35 Burst results for "Berta"

As oil and gas declines, where do the workers go?

The Big Story

06:17 min | 3 weeks ago

As oil and gas declines, where do the workers go?

"Part. Three of our special five part series with the narwhal brings us to sharon riley. She is the l. berta investigative reporter for the narwhal. She's a lifelong alberton and she reports from the oil patch. Hello sharon hydrogen. How are you. I'm doing really well. And i'm excited to get a glimpse of what a really quickly. Changing industry Looks like on the ground. And why don't you just start. Maybe so we have someone to frame this around with telling me a little bit about dust. And taylor who is he and what did he do. It doesn't is one of the people that came across when i started looking into the energy transition in berta and what that really looks like on the ground for workers who are making the leap on their own so dustin was born in nova scotia. His his dad had worked in oil on an offshore oil rig there. He moved when he was a kid and he kind of has what. You would consider a fairly typical story for a lot of oil. Chris in this province but yeah i left left school before graduated and pretty much started working right off the hub and like most people numbered. I ended up in the energy industry working in oil and gas Making decent money. I mean it was pretty easy to find a decent job. He told me that it is first job. He made sixty thousand dollars a year. So i don't know about you. But when i was sixteen i was not making that kind of money. But that's a pretty typical story in alberta when the industry is booming oil and gas industry is booming. There's money to be made and of young people. Young men in particular in this province haven't always seen a reason to you know stick around pursuing education when you could support your family and your lifestyle so immediately right out the gate and what happened to him after he'd been there for a while and from your piece in your reporting i gather. It's not super uncommon these days. Yeah i mean. I think there are lots of reasons. Why an individual worker might decide that they want to shift out of the oil and gas industry their cultural reasons. You know a lot of oil and gas work involves working in a camp means being outta town away from home for at least a ten days if not a couple of weeks at a time. Which if you're if you're having if you have a family means you're away from your family for all that time as well. So what dozen described as a bit of a moral conundrum definitely remember watching the oil spill happen It was plastered all over the news for days. And i kind of watch this giant catastrophe. Just unfold in front of our eyes for days on end. Never really knowing what was going to happen. And it was kind of a heartbreaking moment he just suddenly something clicked in his mind where he decided that no longer could he work in an industry that he thought was detrimental to the planet and to future generations and he said that had a lot to do with him having kids and wondering about the world. They're going to live in and he decided to make a shift. It was a gamble for him. Where did he go well. He part of what does made him decide to make the shift as well as that. He lost his job so he lost his job so he went back to school retrained to be a solar installer in alberta. His story is the successful. He's now gainfully employed as a solar installer and he's completely left his oil and gas lifestyle. He can be home every night that that's not the reality for every worker who who may want to make a transition or have to. Because the job that they've had for many decades has disappeared. He had to do this on his own. You know he didn't have a lot of government support. There's no oil and gas transition worker program in alberta or in canada for that matter and so it's a. It's a financial gamble. It involves a huge lifestyle shift and something he took on his own. Before we talk about you know how the transition is moving along and what's to come. Can you give me a sense of just how prevalent of the oil and gas industry is in alberta. Because for for someone like me who's spends most of his life in ontario it can feel like everyone in alberta works in oil and gas. It can feel like that as well and there's are different stats out there. As to how many people are directly employed in the oil industry cap. Which is the canadian association of petroleum producers. An industry group. They said in two thousand seventeen so it's a couple years old now. There were hundreds of thousands of jobs from oil. And i think they said around three hundred and forty thousand now. Obviously that number has changed a bit since the pandemic kit. Everyone but it does go to show that. That's that's a large number of jobs and those are jobs directly related to oil so that doesn't include all of that hotels and hotel workers restaurant workers people who support the industry And the people who are directly employed in another way of looking at it is Looking at statistics. Canada figures statistics. Canada doesn't directly breakdown oil workers. It lumps them all in sort of what you might call extractive industries so that includes mining of all types oil and gas forestry fishing. And if you look at those numbers. One in every sixteen workers is employed in those extractive industries. So if you're in a room of sixteen people. One person is employed in that extractive industry. That is quite a few right. And where are we right now. I guess as we're talking in the transition towards renewable energy in in canada and around the world just in terms of how much longer that one in sixteen figure is going to be viable for albert. I think that's a million dollar question. We we hear a lot about the energy transition. We we hear from politicians and environmental groups. We've heard it from justin trudeau. We heard it from. Joe biden presidential debate that the us needs to transition away from oil. Even albert premier jason kenney has made reference to the energy transition is going to happen at some point here and just been pretty widely reported and repeated that if we're going to meet canada's climate targets many workers in fossil fuels will need to look for new jobs

Sharon Riley Berta Investigative Sharon Hydrogen Alberta Alberton Berta Dustin Nova Scotia Taylor Canadian Association Of Petrol Chris Canada Ontario Justin Trudeau Albert Joe Biden Jason Kenney
Conchata Ferrell, 'Two and a Half Men' actress, dies at 77

Donna and Steve

00:56 sec | Last month

Conchata Ferrell, 'Two and a Half Men' actress, dies at 77

"Men star Gunshot. A feral has died following a cardiac arrest. No, she was 77. Boy. I just loved her. She played housekeeper, Berta. On 2.5 men that gotten earned her a couple of supporting actress in a comedy comedy. Theories Emmy nominations. She also appeared on TV shows as far back as Good Times, E. R. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, She was in movies like Mystic Pizza, Edward Scissorhands. Krampus. Krampus Krampus. Oh, that's scary. I know. Eight Jon Cryer tweeted. She was a beautiful human bird is gruff exterior was an invention of the writers Chad. He's warm and vulnerability were her real strengths. And I'm crying for the woman. All Miss and the joy she brought to so many Isn't that beautiful? So say odd

Krampus Krampus Jon Cryer Berta Edward Scissorhands Emmy Chad Good Times
Conchata Ferrell, Who Played Berta On ‘Two And A Half Men,’ Dead At 77 In Los Angeles

Tim Conway Jr.

00:29 sec | Last month

Conchata Ferrell, Who Played Berta On ‘Two And A Half Men,’ Dead At 77 In Los Angeles

"And the actress who played the sharp witted housekeeper Berta on the TV show 2.5 Men has died on Shata Ferrell was surrounded by family when she died yesterday at Sherman Oaks Hospital after Jon Cryer says Ferrell was a beautiful human Charlie Sheen says Farrell was an absolute sweetheart, a consummate pro and a genuine friend. She worked in stage before moving to TV TV and and film film in in the the 19 19 seventies, seventies, where where l l had had been been in in the the hospital hospital since since May. May. She She was was

Shata Ferrell Sherman Oaks Hospital Jon Cryer Charlie Sheen Farrell Berta
Conchata Ferrell, 'Two and a Half Men' actress, dies at 77

Emotional Management with Dr. Christian Conte

00:28 sec | Last month

Conchata Ferrell, 'Two and a Half Men' actress, dies at 77

"A memorable made from a popular sitcom has died in China. Ferrell was best known as a sharp witted housekeeper, Berta on the sitcom 2.5 Men Bonus. You brought Co star Charlie Sheen tweeting a shocking and painful loss. The role broader to Emmy Award nominations for best supporting actress in a Comedy series, but she first achieved a claim on stage winning multiple awards. Farrell died Monday in Sherman Oaks Hospital in Los Angeles. She was 77

Sherman Oaks Hospital Charlie Sheen Emmy Award Ferrell Los Angeles Farrell China Berta
Conchata Ferrell, 'Two and a Half Men' star, dies at 77

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | Last month

Conchata Ferrell, 'Two and a Half Men' star, dies at 77

"Funeral services are being planned for actress gunshot, a feral perhaps best remembered for her role as Charlie Sheen's sharp witted housekeeper, Berta on the sitcom 2.5 Men. Sweet whistling Geronimo. You be more like a box of hamsters just crawling. Carol died Monday of Sherman Oaks Hospital, according to Celebrity News site News website Deadline 2.5 men costar Jon Cryer tweeted that Ferrell was a beautiful human and he was fortunate to share a stage with her Charlie Sheen tweeted. She was an absolute sweetheart. She also appeared in classic films like Mystic Pizza, Erin Brockovich and Edward Scissorhands. She'd been hospitalized since May, and T. M. Z reported in July that she had fallen ill and wound up spending a month in intensive care, eventually suffering cardiac arrest that left her on a ventilator and unable to communicate. She was 77 years old.

Charlie Sheen Erin Brockovich Sherman Oaks Hospital Jon Cryer Edward Scissorhands Ferrell Berta Carol T. M. Z
Conchata Ferrell, 'Two and a Half Men' star, dies at 77

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:42 sec | Last month

Conchata Ferrell, 'Two and a Half Men' star, dies at 77

"Word today that actress Concetta Ferrell has died and she never totally recovered after suffering a cardiac arrest several months ago. She is probably best known to most of us for her role is no nonsense housekeeper, Berta on the hit CBS sitcom 2.5 Men. The role earned her two best supporting actress in a comedy Emmy nominations in 2005 in 2007, her costar Jon Cryer Tweeting. She was a beautiful human. Bertha's gruff exterior was an invention of the writers. Chaddy what they called her Chatty's warmth and vulnerability or her real strength. I'm crying, he said. For the woman, I'll miss and the joy she brought so many consider a feral, died yesterday, surrounded by family and friends. Sherman Oaks Hospital. She was 77

Concetta Ferrell Sherman Oaks Hospital Jon Cryer Berta Emmy CBS Bertha
Last two journalists working for Australian media leave China

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Last two journalists working for Australian media leave China

"Journalists working in China for Australian media have flown home after a five day diplomatic standoff, during which police demanded to interview them. Gilberte LS trying to correspondent for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and Mike Smith of the Australian Financial Review through from Shanghai. Gavin Morris, the director of news at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Thank those who helped release his colleague, Mr Berta, lt's We've really tried to work out what was going on on the ground. The information was in short supply. On. Really. What we have to focus on was the very clear advice. We were getting that it was best for Bill T leave the country and so thanks to some excellent consular support from the embassy in China. We have successfully brought Bill home and we're very happy that he's here.

