19 Burst results for "Besseges"

"besseges" Discussed on The Light Inside

The Light Inside

06:22 min | Last month

"besseges" Discussed on The Light Inside

"Projecting that filter of what they feel and see out of expectation in situation. Sometimes it's barely the projection of past experience of our own done it's the projection of beliefs authors. Leaving green gifts you learn by those environments winging living grow in those environments we've all forth from. Yes if we constantly hear those besseges. Tell us contradictory to our true joy bags true beliefs. We often start the one thousand percent. So here's the deal. We start off as children with eve. Beautiful believes in our selves in our abilities. That's why some of us are. Like i wanna be superman. I wanna be wonder woman right. Like i wanna be amazing characters. Steve because we see that straight within ourselves you know unfortunately broken down by life. Parenting teachers older siblings appears. They'll break you down. You tell somebody. I wanna be wonder woman. You can't be no wonder woman you ate at enough vessel right like you hear all these being than you're like own my god i. I guess i can't will. What's the next best thing i can do. We start to diminish ourselves. Dim are light is what i like to call it. Other people in the thing about it is that's why getting back to loving yourself is so important because everything that we've been through it has dimmed are light. And so that's why in my book standing your light. Chapter two is all about love for cells. It's my longest chapter in the reason. It's having after because it's the most important to dish. It's the foundation. And if you're looking at you know if you've heard all your life. I mean you know not to not to put all my little business out there but like my mom used to tell me your older sister says you're younger. Sister steve's you are just not a saver and so i went about my life thinking i wasn't a safer and so every time i would get money. What am i doing. i'm spending it. I can't see. I'm not a saver right. This was a story. I believed myself and so in my hat in that hook i talk about getting into the mirror. Getting reacquainted with that person. You've always wanted to be and it starts with a you know for me. I mean for you. it'd be hello handsome me. Are you doing do fat love for yourself bat distant like you were defined a new relationship and you're dating according this person you're waking up to good morning like the first you said right good morning and all this other stuff getting a mirror intel yourself that we'd idols that relationship right. Good morning gorgeous. How you doing today and then you can go into affirmation of what it is you want to do what it is you want to be. Remind yourself you wouldn't even have the affirmations if it wasn't already within you that affirmation wouldn't even resonate with you so you must remind yourself k. So it is highly important to get in the mirror to reacquaint yourself with that fabulous person staring back at you. If the moment that you do that you could do anything. You can be anything because you are in control. You've creator of your destiny. Such a really reminded immediate that role that that self talk often plays. Yeah so often. It's going on in the background of our d- reaffirming we do not what to become Simply stepping back into that light to sing. This is the true voice of what i wish in hope. In what can desire to become and then living metrics as when thousand percent step back Chatanooga bad because that is where you belong. You don't belong in the dim light ninna now. None of us belong at a dim light. I don't care if you say. I'm shy introverted. No baby but you still got your own language in. That light is where you belong. And so i mean. I don't know if you've ever noticed some people who really shy but then there's certain spaces where they shine. Yes there's certain spaces where you go into that space with them and you're like oh my god. You're amazing kicked the nerd. Nerd maze not shine in the b. classroom setting. But you get that nerd alone in their. You know their and i'm saying to be to just generic. I'm sorry. I'm not trying to act like robotics right until they get into the their robotics community. Nba shine you know or the person that cheerleaders. She may do terrible like my daughter team. She's terrible at when she gets into her tears section she shine and so it's just a matter of finding you're shining light space and standing back in that light. That's where you belong. That like is the subtle difference between that nouri story in that story of switching to owning that becoming a train kinks on. Now you know. Steve jobs probably wasn't popular in high school tanaka in line. Honey each shy. okay. I'll follow. The i i mean. We can't live without him today. The matter of binding where you shine they say. What was it richard branson. He didn't even graduate high school hunt. He he didn't even graduate but now he runs burgeon. So there's just so many things that just finding where you shine in standing right in your light you will do nothing but sore. Just get so scared. Like i feel like this is where i i'm supposed to be but i don't shine here. Betty better find so in your book standing in.

Steve steve intel nouri Nba tanaka Steve jobs richard branson Betty
"besseges" Discussed on Papo de Fotógrafo

Papo de Fotógrafo

08:35 min | 5 months ago

"besseges" Discussed on Papo de Fotógrafo

"With. You can't freaking on as how do you do. The is also you. Bain kleanthi elmes between those songs. Scientists as an uncle maslum partner mile a personalized. These is these much foam. My own lethem women's abuse to sadio. I say donate By the medina spitting hated momentum partner mouse season no spittle solitude regime mice keno thing is to say the most though solar energy to our pricing fica oriented and forget or back not allow. Anybody could must be talking to the way. Kicker is hitting rumors as you probably to learn how prepared to not to our team. Right as such as louisiana's these mice. I say not to almost of ood guide. Report the formal sphere yet. He does us to keep the no need. Dannebrog blue has safeen. Alpha delta outbound sales are cpap themes be guilty on manga beckoned. Couple of spending. Masami mccall gotta get online again on. Those batted wa samples for local. Like a man. Do i meet you. you're moment uefa. Muslims amendments don Featuring waigel facing. I mean a stone. My salsa made the and this has the quake keeping so don't believe that if he hits the thickness mind the bianchi every minute spitting in san diego to los angeles five told me think-i te'o or satan ahead sociale eating louder voice dismantle bogus. Pogo sewn do premature ballots simply mayor napkin jessica pasta or she mortem poker minds. Australia's cut through g. Now is that the update stink. Yeah if i thought was the now defeated needham is that the could answer Game photographer in some photos. Regains lanes kazakina three times. What people identify process towards the disciplinary pie to comic for zero vs. Nancy l kicks happening there forcing our ceo stress. Oh besseges log the ah fatal melinda feelings mc safe our push who is your age range each page of my for myself. Sieff sofala phase keys. The bus stench camis kale for inferring zone. Savvy own the respect you said. You don't mean that they can run tom. Tv difficult batted zeal Drinking these mice inviter gets fussy that you can eat on the mecca. We'll get paid for myself about a vast him back issues out so very vitus. Visited new dolby Defeated argues is. If i may say see evista using my theon focused on scene. I after resume. Appropriate cities eat though awfully miserable. Vivian kilo could be is operatives angel and one with a history of cows. Walkout boys the malvo the video. And i think you'll find the home from dior. jesus As she to they can go. 'super internet courses keyboarding modera complex. Which brings for me. So thank you soclean's district permit. They'll do mean daily sabih own lepore g. o. kelly meters daily mementos interested so unique was seen paint vault and on pain despair working day shamir. They who inc bucs zena. But i want to kick conseil mccoy's setup brought to prepare for the movie just the home optical principle massages after no. It's called thumb with seems to give us sign of naval. Say thank you cares. All deputy nothing see for james is as support for duplicate for very rarely author. Thank you john. Loudon thought he'd there's fine. Ema gina photographer most echinacea larvae sash kalvitis. That in the hippie cheated the character thinker owned by muscle. Kimani blood cell. But i don't know. I know i to the i remember so you about the bouquet little i mean i saw that they need to. They don't seem to case. Was that care for the was. The gay kidding may to kick out. The don't go isn't will sit. They'll visit by domain so let's see the authors how the other looming that that does not zeev vade omen a lookout is because some vike his speed to keep in his paid to me provided the photographer important tool mice in his speech makita landline speedily. But i will say team. Aboard inch fica and chain kizzee's totem mainframe to system performance tonight thirty think suburbia manta to g g. Jiffy l. catching on say to the teacher.

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"besseges" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:59 min | 11 months ago

