawaii on December seventh nineteen forty one the ship capsized after being hit by torpedoes four hundred twenty nine crewmen were killed at the time. Only thirty five people's remains were identified but in twenty fifteen the Pentagon began using DNA analysis to identify sailors killed in the attack tonight, mostly clear, low around thirty two degrees. Currently forty degrees at five thirty five support for NPR comes from Member State. Nations and from Universal Pictures with welcome tomorrow, win a new film based on an inspirational true story from the director of Forrest Gump starring Steve Carell, and a story about hope, friendship and healing. In theaters this Christmas and little passports, a monthly subscription service for kids each package includes game souvenirs and activities from a new country designed to spark Yossi and cultures around the globe at little passports dot com slash radio from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang, and Mary Louise Kelley the US relationship with Saudi Arabia is center stage on Capitol Hill today in closed session, senators heard testimony from secretary of state, Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary Mattis. The pair were briefing senators on the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi and on US involvement in the war in Yemen. Next door to Saudi Arabia, New Jersey, Senator Robert Menendez is ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations committee, he was at the. The briefing today. He's on the line now. Hi, senator. Hi, good. To have you with us. Take take both those matters on the table today, the US role in the war in Yemen. And what we know about the killing of Saudi journalists Jamal kashogi. Did you hear anything from Madison Pompeo that persuades you that current US policy toward Saudi Arabia is the right policy toward Saudi Arabia. No. First of all as it relates to Jamal kashogi. The fact that Gina hospital. The CIA director was not there despite bipartisan calls for her to be there and to testify as to what her agency and other intelligence agencies conclusions were was pretty outrageous. My view it's a cover up of a critical question that we have as it relates to U S Saudi relationship. Why why is it so important to you to hear from her when you had two other top administration officials there because only she listened to the kashogi tapes, only, she and the members of the intelligence community did all of the intelligence gathering to all of its methods listened to all of the relevant elements of it and came to a conclusion, I don't really need someone to somehow characterized her testimony. I'd rather hear her testimony. And that's what members wanted and the administration denied us from having that opportunity. What explanation were you given for why she wasn't there. We weren't given one. We pressed the secretary of state and the secretary of defense as to why she was not there, and they punch it to the White House and the White House gave us no answer. And so to me, it's very clear that the publish reports that Gina hospital in the CIA have come to the conclusion with a high degree of confidence was generally the highest determination. They give to to an analysis that the Saudi Crown prince was involved in ordering the murder Jamal kashogi is something they didn't want members to hear directly or to have verified directly AllState for the record the CIA put out a statement denying that she was instructed not to attend. So let me set that matter that mystery to the to the side for the moment, I know that much she didn't make it. I don't know who who didn't who'd said, go don't go. But she was clearly asked by myself as a ranking democrat on the foreign relations committee. By the chairman of the foreign relations committee by by brains members on both sides, and she wasn't there. Okay. Let me turn you to Yemen. This afternoon, you all voted to advance a resolution would end US military support to the Saudi led coalition secretary Pompeo argued hard against this as I said, it was a closed door session. Certain hear what he had to say to you. But he wrote a piece in the Wall Street Journal today saying this is just going to help Iran, and it's going to undercut a key ally. Saudi arabia. Why is he rock? Well, he's wrong. Because number one is the the Saudis will still have the concern of Iran. They will continue to push back on Iran's influence in the region. The Saudis will still have the concerns of international terrorism as it affects their country. They're not gonna walk away from making a fight on those issues and he's wrong because I originally did not support the resolution that came before the Senate once again today, I actually voted to table it to give the administration the chance to show me that in fact their policies and our engagement and the department of defense with the Saudi led coalition was actually leading to less severe civilian casualties and a pathway towards a political solution. Thank you. I'm I apologize. We're going to have to leave it there. Thank you very much. Thank you, Senator Robert Menendez, the top democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations committee. And now to China and the story of the genetically altered twins, the scientists who is responsible has faced intense criticism for his work researcher. John Kway defended himself at a conference in Hong Kong NPR's, rob Schmitz, joins us from Shanghai to talk about all this. Hey, hi is claiming that he has successfully altered the DNA of twin girls to make them resistant to HIV, what is the scientific community in China saying about all of this other pretty up in arms, just like the scientific community is about this. And since the news broke, you his own university has all but disowned they've insisted that they had no part in these experiments. They said they've lodged a police complaint against him despite online records showing they signed off on this experiment, and dozens of Chinese scientists have condemned him calling what he did crazy unethical as far as China's government is concerned, national and local health authorities here in China have already announced investigations into hus- research, and this will likely be a big problem when he returns to China, but I thought for years China's government wanted to compete with the west in science and technology. So why is it reacting so strongly to Chinese scientists being the first to accom-? Something like this. Well, this type of experiment is not what China's government wants to be known for, you know, the case of login exposes some of the worst fears that the international community has long held about China that in its zeal to become a world leader in science and technology, scientists would cut corners and as performance today in Hong Kong where he defended himself was full of half truths. Dodging questions at one point. He said he had checked in with ethicists in America during clinical trials, so essentially shirking responsibility for what he had done. You know, what's interesting here is that this behavior is strikingly similar to how China's government is often perceived as behaving when it defends its own actions to the west. So in some ways is just reinforcing this negative stereotype in that is terrible public relations for China, which is busy fighting this negative image. In nearly every sector from the trade war with the US to being blamed for influencing other. Countries you name it. This is not the image. China's government wants to portray on an international stage. If her John Quade didn't have the government support or or even the support of his institution. How was he able to even do this experiment without anyone knowing about it? Well, that's a question. Many in the scientific community are now rightly asking and part of this boils down to how China's government runs its own country laws in China tend to be enforced in an ad hoc way, this type of system gives the communist party more leverage when it wants to punish someone while the party itself can wriggle out of breaking its own laws, but this type of system also creates an environment where people tend to do something first and then ask for forgiveness later. And that's what's happened here. China's only guideline for the type of experiment that ho is working on states that clinical experiments that violate quote, ethical or moral principles unquote are illegal. But no further explanation is given under Chinese law. And what is and what is not ethical is not defined. So it's a very vague law, and in China, you've also got a government that is constantly pushing it scientists to break new ground to compete with the west. So it's likely that hood took advantage of this environment to break new ground. And it seems like. He's certainly done that that's NPR's. Rob Schmitz joining us from Shanghai. Thank you so much. Rob. Thanks. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Sometimes children might get diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder simply because they are younger than their peers and not because of a medical condition. That's one way to interpret a study published online today in the New England Journal of medicine NPR's, Richard Harris reports attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is on the rise in the United States and is being diagnosed even in preschool children on upon Jenner in his colleagues at Harvard Medical School decided to follow up on studies suggesting that the youngest children in a class were more likely to get an ADHD diagnosis, then they're relatively mature classmates. ADHD is a condition which a lot of people think might be over diagnosed, and you could certainly imagine a scenario in which two kids who are in the class were different in age by almost a year could be viewed very differently by a teacher school personnel. Who's evaluating them? The researchers relied on a court of school enrolment in order to identify the. Youngest and oldest children in a class. Many states have a cutoff that has children born after September I have to wait a year to enroll in kindergarten the children with August birthdates, come in just under the wire. So they're almost a year younger than the oldest kids in the class. A year of age difference to the five year old six year olds huge Jenner and his colleagues had a huge database have health insurance claims they sorted kids by their birth month than ask a simple question..