Australian Broadcasting Corpor Australian Financial Review China Bill T Gavin Morris Mike Smith Mr Berta Shanghai Director
"berta" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:16 min | 3 months ago

"berta" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"From Wonder Media Network, I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica this month. We're talking about activists women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world are activists of the day work to improve human rights and to end environmental abuses in Honduras she thought against major corporations and her country's government to protect indigenous lands despite the fact that her life ended tragically and far too. Soon, she made a lasting impact on a fight to ensure the livelihood of the Linka people. Let's talk about Tech Kassir S. custer was born in nineteen seventy one in lifespans Honduras. Basically from infancy Betas mother Ostra Flores instilled in her children a sense of moral obligation to make the world a better place. Care of refugees fleeing El Salvador. She also was a member of the largest indigenous group in Honduras the Lenka Veritas mothers dedicated to activism clearly rubbed off on to while at university where studied education bear to co founded an organization called the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations Honduras. Makassar a Florida he soy. has. Invasion of the. Thing. Is someone the Palanca the group organized to fight infringements on the rights at the Lenka people? The indigenous group was often at the center of humanitarian and environmental. Challenges. In. Two thousand six Berto was asked to investigate the appearance of a bunch of construction equipment that appeared on link a land. She discovered a plan was in motion to build a dam on the cart gay river without the link is knowledge. The river was and is extremely important to the people living in the area. It serves as a supply route for water food and medicine. It was and is also a place of spiritual importance for the of people bear fight to stop the dam's construction had international legs. It's actually against international treaties that govern the treatment of indigenous populations to build a dam without local knowledge or consent. Still a partnership made up of a Chinese company and a Hindu Orrin company was attempting to start construction. VERITA and the Council of Popular and indigenous organizations of Honduras wrote letters started peaceful protests in Tegucigalpa, the capital of Honduras an organized local meetings to make clear that the link of people had not had their say and did not approve of the construction they reached out to the inter-american. Commission on Human Rights and the International Finance Corporation part of the World Bank. Still, the local and national government paid no heat and determinedly continued pushing the project forward. Government. Support for the project was further bolstered by a regime change in two thousand nine. That year there was a military coup that removed President Manuel Zelaya. The new government formed in the aftermath of the coup had US political military, and monetary support. Support directly impacted the dam. Project. Previously. Construction site had been guarded by contractors. After the coup the site was guarded by. American. Trained soldiers. and. This particular site wasn't the only dam plan for construction after the coup the new government plan for mining operations on thirty percent of the country's land requiring significant energy and leading to plans for the construction of hundreds of dams around Honduras after the coup, the Inter American Commission on. Human. Rights called for Berretta to be protected. The group said she was under threat due to her activism. In April twenty thirteen bear to and her fellow activists in the movement decided to take action at the site itself. They organized a blockade, the construction side of the dam and question it for over a year. Guys who will run the Gay Toys Ghana took in the through the US. Not on Parton Salvador Tom Being. He is simple. The Cow Bustan thyatira is to commotions same era in. A. In. Their. Data Control Service late in twenty thirteen. The Chinese partner on the damn backed out the international. Finance Corporation also withdrew funding from the project. In Two Thousand Fifteen Berto won the Goldman Environmental Prize an extremely prestigious award in the field of environmental activism for her work in blocking dam construction and additional environmental initiatives. While this was a huge honor. It was not without risk that same year global witness wrote that Honduras had the most environmental and land defenders killed per capita of any country in the world on March third two, thousand, sixteen, a friend and Mexican environmental activist Gustavo Castro Soto came to stay with Barracuda. He was in town to help bear to think about alternative solutions for powering the proposed government minds. Heard a loud noise and shouting before running to find four men with guns they shot bear to multiple times and Gustavo twice. To died in Gustavo's arms, Beretta's death was attributed to a robbery but international uproar led to further investigation. Five men were arrested two of whom had worked for the dam construction company and one of whom was a member of the military in two thousand eighteen hundred court ruled that executives at the hundred dam-building company had Veritas murder. The president of the company was arrested while the perpetrators clearly intended to silence bear Kassir s at any cost her murder did the opposite. It brought more international attention and halted the dam project. The Organization to CO founded the Council of Popular and indigenous organizations of Honduras continues the fight her legacy lives on. All month talking about activists for more on why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our newsletter Manica Weekly. Can also follow us on facebook and instagram. At Encyclopedia MANTECA. You can find me directly on twitter at Jenny, Kaplan. Special thanks to lose. Kaplan, at my favorite sister and co-creator. Talk to you tomorrow. I WanNa tell you about a new podcast called the cut from New York magazine and the Vox Media Podcast Network every Wednesday ensemble voices from New York magazine's the cut led by host avery truffle men engage in the conversations that matter most in our current moment. From discussion with La- Darius from the Netflix show cheer about what optimism means in twenty, twenty, two examining nature and our relationship to. Tune into the cut each week for intimate groping looks at the world around us. First episode of the cut is live now. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts..

Honduras Council of Popular and Indigen Jenny Kaplan Berto US Kassir S. custer Council of Popular Makassar Gustavo Castro Soto Ostra Flores El Salvador Florida President Manuel Zelaya Linka Wonder Media Network New York magazine International Finance Corporat gay river Manica
"berta" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

01:48 min | 3 months ago

"berta" Discussed on In The Thick

"A Catholic why mom was like a staunch to Catholic and that's not a dichotomy way past lita identifies as a Catholic Lenka. You know I think that would be Latin America sort of mixing of spirituality and organized religion, but it was really important to. Copay and how organization was always about defending indigenous wise. But indigenous lights mean are landrights territorial lights the white to sustainable sort of use Lavin exploitation of natural resources. Human Rights listening to this is Lana Americanised. She is of a long legacy. That can never be forgotten and she also had many roles. Yeah and what's great about your writing Nina is how we get to see that we see her as a mom right to four kids as a friend as a daughter as a lover. We, see her in the fullness of her life. Like you said, you've interviewed old classmates of hers who told you quote Baked, was beautiful and had lots of boyfriends. She loved to dance a love that quoth you write that she never lost her playfulness when we were talking about as many as always said like there was a kingship there when you met her mighty out and she was so dedicated to the struggle to defending our people and their land. She was told she was a bad mother because of it and that her again, there's this notion of like Oh these leaders and they're like angry women no better was actually filled with so much joy and when I think of Bertha I, think of that continual smile that she had with her but let's talk about better does murder in the context of Patriarchy and machismo in fact, throughout her activism, you right Nina that she quote came.

"berta" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

07:31 min | 3 months ago

"berta" Discussed on In The Thick

"Teach us as giving our lives in various ways for the protection of the rivers is giving our lives for the well-being of humanity and of this planet. Gen Y. Lettuce wake up humankind we are out of time we must share conscious free of the repeal capitalism racism patriarchy. Only shirt our own selfish. Does. One of those stories that we covered a lot Latino rebels and it's important to remember, right Those who are responsible for the death weren't just the people who killed her in her home because when we talk about this corrupt system of power that starts with corporations to various governments to the military, they're all rooted in imperialism. Misogyny they all had a hand in the murder. So you detail all this in your book but for our listeners are maybe you know they might know about better story or they're like walking into the story for the first time who do you hold responsible for does death? Oh There's so many layers of responsibility and in a way the question who killed the castaways. It's not fully answered question. Now, I will see owning to journalists that attended the trial every day for five weeks at the end of two, thousand eighteen. You were the only international journalists. I was be judged list national international. That was there every day you know even local journalists who did call would come in a few minutes Chen religious grab an interview with one of the defense lawyers who would just spout some you very opinionated anti. Antique. Oh. SORTA message, not challenge them and that would be the message that would go every day I. mean it was totally depressing. What we know is that a group of carriers are hired hitmen were paid to kill tire on the night of the second of March has an in sixteen. They possibly didn't know who she was. Unlikely that they did we know from their twelve that there was involvement from the company. What the judge volved that a plan was made an order given to kill her at the end of two, thousand fifteen around the time that the company we started construction of the dam, they moved the site of the dam to the other side of the Khadka. Had triggered. Refreshed opposition and protests from better time the Lincoln people against the dime, and that's when the plan was hatched and over the next few weeks months, you know that she was followed, she was monitored. The company had paid informants in community abandoned river. Those convicted included two people linked to the company, a former security chief who was a US try and former military officer saw the company's communities and environmental manager, and also a active special forces major who's really interesting because he was a heavily really decorated. So officer trained by the US. Many times sat with the coalition forces in Iraq, it also served. As a peacekeeper and at the time of the murder, you know he was on route to being promoted to lieutenant colonel but he was at the same time under investigation for drug trafficking and kidnapping charges by is lot. This'll tip parallel magical somew- mealey's Ovando us in central, America. So his phone was tapped at the time. So we bought quite a lot of evidence that there was actually a botched mission to mud about a month earlier she had two of her daughters loud that tita about home with us and mission was abandoned hilary seven men who I would describe as the Hitman and the middleman. Tried and convicted of her murder and four of them were also convicted of the attempted murder of Mexican style Castro up different by the task who clearly the killers did not know was going to be a house and he survived by playing dead. But those who ordered those who paid for those who enabled in benefited I? See how much as like the grand finale of what was a campaign of terror again. and Co pain and the link of people that was initiated by this internationally funded company. You know which had also investors for one of the most powerful clans in Honduras. They were able to use their ties and influences in a prosecutor's office in the criminal. Justice system. We've police security forces with the army. We politicians are local and national level to really solve unleashed his campaign of terror against the community and butter which involved stretch sexual harassment communalization defamation. Violence, assault they were cease hired thugs that evidence suggests were working for the company terrorizing people you know and some people were killed because they were opposing the DAB way before but there was killed and how much was the grand finale and vice people I hold responsible these campaign of Tara. Before matter through the mud and for really everything that's happened. You know because only reason that was been some partial justice in case of the Kesslers is because of the international pressure and really the sorts of incredible tenacious demanding campaign behalf family by people by Organization and friends, and when you see that the murder of the cassidy's was kind of like the grand finale of the terror in place on this entire community. I didn't ask this when I was with. Beta. Yeah. That was the kind of person who could have run for president. Yours easily is she was like Alexander Dough Cossio Cortez before Alexander Dough. Casio Cortez. As somebody who's been covering this actually for decades the United States and its relationship in on dude as if we even call it a relationship. Is really incredibly problematic rights specifically in on dudas in the rise of the regime there that has given concessions and fast track legislation to allow companies both hundred and international to profit by. Natural Resources and the way they do that is. Frankly by taking indigenous land from the people. Yeah when Bertha we talk about this you remember this as you would just say it's gaze lonely go get the NIMMO's the only thing that we have is our land In the case of Bertha, they were keeping tabs on her whereabouts. They were hiring these hitmen, they were sending threats. In fact, she had received thirty three previous threats before she was killed corporate interests gained power after the coup in in two thousand nine when the democratically elected president minority Celaya. Who Lean left was ousted, and so those corporate interests have more power. Yeah. It was classic Latin America and need. We remind everyone in two thousand nine who was secretary of state. It was Hillary Clinton. There's been a reckoning. In the left about her involvement in the coup and we call.

murder US officer president Alexander Dough Cossio Cortez Hillary Clinton Bertha Casio Khadka Chen Latin America Iraq hilary America Honduras prosecutor harassment assault
"berta" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