"besseges" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"It's thanksgiving weekend within two tomorrow. Thank you for tuning in. Because that's what we have mostly to be thankful for is our audience. I'm dave grave line. I'm chris grave line. We are thankful for folks tuning in because it's our twenty fifth year on the air and we couldn't do it without our audience obviously and we're even more thankful when those tune in that Call in to the show and participate on the program. Because it makes a huge difference when you in fact use cameron's mantra come win stuff. Thank you then thank you. Because he's right when you call in win stuff it's that easy and you can do so either by calling eight hundred eight nine nine into or using our free into tomorrow app and we love sending you prizes when you hear you on the air. F- this portion of into tomorrow is brought to you in. Part by hughes net high-speed satellite internet available where you live or text radio to thirty five thousand from our info again text. The word radio. Two three five zero zero zero history. The largest and oldest. Here's chris grave line historic passed in nineteen seventy-one the funk stallone was officially renamed internationale funk oust along or ifa in short with exhibitors from all over the world philips and grundig showed the prototype of the world's first video cassette recorder based on vcr standard. The tape was housed in a set with two loops of tape. One top of the other a timer and alarm clock was built in record. Time was up to an hour. That's this week's efe update brought to you by berlin. Be sure to visit. Ifa dash berlin dot com. Be sure to do just that now. Nick saban who is the ceo and founder of future candy an innovation agency from hamburg. Germany had an interesting. Ifa talk and of course our team that was covering audio and video for us in berlin captured. His talk and one of the more interesting keynote titles at for this year was called from jesus to hyperloop this part of the shift mobility event and it certainly caught our attention. It was presented as i mentioned by nixon the ceo and founder of future candy. He says there are. They are an innovation agency and in his talk. This gust the past present and future of the travel industry. Two thousand years ago. The everett's person in its entire life span only lift in the south of one hundred fifty kilometers. Jesus christ only moved around in a radio seven hundred fifty kilometers and last year of it we could take a plane. They are still. It only took us forty five hours to get around the globe and there was also because of one plane that is being discontinued this year. The seven seven from boeing. The plane that frank the world so mobility is one of the main things in our entire life. It means everything. Trevor and mobility is one of the main needs of human beings and of course the travel industry is one of the oldest around and like many industries it continues to evolve once an industry is gone. It never cease to exist. It's always continuing the only important besseges. The technology changes so here. We had in the beginning and eighteen hundred. We had railroads and now we have hyperloop. So transportation and mobility is a very dynamic sector and then but the main problem of all of us here in our brains. we have fifty years of advertising. Spend from the from the car industry fifty years. The kind of stories have told us we have to own a car. So this is why we all still desire. Many of us still desire to buy a car. But i say this changing i say now here onstage. In three years time more and more people would say okay. I spent eight thousand euros or dollars. I spent on owning a car every year. I take this money and spend it on other things each scooters bikes kaas herring all these other things one of the things. Nick related the mobility industry to its entertainment. And the fact that the more choices we have the more we will take advantage of so in the nineteen seventy s people spent only three hours consuming media and now in the two thousand people spend ten hours an average per day in germany using media unbelievably and that is because of more and more platforms. We had internet we had more by streaming the more platforms. We had the moment time. People who consume media we formally only had the car the public transport plane the bike and walking. Now we also have cast herring. We have east quotas we have. We have bikes hearing. We have all these new new inventions and they would make us more mobile. So we all benefit from this more fragmented view. The the more mobile boy. It's too bad he wasn't excited. He also talked about other ways. The industry is evolving like the fact. In light of the pandemic certain new careers have popped up. You need to employ hygiene engineers like this guy raymond wing. You need to take people killed on both because the need to sink. What do i do. Actually with era sold inside my means of transport with the surfaces. Do they clean themselves here. This guy he invented a new sucking system inside a cabin of an airplane so if a person sneezes in an airplane you see that all the germs and aerosol get sucked out in the bottom of the seats. So that's why no one can get affected just by some of anticipation rhyme and vang invented. This and people who did inside your business is now because the consumer will pay for hygienic. Clean mean of transport. One problem many of us living in larger cities have is of course traffic the sheer number of cars and cities like new york. Los angeles even here in miami causes a huge headache. One solution nick offers is a whole new way to plan cities. The reason why we all have cars is because the city planning was designed like this so now it's really coming for the western world to to own a car because most cities but designed to the sixties after the second world war so but the problem is is is of course. It takes a little space to other people in the car to people on the bike to an upheaval in bus. All in a train. You can see how much clever it would be to have. Everyone fitted into a train. We see that because of the new cities new transport and able to completely new city planning now and even the united states where we have a lot of car owners kyw us. This scientists say as full for bike has gone up hundred thirty percents. You can't buy a bike anymore in. Us.

berlin grundig Nick saban cameron philips hughes hamburg everett nixon boeing Trevor Germany Jesus christ
UN Chief on the release of the updated COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan

UN News

01:27 min | 1 year ago

UN Chief on the release of the updated COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan

"Six weeks ago the global coffee nineteen pandemic began to eat some of the world's most fragile countries. I asked governments to step up for the world's author vulnerable people in a spirit of solidarity compassion and for site. The response was prompt and generous. We now have more than half the two billion. Us dollars we asked for United Nations. Our NGO partners at achieving results. For those who need it. Most water and soap are being delivered to vulnerable. Refugees hospitals and clinics are getting support life saving information campaigns are reaching millions of people and the Global System of air links eastern sporting medical supplies and equipment to someone ended in twenty countries worldwide. We are ramping up to seven hundred flights months for cargo and besseges my message to the simple. We have made a good start now. We must built on it. We need six point. Seven billion dollars to protect millions of people and help stop the virus from circling back around the globe. Humanitarian aid is not just a moral imperative it is a practical necessity to combat the virus if covered nineteen rix faulk in the Buddhist classes. We are all risk. I heard your strong continued support for this appeal thank you.

Rix Faulk United Nations United States
"besseges" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Get adapting technology and tactics to stay one step ahead of the law. Rob explain. Happened for a while. But the numbers show that the number of senior scam is bullet rating using new technologies of especially the roll call and scooping technology that guys is area codes, and exchanges and make them look like whoa calls, and a computer Besseges and everything else, but they're increasing in number and more people, getting taken, at least according to the data and seniors of the easy target, senior everybody's vulnerable to be an especial target. And I think one of the reasons is because they're home. They have phone lines trusting their little uncomfortable with technology, and they also have said that when someone calls, you should answer, the phone and not let it go to voicemail. I think it's a sort of a leftover from the from the era before cellphones where. Most of the calls came from folks, you knew, you know, you open the story with this poor guy. And thankfully, as you said, it was a watchful supermarket manager who stepped in, but explain what happened there. Yeah. And I heard this story from the police chief in swamp Scott Massachusetts. Which is a town north of Boston. And they got a call from the manager or they local stop and shop and older gentlemen from out overland had gone there. And he had just taken twenty five hundred dollars out of the bay out from the Bank and tried to convert it into gift cards. He told them that someone social security had told him to do this, and had called and said that his uh compromise that you needed to pay, but he'll he would lose his, he could move identity is over security checks, and even about to do it. And fortunately, they sent over a couple of police officers, and they talk some sense into him, and he would say, but as cheap points out, many others do fall for these speak with rob Weisman staff writer at the Boston Globe. He's written a piece about how senior scams or proliferating are there, new tricks. I feel like the, you know, the phone call scam has been around for some time now, along with emails, I guess, are there other ones that are out there. The that's popular technology. Now they're able to you know, they're able to combine the robo call with, with scooping technology. So if you're in the six one seven area, code I n the will pop it'll pop up on your caller, ID one seven. And you'll think it's even as I three numbers of your own number was supposed to be somebody down the street where it could be somebody from Russia, India, or order or China wherever was calling, and, and then they very official Saudi voices and, and they say push water push to engage. If you actually follow their instructions, but there, also constantly refining the types of scams. One of the most popular now is the impostor scans of people posing as grandchildren. So they're calling older folks, and they're saying good in jail. Mexico and I need buddy don't tell parents, but I got caught with marijuana, whatever it is. And that seems to be something that, you know, hits the vocal chords. A lot of people, they did that you. Yeah, it doesn't probably like you but well little nervous now. Whatever. Broadway's men reporter at the Boston Globe thirty minutes now, after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. At bluecross blueshield, our companies take what we learned from covering one.

rob Weisman Boston Globe bluecross blueshield Boston swamp Scott Massachusetts Broadway marijuana America reporter staff writer Mexico Russia China India official twenty five hundred dollars thirty minutes
"besseges" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Efforts to prevent scams the wider the fraudsters, get adapting technology and tactics to stay one step ahead of the law. Rob explain. But the numbers show that the number of. Senior scams is proliferating. This was using new technologies, especially the roll calls and technology guys is area codes and exchanges and makes them look like local calls and across the top computer Besseges and everything else, but they're increasing number and more people, getting taken at least according to the data and seniors of the easy target seniors of everybody's vulnerable seniors to be an especial target. And I think one of the reasons is because they're home. They have phone lines trusting their little uncomfortable with technology, and they also have said that when someone calls you should answer, the phone and not let it go into boys, male. I think it's a sort of a leftover from the from the era before cellphones where most of the calls came from folks, you knew, you know, you open the store. Sorry. With this poor guy. And thankfully, as you said it was a watchful supermarket manager who stepped in. But explain what happened there. Yeah. And I heard this story from the police chief in swamp Scott Massachusetts. Which is a town north of Boston. And they got a call from the manager. Are they local stop and shop and older gentlemen from out over overland had gone there? And he had just taken twenty five hundred dollars out of the bay out from the Bank, and try to convert it into gift cards. He told them that someone social security had told him to do this and had called and said that is. Compromise that he needed to pay. But he'll he would lose his he could move identity is over security checks, and even about to do it. And fortunately, they sent over police officers, and they talk some sense into, and, and he would say, but as the police chief points out, many others do fall for these speak with rob Weisman staff writer at the Boston Globe is written a piece about how Senior Skins or proliferating are there new tricks, because I feel like the, you know, the phone call scam has been around for some time now, along with emails, I guess, are there other ones that are out there. The popular technology. Now they're able to you know, they're able to combine the robo call with, with scooping technology. So if you're in the six one seven, Eric coda. I n for will pop pop up, your caller, ID one seven. And you think it's even has a first three numbers of your own number supposed to be somebody down the street where Jack could be somebody from Russia, or India or or, or China wherever was calling, and then they very official Saudi voices and, and they push water push to price. Well, even gauge if you actually follow their instructions. Constantly refining types of scams. One of the most popular now is the impostor scans people posing as grandchildren. So they're calling older, folks. And they're saying, this is good in jail in Mexico, and I need buddy don't tell parents, but I got called marijuana, whatever it is. And that seems to be something that, you know, hits, the vocal chords, a lot of people they give it doesn't sound like you but well a little nervous now. Whatever is rob. Rob Weisman reporter at the Boston Globe thirty minutes. Now after the hour on.

rob Weisman Boston Globe Boston swamp Scott Massachusetts Eric coda marijuana Mexico reporter staff writer Jack China India official Russia twenty five hundred dollars thirty minutes
"besseges" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on KTOK