US China Yemen Saudi Arabia Jamal kashogi NPR Senator Robert Menendez CIA Senate Foreign Relations commi New York City senator Pentagon Madison Pompeo Gina hospital New York Long Island secretary Hong Kong Shanghai
Amazon's HQ2 announcement is imminent

Q

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Amazon's HQ2 announcement is imminent

"Beth Fertig reports it has to do with how defendants are represent researchers from the RAND Corporation studied the Bronx defenders so called holistic model which provides social workers to clients and helps the max drug treatment and other services. They compared outcomes to the legal aid societies more traditional practice looking at a decade's worth of data. They found clients served by the Bronx defenders were about sixteen percent less likely to get sentenced to jail and their sentences were twenty four percent shorter. The researchers said lawyers who help clients address their problems are able to persuade prosecutors and judges to select alternatives to incarceration, the legal aid society noted that much of the data came from a time when it's caseloads were larger than they are today for the. The rest of this evening here in our area. It'll be pretty rainy temperature rise knew about

Beth Fertig Rand Corporation Twenty Four Percent Sixteen Percent
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This afternoon is Julianne Welby. Thanks, jamie. And you know that I focus on our immigration coverage here at WNYC. I'm not sure there's any other issue. I've seen motivate New Yorkers in a while as is immigration, and we at WNYC of responded by pulling together an all star team of WNYC reporters to cover it. You've heard Matt Katz covering refugees. Heaves cut covered the county jails in New Jersey, and the fact that Democrats are are okay with detaining immigrants for many many millions of dollars. Beth Fertig keeps taking us into immigration court and sleuthing out all the ways. The Trump administration is making it harder to become a city. Listen and ruin vinegar, Paul has been covering ethnic communities like the nape Elise. They have temporary protected status, but not for long communities that don't get enough. Attention other media outlets may want to cover this. But either don't choose to invest in it or can't find the resources to do it. But here at WNYC, we know it matters. And we're committed to continuing coverage like our immigration coverage. Because it really does matter. It's your neighbors. It's your fellow New Yorkers, and it's perhaps an influence on what you're going to do with the in in the polls next month. If this is something that you have responded to that you've been moved by. I hope it will translate into a membership now during our fall drive. Here's the number to contribute to the independent journalism. You're hearing on WNYC it's eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine to you can also contribute at WNYC dot org. In.

