18 Burst results for "Beth Comstock"

Imagine it Forward and Goodr

Zero to IPO

04:23 min | 3 months ago

Imagine it Forward and Goodr

"To another episode of Zero, to IPO were absolutely thrilled to have to amazing guests on the show today I wanna I introduce Beth comstock who for many years in fact, almost three decades was at GE and served as the vice chairperson. There is on the board of Nike is also the author of this amazing book called imagine it forward, which I am really enjoying and learning a lot from and have a bunch of questions to ask Beth about the. Beth welcome on the show. Thanks Josh. Great to see you great to be here. And our other guests is Jasmine crow who is the CEO and founder of Gooder, which is a company that I am fascinated by I. think it's one of the more insightful companies that I've come across. Recently I also have a lot of questions for you Jasmin about how the idea came to you, but but welcome on the show. Thanks so much gas and happy to be here. Of course, we've got Freddie caressed my co host. Zeroed IPO your morning Josh, how you doing good I bet and Jasmine, nice to see you. Thanks for joining us today I'm super excited about today. Yeah me too good to see you. Well, let's dive right in because we have a lot to talk about Jasmine I wanNA start with you and I want to understand I want our audience to understand where you're coming from. When you started gooder there's some kind of basic facts that I want our audience to understand domestically we are wasting seventy-two billion pounds of food every year while forty two million people are struggling with food insecurity absolutely that's a foundational mess. And it's even worse. Now, I'll of everything that's happening with current virus who are wasting more food and more people are going hungry. So it is a huge issue. Yeah. I mean just to be clear before this even. I read somewhere that we were wasting about a quarter trillion dollars a year on food in the United States if people number eight is that right? Yeah. Right Frederick in. So I guess to put an even more simpler context about two percent of GDP is on wasted food for that's a lot of money spent on food that never gets eaten in this country does Like many people I have some passing familiarity with this I. Read about it I don't even know where to start and it seems like maybe you go out and you you know you try to donate food as best you can and and I think that's maybe where you started. Yeah and it transformed into something quite extraordinary. So yeah if you know Josh I started feeding people that were experiencing hunger and homelessness in two thousand thirteen out of my apartment in Atlanta Georgia So that's where got started I found a parking. Lot I drove past it one day and I just saw hundreds of people that were homeless in in something kind of just pulled on my heartstrings at that moment and I said I wanNA help you know what do I didn't have a ton of money and I knew I could cook and so I just went home I post it on facebook I mean Sunday. I'm going to go downtown and I'm going to feed on the streets. If. You want to join me I had about twenty volunteers I made a spaghetti dinner. And loved it. You know brought out my little beats pill at the time, which wasn't that loud outside. Dating us, you're dating we know exactly when you're store your. Heckling when it happened so I really wasn't that loud music thing. But I have bad and you know the idea was it would be old school kind of Sunday music why Jackson five and Aretha Franklin James Brown like this classic kind of music and a good Sunday dinner, and that's how it all got started in. So of eighty own from one of my pop up restaurants went viral on facebook and people are saying this is so amazing which restaurants donate the food and the reality was nobody I was couponing on price matching I always say, I'm the reason Walmart doesn't price-match anymore I definitely feel like i. gave them a run for him. And then I was cooking thing taking it downtown, serving it coming home cleaning up, and so it would take me like forty hours every week I did this and I started researching food ways and was really like upset like I can't believe this much food goes to waste in here I. Am you know putting together five dollar donations and my own money and trying to make these feeding is happening to feed five hundred people

Josh Jasmine Crow Beth Comstock Facebook Nike GE United States Jasmin Walmart Freddie Atlanta Gooder Frederick Aretha Franklin James Brown Jackson CEO Georgia Founder
"beth comstock" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"And I really think management is. We know what is dead back to what you said people even in Silicon Valley, they think it's command and control. It's not. Yeah. And so more people need you right and people who really next I'm been working on this book this year, and I'm going to go off and rediscover, you know, sort of going to wandering tour. What would be your thing? Absolute thing that you haven't done that. You wish you well. I I wander I'm gonna wander I dunno. I wanted. I just wanna I think I'm good coach. I'm going to help you leaders. I don't want to go back to big business. I'm done with that. Yeah. Some going to go wander boards. Beth I'm on the Nike board. Yeah. So that's a good point like some things over there. Yeah. They're working on may do I may do another board. But I'm going to wander around a reenter business in a very different way. I'm gonna really I really want to lean into my expression. More creativity. Do maybe do more writing good Beth Comstock, thank you. Thanks Kara show. I look forward to your next chapter me to what people say that next. Check. I don't know. I've been saying I want to be an intern. So maybe I'll come here and all my God internet Rico. All right. Thanks for your application, turning it down. I don't literally I'm trying to shed people to understand I want to like just want. I wanted to take scooters all around the city by myself. But that's what I'm gonna do. But I do those and intern just come in wander and fix things think about consider your application a little high paid. I'm I'm gonna do this for for. Oh, no, no, no never say that. Well, no, I have to get paid something here. Rank you get paid something. You're right. Do anything for you? Right. Good luck. No women should ever. No one should ever. Now. Really? Anyway. Thank you Beth Comstock for coming on the podcast. And thank you all for listening. If you liked it, please tell a friend. You can follow me on Twitter at CARA. Swisher? Thanks to our sponsors into cadence. Thirteen invokes media for selling those ads. Thanks to Joe Robbie who Edison show and our producers gold, Arthur and Eric Johnson. This is Recode media. We'll see you next week.