"That make those incoming calls, seem local and reporter, rob Weisman. At the Boston Globe says the more law enforcement and educator, step up efforts to prevent scams the Wyler the fraudsters, get adapting technology and tactics to stay one step ahead of the law. Rob explain. A while. But the numbers show that the number of. Senior scans is full of rating cameras that using new technologies most, especially the roll calls and speaking technology, guises area codes exchanges and makes them look like local calls and across go, prop computer, Besseges, and everything else, but they're increasing number and more people, getting taken at least according to the data and seniors of the easy target. Everybody's voluble seniors to be an especial target. And I think one of the reasons is because they're home. They have phone lines that Trump sitting there little uncomfortable with technology, and they also have said that when someone calls, you should answer, the phone and not let it go into boys, male. I think it's a leftover from from the era before cellphones where most of the calls came from folks. You know, you open the story with this poor guy. And thankfully, as you said, it was a watchful supermarket manager who stepped in would explain what happened there. And I heard this story from the police chief in swamp Scott Massachusetts. Which is a town north of Boston. And they got a call from the manager of a local stop and shop and older gentlemen, from overland had gone there. And he had just taken twenty five hundred dollars out of the bay from the Bank and try to convert it into gift cards. He told them that, that someone social security had told them to do this and had called and said that his uh. Compromise that, that he needed to pay this, but he'll he would lose his, his identity is social security, checks, and even about to do it. And fortunately, they sent over couple of police officers, and they talk some sense into him. And he was saved. But as the police chief points out, many others do fall for these camps speak with rob Weisman staff writer at the Boston Globe. He's written a piece about how senior scams are proliferating are there new tricks, because I feel like the you know, kind of the phone call scam has been around for some time now, along with emails. I guess are there other ones that are out there. The popular technology now in they're able to, you know, they're able to combine the robocall with, with scooping technology. So if you're in the six one seven area code, I n the will pop up on your caller, ID one seven. And you think it's even has the first three numbers of your own number down the street where it could be somebody from Russia, or India or order or China or wherever calling. And, and then, of course, a very official salary voices and, and they push water push to engage. If you actually, you know follow their instruction. Constantly refining the types of game, one of the most popular now is the impostor scans that people posing as grandchildren. So they're calling older folks and they're saying. This is your. Jail in Mexico, and I need money, don't parents. But I got caught with marijuana, whatever it is. And that seems to be something that, you know, hits the chords. A lot of people. Yeah. Yeah, it doesn't sound like you. But well I'm a little nervous now. Whatever is rob. Rob Weisman reporter at the Boston Globe thirty minutes now, after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Bluecross blueshield believe everyone should have access to healthcare, no matter who you are or where you live. That's why in every state are companies are working to improve health and expand access to care from training..

rob Weisman Boston Globe reporter Bluecross blueshield Boston Trump swamp Scott Massachusetts marijuana Mexico America official staff writer Russia India China twenty five hundred dollars thirty minutes
Akbar Ahmed Recounts the Train Ride That Changed His Life Forever

Tell Them, I Am

06:06 min | 2 years ago

Akbar Ahmed Recounts the Train Ride That Changed His Life Forever

"Could you tell me who you are? And what your best known for my name is Ahmed? I am a professor on campus at American University in Washington DC. I'm the chair was slopping studies, and I have over the course of my life, made films, documentaries written books. Being the puck sun, High Commissioner to London the story that we're focusing on is when you were a little kid, and you got on a train during partition could you take me back to that moment. Like what was happening? Well, it was nineteen forty seven it was the height of summer August wishes. Wishes, as you know, many races creeds religions that didn't have that inhabit subcontinent of India, that are two major nations, the Hindus and Muslims. Hundred billions and Muslims cannot fit categorize as minority. We are seventy millions in the northwestern and not eastern zones of India. We constitute a majority of seventy percents against the cost Hindus in these homeland. We want the division of India and the partition of India between two countries. India and Pakistan had been announced very faint memory of an incident, which is a blur. It may have happened. It may not have happened. But I recall a lot of noise, a lot of shouting, it was late at night, again, in the official house in these divisions superintendent houses huge that large lawns, and that literally dozens of officials servants bearing red, the red tunic and the under the and I recall a shouting yelling, and then I just walked out amongst. That's what's happening, then I recall everyone saying, get them in get him in don't, don't tell them. What's happening? And I had some idea that someone had died and someone at thrown someone into the well. Millions of people were seventy given a choice which country, they wish to live in a lot of Muslims in India decided to move to Pakistan, this new country, which Tintri exist, and many Hindus Sikhs living in what was Pakistan wanted to move to India, because people what he didn't were suspicious and fearful of their neighbors, and perhaps, the religious violence that was to come. My father was a senior official in the British railway system, and he opted was called opting, which country do opt for he opted for a Pakistan, and very quickly things began to develop those a lot of writing killing Muslims have been killed. So we had to very quickly, rather my father, I was just a boy for had to scramble to somehow get his small family, my mother three of us into the train and get us across the border. Now, that was simply said than done because everyone wanted to try to catch a train, there was no other transport with his new civilization. There's no airplanes buses stop because of the violence on both sides and not India, this huge swathes of territory was up in violence. It was it was like up into ethnic, and religious violence, and Michelle think of it, something like two million almost two million people died in this mad communal fury. Everyone seem to have gone mad. We were living in Delhi. Delhi was the capital. I have no idea with it was little evening. Have some sense that it may be late in the evening now in the thick of this crisis are train moved from Delhi through the job to the killing fields of the job on its way to the new capital Karachi and the journey was normally particular today's maximum. But because of the situation in the job and the violence, that was taking place on both sides. Remember, it's very important to understand that this is taking place on all sides. This journey took several days. And this is what these do the sides, the two sides that they would slaughter all the passengers on the train except the train driver. So in the train pollen into Karachi, the capital, punks or Delhi? The capital of India, the entire train would be of dead Besseges, except the driver. And my first memory is of being in a compartment in that train going through the killing fields of the job. I remember that color yellowish, because that is the color throughout it was kind of greenish yellow ish his in the Parliament, I remember my father saying again and again his finger on his lip syncing. Don't make a noise. Don't, don't even breathe get under the, the, the but the bottom, and I even thought to myself, then I'm just a little boy, I thought, if someone's looking for us, he's not going to be hard to find us because we have a leg sticking out of hand sticking out. Nanny headed evolve in his hand. He was very peaceful Bannon, always very warm in fiction to everyone is genius seniors, everyone, there's something so horrendous and frightening outside the compartment that my very peaceful father had to have a revolver in his hand. And the train would stop a lot. I remember this distinctly the train would move a little bit. And then suddenly, it would stop the jerk, and that became rather ominous and I would feel a lot of tension because that meant that the people blocking the train not lying to move and it meant that, that was danger.