WNYC Julianne Welby Beth Fertig New Jersey Matt Katz jamie Paul
Kushner Family Closes Deal to Unload 666 Fifth Avenue

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 2 years ago

Kushner Family Closes Deal to Unload 666 Fifth Avenue

"Kentucky President Trump is, preparing to hold his third rally this week he sent to travel. To Ohio today NPR's Serra mccamman reports he's stumping for a Republican congressional candidate near Columbus he's campaigning for Troy, Balderstone and Ohio State Senator who's running against democrat Danny O'Connor, in a special election to fill. A seat left open by. Republican congressman Pat t berry he resigned out of his apparent frustration with the current political climate the rally is part, of Trump's larger. Push for Republicans ahead of the. November midterms and you're listening to NPR news and this is WNYC in New York I'm David I more than thirty New Jersey transit trains were cancelled yesterday many during the morning. And evening commutes New York Times transportation reporter Patrick McGee and says staffing shortages are one cause of the agencies troubles this summer they've had trouble both. Keeping and hiring engineers which. Is a bit mysterious because they're union jobs they have full. Benefits they pay well New Jersey transit. Says a combination of. Unexpected absences mandatory staff rest times and trackwork are. To blame for yesterday's cancellations the family of President Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner Schnur has reached a deal to offload their company's, flagship property in midtown Manhattan WNYC's Ilya marritz says six six six Fifth Avenue has been a longtime drain. On the Kushner's finances Kushner, companies paid one point eight billion dollars the highest price ever for single building, in Manhattan at the. Time it changed hands in two thousand seven from the start debt. Payments it of all of the buildings net income according to Bloomberg after Trump was, elected Jared Kushner and his father Charles had talks with the Chinese insurance. Company about. A rescue package critic saw a conflict of interest with Jared Kushner headed to the White House now Brookfield asset management, a Canadian, firm will take control, of six six six Fifth Avenue the US government says at. Least six hundred children separated from their parents, at the US Mexico border remain in federal custody, more than a week, after they were, supposed to be reunion reunited but it is unclear, how many of them are still in foster care or shelters across. New York City last week mayor de, Blasios Said they were less than one hundred migrant children who had not been reunified that. Number has since fallen but WNYC's Beth Fertig says it is difficult. To get an exact count a lot of. The kids were, represented by Catholic charities, but, they, don't feel comfortable giving numbers because they say it's a moving target and they want to, respect the privacy of their young clients lawyers, estimate that at least fifty. Two, children separated from, their parents are still in federal custody in, New, York seventy seven. Degrees right now expecting rain this morning some of the storms could be bringing gusty winds and heavy rain support for NPR comes from indeed used by over three million businesses for hiring where, employers can post jobs and you screener questions to build their short list of preferred candidates learn more at. Indeed dot com slash higher.

Jared Kushner Donald Trump Wnyc NPR New Jersey Manhattan Jared Kushner Schnur New York Times President Trump United States Ohio New York City Serra Mccamman Kentucky York Balderstone Congressman Pat T Columbus
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kids about legal stuff we asked Leo's lawyer how does she do it and her name is Jessica Lynch she said that she met lay oh once before court today and then she asked at that time what do you want he said he wants to go home to his mother and she told him what. A lawyer does I said you know there's so much goes to court and helps helps the children helps again and I'm going to go. To court today and I'll be with you To the judge that you want to go back home and be, with your mother so it's hard to imagine that the kids understand the. Process and what the judge is explaining to, them, like who the department of homeland security lawyer is or that the lawyers sitting next to them is. Not providing them legal representation but is. Instead considered a friend of the court. The children. Just sort of sit there and not their heads to these things so bath was Leo the only case, in court this morning no now there are a, lot of children may be like twenty five children in. That one courtroom this morning I saw about eight or ten, of them in line, outside the courtroom they were? All with an adult who said. Okay Nino's this way like you, would, think that they were, on some sort of school trip some, place if you didn't? Know what was happening they all went into the court together very quietly we don't know the circumstances. For these, children if, they were all separated from their parents at the border some could have. Come alone or with other people but regardless they're all considered unaccompanied by Diners. And they all look really young they waited hours for everyone in the group to finish some of them had tablets that they were playing on but that was about it I want to just single out one kid we saw Cindy, he was a seven year old boy in a, red and white striped shirt and he looked really upset unlike Leo who seems. A little bit more outgoing and smiled at people in the. Courtroom. This little boy he stood outside the court before he came in he didn't wanna come in and there, is a woman talking time for a while and eventually she kinda coaxed. Him into the courtroom but he looked very, withdrawn, right and he had just met his lawyer for the first time the lawyer didn't have the basic. Documents about his case so the case. Was adjourned until November so Cindy will. All these. Kids be reunited next week in time for the deadline well the government says it's got a plan to, do this and it sent out a chart that's, a very convoluted multi step process but We know that with the first batch. Of kids under five not all of them were reunited, they said there were reasons. They couldn't reunite they said some of the. Parents have criminal, backgrounds or some of the parents couldn't be located there's also kids whose parents, were deported and technically those children are not subject to this deadline next week to be reunified so Leo he asked. For voluntary departure, so he can be deported to join his mom. And he's given one hundred and twenty days to do that I actually spoke to. Lord this Leo's mother this afternoon she said that. Her son Leo had called her, after his court hearing he was excited because he was told. That he was going to be sent back to her. She's hoping that it's not gonna take. A hundred and twenty days and that he'll be back home much sooner than that. WNYC's, Cynthia Rodriguez and Beth Fertig have been following the cases, of child separations here in New. York thanks for joining, us thank you. David You're. Welcome.