Beth Comstock intern Twitter Nike Swisher Joe Robbie Eric Johnson Arthur Edison
"beth comstock" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"But I wanted to do scenario building. I was obsessed with the idea of what the ten things that could. That's how I do my reporting. Yeah. No, great background make up things. All the time. One of them is right. Yeah. He's always. Then you're testing your out. And then I'll call people know counted, you know, you just made it up turns out to be like one of them is true. Like, it's interesting, and it's always pushing against something and you do those kind of answers. And then we get back. I want you talk about sort of some of the tips in the book what to do that. And how you company that way? Because I do I think if you're not my whole premise is everything that can be digitized. We'll be digitized going forward. And if you're not creative you're finished. That's why I wrote the book. Yeah. It's all about karma, Tiffany and talk about that. When we get back. We're here with Beth Comstock, her book is called imagine it forward, courage, creativity and the power of change. She was also a pretty big executive at G, he and other places and NBC, and we'll talk more. We get back. Hello. I'm Spencer hall from SP nation. And I want to tell you about my new show. It seemed smart it seems smart as a show about people doing things that for some reason or another seems smarter at the time. Those things might include doing a little cocaine driving a bike up a mountain or I don't know maybe racing one hundred miles per hour across the country in the middle of the night with no one's permission or even stealing a bat from an empire is room in a major league baseball park, check it out. And if you like it Tele friend, I'm Spencer hall, don't do anything smart. Okay. We're here with Beth Comstock, she's the author of imagine it forward, courage creativity. And the power of change is also been a major GE executive in worked in NBC and other places. So talk a little bit about some of the things you have to do to imagine it forward. I think there are just thought exercises. You can put yourself into so one I love is think back ten years ago to something that seemed stranger weird and now as mainstream, and then think ahead ten years what that might be. So you think back ten years? I mean, I was just I was just in Las Vegas the key. There was a cannabis convention next door. I mean medical marijuana marijuana huge now right ten years ago. It seems silly to think that right be. So I think those that's a good kind of you know, just because why I was there. I was doing something with Autodesk in Las Vegas, right? I like to think through just weird scenarios. You know? What's the what's the think of the opposite? What if the opposite of what you think is going to happen? Give me happens. I don't let's try to think of a a media. I don't know everybody thinks that everybody's gonna go to subscriptions in in media content. What if suddenly they decide they they want to go back to advertising, are you constantly? What is your advertise? What is like what does it look like constantly thinking through some of those different scenarios? I mean, this is an easy one. But what's the worst thing that could what's the worst that could happen? I think companies don't spend enough time thinking through these things I always like those red team blue team exercises that came out of military where you deliberately seed one point of view versus the other. And you kind of set up a cage match we did that with our cleantech, Mark. And the team there was the pro climate change in the anti climate change out of our research labs, and these were very, well, regarded scientists and the pro climate change was so compelling the other guys capitulated, right? That's it. We get it. We're all in. So I think you have to set up those kind of things in your company. It's not about a business plan. Not about an monetary. Yeah. You got to do some of that. But that's often where strategy ends. And companies, and I worry that we're too short term focused. I think that how do you change that? Because the of Wall Street, right? Well, even Donald Trump has talked about that. That's one thing. He said, I thought was quite intelligent. Yeah..

Beth Comstock Spencer hall Las Vegas NBC executive Donald Trump Autodesk baseball Tiffany marijuana cocaine SP cannabis GE ten years
"beth comstock" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"And so you were running that when you look back on that. What mistake do you think you made or the company made? Well, I can talk a lot about what I made. I tried to do in the boy, I mean one I think the big mistake I made person. Really? And with the team is kind of the cool kids versus the nocco kids. And I think that happens a lot in change, and I hired a bunch of digital Turks, and we were going to take on the world, and I was out with my face on every magazine cover like. Yeah. Digital's the future. And I didn't spend enough time building the bridges and building the partnerships internally. And then therefore therefore they dug in I mean here, and it became sort of them against us. And I remember once one morning waking up, and I always read the New York Post, and there I was. Yeah. I I read the Daily Mail everyday to. But there I was page six there was this quote that I was so stealth that I could take out your kidney, and you wouldn't even feel it. At the time. I was quite distraught. By that now, I think it's quite a compliment. But at the time I was distraught. I would be thrilled. Yeah. I needed a dose akara, then I needed to. I wish because it was my it was my own colleagues, basically it was drive-by shooting. And did you take anyone's kidney? I should have. I should have. I'd like to know who's kidney. They thought I took. And that was it was many of them. Yes. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. And it just good just after lady. Yeah. Dale's belief comes in and takes your kidney. And I also understood because I was sent back from GE. And they thought it was the corporate spy, I remember showing up at universal. You may have been have been I remember showing up at universal. And this one of the top dogs. It wasn't Ron who I became friendly with. But one of the top dog said, look, you got a couple of strikes against you. And I'm just gonna tell you. I'm never going to work with you on you used to work at NBC and to your here from GE, and I'm just never going to work with you. So that was like my AOL Time Warner that was the environment. And so everybody was out for everybody. Yeah. So that's the learning. I think you can fall into that. Which I did or you can rise above it, which I didn't. Yeah. All right. When we get back. We're talking to bent. That's a great story. I you know, I was in page six about my pregnancy. I'm not going to go into it. It was quite funny. Wow. That was where it was announced. They thought Jeff Bezos was the father. I will not go into it. But that's not or else we would have a plane right now for my children, but we do not a juicy story. Yes. My baby. Daddy. Jeff as us what an incredible experience that was anyway, we're gonna take a quick break. Now, we'll be back in a minute with Beth Comstock, she's the author of imagine it forward, courage creativity. And the power of change it and talk about the book when we get back. Today's show is brought to you by MAC Weldon. They make the most comfortable, hoodies sweatpants, underwear and sexual everywhere. If you've listened to this show before you know, that I by MacWorld and products myself a lot of socks from them..