India Religious Violence Delhi Official Pakistan Karachi Ahmed Washington Dc Commissioner American University Professor London Bannon Michelle Superintendent Parliament
"besseges" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"But also, there is just like the space of it is also the age of it, right. Like, maybe we are alive right now in a moment after the most populous time in the universe. Like, maybe everybody was alive a few billion years ago or maybe everyone's going to be alive a few billion years from now. But right now, we're maybe like the first one party or something or the last ones. Yeah. And that's the last element in the Drake equation, raise the probability that we're live at the same time to communicate. And you're right in terms of how long we've been around and listening to this guy, and talking to it. It's a tiny fraction of the life of the universe. And then you have to wonder like how long it's gonna be around. And receptive to Besseges is going to be fifty years, which is all we've had our or fifty thousand years, even still which would be tiny fraction. So you're right. It could be that life flourishes and intelligent, life is created and then destroys itself every time. And so that these things don't last very long which would make it difficult to talk to each other. Yeah, yeah. Oh, that's not very. Domestic. The idea that maybe life is super popular in the universe. But it all eventually like kills itself. That's right blows itself up in glorious fire like me, there have been other that followed the exact same steps, we have, you know, like all made cars, you're about to say that Donald Trump is inevitable. It's a universal truth that every civilization creates Donald Trump, eventually Trump is an alien that would explain a lot but. But at some point, also, eventually may be like, learn how to split the atom and the al-belita inevitably it's possible. But again, I think that's just extrapolation from our experience. You know that's the kind of things humans do. Right. So we like to think we'll probably everybody does that, but we really don't know. Right. Remember, we really have no idea. I mean, it could be that other aliens. Don't have such a defined sense of individuality. Right. I mean, we have this notion that I'm mean you are you and there's this biological difference defined by our skin. But that's a biological conclusion from biological artifact right was the skin that we have and other beings could be like more fluid. We're like the nature of individual depends on who's near each other. And so their concept of like resource sharing and therefore war is totally different. And maybe very unlikely that they kill themselves. We just don't know. But it's it's certainly possible that life is flourishing destroying itself air rapidly. I also thought the craziest idea that I read out, there was this idea that maybe the university teeming with life. But nobody wants to talk to us. We're in a bubble where they're like, let's not let's not even touch these guys or, or there's an idea out there that we're like zoo or something on a hate that I. I hate that it not because I think it's wrong. I think it's actually pretty reasonable in clever rating. Right. I mean I said earlier that meeting alliens would be dangerous. And I think they're probably would be that doesn't mean I wouldn't want to. I mean I would love to meet aliens. We could learn so much about the universe and physics and math in life. So if they're out there and could contact us and they're just not because we're lame. Boy, that would be pretty disappointing. That would be crushed Delia to our self image. So, I think it would become to know that we're not alone in this universe right like today, it's kind of like having an older sibling or something, you know, somebody who's been through it who sort of maybe has some more knowledge than we do. I think that would be cool. You're thinking that maybe it might be dangerous to contact other lifeforms. Absolutely. I think it'd be dangerous the history of contact between different cultures. Is that the more advanced one always crushes milissa advanced one? And if we're going to contact Ilyas more likely they're going to come to us, then we're. Going to get to them, which means they are the more advanced and, you know, that means right. I mean, think about the way we treat lesser intelligent creatures. We domesticate them, right? And chimpanzees don't have rights in our society, and we argue that they're listened elegant. We even eat some listen, telling creatures aliens come. We apply that same rally them and say, well, yeah, you guys are twice as Mars. So go ahead and make us your pets and eat. However, many of us you want. Right. I think that's the most likely I'll come. I see, like if you run into less intelligent species, you're most likely you're thought is, is not. Hey, let's bring these guys up and show them. All we can do more like this. As slave labor or something. Resources. Yeah. We've been traveling on for millions of years. Finally, we get to eat something warm. That's right. Roasted human, and that's my concern. And, you know, we have sent messages into space and I think that's kind dangerous like advertising where you are. And who you are? And the fact that you're pretty clueless. So imagine, for example, say the universe is teeming with life and nobody's contacted just because nobody knew we were here. And then we just on the edge of our technological capabilities to contact people. We announce ourselves. Hey, everybody look at us. We're totally weak and helpless. You know what's going to happen? Here. Exactly. Magic dropping a baby into the most dangerous neighborhood on earth. Right. Even cry. And then what's going to happen? We'll very unlikely. Somebody kind hearted is going to pick it up and take care of it. So again, I don't know if finding intelligent life in the universe is an optimistic or pessimistic, viewpoint. So it doesn't seem likely that we will ever contact or talk to learn live. So maybe the lesson here is that we should learn to be by ourselves in a way, you know, like, don't expect those Asian to save us or two destroyers made the lesson is to really kind of own being alone and take responsibility for our our existence here on earth. I think the best case scenario would be if we discover intelligent life in a we developed technologically, we move onto other planets. Maybe we explored the galaxy. We build those self replicating probes. Then we discover alien life, and we learn from them. I think that'd be the best case scenario humans to be the colonizers the Z's. Well, I hope by that time, you know, we will have developed a higher morality, and we will not take advantage of those squishy, little cute aliens, we discover on whatever planet but yeah, I think it'd be better. If we found them before they found us for sure. But I would also love to see. Another planet and media 'Lions and get to talk to them. But, you know, every time I see a science fiction movie where there's aliens. I'm always amazed at how it always takes six minutes for them to figure out how to talk to each other. Raise your hand part your your fingers. And that's it. May've long and prospered. Well, whether we are alone over one of many who out there and enjoy the experience of being and to our alien listeners. If you're gonna come to earth, please arrive gently eat something before you get here. Fill up. Thanks a lot. Still have a question after. Listen to all these explanations. Please drop us a line. We'd love to hear from you. You can find us at Facebook, Twitter and Instagram,.

Donald Trump Besseges alliens Ilyas Delia Facebook Instagram Twitter billion years fifty thousand years fifty years six minutes
"besseges" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:07 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Deal, but it is still plaguing. With limited hand, it's working for now, but it's unclear whether it will continue to work in the future. So when you creating policies to better compete with Russia in the Middle East, the US ought to take a step back and truly look at the challenge that's posed by Moscow. I need an essence. We need to make sure that we are not accidents making Russia ten feet tall in the Middle East. Russia is unable to supplant Washington as the primary security guarantor in the Middle East. It's not going to happen now. It's not going to happen in the future. Short any decision that Washington may make which I think is highly unlikely. So we need to recognize the existing limits of Russia's approach and rather than being reactive. We should look out over to long-term because Russia's limits are going to become more, pronounced and more clear over time. Dr Katz report, you suggest that strategic patience is one approach that the US might seek to adopt. I don't think it's a terrible suggestion. I think it's actually quite a good one. Just because Washington is father and five Russian activity in the region doesn't mean that necessarily needs to be countered. There's a lot that does need to be countered. So please don't get me wrong. But every single little thing shouldn't, and if we try to respond to it actually becomes a cost imposing strategy on Washington and something that is going to further constrain, what it is that we can actually achieve. Moore over the US hasn't used all the tools and it's toolkit yet, when it comes to dealing with partners in the Middle East caps sanctions, which was previously mentioned. One of the reasons why I don't think they've been used is because they are more likely to great our relationships with regional partners. When our best counter to Russia is to strengthen those partnerships. So in my opinion, staying the course and continuing our regional diplomatic engagements security cooperation, our economic partnerships with regional partners is the best way that we can compete against Russia in the region are consistent engagement with regional partners may actually reduce the amount of hedging that they tried to do with Russia, because Russia has made perhaps, maybe some of the most games related to the perception of US disengagement from the region or coming to engagement from the region. We need to continue to reassure partners that the US isn't going anywhere and not the focus of the national defense strategy on your care, conflict, and strategic competition with Russia and China does not mean to for pivot to Asia. Beca. Lahser with the rain corporation, live at the council very much. Very interesting perspectives. You're gotta take the moderators Braga and asked a few questions, pick up just where where you left off on the sanctions on the new station tools that we have on our cats. But also we have existing sanctions on Russia as well. So Katy, let me let me ask you first. What kind of Besseges are you trying to send with these new tools? How you communicated throughout the throughout the Middle East sort of question. One question two on. This is. Is the existing sections that Iran Russia? Sanctions are such an important tool of the Trump administration's policy on a variety of respects. Are we looking to enforce them with our partners as strongly as completely as we say, the Iran sanctions, or are they getting messages, that one matters more than the other question to Catherine Wego, Bargar acting assistant Defense Secretary first question on, on the new tools in particular, as I said, in my remarks, we try to be exceptionally clear to the region, and particularly when it comes to certain transactions that it is a tool. We will use. We've used it against China. We are honoring using against others. We have. There's some discretion involved. There's a there's a waiver that congress did give us in certain situations where we really want to use it at to address new relationship with Russia, not necessarily while while traditional partners with Russia. We wanna see them. Limiting that that that exposure over time. So really, that's why the four hundred in particular Turkey is such a monumental challenge for us. And it's also one that we've tried to be very clear to Turkey in particular, that it's not just in the executive branches hands on this one, are you with congress on a bipartisan bicameral vases, are pretty opposed to this potential transaction and will if we don't do the actions, they said they'll just pass a law. Make us do it. So we have sent that message. I think as clearly as we can numerous forum with respect to other partners in the region talk thinking about buying Vance Russian equipment. I think we have had some successes with just the mere threat of the being imposed particularly for again significant advance weapons systems that they're pondering contracting, four that it's a successful efforts, Russ to wore them. That kind of thing that we, we really can't allowed to happen. It's not just the economic. Relationships that it allows or the complication that provides the United States, but as I was trying to make our it's really not in their best interests to have defense relationship with Russia so much in the region security architecture and interoperability that we provide them, particularly on, let's say missile defense systems that once you introduced Russian systems really undermines our ability to continue helping them defend themselves. So that is something that we try to make very clear with respect to the existing sanctions. I think with respect to the ongoing sanctions against Russia. European nudity in particular against Russia post two thousand fourteen on the sanctions piece has been very key. We can send you to whether it be in a bilateral or multilateral basis with our European partners impress upon them the importance of maintaining those anxious until we see a concrete change in Russian behavior. That's sort of the Genesis of the Catholic sanctions as well. I certainly don't think there's any. Appetite in, in the administration to see one as more important than the other in terms of the fresher were applying to Iran with respect to the the sanctions there by the with respect to, to rush at this time. She's been radio programming from Thursday. WCS from Washington. Any thoughts on? How the. Countries leadership in the region will react to, to potential new sanctions regime. What are not going to like it? That is for sure. What I think is that. A certain sense, we have to make it clear. What things are not acceptable. I think s four hundred zero particular are not on the other hand, I think that we also do need to sort of let them realize on their own. Other words that if the Russians are telling we can help you with your audience at cetera. At some point are they going to produce? They argue that they'll tell you now that, yes, it was a mistake in nineteen sixty seven to have broken relations with Israel, this allow the US dominate the Israeli peace negotiations. But now the shoe's on the other foot that Russia can talk to everyone in America won't talk to certain actors there for Russia in the position to bring about resolution, and that argument might be very appealing except for one thing. And that is, it's not good enough just to be able to talk to all sides in order to bring about conflict resolution that resolution diplomacy involved a combination of carrots and sticks, especially. Carrots, which which Russia doesn't have, and I think, what's interesting what the Camp David accords. This nineteen seventy nine we, we have agreed to provide substantial economic assistance, Israel, Egypt, and we're still doing it forty years later Russia's not willing to do this. And certainly I've been to the all conference on the Middle East and Moscow about the big little with love. And a point that they, they keep making is that, oh, the stabilization of series, global public good, therefore, the globe needs to pay for the stabilization of Syria, the west does the Middle East everyone, but Russia has to pay for it. And I think that, that's sort of shows you the difference between sort of great power broaches. And this is not very, very useful because I think so long as the Assad regime behave as does nothing to be stability, even if they won the battle, there's not gonna be stability. So I think it's partly that is that we have to I think did indicate that are at least allies are increasingly understanding that Russia doesn't deliver. And I think that's, that's simply message. We have to keep hitting home. Along those lines, something that you referred to your talk is the fact that Russia's approach is generally to have good relations with everybody in the region Marcus into as well. Is that ability at the end of the day because they're not making size on certain issues that countries find to be vital national security interests of their own or not exit central interest of their own, then inherently limits their their influences. Tough limitations that you're going to see over time. And I think even now you can see a little bit of this with the crisis where Russia's tried to play it, as though it's been an advantage to Moscow that being courted by Saudi Arabia in the UAE on one side and uncut are on the other has been great. They've been able to sign him. Oh us. They've made new investment deals. They've signed energy deals. It's wonderful the money's gonna come rolling in except for the fact that it won't because the money is not real, all of these are Emo us. And so it's really just been this idea of playing one side off at the other. When both Riyadh and AVI on one side, as well as the other they're really starting to try and turn the screws on Russia, to make them choose a side and that's continuing overtime Russia initially thought that it was going to take back seats and dissipate, but it hasn't and so you can see that as being an example of how being behold into different actors. On different sides that people are going to really constrain, what Russia can do over the long term, unless question before I go to the audience kitty, if I could ask you. This changes on a day-to-day basis. But can you give us a little bit of an update on Russia's most recent activities inside Syria? Particularly with live, and, and how the department of defense looks at those activities, we continue to call on primarily on all parties to exercise restraint, and to avoid significant esscalation of conflict in, there is a tenuous agreement between Russia and Turkey on how to go about the crisis. We see it as a potential flashpoint concerns for this to -bility Syria Turkey on the entire region. So I think right now, things are relatively they haven't been provoked in the last few days. But it's a message that we have to consider consistently send to all parties and I know something that investor Jeffrey was recently discussing the, the importance of sort of a significant operation into it live by either side of the party would have monumental consequences, and for Turkey in particular, I think if it's something we try to impart to them is. The moderated approach to addressing terrorism concerns that they have on their southern borders appropriate. Otherwise, they're going to see a flood of refugees migrants are others out of a way that's continue, destabilizing them unhelpful way..