Leo Cindy Jessica Lynch Nino WNYC Cynthia Rodriguez David York Beth Fertig twenty days seven year
Nevada execution blocked after drugmaker protests use of its sedative

All Things Considered

04:37 min | 2 years ago

Nevada execution blocked after drugmaker protests use of its sedative

"Live from npr news in washington i'm deal willman president trump and german chancellor angela merkel held bilateral talks today during the nato gathering in brussels speaking through an interpreter mirko said she was grateful for discussions with trump let me say that i'm a very seasoned jazz for the exchanges us at indeed community to have an exchange about economic on pursue such as migration and also the future of a chafee nations earlier in the day trump blasted germany for its joint natural gas line venture with russia's saying merkel's government is captive to that country a nevada judge has delayed an execution because the drug maker has objected to one of its products being used as part of the lethal injection npr's aina jaffe reports that scott raymond dosier was scheduled to be executed tonight in the northern nevada town of ille if the decision holds this would be the first time that an execution has been halted because of a successful lawsuit by drugmaker alvin said it didn't want it sedatives my dazzle them to be used in a quote botched execution the company also claimed that the state of nevada had obtained the drug under false pretenses drug company sandoz has also objected to nevada using one of their drugs in executions that has not formerly joined the lawsuit fortysevenyearold scott raymond dosier has said he'd rather die than live in prison and that he doesn't mind zach is painful he was convicted of murdering and dismembering twenty two year old jeremiah miller who'd come to a las vegas motel to purchase ingredients for manufacturing methamphetamine either jaffe npr news the celebrations have begun in croatia following that country's come from behind to two one win over england in the world cup semifinal croatia was behind one nil until the sixty eighth minute and the go ahead goal came in the one hundred ninth minute with stocks the dow jones industrial average closed down two hundred nineteen points the nasdaq also was down forty two this is npr and you're listening to wnyc i'm jamie floyd wnyc has learned to young migrant children separated from their parents at the border were successfully reunited with their families here in new york wnyc's beth fertig has more sources and city government say immigration and customs enforcement brought to father to new york on tuesday to reunite them with their young sons that was the deadline set by a federal judge in california for the trump administration to reunite kids under the age of five with their parents the two families were received by lutheran social services and catholic guardian services hundreds of migrant children in new york were separated from their families after illegally crossing the border but government officials say they don't know how many are under the age of five federal officials did not respond to requests for more information about the children tune into the brian lehrer show tomorrow morning at ten for the latest on the trump administration's family separation policy and how it's playing out here in new york jersey city's mayor wants officials to scrap a contract to detain immigrants at the hudson county jail this in response to wnyc's report that the recently expired contract with isis close to renewal wnyc's matt katz reports steve full of is the mayor of one of the most diverse cities in the nation and the largest and democratic controlled hudson county he says if you oppose president trump's immigration agenda you can't jail the immigrants victimized by most if not all of the elected officials here speak to the fact that we don't support the trump policy but in actuality when you look at what they're doing they're actually doing something that opposite what they're saying essex in bergen county's also contract with ice the gel immigrants the three counties are paid six million dollars a month and mayor de blasio is denying allegations that he violated immigration laws when crossing the border during a visit near el paso last month the claims are outlined in a letter from us customs and border protection which was obtained by a p de blasio joined about twenty other mayors from across the country at the border to visit a holding facility for immigrant children he was denied entry he and his security detail went into mexico and then crossed into the us to get a view of the facility the letter was sent june twenty fifth to the nypd who runs the blasios security detail a spokesperson for the mayor says the group did nothing illegal tonight isolated showers and thunderstorms currently seventy seven degrees in central park at.

Washington Angela Merkel Brussels NPR President Trump Chancellor Nato Seventy Seven Degrees Six Million Dollars Twenty Two Year Twenty Fifth
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wnyc wnyc's beth fertig and her reporting that helped one family separated at the border reunite in new york city this morning now wnyc's a ruined venacuro paul joins us with a story he did that will give you food for thought and maybe conversation with your friends and family on the fourth of july it's about the unique history of the american flag and how it can mean such different things to different americans it can mean one thing to this new england patriots football fan we don't meal for the national anthem and we don't neil well we're supposed to be paying our respects to our flag it can mean something entirely different to this rutgers professor who is shopping neighborhoods recently to buy a home when i walked into certain neighborhoods you know if i saw like a blue lives matter or american flag that's definitely a signal of a block i really don't wanna live if there's like three american flags there as opposed to like the lgbt flag with the black lives matter sign or just nothing because in the end of the day nationalism is always about figuring out who's insider who's an outsider right at its core that's what it is who we have special obligations to and who can we as a second to your priority now i'm sure neither of those clips comes to surprise as a surprise so ruined story looks at the history of why our flag in theory unifying symbol actually symbolizes different things not the same things to so many different americans are countries unique history of how it came to be that way and also the question can it be different and better can we make the american flag uniting again can it be a progressive symbol as well as a conservative symbol for example if it ever was hiram hi brian and let me put the phone number out right away because listeners this is for you tell us from any point of view for you what is the american flag mean to you when you fly it or when you see it and if you think of the flag as a right wing culture wars thing these days canopy reclaimed to also be a progressive american symbol that's part of a ruined story that will get into but two one two four three three wnyc is our phone number four three three nine six nine to what is the american flag mean to you when you fly it or when you see it and if you think of the flag as a right wing culture wars thing these days canopy we claim to also be progressive american symbol or a more uniting one two one two four three three nine six nine to so facebook ruin you told the story of how you got the idea for this story when you and your dad were driving together down in houston back in march can you tell everybody that story yeah this was the third or fourth incident really brian that that had happened to me and this is by this point i realized there was something here we were driving along and i saw pickup truck parked on the side of the street there's nobody inside the pickup truck but i saw a big all flag now from pole in the back of the trot and so i just said i just you know you get a feeling i got a feeling and so i asked him just kinda pull over and pull up to pick up just so i could look a little closer and i saw sticker in the back on the back window and it had in large letters secede and that was what prompted me to sort of throw it out to i guess you know facebook because i had as i mentioned earlier incidents one was on election day in two thousand sixteen i was out in deer park in suffolk county talking to voters outside a polling site and there was another pickup truck they're driving back and forth on tinted windows kind of thing and i remember talking to a voter hearner her son she was pakistani american i remember mentioned to her is speaking to her i said it's funny there's this pickup truck that just driving back and forth with this flag and she said half jokingly said oh maybe it's because he sees you interviewing me and i couldn't help but feel that had all kinds of weird resonances and so back to this year there's so much that's been going on.