Jeff Bezos GE Beth Comstock New York Post Digital MAC Weldon NBC MacWorld AOL Dale Ron Warner
"beth comstock" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Network. I'm CARA Swisher in for Peter Kafka. And today, I'm talking to Beth Comstock, the former vice chair of GE. She's also the former president of integrated media NBC universal where she oversaw the early days of Hulu, and she's also the author of a book called imagine it forward, courage creativity. And the power of change Beth. Welcome to Recode media. Thanks care. For our say how we don't have say long. But nonetheless, you had quite a career when the reason I wanna how you on here because I think it's really important not just for women, but just in general talk about how people's careers. Go shifted really drastically. I never would've imagined having this career. Yeah. Exactly. So let's talk a little bit about what you done before. NBC? You were not I'm blanking about where you were. Well, I actually started my career. I wanted to be a journalist, and I wasn't very good at what was your only wasn't confident and pretty quickly. I got behind the scenes I actually worked I grew up near Washington DC, and I worked in a version of Wayne's world back in the day for public access television. Wow. And then from there ended up going to NBC joined NBC as a publicity coordinator. Right. Okay. And then I worked releases releases. Yeah. And I worked my way through media from there. I went into CNN and went to CBS back to NBC than NBC led to g right Cincinnati. But me, right. Okay. All right. But in NBC, you did a lot more than that. You weren't just publicity NBC movie. New York, and I went through publicity, and then I got into more promotion, and I went to GE became chief marketing officer, they shipped me back to NBC, and I led the digital the early days of digital media, which was incredibly informative, right? So g bought NBC g bought NBC like nineteen eighty six and had almost twenty years something like that. Exactly. Yeah. So talk about that talk about doing that. Because this was the early days of the internet. I think that's probably what I met you when you were working. Yeah. It was and that would have been in the mid that would have been probably like around two thousand six would've been when we started that when I think about think take people back to that day that time was YouTube just on the scenes in media. Everyone was panicked because it was cats playing the piano on video, and they were like they could cats. Yeah, they were good cast. But one part was like, ha ha ha so cute. The other was all my God. We don't know how to do this and people were panicked and YouTube had yet even been bought by Google at that point. Right. And so I was brought in I had done. Some disruptive things at G. Chas. I I want our cleantech initiatives, and they're like, okay, she can figure something out go. Go figure out digital right? And I had no digital background clearly, but I had marketing background, right? And so how did you look at it at the scene this year?.

NBC Beth Comstock GE Wayne YouTube CARA Swisher vice chair Hulu G. Chas Peter Kafka Washington CNN New York chief marketing officer Google coordinator Cincinnati g
"beth comstock" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Today's episode is brought to you by the Buick Encore. We know a lot of you listen to us while you're commuting. And whether that means you're on a train walking to work for in your car, commuting his maybe not the most fun. But we do something that could make it a little better. Introducing the Buick Encore because let's face it. If you're gonna get stuck in traffic, which you are why not spend that time in a car you love the Buick Encore takes the stress out of boring driving situations. I would like to think we do too. You know, what else is really fun when you're in the car. Do you? Remember the license plate game. I think you're alone on that one. Let's just get into today's episode. To me if I had a business trip, and I could just sit in my room in my jammies. Having room service. Oh, it's it's just like. Yeah. I've won the lottery. Just absolutely. And it's interesting. I think I think is a leader. You do have to overcome those parts of your nature because the team expects you to do that. I'm Danielle Weisberg. And I am currently eight and we are the co founders of the skip. You're listening to our podcast skimmed from where we talked to other female entrepreneurs about what it takes to get to the top. And men what it's like along the way we're talking about advice, the renaming low days management mistakes, everything that goes into the real stop, no BS. We started the skin from a pouch. So what better place to pack it out somewhere? It all began on a couch. Join us in welcoming Beth Comstock to the couch bath has built a long career in corporate communications at companies like CBS CNN and NBC universal NBC. She helped get one of your favorite binging sites off the ground, Hulu, a little later, she moved to General Electric to take on a communications role. Once she was there, Beth capped working her way up all the way up to vice chair of the company, and she was the first woman to hold the spot in the company's a hundred and twenty six year history while and most recently Beth wrote a book about courage creativity and making change it's called imagine it Ford. Congratulations Beth welcome to the couch. Thanks for having me. Great to see you guys. Great to see you till singer. We are very very excited to have you here on a personal note..

Beth Comstock Encore Danielle Weisberg NBC Beth CNN vice chair General Electric Hulu CBS Ford twenty six year
"beth comstock" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on This Is Success

"So yeah, I think that's what I'm saying to people right now, whether you're twenty or forty or sixty, there are times in your life when you gotta kinda let yourself wallow in the ambulance to get out and kind of discover new things put yourself in uncomfortable positions because you're going to find out something about yourself and an opportunity that might not have existed. So that's what I think it's about. Thank you so much. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Thanks for listening to this is success from business inside our shows produced by Animas rackets and Sarah woman. Damn Bobkov is our executive producer in. I'm rich baloney. Before you go, we're checking in with Beth Comstock one more time to hear something. She says her colleagues would be surprised to learn. I, I like really body jokes. I think would not be something people that were good. No, but I love jokes and I love like race jokes. So that's probably one thing they would be surprised to know about me. You would be tossing around like dirty jokes at work? No, I wouldn't do that. Especially in today's environment. That's a really short term recipe for for not saying in your job very long next week on the show you've got Pinterest co, founder and CEO Ben Silverman when he built out his team in the early days, you some unusual recruitment methods. There was another guy that I met because I put an ad onto Craigslist Hughes, an amateur magician. He was programming magic tricks into his phone. I mean, he was using Pinterest as well to hear that episode of more. Make sure you subscribe to our show while you're at it. Give us a rating and leave us a review, letting us know what you think. It really helps us grow our audience. This is success is a production of insider audio..

Beth Comstock executive producer Pinterest Craigslist Hughes Ben Silverman Sarah founder and CEO
"beth comstock" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on This Is Success

"Beth Comstock left GE in two thousand seventeen. When the new CEO John Flannery came in and wanted a new team. That's what happens. I mean, that's part of change. You know, we have this magical thinking, you can control your accent. I think I thought that I was a g a long time. I probably stayed too long that being said, I loved working there. I feel like I contribute a lot and I got developed a lot. So I had a lotteries in the Roy's new challenges and that one of the reasons I stayed there as long as I did I, I love that company. What do you mean by that that you probably stay to? Well, I think you know, you always have to ask yourself. Is it time for another team to take the reins? I kinda came to the end of the road of what I was doing at g. either wasn't the next necessary. Obvious thing I wasn't going to be the CEO of the company. And you know, I think sometimes we have to be honest with ourselves, have I done as much as I can. And is it time to go? So I'm not sure. Asset enough, you're on the board of Nike yet now, and that's a company that has been in the news a lot lately because of changes in it's kind of its branding and its approach, especially with like the whole Colin Kaepernick ad campaign. How do you see that? Like what was the discussion around there of how Nike wants to kind of represented? So yeah. Well, I think if you, I mean, Nike's had this amazing tagline and campaign in just do it for thirty years, and their strategy has been to reinvigorate just do it around mission, and you know the passion around sports and sports for progress and social progress. And so they were telling athletes stories and they know the consumers really well, they know what their consumers think. It's important that their athletes and that a brand stands for something. I think we're in a time of brand courage, and I think anyone who might be listening, you know, in a brand kind of roll, it means sometimes you have to take uncomfortable positions. It happened to me when we NJIT when we were doing EKO magic nation, not everybody liked that, gee, was standing. Out for clean energy. So equal magic nation is was our clean energy effort back in in the early two, thousands, and you know it was uncomfortable..