Russia Middle East United States Washington Moscow Turkey Syria Iran China congress Riyadh Dr Katz Trump administration Vance Russian Braga Katy Israel Asia
"besseges" Discussed on Casting Actors Cast

Casting Actors Cast

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on Casting Actors Cast

"Finally, I couldn't help myself. I just said to the actress I said, so what are you? So afraid of. And she said, I am afraid I'm going to make a mistake. I said the state is being afraid of the Mustang. She got the messenger. Welcome to casting actors cat insights for actors on acting in the business of show casting director Jeffrey dries Bach takes you behind the scenes and reveals secrets to successful acting career. You can find out more on the web at casting actors cast dot com. Please joy liken share casting actors cast. Now, here's your host Jeffrey dries up. Well, Hello and welcome to this episode of casting actors cast the podcast for actors from a casting director. Hello, my name is Jeffrey dries back. How are you? I'm a casting director with mccorkell casting in New York. And it's so cool that you're here and joining us today, if you're just joining us welcome aboard, it's been so much fun. These podcasts are brought to you absolutely free of charge. And I really love doing them. So if you love hearing them, if there's been some information that you've found very helpful to you. Then I'm going to ask you a favor, and that is please let your friends know about this. I'm trying to get as many listeners as I can't just because I think the more the merrier, and if you go to casting actors cast dot com, you can get a bunch of past episodes going all the way back to episode number one. And also if you fill out the form, there's a comment form area there, you can fill out that form. And it'll take you to another location where you can. Download the absolutely free PDF one hundred page workshop manual called conversation pieces out of the studio the workshop for professional actors. It's a book that I wrote about oh gosh few years back not too far long ago, but a few years ago that I know actress have found extremely useful. And it's very thrilling that this book has been used in the lot of college and university settings. And if you have any interested all in finding out what does it take to be avoi- s-, actor, then this is the book for you, especially if you have some performance training in your background this really answers a lot of those questions about how do I get into voiceovers, and that's absolutely free by going to casting actors cast dot com. Also, while we're talking about that right next to that comment form is a place where you can leave me voice message, and I have to apologize because I just realized that many people have been leaving voice messages. And I rarely if ever check my spam folder. I know I'm a dummy. So stupid. And so many people have voiced Besseges. And I do my very very best to get back to folks who leave me voice message, and I have not done that because I simply didn't know that you'd have voice message. So for those of you there, many, many people who have voice messages, I'm terribly sorry. I'm going to try to write back to you. And let you know. And I apologize for that. I fixed the issue, but you can leave me alive voice message. I'd love to get to the point where I could literally take your question on the air. If you leave me, a voice message that I can put it on the air in an answer the question, I think that might be a lot of fun. All right. That's a long winded way of saying welcome to casting address gas. Today's episode is called question everything. And I mean question everything, and I'm going to explain all about that. In just a moment. So it's at this point in the podcast that I usually say this is that time in the podcast where I talked to you. And you know, what I just want to kind of share a question that I have the today's episode called question everything, and I've been toying with the idea of taking these podcasts and actually streaming them or me doing the podcast and putting it on YouTube. There's kind of a lot involved in I'm excited because I love the idea of that. But I'm just wondering if you wouldn't mind thinking about that for a moment, if you're a regular listener, or even if you're a new listener, do you think it might be useful? Would it be helpful to you? If there were a podcast channel of you know, me talking about the very same subjects we've been talking about. I'm happy to do it. I just wondered if there's an outreach or there's an an idea that would be better served by doing it on video rather than just me talking behind the microphone or. The other thing I do is. I'm thinking that maybe I could just shoot a video of me doing the podcast. Does that have any value? Would you please let me know by either sending me an Email casting actress cast gmaiLcom or casting actress cast dot com and fill out a comment for him. I would love to hear that. And as I grow, and certainly the audience has been growing, and I'm thrilled to have over ten thousand listeners now, and I think that that's more than exciting. But I'm just kind of wanted to continue to evolve and help as many people as I can. And if that would be of any help to you or to maybe some of your friends. Thank you, today's podcast is question, everything, you know. I love the acronym of fear F E A R. The acronym really is false evidence. Appearing real. And I think that that's a really great statement for today's podcast 'cause we question everything. Sometimes we question everything. And when we hear the answer, we're not satisfied, which only prompts us to ask another question, and I know actors are doing this all the time and based on the past couple of weeks that I've had with not only classes, but with actors in an audition, I did a day and a half of EPA's this week equity principle additions this week where I saw many of the same actors that I've seen many many times over because in our office and mccorkell casting everyone contributes to all the projects usually and the EP as our sort of my jurisdiction. So I'm kind of the gatekeeper, and I love doing the EP as as I've said many podcasts before, but that's prompted a lot of questions both from me. But also from the actors that I've been seeing not only at the as like I said, but also in some of the classes, and I thought I would use this particular podcast today to talk. About some of those questions, but keep in mind, the acronym. Fear false evidence appearing real. So here's the first question for the podcast is one that I actually asked just a few moments ago about whether I should turn this podcast into a YouTube video the reason I'm asking that question is not because I'm fearful, although I guess I have a little bit of fear of failure. I'm wondering if I do a YouTube video am I just setting myself up for kind of the scrutiny that I'm not interested in hearing. 'cause you know, we're all sensitive, folks. And I only want to get this message out. I don't have sponsors. I'm not actively seeking sponsors. But eventually if this grows it would be really great to see how it involves. But that's a question that I would love to have some answers to and I guess there is a little bit of fear in that. But here are a couple of questions that I've gotten this week. And I really wanna be Frank with you in terms of the answers and one question that I've gotten what do we meaning to us casting directors really say when you leave the room? So