08:17 min | 4 months ago

"berta" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Announce that we are continuing our journey with a new podcast called Scientology Fair game. What is fair? Victims a term in scientology that that is used to describe a was used to describe. The. Taking care of and that's the euphemism Tom okay rats and enemies of. Scientology. What it really is is a series of writings and policies directives by l Ron Hubbard that lay out how you go about destroying someone who is an enemy of Scientology listen to Scientology Fair game on the iheartradio APP, apple podcast or wherever you listen to podcasts. Hey guys. Welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day. Today was August second 1894. Maria Julia lutes was born in Sao Paulo Brazil. Luke's is remembered as a dedicated feminist and diplomat and accomplished scientists. Fairy. Tale was born into an upper middle class family. Her mother was Amy Fowler a British nurse who had cared for people with leprosy in Hawaii. Adolfo. LUTES BERTOS father was a Swiss Brazilian physician and epidemiologist who specialized in tropical medicine and. Have, went to primary school in Brazil. But she traveled to Europe to finish her studies. She attended the University of Paris Sorbonne Studying Natural Sciences and concentrating on volatility. In nineteen eighteen, she received a degree in biology from the sort bone after she graduated, she returned to Brazil. In nineteen nineteen, she took a high civil service post as secretary at the National Museum of Rio de Janeiro. But while in Europe, she had been paying attention to the suffrage is and gained interest in the struggle for women's right to vote. In Brazil, she began advocating for women's suffrage and equal access to education and public office. Though she did not believe that the militant actions of suffragettes and Britain would've work in Brazil. She did believe that women needed to organize in their fight for rights. She published a call to Brazilian women which said in part I am proposing the establishment of a League of Brazilian women. I am not proposing an association of suffragettes who would break windows along the street. But rather of Brazilians who understand that a woman ought not to live parasitic based on her sex taking advantage of Man's animal instincts but rather be useful educate herself and her children and become capable of performing those political responsibilities which the future cannot fail to allot her. Loose began serving as director of the Administrative Commission and the League of Brazilian women an organization that was established in Nineteen nineteen and had the motto. Aid Elevate women. But LUTH's would go on to found her own organization together with a teacher and author named. Maria. Does you Mora she established the league for the intellectual emancipation of women in nineteen twenty. Unlike other organizations and publications that. Christian morality and we're Philanthropic League was secular and did not take charitable approach. It focused on employment and suffrage and promoted women's intellectual freedom through rational scientific. It's program was publicized through articles in the press petitions and proclamations. In nineteen twenty one, the name of the organization was into the League for the emancipation of women and political legal and economic issues took precedent over intellectual freedom. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two lutes traveled to Baltimore Maryland has Brazil's delegate to the Pan American Conference of women there. She consulted feminists and suffrage leaders on strategies for the movement and Brazil. She was elected vice president of the Pan American Association for South America. And when she went back to Brazil, she established Brazilian Federation for the Advancement of women which had representatives from all of the Brazilian states, women's professional organizations and social action charity groups. The organization focused on and was supported by middle and upper class women in urban areas in some impoverished women as many were illiterate and therefore ineligible to vote for turned off of the organization and lose for this reason. But the federation did have programs initiatives that helped lower class women including one that focused on shorter working hours, health issues for rural women and access to secondary education for girls. The campaign for women's right to vote was contentious even among Latin American feminists who did not all agree on the value of the vote to their cause or were more concerned with other social and economic issues. Either Way Lewis continued to campaign for women's suffrage established organizations and take more leadership positions. She worked on the Drafting Committee for Brazil's new constitution, which was adopted in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, and women gave the right to vote. She got a law degree in one, thousand, nine, thirty, three, she entered into politics, but the establishment of a dictatorial Estado Novo or new state ended women's participation in electoral politics. The women's movement lost momentum and people were split over the effectiveness of loses leadership. She turned her attention back to her pathology. lutes became director of the botanical section of the National Museum a position she held until she retired in nineteen, sixty four. She died in nineteen, seventy six. Several species of frogs and lizards are named after Bertolucci. Coat, and hopefully you know a little little more about history today than you did yesterday. Get more notes from history on twitter instagram and facebook at td I H podcast. We'll see you here in the same place tomorrow. For more podcasts from iheartradio visit, the iheartradio APP apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Burger. was unimaginable crime. We couldn't believe something like that would happen here. All from the same family this is the piped-in massacre. Listen to the pectin massacre on the iheartradio, APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. From iheartradio in tribeca studios, this is fierce a podcast about the incredible women who never made it in your history books and the modern women carrying on their legacy today. I'm your host Joe Piazza. Fierce brings you stories of groundbreaking women from the past who made huge contributions to the present but whose name still aren't on the tips of tones. In this podcast, you hear about women like Chinese Sal, the greatest pirate that histories ever known she outclassed says. Every other known pirate by every metric, he would use to discover success and Phillis Wheatley who became the first, African? American. Published female poet while she was still enslaved, she published a book when she was at most twenty years old while she was still a slave I mean it's really kind of astounding story of life. You can binge all of season one. Now, we even have any bonus episode for you L. Listen to it to hear conversation about how we can continue the work that.

Brazil Pan American Conference of wom apple Sao Paulo Brazil Maria Julia lutes Ron Hubbard Europe director Phillis Wheatley Tom University of Paris Sorbonne S Brazilian Federation Philanthropic League National Museum of Rio de Jane Amy Fowler Luke League of Brazilian
Cultivate Calm During Chaos With Neil Pasricha

The LEADx Show

04:58 min | 4 months ago

Cultivate Calm During Chaos With Neil Pasricha

"Welcome everyone to this lead x Webinar with Neil Pastor Rita. Thank you so much for joining Neil. Past reach is the author of seven bucks including the book of Awesome. The happiness equation Awesome is everywhere, and you are awesome. His Books Are New York. Times and number one international bestseller's and have spent over two hundred weeks on bestseller lists and sold millions of copies. Neal is one of the world's top brings speakers and his first Ted Talk. The three days of awesome is wearing to one of the ten most inspiring all time. He thinks rights to an speaks about intentional living, and all of his work focuses on the themes of gratitude, happiness, failure, resiliency, and trust welcome Neil. Well. Thank you so much for having me guys. On this cold slash hot sunny slash cloudy Friday afternoon slash morning. I am in Toronto Canada. And it is cold and cloudy and the afternoon here, but I can already see people chiming in on the side Jason's. That's good morning from. Kansas, happy Friday everyone. Guys, please. Let's the chat open that box open on my screen the whole time. I would love to be reinvented time. Why because right now? During coronavirus, one of the biggest sort of needs I feel that I need and I feel like you probably feel it too, is community. Connection. betsy, high from Boulder, Sonya Hi, from California. This is wonderful for Michigan Los Angeles anyone not a not from America it'd be great to hear as well. I don't know. Who I'm talking to the other thing that would be great to salvage front before we get into our exciting conversation. Cuban a love all the texts coming in, thank you is who knows me so when I ended up. Speaking to groups of people, hundreds of people like I'm doing right now. What I don't know is who have you have read the book on some or Oj Geek from India I'm hearing these great ones Calgary. High highly shot cloudy Gog always touting car, isn't it now I'm just kidding but I almost called love. coury loved the Chart Cut Restaurant downtown props to independent restaurants bookstores. Guys got to bring him back. So I. Don't know who's read any books book Balsam the happiness equation you are. Does anybody listened to my podcast three bucks? Maybe some of you were when you get to hear me other places has anyone ever heard me give a speech a Tedtalk? Have you seen like dislike me? Know where you touched my stuff, if at all, or maybe you're like I have no idea who Zappa at me so? You quit your Yapper, but let me know so I'm seeing a seeing I'm seeing some Yeah, Berta, I've never heard of you until now. Diane says you are not unique to me, but I'm already intrigued. The says I've read the happiness equation. oh, I watched you on. Ted Ted or lead Ex. Yeah, so there's lots of I like the newest Story never heard before. Guys don't be sorry. There's eight billion of us in the world right now. I'm one person My community, which I'd like to welcome you into. Is You know one hundred thousand people? These are people that want to live a deeply intentional life. The reason I want to do that is because about ten years ago. My wife left me. My best friend took his own life. These two things happened in the span of a few weeks. I was devastated I stopped. Eating I stopped sleeping. I! Was a skeleton of myself mentally physically psychologically, and then I started a blog called one thousand awesome things, dot com, and for thousand straight weekdays I wrote an entry. Cheer myself up like old dangerous playground equipment like the smell of bakery, air or wearing warm underwear from out of the dryer. The blog took off one best log on the world two years in a row one hundred million hits. It turned into a book called the Book of Awesome so that book here the black. One came out sold. A million copies was a big bestseller I thought that's my fifteen minutes of fame. I kept my job at Walmart the whole time. I got my blog went by. Everyone gets like one viral fleet in their life and their life, but it kept going, and it turns up. I needed to when I got remarried five years later I ended up writing a guidebook to my unborn child than how to live happy life that became my book called the happiness equation more recently. Now I have three boys, five three and one very happily married my wife, lastly on lucky say, and ever in a brand new book all about Resilience Okay so you are also came out last November. On Book Two right now, but of course everything shut down that about resilience. The subtitles had navigate change, wrestle failure and live in attentional

New York Neil Pastor Rita Ted Talk Ted Ted Neal Kansas Toronto Walmart Chart Cut Restaurant Canada Michigan Jason Calgary Diane Berta Sonya Hi Betsy Zappa
Lamar reviews 'The Stranger'

Bob and Sheri

04:38 min | 8 months ago

Lamar reviews 'The Stranger'

"Good friend of ours recommended the stranger and she was not wrong. The Stranger is based on a novel by Hauling Cohen. And it was originally set in New Jersey but Netflix chose to move to England because evidently British mysteries or a lot cooler than American mysteries. And I don't disagree but along with that. Coolness comes that British accent that makes everybody sound smarter and what they're saying seem more important. It has its own set of problems. I can't always understand what they're saying to characters home sentences that will make everything clear with a hugely dramatic consequence and cargoes wait. What did you say go? We wish? Stop and rewind which means instead of going back to riot before the two sentences we wind up twelve minutes earlier so they're not trying to fast forward back to where we were and zoo passed it and then we see some that we should have seen until we understood those two sentences and callers like what are you doing and I said I'm over here if you could do any better take the remote now. We're having a fight over this because it's it's nuts nuts and it happened at least three or four times in each episode. So now it's like I don't know the words they're using this need. I need less mumbling. Okay and so what? I should have done what I'm telling everybody else to do. If you have this problem it's turn on the closed caption it so you can see what these fools are talking about. It's at don't ever have this problem. One Lamar the TV show peaky blinders learned how to turn the clothes caption on A. I agree with what you're saying but right now there's some guy from England who's living in the United States saying are you telling me some guy from Georgia is criticizing how the English speak what they invented the language. At least it looks like they could speak it clearly. Mean no it's true. It's very and the toughest understand out of the all of the United Kingdom Areas is Scotland Scottish. Accent to me. I can't even understand what they're selling. Well I keep them I turn on the closed caption for peaky blinders and for outlander because when some of the side outlander characters dodger that. I'm pretty sure that Berta just said something critical to the plot. I have no idea what it was so I feel you Lamar. When Kelly was learning Japanese. She told me that she would. She would go to this place where the old Japanese men were talked to them. She said the hardest thing to understand is old because everybody they've been talking to each other for so long they just sort of say half the word and everybody's sort of picks up and I think this is what's happening here. I'm not getting the whole things I don't know anyway. Back to the story the series Stewart Richard Armitage and hit as Adam price season attorney has a wife and two boys. He's approached by this attractive young woman. The Stranger played by Hannah. Joe John Cameron and she tells him that his wife has a secret and she has been lying to him for the last two years she tells him or he can find the proof and now that he knows that she's a liar. He no longer has to stay with her so this she just leaves now. When he confronts his wife his wife says well. There's more to it and I'll tell you everything but not right this minute it while this is going on. A decapitated animal is discovered in the middle of the town. Along with that comes. Multiple visits from the stranger to other people naked bodies found in the woods. Really Bad Cup. I really good cup murder embezzlement blackmail infidelity and so many other things that have nothing to do with each other or do they have power. They connected snowden brings more questions but no answers. It's just definitely been show. You can't stop once you start there eight episodes. They're forty two minutes just rated TV may for language include the F word a lot edgier seat twist and turns with a lot of surprises and a lot of British monklands. It's you have no idea what's going on but overall it's a good series. My schoolwork is four solid budweiser. I enjoyed

Kelly Joe John Cameron Lamar England Hauling Cohen Netflix New Jersey United Kingdom Scotland Scottish Berta United States Stewart Richard Armitage Hannah Snowden Attorney Georgia Murder Embezzlement Adam
Are you tired? Theres a reason, it's Daylight Savings Time