beth fertig new york
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There appear to be enough foster parents available now but again we don't know where the situation is going at some point there may be a need for more foster parents as well so new yorkers have been very generous as usual in response to this crisis and that's the way that people can help right now our reporter beth fertig has been talking on the air about how the presence of protesters even though there at some of these facilities to support the children may be doing more psychological harm than good that various politicians and groups are still planning protests outside facilities the take the children below say the protest and the presence of police that the protesters attract is extremely frightening to the children i would urge everyone pick another location i mean the the the good news here is that voices protests are being raised all over the country so there's no absence of activism on this issue i think what people are doing is nobly intended but yeah get let's get away from those centers there've been threats to those centers which i understand what people are feeling but it's absolutely backwards to go after the people are trying to help the kids and yeah we have had to put up police presence to protect the people who work at the centers and the kids themselves so yeah let's let's separate protests focus it on the government agencies that are doing this there's they're really easy to find a go focus the energy there let's give these kids some peace in manhattan you're on wnyc with the mayor thank you for your patients oh hi for taking my call this the mayor.

beth fertig manhattan reporter
Advocates: Don't protest near immigrant children

Morning Edition

01:05 min | 2 years ago

Advocates: Don't protest near immigrant children

"The young migrant children arriving to new york from the us border have some advice for local activists hundreds of new yorkers gathered outside laguardia airport on wednesday after activists learned about the arrival of a group of children from texas but wnyc's beth fertig says attorneys tell her protests can be overwhelming for the children do not protest outside these these facilities with the kids do not protest at the airport when the kids see big crowds of people and police it's really scary after everything they've been through new york governor andrew cuomo says as many as seven hundred migrant children separated from their parents at the us mexico border have ended up in new york president trump signed an executive order ending the family separation policy but it's not clear how the separated children will be reunited with their families city hall has set up a way for new yorkers to donate to help children separated from their parents first lady sherline mccrae says the mayor's fund will be contributing thousands of dollars for affinity objects like teddy bears residents can contribute at nyc dot gov slash fund new.

New York United States Texas Beth Fertig Donald Trump Sherline Mccrae Andrew Cuomo President Trump Executive
George Zimmerman tells court he's $2.5 million in debt [Video]

Morning Edition

02:25 min | 2 years ago

George Zimmerman tells court he's $2.5 million in debt [Video]

"Live from npr news in washington i'm louise schiavone the trump administration is outlining some of the reasons behind the cancellation of a nuclear summit with north korea as npr sarah mccamman reports the white house says a us delegation planning the meeting was stood up by north korean officials there are several factors here a north korean official recently insulted vice president mike pence calling him a political dummy the white house says that wasn't helpful a senior white house official says an advanced team recently travelled to singapore to start planning the summit but the north korean team that was supposed to meet the group they're never showed up the white house says all of that shows up profound lack of good faith in hawaii volcano continues to send out streams of lava the volcano remains active at its summit and as hawaii public radio's bill dorman reports more lava is reaching the ocean civil defense officials are doing contingency planning in case further evacuations become necessary the marie chorus in two super stallion helicopters to the town of hilo each capable of carrying more than fifty people at a time in case roads are closed by lava as the memorial day weekend begins the forecast is for higher gasoline prices the aaa expects the average seasonal price across the us will be around three dollars a gallon a level unseen since two thousand fourteen but analysts are not expecting a dip in demand i'm louise schiavone npr news i'm richard hake on wnyc in new york good morning a haitian immigrant has the right to a bond hearing while his deportation case continues wnyc's beth fertig has more on federal judges ruling august and saggio is a legal permanent resident but the government wants to deport him over his two convictions for tampering with a metro card he was originally supposed to have a hearing in march on whether he could be released on bail or bond while his case continues but that hearing was canceled after the us supreme court found attained immigrants aren't required to have bond hearings sasha's lawyers argued his eight months detention violated due process a federal judge agreed and ordered he must have a hearing within two weeks but that ruling only applies to him meanwhile immigration and customs enforcement won't comment on pending litigation now for some oddly unsettling news if you're walking along third avenue in midtown.