director YouTube Jeffrey dries Bach Jeffrey Besseges EPA New York Frank
"besseges" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:46 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Has a chauffeur Prager you every week. On the internet Larry overs for just this week. See that one will see all of them. Canna showings, was in congress and it went viral in her inimitable way. Calm and courageous. I have said canvas for a long time that the most hated group in the United States or conservative blacks. Would you agree with that one hundred percent? I mean, I think I have for everyone to see and and and they're vicious attacks on my character and something. Right. They are having issues anti. So you kitty, speak and try to me of all people a black woman works organization, he's just classics Saul gonna crack tactics with right? It's the inversion. That's right. That's exactly the fee inversion of reality. It's. Too far time, maybe at work a lot of people Trump and pretended despite his Jewish daughter and Jewish grandchildren. He was medic and we saw Hitler stuff going around and racist, and sexist, but it's a lot of people up when you attempt that same stick with a black American. Deal the wrong. In the past three days. Emails Besseges from so many black Americans policy believing media narrative because they watched it. They watched my whole feet -ment. And finally what I was actually about how quickly democrat congresswoman trying to turn out real time near campaign. If they lose I think, I don't know what the percentage is somebody's figured it out. But if they lose only ten fifteen percent of the black vote, they it's almost impossible for them to win national elections. So the collective here. It's actually only five percent. Got eighty nine. They cannot get below eighty five or done completely done, which is just remarkable. I believe Joan passive resistance. Black American we've lost everything could end of their policies. It's messaging vestige is just to look at where you're at what's happened to our meetings. What's happened to our family unit? I'm looking how many are in prison, and you start to understand why you realize messaging the truth to the black vide- will destroy the last. I was about to ask you. Why are so many blacks enthralled by a message from people who've done nothing good for them. But then I I'm really opening up to you. And my audience my mind, then went to the next question. Well, Dennis couldn't you say that about your community the Jewish community. Why are they in thrall d- by by this group where ninety nine percent of the anti-semitism in America? And the west today is coming from the left Corbyn in Britain is an anti Semite, and he's the head of the labor party rating in tonight crowd of it on proud of that that that what their entire time. I'm going to be the parking that speak openly about how I hate the things. I think the humidity has to. So. Right. Envy. People that work hard as people that are successful. And I always black. It says of how far back with the crew on their back in World War Two, and they pulled it together. Maybe another with sensitivity hard work. No, excuse Jewish life all the time. Right. Works. Have to heat that they want the opposite. They want everyone to be lazy. I mean, which vote allergy. How's it going to fund? Simply don't want to work you send desire to work right hand. It goes the black community culture, we've been culturally, and I spoke about this a bent at CPAC where would the idol become Braun jeans? And and uncle Tom as faira says because Dr Ben Carson problem problem wreck is lockstep with Hollywood being boxed up with Hollywood the need for them to keep control blasted. He and I'm trying to show that actively. That's right. Do you feel you're making progress? Oh, I know. They know what to say. No what I personally can't play advice about their active. Every day. I mean, they trying to blame me. It on at at the people to be and Trump. Well, I remember you talking to me about that. Yeah. I'm working on mosque shootings here. Effect desired, right? They try to do something that ridiculous ridiculous would end up working my because it wakes lack Americans up. If they don't think that I'm black causes. They're not going to say, I really strikes realistic. We think that sheets buyers, boss or. That she hates to people. So they're actually dropping their own aside by accident. Exactly. What trump? They try to fascinate him with his character. And they get the him. And now sitting on sixty minutes. Let me say as jhu as a committed Jew as involved in Jewish life entire life as an author of Torah commentary as an author of a book on anti-semitism. You are as decent and good and kind and loving Jews as a non Jew has ever existed. Very Jewish greedy. Stamford advocate, five I'm shocked, call at this detri- because of that receipt. Comfortable that I didn't expect it just came at a fail where but they're looking at the population of the Mongols Christine America, they're saying how do we get our they're catching their affections because all they care about the only computer boats. Spokes only if they want to open the borders. They see them as going block retention place. Stagnated. And that's all about votes, you could almost predict their behavior. Well, when you're next in LA liked to have yawn for an extended time. So that people understand how you got to wear you got.

congress Hollywood United States Prager Saul jhu Trump Hitler Besseges America Joan Mongols Stamford Dennis Britain Braun Christine America LA
"besseges" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"You every week. On the internet. Larry over is gifts this week. She that one see all of them can showings was in congress and it went viral. In her inimitable way. Calm and courageous. I have said canvas for a long time that the most hated group in the United States or conservative blacks. Would you agree with that one hundred percent? And I think I think that life for everyone to see and and if they're vicious attacks on being by character, and we keep book right there. According to issue, anti fragility, speak and try to me of all people a black woman works peculiar organization at his just classics, Saul or democrat tactics with right? It's the inversion. That's right. That's exactly the fee in version of reality. Far time eighty at work a lot of people to Trump Nate mccay tended, despite his Jewish daughter and Jewish grandchildren. He was teaching medic. And we saw a honk true Hitler stuff going around and racist, and sexist, but it makes a lot of people up with you attempt that same stick with a black Americans lunch. He'll the it was wrong. Flooded in past days. Emails Besseges, silvery, black Americans apologize. Believing media narrative because they watched it. They watched my whole opening statement. And finally when I was actually about how quickly those democrat congressman we're trying to turn out real time near campaign. If they lose I think, I don't know what the percentage is somebody's figured it out. But if they lose only ten or fifteen percent of the black vote, they it's almost impossible for them to win national elections. So the to collect to here. It's actually all the five percent. Got eighty nine. They cannot get below eighty five or done completely done. Which is just remarkable. I leave Joan passive resistance. Chance to black Americans. We've lost everything could end of their policies it's necessarily because vestige is just to look at where you're at look at what's happened to our committees. Look what's happened to our family unit. I'm looking how many are in prison, which you start to understand why you realize messaging choose to the black city will destroy the left. I was about to ask you. Why are so many blacks enthralled by a message from people who've done nothing good for them. But then I'm really opening up to you. And my audience my mind, then went to the next question. Well, Dennis couldn't you say that about your community the Jewish community. Why are they in thrall d- by by this group where ninety nine percent of the anti-semitism in America? And the west today is coming from the left Corbyn in Britain is an anti Semite, and he's the head of the labor party rating entice and crowd of it on proud of that that that what they're tired. Okay. Speaks openly about how much I hate refuted. Then I think the meeting after rely so she was anti semitism. Go hand in hand. Right. Socialism of entry. People that work hard empty people that are successful. And I always black. Be says how far that with the crew on their back, and they pull it together. Another a sensitivity. Hard work. No, excuse Jewish life all the time. Right. That they want the they want to be lazy. I mean fish which vote allergy deal. Going to find you don't want to work you send desire to work right hand. It goes the black community culture weeping, and I spoke about this a at CPAC where the angle become Braun, gene. And and Tom as they there has become Dr Ben Carson problem problem bases. Why wreck is lockstep with Hollywood being boxed up with Hollywood the need for them to keep control black comedian. I'm trying to shatter that. Actively. That's right. Do you feel you're making progress? I know they know it too. They know what I. It it comfortably. I can't play ignites about by actively looking. I mean, let's forget trying to blame me for the box. And if Felix. We're on that at the people to people being Trump. Well, I remember you talking to me about that. Yeah. Yeah. I'm working on mosque shootings here. It's so quickly when I say equal affect desired, right? They try to do something that ridiculous to would end up working in my favor because it wakes lack Americans up even. Basically, they don't think that I'm black causes not going to say realistically strike faith, realistically that she's fires auctions or realistically fake that she hates to people might twenty. Is there actual dropping their own aside by accident? If Jackie what Trump they tried to fascinate his character. And yet they create him announcing city, sixty minutes. Of. Let let me say as ju as a committed you as involved in Jewish life entire life as an author of Torah commentary as author of a book on anti-semitism. You are as decent and good and kind and loving Jews as a non Jew has ever existed. I grew up in a very Jewish community. Stamford advocate five I'm shocked, Paul at this detri- because it that would Inc. Comfortable, I didn't expect it it just it just came out of nowhere. But it's jumper. They're looking at the population of the Mongols increasing America, they're saying, how do we get our they're Katcha their affection because all they care about the only computer folks, the west expose only if they want to open the border because they see them as you walk retention place because our population stagnated, and if you understand what all about votes, you could almost predict behavior. Well, when you're next in LA, and like to have you on for an extended time. So that people understand how you got to.

America Hollywood congress United States Saul Larry Nate mccay congressman Hitler Besseges Dr Ben Carson Joan Mongols would Inc Dennis Britain Braun LA Stamford
"besseges" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