The Big Story

10:11 min | 9 months ago

Are you tired? Theres a reason, it's Daylight Savings Time

"I I don't know about you guys but I'm tired. Part of that is the ceaseless Rahm of end of the World News. Of course part of. It's just work or family or the everyday things that always get to me by the end of the week and this week in particular there is another reason. I'm tired and you know it. Or at least most of you deal with the exception of most of Saskatchewan and none of it. You Lucky Jerks Canada's sprang forward this week and if this world isn't seem bleak enough now it is once again dark when I leave my house in the morning every year more and more people ask why we have daylight saving time and the calls to abolish it grow louder and now we may in some places be ready to actually do away with except there's about of course there is what happens if some places in Canada eliminate daylight saving time but their neighbors either to the south or to the side. Do not put up some places decide to stay on permanent daylight time and others decide the opposite. What if every province and territory makes their own call and we end up with a maze of time zones the plays hell with scheduling things like sporting events are flights or deliveries. The last thing any of us want is they solution. Daylight saving time ends up making us even more tired. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the Big Story. Alex mckean a reporter at the Toronto Star and their Vancouver Bureau and she's Ab. As tired. As I am I out. How are you? I'm tired like I said this time shift always throws me for a loop. Yeah me too. I mean I was actually not only experiencing the time change weekend but I also flew to Toronto and then back to Vancouver so I've got double jetlag going on so your province is perhaps maybe on the verge of getting rid of daylight saving time and we will talk about that but first because this is a really good part of the story. Can you just tell me who is Ray Saunders? Sure Ray Saunders is a gentleman who just recently turned eighty years old and not a lot of people in Vancouver may recognize his name but they certainly would recognize his most famous creation. Refunders the maker of the Gas Count Skin. Kwok which is one of the biggest tourist attractions in the entire city of Vancouver. It's this incredible clock that is powered by steam and has whistled plays a tune every I think every fifteen minutes or so tourists come and look at it in the context of this historic part of the city gas town with. Oh it's a it's probable streets and they take pictures with it and Race unders is is the guy that built it. He built it in nineteen seventy seven and for a long time he He maintained it as well. Now it's maintained by the city of in coober but she wrote back walk and two hundred other public clocks in Vancouver Canada and all over the world to we can a year. He goes around to all of the Public Clark's in the city of Vancouver and surrounding area and he has been the guy who's responsible for manual we. Changing those public Clark's to reflect the time change at daylight savings time so He he describes me that during the this spring forward period which just happened this past weekend. Most of the public clocks they'll have kind of a speedup function and so it'll take about Six seconds he said that for the two wine forward an hour to reflect the new delay time and of course the the opposite happens during the fullback period in November. So He's been doing that for twenty years or so. It seems so quaint in a way but this might be the last weekend that he'll ever do it. Tell me about that. Yeah that's right. It might be the last weekend he ever does it And it's you know it's kind of fitting away because as described when we were talking. He's getting older. He unfortunately experienced a fall recently which which made ladder finding a lot more challenging for him. Of course you have to climb up the ladder in order to reach the public bases. So that's part of this task that he's been doing for for the last couple of decades So but personal reasons aside and personal limitations aside He also possibly last weekend that That this kind of topic will be required in the city of in coober because Bc is looking out just mixing the time changes all together And I I think you're right it it is. There is something kind of quaint about it if if I could just describe a little bit about Something that struck me talking to ray was that he has this really interesting relationship with clocks and time so I mean I'm a millennial and I will admits that most of the time that That I'm actually checking the time. I do wear wristwatches but most of the time I'm looking at my computer screen or looking at my phone that's the thing. That's like really intuitive to me. Ray has this this cool relationship with clocks. Where he says look. There's something lost when you're just looking at numbers on a screen. The clock face the circular nature of it the fact that the hands are always kind of moving around the tell us something about the time that has passed and the time that is yet to come. It's more You know accurate to the way that we actually walk through life and I thought that was such a such an interesting idea not anything that I considered at all so I think he his sense of affection for these public clocks in and the analog nature of them really came through so why is British Columbia considering getting rid of daylight saving time and how did that movement sprang up and come to be yeah. It's a great question And different people will tell you different responses as to the origin story of why British Columbia's dealing with this thing but I'm gonNA start with the practical elements of it. Which is the. This is a conversation that it's also happening South of the border in the western state so Washington Oregon California all considering changing to a permanent daylight time and that has pretty significant implications for us here British Columbia because we're coordinated with those states. There's a lot of commerce that happens between those days even things like as work scheduling. That happens along the West Coast and these are things that it makes sense to be in in the same time as them so Washington last fall passed legislation to change their approach to time to permanent. Be Lifetime. And that hasn't happened yet because they need the approval by the The Federal Congress there in order to make it happen but our premier John Horrigan Here British Columbia was in conversation with Governor of Washington State and said look. Maybe this is something. We're interested in in British Columbia is well. It's something that the the government launched a public consultation on. They sent out a survey and they received within the first month or so. They received more completed surveys than they ever have in the history of all public consultations on on this topic of changing to permanent daylight time so they received two hundred and twenty three thousand completed surveys Colombian yeah and overwhelmingly ninety. Three percent of people said get rid of it. We don't want time changes anymore. We just want a permanent time. Is that something that we see elsewhere in the world You mentioned it's happening already on the west coast of the US but also some parts of Canada. Don't have it as well. That's true and you know after I published this story on what? Bc is doing. I got quite a lot of emails from folks in Saskatchewan because the way described it in the story was that Scotch Wayne is on permanent central standard time but both insist on reminded being over over email but in fact according to the line to Scotch. When is that? It should be on mountain time zone for the same time zone as Berta so the fact that it's on permanent central standard time actually means that it's it's more on a permanent stay like time similar to what? Bc is trying to do so it all gets a little bit confusing but since nineteen sixty six scotch and has been the Canadian exception to this time. Change practice that we have been doing and the they've been on the most places in Scotland. Anyway have been on permanent central standard time. Alberta has considered it. I understand that there's also a private member's bill In Ontario on this topic. So if it's something that people are increasingly aware of but the one that I has really caught my attention in the last couple of weeks was the Yukon because of course the Yukon is also a jurisdiction along the west coast. And they've already pulled the trigger. They said okay. We went to move the clocks forward an hour this past weekend. And we're not going to change them again. It's just GonNa stay dot so Yukon. Who is the one that's most recently has actually made the changes that British Columbia is talking about? Making what is the case in this day and age for daylight saving time? Can

Vancouver Canada Ray Saunders West Coast British Columbia BC Coober Toronto Saskatchewan Yukon Columbia Rahm Clark World News Washington Jordan Heath Rawlings Vancouver Bureau Kwok Alex Mckean
Whats driving the explosion in Lyme Disease in Canada?

The Big Story

12:23 min | 10 months ago

Whats driving the explosion in Lyme Disease in Canada?

"Today disease a complicated disease that we are having trouble testing for a disease. We never expected to see with any regularity in Canada only to realize perhaps too late. Maybe that was Donald. No this is not a new virus from across the world world. It's not some weird superbug. It's not particularly contagious illness. You probably don't think much about until it makes headlines because somebody famous something was wrong with Justin Bieber last year and we saw him with visas. Arm We we now know what was going on here. Justin Bieber has lime disease but it is a mistake to think of lyme disease as a rare illness because all of the data we have and we still don't have enough shows that it is exploding in Canada with numbers of confirmed cases spiking every year. Get One guess as to why but even that is not the key problem here what we need to figure out and fast is a comprehensive way to test for your dial and treat lyme disease because that's where we lag behind almost everybody else. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Janet sperling is a PhD candidate at the University of Alberta. She is also a board member number on the Canadian lyme Disease Foundation. Hello Janna why. Don't you just start I think all of us the term but maybe just explain what what lime disease is sure. Lime disease is one of the more complicated things you would hope that I should be able to say. Oh lime disease is You know a bacterial curiel owners and it's transmitted by tick but unfortunately when you peek under the covers it gets a little more complicated so if you go to the government of Canada website. And you'll see that lyme disease is Berea Bergdorf Ri- and you say Oh. Okay that's nice and easy I can follow what they're trying to say but now if we just step over the border a little bit to Minnesota and we look up the male clinic they say lyme disease is four main species of bacteria and then they list four types of Berea so now you know your head is spinning you say okay. Well what do they say in Europe so if we go due to Europe and we go for example to Germany we see lyme disease is caused by spy. Rookie Berea Bergdorf. Wry sense allow to which means it's a whole bunch of different Burrito So this is part of the reason that we're ending up with a really complicated answer to what ought not be a very simple question. Why do various countries disagree so much on precisely what it is? That's not the case with most of viruses or diseases. I assume right and I think this is one of the things when I first started like you know back in the nineteen eighties and I took my medical entomology. They said lime disease is a disease it happens in North America. It's transmitted by so I wrote that down on my exam tonight. Got One hundred percent and everybody said great and I said to myself boy. I'm caught. I live in Canada. 'cause I don't need to worry about lyme disease but the more we started to find out notable lime disease and the more we realized it is actually in Europe. It's been in Europe for a very very long time for example You know it sees the iceman man who was found You know he's Bronze Age. I think you know we back in a gleese your those fraud. He had evidence of lime disease. So we know you you know. We've had lyme disease around for a long time. People just didn't recognize it as lime disease so the more you look into it. The more you see that this is something that's called us a Nautica Kasese so it's found circulating in the wildlife and then he kinda jumps over to the people although the disease itself Rigas and aiming for are people so this isn't something like measles measles something that goes from one person to the other person. This is something that's circulating in. It's got Birds is involved in this cycle. It's got animals. You know deer mice all sorts of things so this is why it just becomes more and more complicated. The more you look at it and and of course as a person who's suffering from lung disease you really don't care about all that background just saying I'm sick. Just get better and that advantage of being a bacteria tirrenia is that means we can use antibiotics so I think previously people were being treated for lyme disease without even actually recognizing was lime disease. assise they had antibiotics for some other reasons. They got better. Everybody said okay. I don't know what it was but they're better now. We're very concerned that we want want to make sure that we don't over use the antibiotics so that ends up making it even more complicated so we have the people we know they're sick. We know that got got bit by a tick. We know that something is wrong so some of the doctors are saying okay. We'll give them the antibiotic conceive to get better so those people all say. I think it's lyme disease and other people say I don't think it was on disease at all. It was something else it was transmitted by tick. But it wasn't lime disease so now we've taken a really complicated problem and we've really muddied the waters. We have people who say I have lime disease and other people who say whatever it was. It wasn't lime disease but I'm glad they got better so if the waters are so muddy and to your point the description you gave about learning about lyme disease in the eighties was precisely as much much as I knew about. LYME disease period Why are we discussing it so much more frequently right now? Are we seeing spike. Absolutely and I think it's certainly only with the global climate change we're getting the tick has expanded its range so you know back in the nineteen eighties. Certainly ticks. Albertus stopped about sort of middle. The problems you didn't have to go very far. Well now. They're all the way out into the Yukon. So this is something that's changed. It's it's new. I think we've always had you know a a couple of topics here and there and the other place but now it's much bigger. We know that most Canadians live right along the US border so we know most of our population is sort of super at risk as the ticks start moving north. Do we have a sense of how quickly the problem is getting worse like. Do you guys have have numbers on no matter how quickly the number of cases arising well we don't we don't have numbers because the numbers are set to be very very specific to Berea Maria br door fry and then it's particular string thirty one that somebody described in Boston Massachusetts lyme Connecticut down in that end so for Canada. It's kind of difficult to say can say you know if you're looking very strictly for one type of Lyme disease we know that the numbers have increased hugely sleep but we also know it would be kind of unlikely that we're just Columbia would have exactly the same type of lime disease as Boston Massachusetts. You know there's a latta kilometers in between the two and then also There's huge mountain range and then to make at one stage more complicated the even have different species of tick so this is where people get annoyed because they say I'm sick. I think I have lime disease because you treated me as though I have lime disease but still it's been denied as being lined disease or even anything like lyme disease. Why don't we have a simple test that can categorize it as one of what may be many kinds of lyme disease for instance right? Well we do if your dog so if your dog your jet can in Cohen tests the dog and say okay you have a sick dog. The dog is Being picked up to have this general sense of this says lyme disease lyme Berea of some sort so your vet will probably just treat your dog and say I'm calling lime disease good enough for me taking antibiotics and get better. Okay but humans but humans don't have exactly the same immune response so a dog has a much stronger immune response so it makes it easier when you're a VAT and and also with the humans. People are so readable antibiotics that you have to absolutely meal the diagnosis before they're willing to give you the antibiotics in the first place and that makes sense because we have talked on this podcast in the past about the need to not use antibiotics. Unless it's serious I guess what's flung meal. A little bit is that this can be a disease. That's it's on the rise that's diagnosed in many places around the world and they're still not the same kind of credible test that can determine like okay. You need antibiotics. Let's go right and I think partly it's because it circulates among birds. It circulates among various little mice and small rooms all the way up to deer and that each one of these animals. This part of this really complicated cycle the deer can actually clear the infection so for example if I had a tick and I knew that that had most recently fed on a bird I would be quite worried or if I knew had most recently said on a most but if I knew knew that the last thing that tick fed on was a dear I wouldn't be very worried at all I would say. Oh okay. Fortunately that's very low risk from that particular tech so this is where I think people especially if your doctor and you've got somebody and they have very nonspecific symptoms because that's one of the problems. There's nothing that's really obviously. This is exactly lime disease. You know you can't stand the front of the room and say okay. People have lime disease and these people don't have lime disease so oh you look people. They've got these nonspecific symptoms. And you're saying I know they're sick but I just don't know what it is. We're going to start looking at a lot of different things. So there's this a big list of differential diagnoses. You need to go through. And then when it gets the bottom of the list you always have lime disease. And that's something that was missed for for many many decades and for example I live in Alberta. And we're still told. Oh you can't have lime disease because you live in Berta but the silly thing is to people travel awful and when people are traveling. It doesn't matter where I live. Where my house addresses if I live in Alberta maybe got it in California maybe I got it in Toronto? Well in speaking of California you probably knew at some point in this interview. I was going to mention Justin Bieber. Indeed and it gets back to kind of the problem that you're describing reading because when celebrities like that come out and announced that they've been battling lyme disease it often seems like he has the best medical care in the world right. He compay millions of dollars for the very best doctors and yet still People were worrying about him for months before he came forward. Exactly and that's I think it's actually shiver common story and if you were to take your average Canadian. Generally they're healthy people. They're living their lives eating wells sleeping well plenty of exercise and and then suddenly something happens. They get sick and they don't even necessarily associated with tick bite and especially in a place where you're not expecting to run into ticks like downtown Toronto. You might not think about it and as you get. sicker and sicker and sicker. Lime disease isn't even on the radar so it takes long time to figure out what it is and the problem with lyme disease is if you catch it early. It's very easy to treat. Take your antibiotics into the story. But if you don't catch catch it and it goes on for a long time like weeks or months or sometimes even years. It's really hard to treat people were saying and this is why I wanted to ask you about like how it presents. How the disease presents because people were saying that it looked like Justin had lapsed and that he was an addict and that he was really struggling with substance abuse? Right you and and I think that that's actually remarkably common and a lot of people find that obviously really hurtful and you can certainly understand and why if you've been