Nike CEO Beth Comstock GE John Flannery Colin Kaepernick thirty years
"beth comstock" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:08 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Beth Comstock in conversation with Gina. You say innovation is a social activity. It is about collaboration. And it's not about you know, one guy going up to a mountain sitting on it for a while. Having thunder bolt of lightning hit his brain walked down the mountain, and then basically have defined the future. It's a social activity. It's a collaboration. It's a it's a group exploration. And it's it's having a diversity of opinions, including the skeptics at the table. And it seems like there's just you have been able in your career to pull that together. Not once not twice but in a regular inconsistent powder. Well, I do believe I and this was a hard lesson learned you do have to invite the critics. I mean, there's nothing I like better than a group of people who just think like me and act like me, and we have just brilliant ideas, except they're using not that brilliant. And so you learn along the way that you need somebody in there to beat up the ideas because oh, you know, that person who criticize you actually, they were right? And so you start inviting them in and you start realizing that too many of the same people thinking aren't going to get you there. And so I think that's a hard practice a hard learning. I in the book, I talk a lot about my time. My last time at NBC, which was probably the hardest assignment I ever had. And it was I call it agitated enquiry critics were kind of twofold. There were the ones who really wanted to battle the idea to make it better. And then they're the ones who were afraid they don't wanna make change, and we all deal with that. What are the sort of gatekeepers the people who just they hold onto what little power they have? They they fight for they fight for hanging on. And they wanna put a Hex to them. They want to put a heck song change, and you have to find a way of resilience to keep going around that keep going around. And so I've often I guess a resilience builds up in you by by seeing like you see that opportunity, and I'm not gonna let you get in the way. And so the more you have a team that. Does that the more momentum you create together? One of the things that you had done in the time. I've known you is really found ways to bring startups into conversations with a larger company, and there is this. There is sometimes the sense in the narrative of startups being like, we're going to go and disrupt anything, and we're disrupting you, and we're going to put you out of a job and you're irrelevant until they got to scale. Right. And then they're like, hey, can we hire you because you guys actually figured out? How to do the thing that we now need to go do? But I I am curious. And then I have such good questions from the audience to share as well. But I'm curious what are some of the things that you've found for either? Whether it's people working at smaller companies or people that are have an idea as they start to think about navigating larger organizations, what are some of the things that you have found that are really important to embarking on those conversations. Journeys discovery processes. Yeah. Well, I think the first thing is even big companies. You got to look at the very small teams that are there. Don't just look at it as big monolith. Because the real change happens in smaller teams. So I often find startups. It'll be like, yeah, I'm gonna I just met the CEO of Wells Fargo like I'm in and you probably not because if the CEO comes in and says, I know we're gonna like we're gonna we're gonna hire this team everybody in might do. I know anyone else's. Yeah. I'll get right on. And they're like, no, I'm not going to do it. Because it's just because the CEO says, so I often say vice people to one identify what problem you're trying to solve and why you can help the help the scaled company do it. I think you have to focus on that problem. Too often, you find startups coming into big companies and saying like, you know, it's all about me as opposed to. What's that problem? I'm going to help you solve your problem. I'm going to help you saw right that that is a tweet -able moment. I think you have to. You have to find a champion. You're looking at those. You're going to go find the I net wells. You're not you're going to say, I a champion me through this. I've got a I need to have somebody who's like helping guide me through is going to help me get unstuck big companies need to put money at work for this. It's not a it's not a philanthropy a startup is going to go out of business in the time of big companies going to react. So I always thought a good rule that I saw some startups us was we're gonna try we're gonna have like three meetings, and if you're committed we'll go forward, we're we're not gonna have twelve meetings. Right. We're we're not gonna do this. So I think there are some ground rules. You have to put in place, and there are ways that big companies came put money to work without taking equity stake. They can fund a pilot project. They can take you to a customer. So some of those kind of early steps don't always just go to getting married and saying like you have to have an equity stake in the company. So those are a couple of things I would urge small companies to think about, but they need scale. They need access to customers big companies need disruptive ideas speed. Nimble thinking in theory. It should be a really good partnership, but you have to be committed to a joint problem, and it kind of create a separate lane and protect the program. Well, and and I think that's a great segue to some of our audience questions one being how did you start thinking about? And how did you even I discover the lean startup methodology, and Eric Ries and all the great things that you know, he's really spent his career uncovering, and how did you bring that into? Well, I just I in my discovery mode. I had some colleagues we went to a book party that was in New York with Eric for his first book coming out and lean startup, and we're like we need what he's talking about. So go up to him and afterwards and say, hey, Eric like, we're leading innovation at GE. Can you come and talk to our company, and he goes, but you're not a startup like why would I do that? And I think he said do I have to wear a suit. And you're like, yes. And he did come. He did come the first meeting in a suit without a tie. And so. Like, Jack Dorsey. Yeah. Yeah. So we've been defying in front of congress. Doc word. Right. And so we've we put a pilot project together we threw him in. We said we're going to put a project together you're in. And he was able to sort of in a pretty short time show and integrated team the beginning he comes in. And I remember they were sitting like this. They're like, okay, smarty pants software guy. What are you know, you talk about a change order? You can make fifty change orders in a in a week. We can't make one order change in a year. What are you know? And he showed them what he knew when he challenged their thinking and he brought them in. And you know, what what we learned. It was the it was the fear that was holding people back, and it gave birth to something we called fast works and lean startup was just a piece of it. But it was really this test. And learn. Minimally viable product became a really great way to get change going. Okay. Just just test. It just give me a prototype. And again software people, and I think, that's the way you work. But not every not every organization is used to doing that. I think that is a really important point one of our audience members asked we are on a show, you said, what was sort of the most surprisingly innovative company out there, and you said WalMart. Yeah. Why? Well, I'll give some context I think in terms of they said, you can't pick any new tech company. Okay. So that is a bit of Kuala qualifier. And I'm just because I worked for the company I'm into transformation stories, I like it's easy to be disruptive. When you start from scratch, and you don't have legacy issues to deal with it's easy to be innovative. It's not easy to be innovative in any situation. Let me let me reframe that it is really hard to transform when you've been around for a while. And when you have big scale, and look they've had a few missteps, right? They haven't gotten the digital thing, right seemingly. Now, they either with fear patients, whatever they've started to play to their strengths they acquired jet realizing they had to be digital. And they've started to accept and recognize their need for their physical locations in a way that I think is pretty smart. And so I like some of these traditional companies, and I guess I would especially sitting here in Silicon Valley you've got Google. Down the road. You've got apple down the road. You've got you know, Amazon plane ride away on this coast. These are these are becoming big companies that are at huge scale with huge expectations about what they're going to do next. Are they going to be able to reinvent? What's next? Are they taking enough meaningful risks? Are we asking those questions now? And are we looking to some of these older companies that have had to go through this look at tesla right down the road right now. There's a lot of challenges at tesla. We could probably have a whole lecture on tests. I'm not an expert. But I think one one of their issues is scale. And so are they learning from what GM has done? Yes. We want to dismiss GM. And CEO there yesterday, the horse and buggy, but there are some good things they've done. So how crazy would it be for the tesla team too? And they are hiring those kind of people to say. Tesla might have a cultural issue are they looking at more established companies that have really invested in the people in the culture and getting them to transform it scale as these companies here get to these places they need those kind of role models, which maybe they're not thinking, they it's interesting from a cultural perspective because if you think about raising a pirate flag outside of your company and rallying a really small team to be better than those stupid people over in Detroit or the stupid people up in Seattle or the stupid people in New York because we're smarter better. And doing something that is actually if you've built a company or a product that achieves growth in scale doing that and not g scale, but like San Francisco stale like that's different sale. When you make that transformation. And how you make that transition actually becomes pretty challenging it does and you have to keep renewing yourself, and you still need those pirates within and that even test jobs finally took some Microsoft money. Yeah. But it's a fine balance. If you're leading these scaled companies that you need both you need the people who can help you the sort of precision operations and you need to constantly received the pirates. And I think you look at these big companies. I mean, jeez classic case. It's it's in a tough place right now. It's a really great company. But you know, you could say could move faster the complexity of that company. I don't think people outside for sure and even inside appreciated the complexity that came with all that scale, and how hard it is to reboot as you reflect back on your nearly thirty years at at GE or at NBC and GE are there moments or there are there inflection points that as you fast forward a decade to today. Hey, where know the complexity and the challenges are actually a little bit overwhelming story, you how do you think about it? What's what's your sort of assessment? And also, what's one practical thing that is you look back on any of us listening to this tonight or in the audience can kind of take away as we think about the story of GE. I think that you don't get to be one hundred and twenty five year old company without knowing how to transform yourself. So there are always highs and lows, and they're always going to be that. And you always have to there has to be some part of the company that believes tomorrow is going to be better than than today. And so are you making room for that? And I could point to show you right now, if I were to take you to even del Ohio where they're creating the future of aviation and manufacturing they three D printing and metal and.