United States Sasha New York Hawaii Volcano Singapore NPR Midtown Beth Fertig Wnyc Richard Hake Washington Hilo Bill Dorman Hawaii Mike Pence Vice President Official White House
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on wnyc i'm richard hake attorney general jeff sessions is considering whether to limit the conditions under which immigration judges grant asylum wnyc's beth fertig reports that his decision could have a big impact here in new york city were immigrants win asylum more than anywhere else in the united states he said the photos on naomi cell phone a gruesome story the twenty three year old mother is showing me the shriveled and discolored skin on her sons left hand that's what it looks like today see salem minority naomi says he suffered third degree burns when her ex boyfriend through a pot of hot oil at her but it scalded her son instead this happened back home in honduras when he was four she asked us not to use her real name to protect your identity while she seeks asylum his look they will put it up on me mean joe misanthrope naomi says she'll feel guilty about it for the rest of her life her son's injuries were so serious she says he spent six months in hospitals recovering from infections and skin grafts on his hand arm and back afterwards naomi describes how the man who had beaten and sexually assaulted her returned is energy gonna be stola that day he showed up with a gun her attorney michelle martinez explains what happened he was threatening my mother he was demanding that i go back with him or else naomi fled and eventually made it to the new york city area she couldn't bring her son because of his medical state but she planned to retrieve him after winning asylum it's taking a.

wnyc beth fertig united states naomi honduras michelle martinez richard hake attorney new york salem twenty three year six months
Day spa explosion was deliberate

All Things Considered

02:19 min | 2 years ago

Day spa explosion was deliberate

"Hundred thirty thousand federal ethics law says liabilities need to be disclosed when they're being paid off not just after their settled the federal office of government ethics reviewed trump's filing an og director david paul has set a letter to the justice department saying trump debt to cohen was ally ability that should have been reported peter overby npr news washington investigators say a deadly explosion at a southern california day spa was deliberately sat in the owner appears to be the likely target federal authorities recovered remnants of an explosive device inside the orange county shop where the owner was killed and two patrons were injured tuesday fbi agent paul daley court at this point are working theory is the physics closure was caused by a device although the damage was extensive there are some components that we have located at the scene of the explosion that are inconsistent with what one might expect to find at this business he says investigators don't have any suspects yet the associated press says the blast is believed to have been caused by a package sent to the spa the explosion badly damaged a two story medical building about fifty miles south of los angeles stocks finished higher across the board on wall street this is npr news and this is wnyc in new york i'm sean carlson new information shows how the trump administration tried to get negative information about haitians with temporary protected status before deciding on the program wac's beth fertig explains the national immigration project of the national lawyers guild obtained emails through a freedom of information act request in the emails the policy chief for u s citizenship and immigration services asked how many haitian tps holders were on public assistance and were criminals when staffers told her the information wasn't relevant and wasn't easily obtained she continued to press for it a lawsuit is now challenging the decision to end tps for haitians which would affect about five thousand new york city a spokesman for us citizenship and immigration services says the emails were part of a diligent review and he called litigation frivolous this evening brooklyn residents are gathering to hear how the mta plans to handle that looming shutdown of the l train coming up next year about one hundred residents turned.

Brooklyn National Lawyers Guild Sean Carlson NPR Los Angeles Paul Daley FBI Donald Trump Washington Peter Overby Cohen Director MTA Beth Fertig New York David Paul
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Activism must take place outside the courtroom and on tuesday in queens it did but we never abandoned any client to say that i think means that the oca doesn't realize would happen i happen to be there on the ground in queens or as things unfolded you should know that we have over one hundred lawyers in queens office and the lawyers that were involved in a protest or about thirty or forty the protests happened just little after twelve noon typically these protests happened over lunch but this occurred started around noontime once we knew the device inside the building and the courthouse i was alerted of that and i asked supervisors to go handle the court parts including the arraignments and but at no time was any representation in jeopardy or any client abandoned in the manner in any way less nurse i wonder if we have any legal aid lawyers besides missed rowntree listening right now or public defenders have you had any experience with ice in the courtrooms or immigrants who are you know managing your lives differently when you have to go to court for immigration proceedings or people you know do or anyone else to one to four three three wnyc ice agents also welcome to call two one two four three three nine six nine two four tim rowntree attorney in charge of legal age queens criminal defense practice and wnyc senior reporter covering courts and legal affairs beth fertig death what's the issue here the federal government says look ice immigration and customs enforcement agency they have a right to stand outside of courtrooms don't go into the court itself to try to arrest anybody there but if they suspect somebody of being a deportable immigrant then you know that's one of the places they're gonna find them so what's the issue here a couple things so first of all as tim just mentioned there's been an increase of this activity since president trump took office we it's hard to.