Lyme Disease Canadian Lyme Disease Foundati Lung Disease Canada Justin Bieber Europe Boston Massachusetts Lyme Conn Berea Bergdorf Jordan Heath Rawlings Donald Trump Janna Berea Bergdorf Ri Alberta Minnesota Albertus Fraud Berea United States Nautica Kasese Janet Sperling
How Mason Buffalo Combats Suicide in His Community

Unreserved

06:13 min | 10 months ago

How Mason Buffalo Combats Suicide in His Community

"Four of Mason Buffalo's cousins died by suicide. He dedicated his life to helping others the man for musk. CHIESA BERTA says while everybody's been hurt in his community. He wants to give them hope again this. ABC's Roberta Bell has that. That story Mason Buffalo puts the headstone at the base of the white cross that marks cousins grave. Holy I'm just GONNA emotional denison Thomas not birthday other. He maintains the Samson cemetery in Moscow. Chief for she's buried alongside three of their other cousins who all committed suicide before they turn thirty. Look all my family here. It's easy for me to disclose known assume but it's easy for me to disco. String up give up on everything but I don't Wanna be either guy. I want to show people hoping community. He says his life is like many peoples in his community. He's struggled as a teen parent on the front line. China's young firefighter with alcohol with mental health and with loss in a community of sixteen thousand people. He says it surprisingly easy you to feel alone. That's why he's dedicated himself to being there for other in person and in spirit. If I wasn't doing what I'm doing right now then I wouldn't be here. I'll probably be buried in Vevey to guaranteed I would have been here in our fight instead helping other people off breath this is his story. Mason walks through the field behind his dad's two story farmhouse. where he grew? Up on the Samson Hamson cremation in Moscow chiefs all get behind his dad. Patrick Buffalo is a rancher and a hypnotherapist and Reiki master astor the reference point for most people is the past and their experiences. That's where they're stuck is in their memories. After Mason became a dad himself at fifteen he took a job with the fire. Department is a fire department. You don't know what call your on on his first day. The very first call it came in was about his cousin ferron three years later it was his cousin. Tyrel seem more. I looked lifeless. Die Total soda from their guts on my life went downhill fast for one full year. Not Something I didn't WanNa live. Noma Mason left my asquith cheese for Toronto. That's where he was when his dad called him and told him his cousin cody had died by suicide. I didn't even have time to come back and pay my last respects for cody. And it's tough especially for if people would what we're GONNA do some analysis step up and take the lead so he came home if you ask them to describe himself now. He says. Suicide side awareness advocate if our thought all my life and what. My plans are in everything that I didn't think I'd be what I'm doing. When he got back he started his first of many community initiatives walking and spirit so with all this as like when you commit suicide is there? You'RE GONNA be lingering around this area time too so it's like You lost your spirits. Lost people people from all four of the nations that make up mask. WHOA cheese now set? Aside a day every year to walk the reserves royal roads carrying handmade signs mementos wearing shirts shirts with the names of their loved ones written across their chests. My heart breaks into a million pieces each day on picking up these pieces and getting my hard-backed together and health and people helps me. Mason says the number of suicides look like they've gone down at least in Samson for him. The work is year are long and a part of everything he does. This team of horses at his father's ranch makes frequent trips to to the cemetery. Three funerals doing within the leaf they pull rehearse with big spoked wheels and light pink curtain toppers with tassels hanging from the top of the glass window on every side. It was an idea that Mason and his dad had to give community members that last ride. That's not all the horses to though. They're also helping people to heal nestled in the snow. Coated trees to the east of Patrick's barn is another project with his son. Mason came back and then he started making pass and clearing the bush and we bought a cabin set up a TV. They call it was dossier village. It's a place ace where people visit to confront their trauma. Going for a ride in a wagon with a team of horses is a very therapeutic. It's very healing going for a horseback ride. It's very therapeutic therapeutic. So that's what we offer here is Is that I am experience. It's so peaceful there it's like Like being somewhere else. Oh Patrick says his son needs to be doing this work for his own wellbeing and others so mason does have a strong villa vision for healing although he struggled in his own ways continuously. You know because he's had his own experiences ever since he was a child that he has to continue. Continue to deal with And it's no different and all with the the sixteen thousand people that live in this community and everybody's been hurt everybody's been everybody's stuck in a Rut. Not Knowing how to get unstuck. He knows what he needs to do and when he's doing it yes I feel good care when we can work as a team. I feel good

Noma Mason Mason Buffalo Patrick Buffalo Cody Samson Hamson Moscow Chiesa Berta Samson Cemetery Denison Thomas ABC Vevey China Roberta Bell Samson Tyrel Toronto Bush Patrick
Imperial Oil ignored its own findings on climate change decades ago