14:07 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"And if, if you're listening to this, and you're spinning and confused and unsure what to do. This is the type of bookie wanna read. This is the book let me put it this way, this book you wanna read, and it's an easy read. It's a nice short rate is not designed to, to overwhelm you at all as actually designed to do, just, just the opposite that but getting getting the mindset. Right if you can exceleron that imagine that, if you can accelerate the process of going through the shock and grief and then getting on your own horse know to, to find your way at added that far east of confusion and doubt, than the you're going to get better so much faster in even in terms of encountering all the obstacles, you're gonna get on your journey your lime journey. If drew. The one riding the horse, then when something happens, you don't have to wait another six months to kind of come around to the next thing, you're the one saying, you know what this isn't working, and I really appreciate you could say this to your lime literate, doctor or acupuncture, Stor, whoever it is that, that you're working at the time. I appreciate what you've done for me. This isn't turning out as I had hoped not progressing. And, you know, I have planned be in my back pocket and we're gonna try plan b now. So thank you very much. And you move on to something else. But if you don't have anything else, if you're not the one, you're, you're, you're going to the point saying, oh, you know, please help me what should I do next and as a practitioner, we've always got more ideas for you. You know, I've never had an you know, I'm never at a loss for a combination of acupuncture points to try or another essential oil or another Chinese herb or something. But that doesn't mean that, that approach is the right one for the person and really, you know, ideally, a practitioner is in the position that they can see that as well. But we can't always and a lot of times it really does fall on the patient to make those decisions. Yeah. And that's a big value for me. And working with clients is really teaching people to be their own advocates as well. Not falls right in line with that. Because part of my own story was, I knew that I had a misdiagnosis like on a kind of a gut level, like something wasn't right. And nobody would listen to me. And so I think that all falls as part of that, like, if you feel like you're in charge of your health and something isn't right. Then you're empowered to say, okay. Somebody else helped me not. You. The point of would you do his body talk therapy. Correct. And as a recall, from my last conversation that gut feeling that intuition level feeling that the bodies wisdom, the brains wisdom bubbles to the surface in strange ways and subtle ways. And can you talk about that, because I think it we get to the point where if you're in a ton of pain, or your brain doesn't work right, that you kind of, like I had a patient recently who comes in, and she's referring to her body in the third person. She's given it a name because she's a relationship with it. Right. And she's trying to love it, and she's trying to accept it. But she's having a. And that's really unusual. Most of us don't refer to yet, you know, like she's having a tough day, right? So in some ways, it gives her some distance right that she's not her symptoms. But in another way, it's a red flag to me that she's really distance yourself and disconnected and your you talk about the complete opposites of tell us about that. So one of the things that I am just passionate about in the work that I do end. Kenneth body talk as a tool for that is really just understanding what the body is trying to communicate through whatever we're experiencing mother that be symptom diagnosis. You know, whatever that physical reality is on a day-to-day basis. So I can totally relate to that story of your patient doing that because sometimes it feels like that with chronic illness, suits. It's like I might body is now not mine, or you know, I'm trying to have some detachment from it. But I think you're, you're right. That's all right. Flack because we're detaching from the. Bodies on wisdom, like the body, I like to say, we don't have bodies don't have words. It can't say, excuse me out. You're eating something that's not right for that medication is just horrible. I can't tolerate it. It only has symptoms and sensations and pain to kind of try to bring our attention. And so, I like to really help people shift into that mindset of understanding that it's not just, you know, an annoying pain, or even more than just annoying. Just like a life, life, altering life ruining pain. It's the body trying to get their attention. And what if we can listen to it? What if we can be quiet on start to tune in to the message that it's trying to give us the questions. So what happens when you do that a lot of people, you know, I the interesting experience with that is, you know, if you're especially, like, in that place of feeling detached from your body, initially, maybe don't feel like you get that was dumb. You don't get that message. And so I encourage people that that's really a process to like, it's kind of a daily practice of saying, okay, I'm going to ask this question, every day may be the first ten times, I don't get an answer. But once your body, kind of like for that particular woman, it's like reestablishing that relationship with the body. The body starts to go only really want to know my answer. And usually will start to kind of get that into sense of what it's about intuition, communicates to us all in different ways. Some people will kind of like here words, some people will see picture. You know, we all just kind of get that sense of what it's about depending on how our intuition likes to communicate to us. Trying to think my mind usually when it hits me just is there's there, no words. There's not even it just feels right? At to explain it. Yeah. Like I knowing like what that's like, clar- cognizance, basically, it's like you just know that, that's the answer, or you just know that's the right choice for you. It's funny. It's it's hard to explain. I don't I don't talk about that a whole lot. Well, I think, you know, that's the interesting thing about intuition, as most people think. Oh, well, I don't see things, so I don't really haven't tuition or you know, I don't get Besseges but we all kind of have away it just it may seem a little different. You know, some people just like they feel something, they just have a sense of that. So it does. It doesn't have to be words or pictures, or it just could be annoying. Now to get to this place. Your mind can't be full of. Did I remember to take out the trash? The dog needs to be walked those things. How, how did you get place where you can hear these quiet whisperings that are really, really there all the time? I usually just I say to carve out some time usually guide yourself through a little practice of, you know, maybe taking some nice deep breaths, trying to just get more present. You know, knowing that okay in ten minutes, or however, long that a catered to this. I can come back to whatever that is might to do list. But this is the time just going to be quiet view. And I'm gonna ask by body. Just these simple questions, you know what, what is the message what do you want me to know? What do you need from me right now? And yell at first again, it's, it's similar it can take some time, if you're not used to being quiet if you're used to being busying a lot, you can notice your to do list, wants to pull at you and all I gotta make that phone call or mytalk needs my. Attention now. And so it's bringing yourself back like, now I'm gonna just practice this for five or ten minutes of just going to be present with my body and whatever wisdom wants to give me maybe he won't hear anything that day. And I think that's that's another important ingredient is just kind of not being attached that you're gonna have some profound revelation in that moment. 'cause sometimes we get frustrated. Right. We, we think why should just know what this is about. And then often the body doesn't really wanna share because we're frustrated were impatient. That may. I'll find myself thinking about something, it could be a problem at work. It could be a patient could be almost anything and I have the I'll I'll find myself in a slight one. My mind is, is slightly quiet. I'll start with the phrase, and, and I'll tell myself. And so, and then I get back to it's like a trigger to think about the thing, but whenever I like tried to power through, at basically just entertaining myself while the back of the brains during the work, and eventually the answer shows itself in sometimes it's in a conversation with somebody else, and sometimes it's just I don't know. Just comes as like oh, that's, that's what I should have been thinking about rather than this. But I try you know, a lot of times I do. Try and force things. I think that's pretty common. You know, let's practice like this, it can be like, well, I gotta get an answer. Like trying to kind of force it to the surface and usually that's not very effective in getting the result you want, because body's kinda like while you're trying to force me to give an answer. I view like a relationship if you're trying to force announcer out of a friend, or your partner, whoever the probably not going to be very happy with you. Though, the funny last night, I gave up and watch rugby. Got to do that to, you know, I'm not really, you know, same thing with meditation often the times, like I just can't right now. That's okay. I'll try again tomorrow, thou. I mean, part of this discussion that we're having now is reducing stress when we're talking about this the other day is okay. You need to reduce your stress. Thanks how. Right, right. Yeah. It's like just being told you have to reduce your stress in it up itself is another stressful event. Very out. Yeah, what am I supposed to do? Like, I've got the to do list that CNN longer than the late of my desk, and how am I supposed to relax reduce my stress for me? It's definitely a process you know, it's like what is what one or two small things that I can do to help myself in, like I may still have that to do list. But what can I do in this moment to just be a little more present with myself for? Help my body feel a little more relaxed at ease, and awesome times, of like taking a hot bath going for a short walk just being quiet taking some breath. I like to also say that it doesn't have to be really complicated, 'cause I think sometimes there's this whole idea, you know, self care has to be expensive. We have to like, go spend a bunch of money on it, or, you know, vital have an hour to do self care will then why bother and it's like it could just be five minutes. And it doesn't have to cost you anything. But, but, but. I think it's the baby. Step approach is kinda wanna try to hit that, you know, you know, it don't expect yourself to go from the long long to do less to being completely than in, you know, one move. And I do think personality is hugely important in this, for example, I can my brain quickly shifts to something else, and is very happy to just block out what I'm worried about right? So maybe that's you know, maybe that's my jeans. Maybe that's being a man. I don't know my wife on the other hand need something that requires a lot of brainwork. So she does Sadako at the end of the night down. A she cheat if I asked her to just sit there and meditate or something like that she would probably just ring my neck, but she's discovered for while she was reading books. So something that really takes your mind over and squeezes out the thoughts of the day. It really it on her part. It takes an action for me. It just takes the decision, okay? It's time to think about something else, and just my brain. I've got a Hoppy brain. It'll just hop on over to something else. She has a very sticky brain. And when, you know if there's an unsolved problem is like, she, you know, the brains like now you can't let this go right now. You have to stay up till three AM to figure it out. Even when it's unfit yer out -able, right? That's some, some things just beyond our control. So she has to do something like Sadako that just takes all her brain power to, to do, and there's nothing profound about Sadako. Right. You don't you don't go to Tabet and sit on the top of the Dalai, Lama's house alerts. But my point in in that, and I'll ask you is like to name a few other things is, like, what are the different ways that you found your clients, and, and that you recommend, you know, that eating totally different from each other to just toss out ideas, I'm going to challenge you a little bit. I mean, some people probably could you know, depending on their health condition or whatever, but it could be more like a vigorous exercise like getting the endorphins going, and just

Sadako Stor Kenneth body CNN Flack Tabet symptom Besseges partner rugby Lama ten minutes five minutes six months
"besseges" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I've been reading to you a piece we're going to put up find that USA today. You know, any family whose? Child is certain that he or she is the other sex, and then the parents. Going to do certain irreversible hormone things or even bodily transformations or allow it or the kit will do it on their own. You should give them this article. Also, a website that this again, this is contributing editor. Of of USA today. He became a woman that that forty. But it was it was terrible period. That was fifty when I had the breast implants removed. The next few years were spending confusion in counseling in nineteen ninety six at the age of fifty five I was finally free from the desire to live is a woman and changed my legal documents back to Walt my biologically, correct male sex. I still have scars on my chest reminders of the gender detour cost me thirteen years of my life. I am on a hormone regime. Regimen to try to regulate a system that is permanently altered. Eventually, I met a wonderful woman who didn't care about the changes in my body and we've been married for twenty one years. Now, we help others whose lives have been derailed by sex-change measured by the human benefit to a hurting population. It's priceless way to spend our time. Have I not been in? Here's the key in here. We come near the end had I not been misled by media stories of sex change, quote, unquote, success and by medical practitioners who said transitioning was the answer to my problems. I wouldn't have suffered as I have genetics. Can't be changed feelings, however, can and do change underlying issues often drive the desire to escape one's life into another. And they need to be addressed before taking the radical step of transition. You will hear the media say regret is rare. But they are not reading my inbox, which is full of Besseges from transgender individuals who want the life and body back that was taken from them. By cross sex hormones surgery and living under a new identity. After de transitioning. I know the truth. Hormones and surgery may alter appearances. But nothing changes,.