CEO tesla GE Eric Ries New York NBC Beth Comstock GM Jack Dorsey Microsoft Wells Fargo Amazon apple Ohio congress Gina San Francisco WalMart Silicon Valley
"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"My family's stories are just unbearable ten years in jail, like real shit. I've, you know, but it's interesting. I've always kind of leaned there. I gotta tell you being an f. student like like, I I have so heavy into the underdog thing, and it just makes so much sense to me and what I actually what. So mazing is the internet for real? No. Like we, I don't think we've quantified this yet. It's going to bring such an advantage to people that deal with adversity on the come up and it's such a disadvantage to entitlement, fake environment. You're in trouble adversity. You're going to win because the platform rewards merit. Yeah, going to be very interesting. It's gonna get real interesting. Yeah. Well, I think it's interesting. Meritocracy is not real. It depends on who sets the standards, and I think I just clued into that in the past few years. This says, you see that. I mean, certainly the metoo movement. Women are been seeing this for a while who Sepah standards. I once did a panel with somebody out of Silicon Valley and he said, you know, we're not going to lower standards and that's why we don't have any more women. And I was like, who set the standards? How do you know the standards couldn't be higher if you had more women? But this is why I tell all my anybody who feels that they're being not not at the seat at the table. AK anybody who is an. Old white. Male, right? I basically say the same thing to them like, fuck them, don't play their game. Go create your own fucking game. You own it. The internet. Go cut like, right, like you're not getting money from Vectra capitalists. Go get money from high net worth individuals like a more creative, don't play the game, like nothing back to like some themes here. Bainer media was built on the fact that I didn't play the agency game. Like I just didn't know it's driven you, I think, hundred percent. You know, I love that about you that you're still trying to disrupt the and there's not much left to disrupt for some of them, but you're right that you're still like that hunger like I know a different in a better way to do it one hundred percent because it's very real. Right? Like you're on the right side of his. Yeah, and because I'm building this machine for myself, I remember you like when you were trying to get more into advertising, like just give me a shot, you're shot. We're going. Our credit is going to be the best and if it's not, we're gonna come back and make it the best and you did. Like you just kept working. I don't think people appreciate that is what it takes. I think that's right. I think I'm so glad to wrap up here in a minute. I'm I'm just so grateful that you told that Ted Turner story. You can't imagine. I'm going to clip that. I think you're gonna change a lot. I don't think I have a very deep understanding of what's going on with communication right now. I don't think you understand. I'm telling you, don't you're going to be so pumped because we're in talk about this nine years. You don't know what that did. Well, okay. I'm telling you about this thirty year old thing Beth, like like I'm telling you there's been such a broken narrow. Interesting. And I just pulled some photos of myself when I was thirty because there is something in my head about that was that story. But it's interesting. You're saying that now for me now that you're saying that I'm thinking thirty was a big year from and you know, we got unlucky, and I'll say, I wish you were thirty one or thirty two. I don't even even narrow in the net. It's this almost everybody in this entitled environment thinks that they have everything figured out at twenty six. Twenty nine thirty two thirty one. Meanwhile nobody has anything figured out ever now. I mean I was I had I by thirty. I had been married and divorced and had a kid and was working on my second marriage and on my way to a second kid and I didn't know what my job was going to be..