oca attorney reporter federal government trump queens tim rowntree beth fertig president
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of dollars in exchange for getting released and agreeing to return for your court date the problem is if you don't have the money for bail you often end up waiting in jail while your case proceeds this can take months even years the injustice and inefficiency of this system has a lot of people calling for reform including governor cuomo in mayor de blasio but what kind of reform are we talking about beth fertig is a senior reporter at wnyc covering courts and legal affairs she has been investigating bail data in new york city for months the first episode of her series the slow boat to bail reform aired today on morning edition and i'm delighted that brings her to mid day i'm sure people are familiar roughly with the concept of bail because i'm sure everyone's seen law and order at some point but let's start with the basics why does bail exist in the first place how old is the system new york's fail ause were last amended or changed in the in the late nineteen sixties about fifty years ago and the purpose of bail in new york is to ensure that somebody comes back to court that's why you put down a deposit whether it's your own cash or you're taking out alone with bondsman and new york's laws on paper i felt a little bit different than other states where the standard for setting bail or or for a prosecutor to request bail has to be dangerousness new york is one of the few states that does it based on your risk of flight so it has to be because you're very likely to skip court you know but in practice what happens is prosecutors and judges will set pails that are very high and out of reach for a lot of defendants even though in new york law it's supposed to be on paper progressive to the extent that they can look at a person's finances and make a bail that's affordable to them but what i'm told and what's been written about for years is that they don't what is the role the bill bondsman that's if you can't pay the thousand or two thousand dollars in cash then there's a higher amount usually to make it a bond so that you will put a portion of that down i think it's ten percents basically interest.

governor cuomo beth fertig reporter new york prosecutor york de blasio two thousand dollars fifty years
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Price break for npr news i'm blake farmer in nashville this is npr news this is wnyc in new york i'm david first a federal court of appeals panel in new york has heard arguments in a case challenging the termination of dhaka the program that protects young immigrants wnyc's beth fertig was in court the trump administration is challenging a decision by a district court in brooklyn that sided with the plaintiffs and said the government must turn over more documents to explain why it chose to terminate the daca program in march the government believes it doesn't have to provide all of these documents but there's a bigger issue which is that a very similar case from california is before the us supreme court right now so in their questioning the new york judges seem to suggest they may wanna wait for the supreme court to act before they do anything the board of trustees of new york public radio wnyc's parent company is meeting this afternoon for the first time since the public learned of harassment inside the organization hosts leonard lopate and jonathan schwartz have been suspended pending investigation into inappropriate conduct former takeaway host john hawke and very has been accused by at least three former staff members of sexual misconduct the meeting begins act at four p m public comments will be taken at six p m in between there will be a closed door portion that will not be open to the public the board will meet in the hilton hotel thirteen 35 avenue of the americas in the grammercy meeting rooms quick look at other weather this afternoon sunny skies were expecting a high around thirty five degrees tonight mostly clear with a low of twenty one degrees tomorrow mostly cloudy with a high right around the freezing.

blake farmer nashville new york beth fertig brooklyn california us harassment leonard lopate jonathan schwartz john hawke npr david wnyc thirty five degrees twenty one degrees
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Says the fires have forced people out of about twenty five hundred home so far we have over four hundred firefighters we have over fifty fire engines assisting within the community's there have been numerous structure threatened with reports of structures on fire firefighters and emergency workers are bracing for more strong santa ana winds over the next few days the largest fire has destroyed a hospital and at least one hundred fifty structures democratic congressman john conyers is resigning from congress after some fifty three years in office representing detroit he's facing alligator allegations of sexual harassment from several former congressional aides and pierced on ganja reports conyers has been facing calls did he stepped down for the past two weeks including from some prominent democrats such as nancy pelosi at eighty eight years of age conyers now says he has decided to retire immediately though he specifically avoid it using the word resign he spoke on the mildred a show on wbz are in detroit where he also rejected the allegations against him they are now anger or there are no cure am i i very worrying worryingly anchor uh special election will need to be held to replace conyers who also use the announcement to endorse his son john conyers the third to replace him in congress don ganja npr news maker of hot pockets and perina dawn food is getting into the supplement business nestle's buying atrium innovations for two point three billion dollars the canadabased company makes garden of life gummy vitamins protein powder and protein bars this is npr you're listening to wnyc in niki warcrimes jimmy floyd in immigration and customs enforcement says arrest surat since president trump took office the numbers in our area include more people without criminal records wnyc's beth fertig reports the obama administration focused on arresting immigrants with criminal convictions but the trump administration also targets immigrants charged with crimes though not convicted as well as those without documentation as a result arrests are up and to new york city 26 percent did not have criminal convictions double as many as in the previous fiscal year in new jersey forty percent had no criminal convictions versus 25 percent in the previous year the trump administration says it's determined to remove those who pose a safety threat but immigration advocates say it's evidence of.