USA Walt contributing editor Besseges twenty one years thirteen years
"besseges" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on KTOK

"Don't they were not producing children and families likely that that's not a pathway to civilization success. And we we have to say to the country. We really want some guy who was driving a truck at eighteen and walked us entire life. We didn't go to college to have to pay taxes to pay for somebody's anthropology degree. He got in eight years of schooling. But we'd never we never look at these issues from the point of view of humanity and fairness and how they affect the middle class people. Instead, it's we just take it. They call some native racist, homophobic, sexist, and we think what what do we have to do? So you don't do that. We really saw that more in that Covington Lynch mall or guys were on the other team. Just because they were so paranoid of being called. That they would be laid out of the gates. They might not be. They might not be so condemnatory of his white Catholic kids what they so much wanted to demonize. So they would virtue signal they were not part of the Trump movement. And that's really disturbing. You know, seeing all this it troubles you as I know it troubles me. And I think when it troubles you you sit down and you're right. A piece right. This is one way you can vent. I get behind a microphone millions of people listening to this program. We see where we're headed. Seeing where we're headed how how can the never Trumpers justify themselves. I mean, they see this is a turning point here. I don't know. I I know them just like, you know, them you've known your whole life. I have to some great people. But they don't understand that in the real world. I was a farmer for a number of years. I still live in a form. I see fifty to one percent or fifty five percent of a question is a game. You never get what you completely want. And I know Donald Trump can be crude and Krause, but right now, he's all standing between radical socialism. In america. And whether you like him or not whether it's digital picks or trying to do something on the border or renegotiating deals with China or getting us over three percent GDP. He's been successful. And I think now it's a psychological mechanism of he's never comes. They cannot. They cannot concede that because it for them. For them. It symbolizes the whole destruction of a world view. So they're now actually adopting policies they used light simply because Trump's fingerprints on them. It's it's really disturbing. They do. I know they don't have a lot of numbers and Trump won ninety percent of the Republican electorate in two thousand sixteen on these independent voters at key rubric, they have they do a lot of damage and I lost patience with them because we're doing the country a lot of damage. Vein and egocentric reasons for the most part, I I don't even engage them anymore dismiss them because they can't be persuaded of anything not that they have to agree with me or you. But it's it's the let me ask you let me put it this way. Are they more troubling than the hardcore leftist to you? You're I don't think they'll do as much damage in the long run because they helped some Besseges of conservatism. But where I work at the Hoover Institution. I right now. That's the people I deal with all day. They're never Trump Republicans, and they have a social class and cultural disdain for people who vote for comper still support it. So my day is how dare you? I'm told how dare you vote for this guy? He's and there's also a troubling class snobby since about something about Trump to action his appearance his resonance with the middle class that he says our farmers our vets he connects they don't like that. They don't like it at all. And so they label it as Hitlerian populism or something, but Trump hit something that was wrong with the Republican party. And you you've worked Rush Limbaugh house, but for the elite punditry they just can't see it because they're a part of it themselves. Well, I want to thank you for what you do when you do it in a lot of places and just keep it up. And we'll keep plowing ahead. I tell you. I worry about this next election because the media and the Democrats want to put this president out if they can't they want to smear him to such an extent what's difficult to win reelection..

Donald Trump Krause Covington Lynch mall Republican party Hoover Institution Limbaugh president america China fifty five percent ninety percent three percent eight years one percent
"besseges" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Grassley making those comments to Fox News bar again, saying Trump's sought no assurances promises or commitments. And I have not given him any that in prepared testimony. He's slated to read today. President Trump issuing a staunch denial. He ever worked for Russia as he lobbed attacks at former federal officials who launched investigations against him calling them dirty cops and scoundrels speaking from the south lawn on Monday. The president blasted former FBI Justice department officials repeating his claim that the investigation into potential ties to Russia is a hoax. I never worked for. And you know that answer better than anybody. I've never worked for Russia. Not only did I never worked for Russia. I think it's a disgrace that you even ask that question because it's a whole big fat Hoke just. The people that started that investigation our McCabe, who's a proven liar and was fired from the FBI are Lisa pay who was forced to leave the FBI as her lover Peter Struck. We got their text messages what they said in a sex Besseges jacket when you talk about bias also coming, and I guess they started it because I fired Comey, which was a great thing. I did for our country. The people doing that investigation for people that have been caught that are known scoundrels there. I guess you could say that dirty cops. And I'll tell you what it is so unfair. What's happened to the FBI in terms of the men and women working in the rank and file of the FBI? I know many of a visa great people, and they are so embarrassed by their leadership you've never seen. I have never seen a turnaround in a bureau or agency like I have with the FBI. They are. So embarrassed, I think well people now have been terminated as others. If you look at what's happening, others are going to go. What happened at the FBI? So they can I have confidence in the FBI or deligence agencies when I see. And I see all of these people when I see Lisa and her lover and their notes in their texts get captured, and you see what they said about me having nothing to do with investigation. Let me tell you something when people see that you have an angry country because the whole thing is a hoax. It's a big at is very bad for our country. So what happened with the FBI? I have done a great service for our country when I fired games gumming because he was the bad guy, and he was a dirty cop, and he lied. He really lied. A New York Times reports.

FBI President Trump Russia Grassley president Fox News New York Times Hoke Peter Struck Besseges McCabe Lisa Comey Justice department
"besseges" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

Don't Worry About The Government

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

"But her her explanation is that if we don't impose our own rules. There is already a mandatory federal version of pay go. And so the version that they're they're proposing as far as I understand it would if they were to pass it supersede that of the existing federal law and apparently the terms under which they're trying to pass pig or more favorable and more. Or loose than the federal law. Now, I don't know if that's true. And I don't know the technicalities of it. That's real inside baseball stuff. But there's potentially a practical kind of technocratic inside baseball reason for doing this the other thing that's going on. And this is where I think, you know, this potentially really stupid politics here is I think that the idea here is we're going to play Mr. good, Mr. and MRs good government. Chuck Nancy or during this thing with Derek demonstrate when we're putting power we make all the responsible moves and to the average person pay go really seems like one of those. It'd be hard to explain to the average person to concise manner. Why pay go isn't a good idea? You don't spend money until you have at that sounds responsible. So I think this is a play for the middle. And unfortunately, this is the exact kind of thing I worry about with the democratic leadership is they're making a play for a middle that doesn't really exist anymore when on the same time, they're they're very actively pissing off there. Base and their base. Does matter their base will vote for third parties their base will write in candidates, not voted all their base will do all sorts of things. And so I think this is just another example of like do not touch this wire that's going to be this play for moderates. Like, if you're moderate, here's what you learned this week nothing. You didn't even hear the word pay go because you were being attention to politics because that's not what you do. Most people are just not doing what we're doing. So the play is lost on them. And it's infuriating to a lot of the basement members the left, so this is bad politics, potentially. If she's right about this good inside budgetary politics. Yeah. But maybe potentially bad policy if you're dealing with the economics of it too. So I yeah. So I kind of you'd the pay go thing took a lot of my thunder there. But I did view it specifically as kind of cudgel against her left flank. I think all Washington DC and. Just the press and not just Twitter, but the political class of Washington DC, perhaps best typified Claire mccaskill are very worried about Alexandria, yo Cortes and her ability to capture media attention and public attention and build a political base. And there are a lot of people on Capitol Hill who would like to see her brand of politics go to the wayside. I almost did. This is the one thing I was thinking about this week. This is my more serious one. I think that women are proving to be more effective messengers of leftist politics, and those women who are becoming those Besseges a realizing that the figuring out how to better message against that. And that is alarming number of people in both the Democratic Party and the Republican party and Pelosi and her play on pay go is clever as you. Identified pay. Go is one of those things that's got truthfulness about it. It's just it feels right it like you don't pay for stuff you can't afford. I mean, we can't do everything on a credit card. You say that out loud. And that feels right. However, you know, the other part of a credit card is if you can't make rent this month, and your only option is a credit card, and you know, that if you can make it to let's say, April, you you will have money again, then you need to use the credit card role to be living underneath the tunnel for the next three months when you don't have to be when you could just repay alone, which is much less painful version of that. So like there is actually an argument for credit card politics. However, the argument for pig oh is much shorter. That is that is a great weapon against it..

Washington baseball Mr. good Democratic Party Chuck Nancy Twitter Claire mccaskill Derek Republican party yo Cortes Alexandria Pelosi three months
"besseges" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"besseges" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

"And of course, all she can do in finding out that our daughter was in life threatening payroll is ground her and send her to her room. This mother is bad. I. All the actress comes off like a Catherine keener wanna be with her dark hair and her breathy talk. It was like, Catherine keener could convey more sympathy. I was specifically they can Catherine keener 's parental relationship in forty year old virgin, but also how long ago did the dad die. That's swimming tape. Video looks like it was just filmed Charlie has not matured. It looks like she does today is like the dad died a month ago and mom had Ron waiting in the wings. I thought I heard the term six months. Okay. That's very fast turn around and be married and living with Ron. Yeah. I'm not setting with Charlie. But I'm agreeing with her that the people are awful. And that there's no reason to talk to them if this is her parents, then yes, this is a world you turn away from and so she's grounded in a room and be taken back strung up and tortured and out of that the deceptive cons finally get to see Optimus prime's Besseges. And they know the Audubon they don't have. To do anything. The audits are coming to them. They just need to let the other deceptive cons. No a perfectly fine macguffin now. Right. I mean, they got to send a message the deception cons phone home. It's the thing again. Right. So the climate is all going to be about even though they built this web. They've got to go to this one satellite tower in in a shipyard. And try to let them know even though I agree with what you guys are saying about the mom and the dad it is interesting that they do come around. It's funny. Oh, John CENA's and they're living in the living room saying, oh, hey, she's confused. She took property, blah, blah, blah, blah. And she just Niks out the back window. He's not security threat at all and just about. And does her thing. She knows about the aliens and their sector seven just bringing her home. So she's fine. We'll leave her there. But she sneaks out. She goes in there..

Catherine keener Charlie Ron John CENA Optimus prime Niks forty year six months