The Big Story

11:42 min | 11 months ago

Imperial Oil ignored its own findings on climate change decades ago

"The effects of climate change are being witnessed all over the world. It's the biggest story right. Now there are downright apocalyptic take images coming out of Australia right now. The country's battling hundreds of fires that burned across the country for months now roads and villages turned into rivers overnight right and tens of thousands displaced many areas in central and southern Somalia have been completely caught off and people here are now in urgent. Need aide Greenland's is sheets is the biggest in the northern hemisphere and it's in meltdown. All of this is a warning sign for the while. We hear it all the time. This is a dire situation. Time is running out. It's a crisis. Makes you wonder if we knew what we know now. Old decades ago could we have done something to stop. The devastation. Could much of what we're seeing today been reversed in the troubling answer is probably doubly. Yes in fact. Some people did know what was happening. As far back as the nineteen sixties major fossil fuel companies are alleged to have known about Science and worse that they were contributing one major Canadian company in particular its own research and ignored the findings and as we hear from our guest today. Imperial Oil Royal Coulda changed its business. Model could have been a leader to fight climate change but instead just decided to make bigger profit often. I'm Richard Southern Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Berta Hussein is a writer at the intercept joins us now Heimer Taza. How good thank you interesting article? One that I think is going to the real eye opener for a lot of people. Maybe anger a lot of people first off. It's really centering around a company that we use here in Canada a lot whether we know it or not tell us what is his imperial oil. Who are they so imperial oil is the Canadian subsidiary of Exxonmobil? The famous Fossil fuel company. It's best known in Canada. Zal at the consumer level for esso-brand gas stations. So imperial is essentially Exxon's arm in Canada and Essel is its most prominent consumer manifestation. Yeah they're everywhere you know but a tiger in your tank bright and you're saying going back to what the nineteen sixties imperial oil knew about the dangers of climate change. What exactly did they know back then? Murtaza well in the nineteen sixties the specific contours of the problem. With coming into view. They will not definite about climate. Change percents at that time but they knew that they were causing serious harm to the environment and they knew that this would eventually lead to a public outcry cry. If Canadians became aware of the full scope. The heart they were causing annual this time. You think of things like air quality polity destruction of habitat destruction of ecosystems. It was only in the later decades by the nineties. They were very very sure are about the science of climate change. We're talking maybe. Almost three decades ago they had come to a high degree of certainty about the impacts of climate change. Despite that knowledge they did not change their behavior and in fact did whatever they could to prevent the public from reaching the same level certainty. EG about the issue that they have what did they do to sway public opinion away from what they knew was the fact that climate change was real and that they were participating ended. What did they do to sway public opinion? Well over a decade imperial has been very concerned about possibility of public backlash and particularly particularly if that backlash led to calls for regulation up their activities or the imposition of climate or environmental regulation but somehow impacted their ability to carry out their operations. So going back to the sixties and then onwards from there are they attempted to do their own public relations campaigns to sway public opinion to Muddy the waters over their own environmental record and to push back against any organized attempt to curtail their activities but it wasn't just Pr. It was also surveillance of non-governmental organizations in Canada local ones like the Canadian Arctic Commission and other consumer advocacy groups to go on the offensive against these people even though they were much smaller than imperial oil oil of course much smaller than Exxon Mobil. What do you mean surveillance where they fled following people around? Was the documents show that they were compiling dossiers on environmental loops in Canada information about their key spokes people their finances their addresses so documents. Give us some insight into do the type that could carry out until two or they did they. Certainly it was on the table for them. Did they do anything. Imperial oil to try. Try and mitigate climate change. I mean you write in your article that a a PR company analyze different ways that the company could reduce its carbon footprint. Do they do anything well in the early nineties you know. Many many decades ago now they essentially knew that for society to avoid the catastrophic this traffic impacts of climate change. It would need to move from fossil fuel extraction to renewables techniques like carbon capture. Many the things that we've discussed today is being necessary to avert the climate prices but the thing is right this knowledge they did not twenty significant degree agreed change their operation. They continued to extract at the same levels and even higher levels year over year this day. They did not engage in the fundamental structural changes that they needed to to avert this crisis but one thing that they did do and I think this quite telling is that they changed the design their own platform in the Arctic and elsewhere to accommodate the fact of rising sea levels and melting sea ice. So they knew this is real soul strongly that they changed their own platform designed to accommodate that but they did not embark on the structural changes. Their business models would have been necessary. And it's even more unfortunate. Because if they had them that they would have had a first mover advantage and renewable energy. You talk about the the Arctic you mentioned in your article and this may be one of the more shocking things is that they looked imperial looked at the the melting sea ice as a new business opportunity for them right right so essentially imperial and other fossil fuel companies day for a very long time had the best climate climate research capacity is any organizations in the world they knew very intimately impacts of change around the world atmosphere here and in the Arctic and now they developed capacities partly for the reasons I mentioned earlier because they were concerned about public backlash over their environmental. I mental record. They wanted to get as good a pictures possible but what they also did was that the this usage capacity which had offensively developed to you know hopefully reduce environmental harm or get a better picture of it also to scope out new business opportunities that may emerge in it radically. Did you date environment. They said hey the fact that there's less CIA is going to allow us to go up further into the Arctic and drill for more oil right more or less maybe more technical language but you just if it was that the fate of Arctic Sea ice will determine how imperial operates right another another interesting thing to with imperial oil was how they saw carbon taxing coming many years ago and how they were how they were sure that that would actually mitigate mitigate some of the climate change of facts right what what did they say about carbon pricing. All those years ago well they knew that carbon pricing would be necessary. She would use fossil fuel emissions but they essentially low ball the numbers the new. That's a much higher number of needed even many decades but they made proposals which were arts private private knowledge and essentially you know we would have probably taxes through which we do need need. Do we need to be much much higher than you would. He needs to be several decades. When imperial and other companies had essentially deceived? The public was imperial. Oil's response to all this. You ask them for response to these documents. You got about all the knowledge they had one of these say. Well you know one thing that I This article is very important that they knew these things privately but for many years thereafter. CEO's if imperial were saying doing things in public when she concluded odds with their own private use and affiliate odds with the consensus of climate change mainly in the late nineties. You know imperial. You see Yo- Roller Peterson was saying that carbon dioxide. It's good for your I'm in started pollutant. There's no consensus about this issue. All and you know essentially open to debate internally do not open to debate very serious and very real so you know response In the light of this it was just that they take seriously and committed to doing what the cans move with the climate crisis. And you know the the thing is not revert. This crisis is businesses usual. Something's GonNa Change. It should've changed three decades ago four decades ago but if it does not radically change now you don't have to prepare for very ugly future in which the vast majority of people many Canadians are going to suffer grievously. Should we be shocked by this. I I mean you know. The cigarette companies knew there product caused cancer. I guess the you know the candy companies. Probably new sugar wasn't very good for people but they kept selling it. This is what Capitalism demands should we be singling energy companies. Like it'd be real oil out. Aren't they just doing what. Capitalism demands of them the difference between the tobacco industry and big sugar and fossil fuel industry. Is that the consequences of these. Allies are much much sh greater than other basic consumer products and. That's not to say that the impact is tobacco and sugar on Health Canadians and others not been grievous what we're talking about eventually an existential threat to industrial civilization Industry Association. We may we now have a planet anymore on which even make future mistakes or to rectify current mistakes. That's why it's really really far more serious than those other phenomena. All those were also serious. Now we're talking about something that we've never experienced before human beings have never done anything anything on such a scale as what they've now begun to

Canada Arctic Exxon Mobil Somalia Greenland Australia Exxon Richard Southern Arctic Sea Essel Berta Hussein Canadian Arctic Commission ZAL Jordan Heath Rawlings
EAA CEO Jack J. Pelton Looks Back at 2019

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

08:09 min | 1 year ago

EAA CEO Jack J. Pelton Looks Back at 2019

"Let's start with Something Nice and easy and measurable like Like membership membership has grown. You know we've had phenomenal growth. Actually when you look at it over the last last five years and membership and we are now in a place where memberships When you look at all types of memberships from families to students to everybody else so well over over two hundred forty thousand members which we haven't seen that number before so this is a great great story that I think is all about the value that DA is bringing bringing to the aviation community and people are voting with their membership cards by being a part of our members when we send out survey work? Don't do indicate that the publication is one one of the number one reasons that they belong to. And you think about how it's evolved how it's improved. You know the the pictures of the quality of the diversity of articles they the value. It's forty bucks. I mean that you can't beat that for a subscription I think a lot of other subscriptions that are out there that are far more expensive than that without nearly the content so so bravo boys. Thanks for doing a great job on it. Well we hear from a lot of people who opened it up read your column and then just set the magazine aside for a while too so it's more of a reflection house. How's what that's all about Let's hop from publications as as much as I would like to sit here and have our praises Sung a little more two programs Yeah obviously known for so many programs that have done so much good for the general aviation community. A new one on the season this year was the Ray Aviation Scholarship program. which if you haven't heard I don't know how you haven't heard it's been everywhere but providing more than one hundred flight training scholarships through the Chapter Network? What are your thoughts on this program and why it has been so successful in your one? I all since we're reflecting on two thousand nineteen this probably has been the most significant new program that has occurred in a long time but he a very. I'm very proud of it. And it has a An impact that's far reaching a very comprehensive is GonNa make the difference in kids lies. I the Ray Foundation stepped up Provided the funding for us to to do something different. The challenge was in flight training today. It's about an eighty percent dropout rate. Call all at sixty seventy eighty but eighties bout what it is. They said they believed in US through our chapter network if we picked people who are engaged in the chapters young people which means they were already part of the chapter and involved in the chapter was willing to mentor them through the flight training process that we could reverse that trend and create eighty percents success rate and we gladly took that on because we believe strongly that that is one of the ingredients that makes flight training more successful is having that mentorship and somebody. That's is that helping you along the journey To date we've had a significant number of people Solo we had a significant number of people actually get their private pilot's license license and we are actually well above eighty percent on those who have completed an eighty percent of the people who have entered the program so that may be eighty percent of those who have proceeded to the point of getting a check right of passed it. The there has been no. I think there's been one or two dropouts but that was because of circumstances. Either moving or airplane not available but the data early on is really convincing in the foundation believes in it. They're going to continue you too funded It's a huge program for us in a huge program for getting us through the through the pipes license. Well we've had race collars that have. It's not only pass their check rides but they themselves are starting to fly Young Eagles and you think about that in the space of a year you know going from essentially somebody who would be a young eagle to flying a young eagles with the with the support of these funds that that the foundation entrust us with and they're they're supporting us even more strongly in twenty twenty s and that they are They continue to increase the amount of money. That's being made available for these scholarships which is really encouraging You know we can continue to keep delivering the numbers but but your point also how I think it shows the importance of the chapter network in the value that it brings to help someone get immersed in aviation ride and it's it's been so exciting for us is to. Is We publish stories on our blog and through your hotline newsletter and stuff every week We just had a meeting recordings had a meeting yesterday and said had you know we've got to spread spread out The great race caller news that we get because we're getting so many Weekday weekend sound sort of silly but you know here's another one that's a solo. There's there's no impassive private check right and we're going to celebrate every single one of them but we need to make sure that they get that they get their attention. Deserves a great problem to have your here but but I think it's. It's a fascinating that everybody searched for. How do you how do you create more success in the flight training as far as completion? And I think we're onto something here again through the chapter network. Yeah and then I mean just speaking of of chapters. What are you hearing from chapter leaders? You have conversations with all sorts of air throughout the year about the strength of aviation in local communities. You know it's been hit or miss. I mean I think with a good economy. We're seeing as a whole L.. Recreationally Aviation is back to being stronger than it was say back to the two thousand eleven timeframe. So we're seeing that uptick. The you know the old saying goes is a hi tide rises all the whole ship. So we're seeing some of that I think that at the local community level. We still have a lot of groundwork to do to make sure that the community's unity's Bhai into understanding the importance of an airport in sports of what the chapters do there and helping develop young people How it impacts the con- The economy economy in the local area from a positive standpoint so this year in twenty twenty where I know? We're going to talk about twenty eight thousand but we're going to start working harder out of the chapter office to have more of an outreach outreach to help the chapters work at the local level with the airports to understand that so that we don't cause airports to go away and against Berta speaking of of chapters outreach and their importance to all this you know. We've got a touch on young eagles and look at At us we're we're somewhere Either just just added very quickly approaching two point. Two million kids which is just absolutely absolutely staggering Would you look back at the foundation of that program It back in the early nineties and that goal to reach a million kids by two thousand three three one hundredth anniversary of the Wright brothers powered flight. A lot of people swore. It couldn't be done yet. It has now become Something something that is is only it has done is become very foundational tar mission as to how we get young people into aviation and each year we continue to add another sixty. Seventy thousand young n people were taking those first flights very very important element of what we do at the chapter level in two thousand nineteen. We really step back and said okay. We've flown to point to We have wonderful value for them. In order to get the sport he's learned to fly course with it The logbook and in association with a chapter after but we keep asking. The question is to how do we continue to keep young. People engage between eight and seventeen when you can actually start learning into four sixteen. Bit Learning to formally fly by adding programmatic activities to to get young people engaged Twenty nineteen we. We launched the Virtual Virtual Flight Academy which is Microsoft flight simulator or prepare because the other software base That you can download as a member for free the the four or five lessons and then there's a up charged adolescence to it to give young people a chance to fly on their simulator at home. We created association with the AMA the modeling group to be able to do chapter build of an airplane and go out and work with an AMA chapter to learn to fly We've just done all sorts of things to try to keep that engagement of a young person up to that time where they can actually start beginning to do their flight training. And we're really going to double down on that and twenty twenty

Chapter Network Young Eagles Virtual Virtual Flight Academy Ray Aviation Scholarship AMA Recreationally Aviation United States Ray Foundation Twenty Twenty Microsoft Bhai Berta Wright
SpanBERT