trump new york president wnyc canadabased fiscal year obama administration beth fertig congressman john conyers jimmy floyd npr nestle nancy pelosi harassment detroit congress three billion dollars eighty eight years fifty three years forty percent 25 percent 26 percent two weeks
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To prosecute president trump's children and harvey weinstein wnyc's beth fertig looks at why these cases have triggered such a reaction as a public defender in manhattan zara am at wasn't surprised when she heard the manhattan da declined to prosecute studio executive harvey weinstein back in 2015 for allegedly groping a model but she said she was disappointed to me it just highlighted this tale of two justice systems two systems because emmett says she seen defendants who aren't richer powerful get arrested for groping people on subway is especially men of color and i thought about many of my clients where there is no confession as that are less than their higher harvey weinstein case and they were still very aggressively prosecuted and their lives were ruined on even thinner evidence and even less culpability emmett is with a group called five boro defenders that's now calling for da vance to resign she says they're not just upset about the trump and weinstein cases they're worried that vance isn't serious enough about reforming the criminal justice system to make it less punitive for everyone manhattan has the highest felony filing rate has highest conviction rates has the most detainees at rikers and so that that suggest to us that in comparison to the other four boroughs it is more punitive and seeks incarceration more often than other is okay those are a lot of claims and not surprisingly vance's office disputes them let's take rikers fences spokeswoman joan valero clams emmett is pointing to inflated data from manhattan because it also includes the special narcotics prosecutor's office that's a separate division and it handles cases in all five boroughs it's true that manhattan has the highest rate a felony conviction since but more people are arrested there than any other burrow except brooklyn valero declined to be interviewed on tape but she said there is ample evidence that vance is a progressive he recently announced he'd stop prosecuting styled jumpers and he dedicated funds to a program that could keep more people out of jail before their try charles by putting them under supervised release so what's the verdict on vance i would wandering she a good bit of systematic study and more than uh you know would comes out because of a group decision not to prosecute.

trump beth fertig harvey weinstein emmett da vance manhattan prosecutor valero charles president executive joan valero brooklyn
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The legislation known as daca enables young undocumented immigrants called dreamers to go to school and work without being deported with president trump planning to rescind the program daca recipients who are studying to enter professions face an uncertain future but wnyc's beth fertig reports some might still be able to work in new york if they're careful lately cuny law school professor janik calvo has beginning some tough questions from undocumented students she says they want to know if they'll be able to get their degrees and work if there are no longer protected by dhaka what she tells them may surprise you even if it were in did you still can be licensed and you can go pursue your education ico a way of hope a ray of hope because of a decision last year by the state board of regents it voted to let all qualified applicants regardless of immigration status obtain about fifty different professional licences nurse danka mid wide barmitzvah there's a catch without daca employers aren't allowed to hire these immigrants because they won't have work authorisation so a teacher couldn't get a job in a school district but calvo says others can work for themselves physical therapist run your own business act acupuncturists run their own businesses lawyers from their own business lawyers like caesar vargas on staten island he's the daca recipient who won the right to obtain a law license after going to court which then prompted the board of regents to act i am working for microbiome or myself i'm in practice even without daca an undocumented immigrants can still pay taxes with a taxpayer identification number but those young immigrants would become deportable if the government chooses to find them vargas says he's up front with his clients about his status and he'll continue to practice of dhaka expires what they cannot take away if our education if our our life and it tower uh you know ability to contribute to the country we call home and he says taking a risk as something business owners already do beth fertig wnyc news we've got some beautiful weather ahead of us today sunny skies and warmer with highs in the upper 80s tonight partly cloudy in the evening and turning mostly cloudy with lows around seventy and we could see some patchy fog tomorrow morning with partly sunny rest of the day and highs in the.

wnyc beth fertig new york janik calvo dhaka caesar vargas staten island president law school professor
"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"beth fertig" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the city's district attorneys were purging nearly six hundred and 45000 old warrants today wnyc's beth fertig explains the warrants were issued at least ten years ago to people who didn't pay their fines for minor infractions like drinking in public or being in a park after hour ars individuals were still at risk of being arrested if they ever had contact with police brooklyn's acting district attorney eric and tholot's asked the judge to dismiss more than one hundred forty three thousand summonses and his berau at this point bras so lola thumbs staten island district attorney declined to participate in the purge he said it wouldn't be fair to those who had gone to court to pay their fines the new york city council has approved a rezoning plan for about eighty blocks of midtown east the new rules will lead to commercial developers built taller office buildings katie brazelle as a reporter for the real deal she says that city councilman dan karadzic's spearheaded the rezoning effort and hopes of attracting more business and commercial tenants to his district of an area where the don't think are really all and can't necessarily compete with if certain of here building your hudson yards your of our manhattan brazelle says builders who want to take advantage of the new rules will be required to contribute funds for public infrastructure improvements such as upgrades to nearby subway stations 79 degrees now mostly clear skies expected this evening a low around 68 degrees support for npr comes from the corporation for public broadcasting and the estate of joan kroc and this bequest serves as an enduring investment in the future a public radio from npr news this is all things considered i'm ari shapiro and i'm audie cornish threats between the us and north korea have gotten as intense as they've ever been president trump says the us is prepared to respond to north korean threats with fire and fury kim jongun is threatening an attack on the us territory of guam on the back and forth happened after reports yesterday that north korea is making nuclear warheads sat are small enough to sit on top of its missiles we're going to talk now with a senator from a hawaii people there are already finalising plans for the possibility of a nuclear strike by north korea senator mazy geraldo is a democrat and joins us on the.

us hawaii north korean president manhattan katie brazelle staten island mazy geraldo senator guam kim jongun trump north korea wnyc ari shapiro joan kroc npr dan karadzic reporter new york city council district attorney tholot eric brooklyn beth fertig 68 degrees 79 degrees ten years