Beth Ted Turner Silicon Valley Vectra Bainer media one hundred percent hundred percent thirty year nine years ten years
"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"I am blown away by people spending all their time trying to convince the knows because it's like a fulfiled prophecy such Cisco device. I tried to build my reputation as someone who is open to anyone with a good idea. And I have people who would just call me with a semi Grady mail. And I'd say, I want to see you. I'm rare. I'm rare, but to your point, we are out there a hundred percent. Did Karen make sense? Right? Yeah. Yes, that is so helpful. Thank you so much. Thanks for watching. Okay, good. Bye. What? What else should we cover? What should people know about this book? I really, I really do want the nation to go out and pick this up. I think this is going to Bank you. Yeah. I mean, I'm really trying to give people a pocket of encouragement to just grab mission and make change happen. Don't wait for one of my quotes that I love and there is like, who are you waiting for to tell you? It's okay. Did the pure tonight to keep going? No, your mother, he's going well, your boss, your mother, Yoda, right? I mean, who are you waiting for your who you're waiting for? So yes, that's the basic and I just share little hacks of things I did and story in there that you said this one was on me. You see, we're starting to talk before we did the phone call about taking ownership and when it was easy to say it was him what gimme the, oh, well, no. I mean, I have a particular chapter in there about the last time I was at NBC and it was a very tense time. And I literally had just real arguments with one of the people I had to work with, and I share them there and I share it in the in the book. Yeah. And did they reach out to you? Not yet, no. But what I had to do was to go back and go put myself in his position. Imagine him at the time the business wasn't doing well. I look like a competitive threat that have been pitted planted from headquarters. That's right. I was challenging hind a tradition with the cool kid approach to digital, and I was coming in a bit like, I'm not good with all this these digital tools. Imagine that and me coming in there, and I didn't have that perspective then, and I wished I had. So that's some of what I was trying to do for you at this point and you've talked about it the medically through here. Either you're born with it, it can develop. But once you actually tap into empathy, you can become unstoppable. The reason I didn't get mad that nobody wanted to this day. The reason I can deal with how much pushback I get because I have to have empathy for I have a specific personality type that on initial consumption is going to turn off people in by the way. I, I need to say this. I wish I didn't. You know, I, I know it's one of you reacted my team, not listen. You get all the pros of being a character, but what you lose is you start to become disproportionately underestimated in your intellect. Nothing is ever talked about how smart I am like this. Is this why you couldn't have Bill what you built without being smart? Yeah, but it takes a while for people to wrap their head around that. Right. That's exactly right. But it takes time plus you have to build it each during the game. Yeah, yeah. To have the appetite to eat shit. Like to me, I like being, doesn't it give you a bit of a competitive advantage when people underestimate you Beth. It's the greatest gift of all time. I nip Yah, late mice. I continue suppress my own success because I think it's that big of advanced. Yeah, I, I think I can relate. I think as a woman in business, I had something similar in the sense of I had to work extra hard. I had one hundred, but I also think as a creative person that I had to fight against that, but being a woman, I was perhaps allowed to be a bit more creative than I think sometimes in certainly in business world, creative men may have a harder time expressing their activity. I think. That's right. You know, it's funny. I looked at a, you know, it's really interesting because I'm an immigrant because I was born this country because Boyd being Jewish and eastern Europe, post World War Two..

Bill Cisco Grady Karen NBC Europe Boyd Beth hundred percent
"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Shit because we got it and with our kids to, we can't have him have all the answers. Lot people like that's what I do to my team. I don't tell in the unintimidated and he's any runs my team. I don't even talk to do I talk to you. Like I am, but that's the that's the future. How do you figure it out. It makes it difficult because he doesn't talk to. No, because Huck because I have to lose and win all my own learn. Yeah. And then if Gary license often, you'll hear about it, but that's also the candor that you need right? The end up super like, I'm the, I delivered vinegar with like Honey in and Honey outright. Like the way I manage is like, look, let's put this into context. I fucking love you and cannot believe what you're doing now real quick with the fuck where you thinking about that dumb shit. And then like by the way you fucking killing it. Let's keep going right. I'm like, because that's the truth. Yeah, it's the truth and, but the failure thing you mentioned you're putting it out there, but we what? What is it? We have this fail fast fail small like no one. Really. You can't just fail fast and fell small. You have to take real risk. And I. He's a little to your point. It's just people aren't willing to take risks these days Beth because we're living in one big fake environment right now. We bailed ourselves, we should just becoming out of a depression. Let's let's really, let's talk about America key. I don't want to speak. This is where I really to your question or your statement. We should just becoming out of a recession, a deep recession. We bailed ourselves out. The last seven to ten years is my world now in your close to it because you were a leader from corporate world which is startup culture is where I'm going Beth were still in the midst of a world where somebody goes to a liberal arts school is wired into the ecosystem of wealth, pops out, never sold a thing or has a business bone in their body gets funded comes to smart for me. You didn't let me build it up. Literally comes up with an idea. Not only do they get funded. It's worth four million dollars twenty two years old. You thought of something. Nine hundred ninety nine thousand billion cadrillion out of almost every time. It's a bad idea, but it is now worth four million dollars and people that are fancy and smart, and Beth and Gabby give you money to. I mean, we are in a fake, fuck it's like, look, you know, you're busy, but like I've evolved quite a bit through, yeah, you know, you real great to send the height of my career in Silicon Valley. I started an agency. Let's start there before. Even my ablution actions. Two thousand nine. I have all. The leverage and I go sort of client service business. All my silicon villagers matter what you wanna talk about light bulbs to like, you can raise one hundred billion dollars and make to you. What are you doing to go to go make pitch big tweets for Linda Boffa g like this. This is what was going on in the backdrop. I just wanted to be fractional. I just didn't wanna fake environment. I just wanted to operate. Yeah, I'm like the way you're framing that of the fake environment. I think he's really good one and why we lot and business to. I mean this, you know You know where. what really plays and this is where in our little ecosystem, are you wanna talk about our kids? You have older kids. If you ask me the biggest fear, I have fake environment. Let me tell you what's really going on. This is just deep and I want to get this off because I'm so passionate that feels like the right time to talk about it. There are people out there who have startups, whose daddy or mommy is underwriting quietly. The only two people that know sometimes is mom and the son, not even the dad knows that they're kicking cash to keep it alive. 'cause the mom or the dad, or the kid, or the boy or the girl, they all like the facade that little Johnny's doing well moms kicking cash because she wants her friends to think we're son or daughter is the next Mark fucking suck they environments and then kids compl- kids complain like my parents fucked me up, but then don't take the money and I'm talking about the gym pass.