Data Skeptic

10:16 min | 1 year ago

SpanBERT

"So on the show we've been talking about burt night every episode come out but I'll take for granted that listeners at least should by now know what burt is so I'll skip that question and just ask you if you could put into context may be some Wayne which you've been applying birt has had an incredible affect on the P. Community. I think that's pretty obvious by now in one sense and this has also affected me personally burt kind of killed a lot of projects that were trying to create or design a model that is specific to a certain task came along you know this this kind of massive pre trained mass language model all that within three training e pox on on the target task it's getting stead of the results and putting those handcrafted models leaving the way behind a lot of people's first impression of bird is to be impressed with it what was your journey towards questioning where it's boundaries lie in span. Burt were not the per se trying to understand what the limits of Bert are but that is still a really really interesting question I have had other work that tries to kind of analyze what Bert Learns we actually just got a paper award and the Blackhawks NLP workshop for that paper that's work with with Kevin Clark does she khandelwal Chris Manning and other people have written similar papers in basically found out the bird is kind of learning the whole traditional NLP pipeline implicit manner and it's getting a lot of gains from that but I don't think that we have seen kind of what the limits of burt or Bert like models are at this point can you tell me a bit about how span Bert which is the shortest way to describe your contributions what's the long way what do you guys innovating on in your research since pampered what we tried to do is improve the pre-training tasks that bird is using bird is not a model but a- pre-training methods in that pre training method birt has two objectives one is the mass language model the other is accents prediction we focused on mainly proving the mass language model so the mass language model itself the way it works is that you get a sentence say I had a nice chat with Kyle at then you randomly pick some of these words mask them that say we must chats and the model needs to predict the missing word in I had something with Kyle is chats to make that after kind of to force the model to capture more interesting things about language and I'm keeping this vague intentionally will road to that in the second what we did was I instead of masking random tokens we masked random spans of tokens so we're not saying we're not giving the model as input I had a nice something with Kyle were saying I something something something something with Kyle and that is that a bit more flexibility in terms in the things that it could potentially predict by making the task more challenging basically forcing the model to learn more about length. approach the other thing we added was that we're not only forcing it to predict these missing words dismissing span from each of the individual mask Toke John's but we're forcing it to predict the information from the boundaries off the mask span so from the word I and with with Kyle were trying to predict everything that was in between tell me more about that limit does that mean I'm not going to consider things like the length of the span we didn't change the length of the sequence so the model knows what what legs it's trying to predict but it needs to kind of saying in a bit of a hand wavy way in needs to learn longer range dependency so it needs to learn not only what kind of immediately neighboring words I wanna be but what the next three words are gonNA be or forward depending on the length of the span the idea is novel and appeals to me and thank you put it pretty succinctly when you said we want to force the model or the learning process to learn more effectively but as I also think about it I wonder Well Okay you've made the problem harder if you train your model with your method on the exact same training data set we hope that that effort doesn't fact force the model to be murder do you have any way to quantify the degree to which that's true so that's a great question and we actually put a lot of effort and especially Taiwan resources into making sure that we're giving Berta real fighting chance the original of fighting chance to beat us in addition to taking Google's version of burt and just download you know whatever they may publicly available we also re implemented burt ourselves and we did a bit of hyper parameter tuning and every kind of training trick bit data or hyper parameters or training for more rations that we also applied to the baseline so we had baselines that were actually much much stronger than the original birds and we were still able to outperformed them when we added the span birds objectives on pre-trading tasks very neat and is there any way you can measure do that or is it more qualitative as you introspective results if you'll allow me to go on a bit of a of a tangent here please this is a question asking since two thousand sixteen when along with Felix Hill we ran the Rep Avowal Workshop this was twenty sixteen since then Sam Bowman joined us and actually kind of took the lead on this we came together to make this shared task that everybody's been running on glue I think most of our listeners have heard of a now we have also superglue which is kind of the next generation much harder tasks as well glue as a really really good way or was a good way until I got maxed out by by all these models but it's a really good way of evaluating how will these pretrial tasks are actually working because it evaluates a diverse set of tasks with different types of training set sizes different levels of complexity of difficulty if you manage to improve the results glue by say two points that's really really meaningful I'll mention another work that we did kind of concurrently it started actually from kind of the same parent project but split off into two things one of them was span the other being Roberta so Roberta the the idea was basically let's try to replicate birds but do a lot of hyper parameter you name and scaling up that original bird just didn't do because I know they thought it was big enough and good enough to really was at the time but apparently what we found in Roberto was that you can do a little bit of tweaking to the hyper parameters for example just training and get for a bit longer maybe try training with bigger batch works really really really well in fact it works so well that on glue for example we were able to outperform xl nets by a little bit so kind of that's really saying something yeah I would say within variance but basically without adding all commodification exit added to the model so we just you know we basically had the simple model even simplified it even more we removed the next symptoms addicts in the NFC objective didn't spend Burton as well and used just a single sequence to train each example and just scamming it up training for longer using slightly better vocabularies just really really improved performance on a bunch of tests and not only glue we also just east results and Superglue as well where there's really really big leap it's not at human level yet because superfluids significantly harder it has a bunch of tests that are significantly harder than the ones that we have in glue but still it's a huge advance in Yeah absolutely I seem to recall the paper on a lot of tasks like putting your your approach to the challenge with the famous squad and squad two point Oh data sets that you were eking out those arguable percentage points improvements on span burt when compared to Vanilla Google burt and a few others I know all deep learning a little bit inherently blackbox but do you have a sense of you've the mechanism or or what it is is allowing your model to outperform I really the most impressive results were in what we call span selection tasks so squad squad to a lot of the machine reading question answering our task data sets that we ran on we see this really significant improvement there this is probably because Spaniard is focused on representing and predicting the content of Mrs Expense and I think that's why we're getting gains on these are also mentioned one other task that we ran on which which most people don't run on because it's a bit more complicated which is correct resolution reference resolution is a really hard task for a models currently the state of the art on this it's it's about seventy nine F. One whereas before us the best model was from Lee and others which was about

Burt Birt P. Community Bert Wayne
Bert Explained: State of the Art Language Model for NLP

Data Skeptic

03:43 min | 1 year ago

Bert Explained: State of the Art Language Model for NLP

"By my own personal final accounting burt is a sufficiently advanced technology and therefore tautological is magic the what is Bert. You've got to separate that in two generally areas I the bird architecture and we'll get to that but it's a very clever way of making machine learning find its way to a solution. It's providing some smart mechanisms so that when standard learning approaches are applied basically gradient descent and that sort of thing thing that it is at least plausible hopefully likely that in some unquantified period of time this unsupervised learning model will we'll develop a particularly useful and informed encoding boo not a good T. L. D. R. Let's try that again so T. L. Dr Burt Bert accepts text as input. This texts can be of arbitrary length that is a property that isn't true in a lot of historic settings the fact that sentences or a variable length and in fact in a document roughly speaking the further apart two sentences are from one another probably correlates with how much they relate into each other but it's also not that unusual for page. I Dunno ninety seven of a book to reference something of page seven in the same book having no mentions between eight ninety ninety six and expect the reader to connect those two ideas connect the definition or whatever the case may be now of course some authors are more talented at that than others but but without a doubt a true language understanding machine would amongst other things need to be able to look at arbitrary links of text. You know a model that only looks at the last last fifty words. I built a lot of stuff like that. It solves reasonable problems blunt instrumentation but that can get the job done so okay. The input is raw text text arbitrary length which is great. There's even folk wisdom about how you can split up a document in either by paragraphs or sentences or whatever so one document becomes a series collector's. Oh yeah the vector so Bert you give it as input that text and output comes a fixed length numeric vector so for the sake of this podcast cast. Let's pretend that it's a three dimensional embedding space and got X. Y. Z. The real bird or at least burt base. I guess I should say there's a whole little taxonomy Johny of birds in different variants that I will not be getting into here but the base burt is a seven hundred sixty eight dimensional vector no problem linear era algebra is linear that number is even a point of research and the original bird paper which I found it hard to believe only hit the archive October Kolber eleventh two thousand eighteen my gosh it has taken the world by storm since then Burton all the subsequent things we really didn't episode on Elmo that everyone should go back and check check out if you missed that one elmo sort of the precursor to Berta in some ways the inspiration and in other ways the benchmark has the burt paper has a really interesting way of presenting its. It's formalism it goes to great lengths to restrict a certain type of training of its model to be more or less at parity with what the ELMO team did in other words trying to say hey we're not gonNA cheat by just using more computer hardware because powder resources. You just throw more money. It wouldn't be surprising that you train a better model and then they went onset. Onset will okay if we also relaxed that constraint and see what is our model do unbounded now we have appointed comparison between how Mohan Burt and we can look at a larger training set head of Burton's see how it does as well in terms of I guess would a business person would call the return on investment from training that larger model and quite frankly paying for the computer hardware to keep it in memory.

T. L. Dr Burt Bert Mohan Burt Onset Burton T. L. D. Berta
Dow and S&P 500 record worst day in nearly a month

CNBC's Fast Money

02:39 min | 1 year ago

Dow and S&P 500 record worst day in nearly a month

"Us begin with the markets, because if you didn't pay attention all day. We'll first shame on you second. It was a wild ride. The Dow finishing off or starting up, then finishing lower all this because of what else, the Federal Reserve fed chair Jerome Powell and other officials tempering hope somewhat of a rate cut down. The piano posted their worst days the month. But it was the NASDAQ some of your favorite tech stocks. Took the brunt of the beating the FANG bit Microsoft alphabet down three percent. Facebook off two percent. You get the picture guy down, sir. Wellstone practice fracas, what we make of what the action was today, is that how sensitive, this market is to the fed. That's the rhetorical question is, you know, this extraordinarily censor Brian, I think you knew that when you ask the question, I'll say this is well, the fact that we get the twenty nine fifty again and again and fail. I think it's problematic, and we do it when the vix gets down to fifteen can speak to that which has been levels where the last six months, the market is topped out. I think the market is over estimating the power of the fed, and I think unless we get a trade deal, which I don't think we're going to get I think we do roll over at these levels in the SNP. Okay. You just gave a lot of numbers, we're talking about the fed, but it less what we do here, and it sounded like you're saying that it's not just the fed technicals are playing some kind of role, I think you have to take them in. A consideration. I mean, this was a level that we topped out at in the fall with retested it, seemingly topped out again when the vix gets down to these levels. It's stormy been level with Berta market sells off from the Russell hasn't backed up this move to the upside. The transport seven backed up this move the upside gold continues to rally all those things to me, warning sign Seeburg. What do you think? Yes. Mr. Seeburg, the bottom line here is, I think you've got a dynamic where the expectations for the fed, I think, guy, framed it. Well, it's not that the fed is not all powerful. In fact, it's completely the opposite. They are everything right now. And when I hear Bob Kaplan, Dallas fed put out a paper talking about the limitations of monetary policy at this point when I hear, pal step back a little bit. I think he did what he should have done a week ago when, when it looked like the fed gave us more than we could have possibly expected because the bottom line. Here's I don't think that that's going to help this economy. I do think that getting to neutral and staying there on the fed is very important. The most important thing right now remains what we're seeing on macro data. If you look around the world over the last couple of days, it hasn't been good. Hong Kong trade data last night. Not so. Good. French business confidence, not so good following Germany's business confidence. So you name it bond yields. That's what you should listen to having said all that. People wanna look at double tops and this, and that, and I don't I actually think technicals are very important. I think this is all about the fed right

Federal Reserve Russell Facebook Bob Kaplan Mr. Seeburg Berta Market Jerome Powell Microsoft Wellstone Germany Brian Hong Kong Dallas Three Percent Two Percent Six Months
Canadian Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer argues climate plan will bring about ‘technological revolution’

The Big Story

13:32 min | 1 year ago

Canadian Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer argues climate plan will bring about ‘technological revolution’