Beth Huck Silicon Valley Gary Linda Boffa America Mark Gabby four million dollars one hundred billion dollars twenty two years ten years
"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Fifteen thousand. I would tell you a ton of people. So I'd go from, you saw what happened and they bought at the top with credit cards because I really saying you have two hundred thousand and I'm getting emails because I'm me, I'm horrible there. Do you know what paying twelve percent interest on one hundred thousand on the thing that's underwater? Why did they do that? Because they want to buy a plane 'cause they wanna be success. So anyway, I don't know. I'm sorry, this is the purpose of this format for different stories. This is a powerful to me. Maybe I'm reacting to it. You at thirty just happy to say Hello. Yeah, and I I bring it up because it is that moment where you're pushing yourself to do something, you're not comfortable with? Yes. As a reserved, shy person. I realized I was standing in my own way to, you know, I mean, I I would go to meetings and people didn't know who I was. I'd worked at this guy for a year and you didn't who I. Was. I mean, it wasn't like his. I wasn't in office every day, but we're in the mix. I was in the mix, but yet I wasn't taken advantage of it. And so there are those moments when you gotta say like I'm holding myself back, and that was one of those moments. For me words, you know, you're grabbing your own agency like I gotta do this good for you, and then the momentum built. And then momentum builds from there. And you know, I, I've used that approach getting over introversion. I'm really the life of the party except the that, and I go to a event and everybody's meeting, hey, I'm, you know. And I'm the first one over by the chip bowl or at the back of the room, and I've had that's another another place I've had to say, okay, I'm going to go meet one person. I would never probably come in you, but I would go find somebody else who looked like they were okay talking to me. And then the next two people, then the next time, then I'd say now I'm going to go talk to Gary v and but that's after the behavior modification is after ten times. I'm finally the confidence and less awkward to do that. A love this real quick. 'cause now speed up a little because I want to get the book and a couple of questions. So from CNN game now, speed up the episode one. So I worked. I worked in a couple of different. I worked at CBS and it came back to NBC and NBC. I worked at NBC news. It was a formative job for me. I love that job is one of my best jobs ever. The news division had undergone a real issue that they almost blew up the whole news division because of scandal in for me, it was one of my most, what I loved about it was entrepeneurship and I think that was my waking that you can be an entrepreneur. Ou're and a big company and really kind of created a path for me. And then I worked my way through NBC ended up going to g I got a call one day John. What was the last job you had an NBC? Well, I went to g came back a couple of times. My last job was I led a digital media at NBC, and I oversaw ad sales and then new stuff and new things were I village and Hulu. So we had one that didn't go so well in one that went really well keep going, then Jack, and then I well, before that I, I got on the radar and Jack Welsh called me up to his office one day and said, I want you to come and work GE. That was the last thing from my mind. Sure. I was going to be a media my whole life. Why would I go to g definitely, and he was on his way up to Jack Welsh. The icon this up when he hadn't quite hit the big time when he was he was CEO. He had said he was going to. He was important. The company was doing well, he was going to retire in four years. And in that four years I worked with him, he really sorta became superstar CEO of his day. And I learned a lot from that opera. Unity..

Jack Welsh NBC CNN Gary CBS GE Hulu John four years one day twelve percent
"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Some crazy successful people are going to roll up on me and be like one tweet you made like, I can't wait. Eight for Beth Comstock to come up to me and say, this is crazy. No, I know I didn't see your light. I saw mid-career, let's say, but I was just too. I like, I don't know. I was just like, what do I say? Like, hey, you say, hey, Diane, Sawyer. Do you remember in one thousand nine hundred something I shadowed you. And I think the biggest question, she's your right to your point. She'll probably not remember she. No, she might because you like, here's where life's awesome. You might have said something weird Does. there. Because he didn't say anything, but no, I was a good girl like, no. When I say, I apologize. I use funny. I use words in not the right way. You might have said something that caught her attention or started a thought, or maybe that day later at home, something that made you remember maybe wearing blue shoes and something like maybe you have, you know you now have to do this, right. Yeah, I know the cats out of the bed. Yeah, I do know that how many people were watching live on Facebook good can the three hundred fifty people on Facebook right now tweet both Beth Comstock and Diane Sawyer and tell them what's going on right now. Thank you. Yeah. But she had great advice Serie when I met her. She's true. Yeah. She said because I was like, I want to be reporter. She's, here's what I want you to do. I still remember because this is the impact people like you have on going young people. And so she was like, my brother was graduated from high school that night, and she said, okay, here's what I want you to do tonight. When you're brother's graduating, you have to have perspective. You can't go and get your brother. You have to assume he's not your brother, what? What's he doing there? What storage are you telling? And I again, like that two hour session just meant the world to me. That was awesome. Yeah, so I never, I never, I never, but that was a pattern for made news. We fixed it. Yeah, we did fix it, fix it. Go ahead. Tell me more than this pattern. I mean, this one I put in the book in the sense that I shared a very similar version of this. When I worked at CNN for a year. You see an I worked at CNN for two years. What years? We've been night early nineties and it was during the first Gulf war that's like for all the youngsters. That is the moment that CNN during the first Gulf war because it was twenty four, seven, full access. It was almost the closest thing I could tell you to the internet. It was a twenty per being my generation translator. Yeah, I'm trying to help these kids, but so Ted Turner, who was at his day, the swashbuckling Steve Jobs of the media world is that day they disrupted traditional media's and I did PR for a k. on occasion for him. And I worked there for a year and he didn't know my name. And so I decided it was going to change all that. And I finally got up my nerve chips on shoulder. So unlike Diane Sawyer, where I never said, Hello, I finally got up my nerve and I picked the worst time possible. I saw him going into the men's room. We were at the UN flat getting an award. He goes into the men's room and I go, now's my chance. As one does..

Diane Sawyer Beth Comstock CNN Facebook UN Ted Turner reporter Steve Jobs two years two hour
"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Ages me everybody's Gary Peterson episode to ninety. One of the ask Gary show. I'm super excited about this. We have somebody who I've gotten to know very well in my professional career in the last last decade or so. Somebody admire quite a bit from afar and really, really interestingly, and this is fun for me to say, and it's fun for me to say with you in the room. I think I'm starting to kick of saying nicer saying things I believe that are nice about people to them because I don't think we do that now. That's nice. You'll like this. I think, Beth, I admire you so much through the eyes of others, but it's amazing we because of the circles we run in for a lot even entrepreneurially, an author and personalities and corporate collide into people that we both know. There's a lot of people that we both. A lot of them are meat for the first time or things that nature however gets brought up over the last five or six years. The one thing I've noticed is the way people talk about you behind your back with no vested interest is awesome. It's like, I so dream about that's what's happening with me. And so maybe that's why I take. No, that's nice thing. Hear you were at the top if people if I came out with a list of like top people, rankings that are having nice things said about them behind them back with no vested interests because people say nice things about people, but it's a move and I can't Asterix. So I know when that's happening a lot. Thus it makes me like you even more than I like you by myself and I see what you're consistent regardless of the scenario. So that's the intro I want to say, you got a new book come. I didn't ask you coming out outing out, cutting out. It's coming out Tuesday, September eighteenth, amazing. So here we are, and thank you for the blurb. Thank you for asking me. I was super flattered, we're gonna get into it in a minute. So Beth Comstock is in my opinion, dynamic force in communication executives and just human. I'm going to let her do her jetted that bar. If this was the, this was comic book. Number one, who are you? And I'm talking like I was born like, who aren't? What is you give me three or four minute. I love context. I think it frames up everything and I'd like to get three or four minutes out of you on like who you are, like from coast to coast? Yeah. Well, I like that. You know, I was born because I grew up in a small town in Virginia, and my parents came from West Virginia. So you know, we talked about the southern accent, so that was that was the upbringing in West Virginia real. Yeah. No, my great uncle started a newspaper franchise in West Virginia called the West Virginia hillbilly. So I have real deep hillbilly roots. So there you go, so. But I grew up in Virginia..

West Virginia Beth Comstock Virginia Gary Peterson four minutes four minute six years
"beth comstock" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on Adlandia

"As beth comstock has always said they feel like permissions granted on that note we'll be right back atlantia listeners know better the most that when it comes to reach you want to reach the right people npr reaches more than just a number or millions of impressions or downloads it's about connecting with the right audiences in the right place take npr's radio reach with more than thirty million listeners each week broadcast remains the most common way people access npr and while cross commercial radio listening among younger audiences down by double digit percentages year over year npr continues to see its strongest growth in radio listening among people ages eighteen to twenty four so you're brand message reaches fathers and their daughters on the radio this reach is redefined and this is npr npr for brands visit npr dot org slash four brands to see what npr sponsorship could do for yours and we're back in the studio with brad grossman the founder and ceo of zych guide the oracle to the industry welcome wow i don't who is the oracle the brower so where what is the site guide and how did you become this guy to the psychiatrist xikai means guy to this guy st okay got it site guys which many people don't know with the real meaning is of it but zeitgeist means spirit of the times german with zych guide is basically we guide super busy executives on what they need to know so that they could lead themselves towards what's next year the coach design guys coach got it yes yes we guide them through are constantly changing cultures so their best prepare for the future yeah my brother's business guy sued makes me kinda say that.

beth comstock npr brad grossman founder and ceo zych
"beth comstock" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on Adlandia

"She uh it's the teamwork it's that ref in a team and think of those sessions i mean you're you're you it's to me there's no place i'd rather be it's just that energy and the give and take and the ideas and it's not whose ideas great it's just let's get this out of the taste so i love that i would to tell you the truth it wasn't giving my time it was very selfish mall it was amazing and i think it is a kind of in my mind uh arkia type pray for leaders um i'm not sure that in general people feel like if they have an idea or they have a a or their passionate about something that their leadership is going to understand it or even give enough time to it to sit down and work it through with them and i think that that's really special i mean to you uh you know looking around at a lot of leaders you've matt do you think that there's more of that in our personal side of business that needs to happen added i in a big way i have this um i do this often called change makers book club we love if it yeah i echo of i did one with thirty and our gala as microsoft and dumb i i thought it was so unique his perspective varies leading with empathy and talking about it he winning his son was fascinating leising and putting it in a book and at one point is said to him but you have to understand see who's told talk like you yes how is that and so i think hopefully you'll see more people i mean he's doing the companies doing well he's hiring great people so i think use you when you see people like that is so unique and they i think the more they get celebrated hopefully the more it will encourage other leaders to step forward and lead with empathy what are the lessons and leadership i mean obviously you've worked with leaders governments dignitaries all around the world is there a common denominator you talked about looking for patterns um that you found that really especially in in the world of brands and and marketing and advertising that you say like this is what i know recipe for success is for a leader will i think a good leader who has a good brand.

microsoft
"beth comstock" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"beth comstock" Discussed on Adlandia

"We are so excited to have fresh books stick it out with us through the end of the year there cloud accounting software that helps you tackle your paperwork faster and we're about to close the books so you can spend more time building momentum in your business and getting ready to go crush it in 2018 for your 30day free trial good afresh books dot com slash at landi an enter a deal a n d i a and how did you hear about a section i'm of my game to the no you're not as true people are going to have to start making that i think we're gonna be talking about this for a long time when you program for everyone you program for noah i think it's that were purpose driven platform like we're trying to get to substance how as the you happy with that yeah this is marketing therapy rate they've really is what's up on laura currency and i'm alexa christon welcome back to add land ee episode 2003 happy holidays holiday were right in the thick of it when are we in the thick of it it's also true it's been quite a year we been an amazing year amazing so many fabulous conversations insightful feedback phenomenal audience yeah we are obsessed with our atlanta community which just continues to grow and inspire us in all the feedback and conversations that were having on social has just been um pure inspiration for all of the questions and guests that we have had in so we can't think all of you enough for sticking this out with us over the last ten months while the months i think atlanta is taking over that's right 28 eight and but that said we also know that the industry is super volatile right now there's lots of change there's lots of questions every right and talking about the media bubble yeah there's digital companies that are.

accounting software noah atlanta ten months 30day