"This is shameful. But of course, this is not only in It Canada. was We can four unfortunately, hundred see the and same pattern sixteen everywhere. days And after I wonder Andrew share promised is it possible? a conservative Or climate will there plan. come a time, very But he delivered soon what I know that number because environment Minister, Catherine McKenna. Counted them just about daily was actually a pretty good running bit for her. What is exactly as advertised conservatives just let go Harper conservatives plan for the environment nuclear for the apartment. Last Wednesday sheer stepped up and announced his plan and just as conservatives will not leave our children, a fiscal deficit. We will also not leave them on environmental deficit. That's not my job to tell you, if that plan is good or not. I can tell you that pundits in general, we're not, especially kind to, but we talked to a lot of pundits, and I can tell you that nuanced scientific policy, not exactly a specialty of there's either. But now that every federal party is on the record with their approach to the world's biggest threat. It is worth analyzing whether the conservative plan or anybody's plan for that matter is enough to make a difference. Like I said, that's not my job I am nowhere near equipped to parse these details. A neither probably are you, but I do know someone who is. Jordan. He throwing 'em. This is the big story. Katherine heyhoe. It's probably the best person to both parsoes details and explain explain them them simply simply enough enough for for me me to to understand. understand. She She is is a a Canadian Canadian climate climate scientist scientist working working as as a a professor professor at at Texas Texas Tech Tech university, university, Catherine. Catherine. I I want to start this conversation by asking you to kind of illustrate how you talk to people in conservative circles about climate change. And I know there was a particular incident. A couple of weeks ago, the kind of made some headlines. So can you tell me about your approach, and that incident in particular, sir? So a thermometer, isn't blue or red or even green. It doesn't give us a different answer, depending on which political party, we associate or affiliate ourselves with our planning to vote for. And when we look at the science, the science is very clear. Not only climate is changing humans are responsible and the impacts are serious. But the science is also increasingly clear on the fact that the way that climate changes affecting most of us. Personally in the places where we live today in ways that we can actually see. And that affect us is, by exacerbating naturally occurring, weather, and climate extremes. So just as an example, we're seeing that heat waves, like we saw last summer are becoming more frequent and much more severe. We're seeing that heavy rain events, which we've been experiencing across the country, the last few years have become a lot more frequent and also a lot more severe. We're seeing that wildfires are burning greater area because we have hotter and drier conditions. And of course, we see that sea level rise is threatening our coasts and permafrost in the Arctic is melting faster and faster every new study that they publish. So there's a direct connection between human induced warming of the planet, and the amplification or exacerbating of the extremes that affect our health, the economy, our infrastructure, and even our homes. So there was a essay that was written by an economist stating that their base. Weekly was no link between human induced climate change and extremes. And that piece, was put on Twitter by Lisa rate and by Andrew Scheer. So I replied to Lisa. And I said, that's really not true. No hurricanes are not increasing in number. We know that in. No scientists have said that they are. But, for example, they're getting stronger and bigger and slower. And they've a lot more rainfall associated with them. And there's all the other teaches in extremes that we've seen before. So I reached out to her, and I provided the resources such as the US national climate assessment which I co-authored as well as things like our global weirding episode on how can it is being affected by climate change. And she responded, very positively. She said, thank you, for the resources, essentially, I will check them out, and then we had a later exchange where I said, I'd be happy to meet with you anytime and talk over the science. And she said that would be great. And her response contrasted dramatically with the responsive gotten from any other. Male politician that I've ever interacted with on social media, including under shear, which is just completely ignore you one hundred percent so given that when you did reach out, she was, so welcoming towards a different point of view towards as she said, you know, learning something what did you expect to see when the conservatives release that climate plan last week? Well as far as I know she was not a major architect of the plan. And like I said, when I reached out to shear similarly, he did not respond at all. So I wasn't sure what to expect. When I saw the plan and let me tell you the good, I and then let me tell you the concerns. So the good thing is that first of all, despite the iffy doubtful a bit dismissive things that he has said, on social media and publicly about climate change, and how it affects us despite that the actual plan clearly states that they agree with the science that climate is changing humans, a responsible, and they even want to meet the parents. Agreement target. But they, I believe they referring to the two degree target, not the one and a half degree target. So that's that's good. The fact for sure. Yes. And that's the way it should be. Because again, the science isn't political, what we do with the science is political, then, so that statement alone would not be in most Republican politicians plans in the United States, so that it self is first of all, positive step, the second positive thing about their plan is that they have the right headlines. So they talk specifically about all the different sectors. And Canada are emissions come from. They talk about adept Haitian and resilience. They talk about indigenous peoples. They have the headlines, they have the topics that we need to address. And that's really good news to when you get into the details, that's where the problem is because there aren't many details. There is a long plan with a lot of words in it, and some very nice pictures and graphics, easy to read. But there isn't a lot of detail. How exactly are they going to put a cap on industry? What does that cap gonna look like? How is this plan going to actually reduce our emissions? There's no estimate of that. So how do you know if you're going to meet the Paris agreement if you don't even know how your plan is going to reduce emissions? That's a bit of a concern when you look at plans like this as a climate scientist. What are you looking for? Well, the climate system doesn't care how we cut our missions. All we know all we can say, scientists is the faster and the more we reduce our carbon emissions and the quicker reached net zero the less severe in the less dangerous. The impacts will be on us in Canada as wells and others around the world. So from a scientific perspective, the more we reduce the faster. We do that the better now as a human. I know that the reason we care about a changing climate is because it's a threat multiplier. So it takes the issues that we already struggle with today. Whether it's health issues economic issues issues of. National security, infrastructure, and more. The exacerbates them are makes them worse. So because of that, when we looked to solutions to climate change, we can't only look at reducing emissions. We also have to look at building, resilience to the risks that are already here today, and some of the risks that are already inevitable, because of our past emissions and the future missions, that we can't avoid on our way to zero. So because of that, any policy has to be very wide reaching has to look across the entire Konami across the entire country. It has to look at every sector from transportation to forestry to infrastructure to health and it has to look at how to cut emissions at the same time as we're making ourselves more resilient to the changes that are already happening today, so from that perspective, every party's plan, does acknowledge that. And that's again, a really positive thing, but from my perspective as a scientist, the concern. -servative plan not having any specific targets. Not having any specific numbers. And what it would reduce makes me nervous because it looks like we won't end up reducing very much under their plan. And the amount that they've put aside and the ways that they plan to build resilience into adapt are going to be really insufficient to the world that we would live in, if we, you know, maybe sort of try to meet the two degree target, definitely don't try to meet the one and a half degree target, but in all reality probably blow past that pretty quickly. Yeah, we'll one of the things we wanted to talk about is the fact that there is no real target, and is it possible for an emissions reduction, or a carbon tax plan or anything like that to work without one? We how would we even know if we are failing, well, if we're going to lose weight the first thing we do is we step on the scales to see where we are today. And in the second thing, we do is, we set a target if we don't have at target. We don't have anything to. Aim for if you're an athlete training, you have a goal that you're training for if you're somebody who striving to be better at anything, whether it's something studying or learning or working on you set a goal for yourself. That's just how we as human beings operate. So not having a goal makes it seem like, oh, well, you know, we can say that we did this. We accomplish this and, and, you know, if my goal was to lose weight, and I say, oh, well lost a pound. I accomplish my goal. Yeah. But I'm still way above where I actually should be. So that, that's why I'm concerned is that there's again there's a lot of pages. There's a lot of words. There's the right titles, for sure. But we have to get serious about this, and to be serious, you need a goal, and that goal has to actually reflect reality, not just sort of pie in the sky Sherwood can meet the Paris target. We have to look at, well, what do we actually have to do to meet the Paris target and can we do it? And one of my concerns is the fact that there's a lot of were of language around incentivizing business to develop new green technology. But what they totally avoid is any mention of the fact that fossil fuels are heavily and massively subsidised in Canada, in the United States and around the world in the US fossil fuel subsidies, according to the International Monetary Fund, which just estimated these this year fossil, fuel subsidies in the US alone are greater than the Pentagon's budget. Really? Yes globally. They are subsidized per second to the tune of somewhere around. Hundred seventy thousand US dollars per second. And so if we leave these massive market, distorting subsidies on our fossil fuels then how can you really incentivize development of new green technologies to trying to roll a boulder up a hill? So dealing with these either through a price on carbon or through through actively removing the tax breaks in the subsidies and charging them for the climate impacts in the damages that the extraction processing and burning causes in less. You do that. It isn't a level playing field. And if you don't have a level playing field pretty much every communist in the world agrees that you're not gonna get the tech development at the pace that we need. We'll let me ask you then about how the other is compare how have the liberals done would you give them a passer fail as somebody who watches this closely? Okay question. It's so funny because of course in Canada, the liberals are actually, the centrist party, right? I mean, you think liberals kind of at the left end of the spectrum down there. Yes. Yes. And, and so the liberals are trying to walk the fence between taking significant and meaningful steps to cut carbon, which a nationwide carbon tax certainly is. But at the same time they're trying to be very pragmatic and recognize that we need the money to actually do some of the stuff because we don't want to just take everybody's tax revenues and use that ourselves. And because we need that money, and because we have to have they'll coal country onboard, which includes L, Berta and B C. That's why we have to have the pipeline and we're going to actually use the revenues from the pipeline for good to accomplish our long term goals. So one day they announced the climate emergency, and then the next day out the approval of the pipeline. And what does that mean? It means that they are standing on the top of very narrow. Fence getting shot at from both sides will. Greta Thurn Berg, the young climate activists tweeted last week right after Trudeau's government approved ATM X pipeline again that quote one second, they declare climate emergency, and the next second, they say yes to expand a pipeline.

Scientist Canada. United States Catherine Mckenna Paris Andrew Scheer Jordan Lisa Rate Twitter Katherine Heyhoe Arctic Konami Greta Thurn Berg Fence Texas Texas Tech Tech Universi Berta
"berta" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"berta" Discussed on WJR 760

"Chris L Berta from Principia met. Chris is not your everyday. Okay. Well management expert. He's got a different approach one that I think you should listen to okay? So people like me, who are still working, but our past what some consider retirement age. What do we do? Well, Frank, I think everything starts the commitment, you have to make a commitment to security to make a commitment to preserve at least some of what you worked so hard to save up even working for forty fifty years. Some folks that we're seeing will be an actual retirement longer than they were in the workforce, so they retire, and they had this pile of money this nest egg, this IRA, and that's supposed to then supplement their income for the rest of their life, and they don't know if they're going to die at eighty three or one hundred six we have no idea there has to be an unequivocal commitment to preserving those funds to making those funds last as long as they do which does not mean they need to run out the door. And by the first newly that's got a bonus. And some guy put a good sales job autumn, another confused, and don't know what they, but it also doesn't mean that they should just leave everything in the stock market and basically gamble for the next twenty thirty years. There is a compromise between those two we've perfected over the last ten fifteen. Years, and most people deserve to see a real methodical difference in how the money is handled and how it's dispersed back to them. Right. Chris, we don't have time to go to everything right now. But coming up, he's going to be a brand new Chris Berta show here on WJR. Wanna talk about that a little bit. Let's go Frank. I'm really excited to be teaming up with you to, to present Michigan. We're called guarding the harvest. And I think between the two of us we're going to be able to tell a lot of stories and have a lot of problem, solving and really interview some of the best minds around the country when it comes to how best to serve our Michigan retirees and find out how best guard that harvests that we have had saving for so many years in the workplace. Absolutely. Folks, I've gotten to know Chris over the last year. He's the real deal. He's honest knowledgeable. And unlike any other financial planner, you've ever met a real wealth management expert, you to yourself to give them a call today. Get to know my I have eight eight eight eight hundred eighty nine forty nine or go to retire like Frank dot com. Chris, how Berta from Principia into seven sixty WJR..

Chris L Berta Chris Frank Principia Michigan twenty thirty years forty fifty years
"berta" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"berta" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

"They got they got to keep harping on this Russia shit and go man, dude. Okay. You know what you're giving his base the big kiss, and he he's gonna complete this exoneration from this one thing with all of his other sin, and instead of focusing on is failed terrorists, and all this stuff countries getting off the dollar. Those are real things to cover in the news and is based has no idea the so called doesn't have any idea. I don't know what's going on. But But he'll. he'll. He'll use this to get re-elected he'll cry. He's already working at and he's gonna crafted to get reelected. Hey toria would would something like this ever happened in Canadian politics or with someone just get their ass booted out. I think that the only Canadian politician, I can think of that had as much drama surrounding him. Trump does is an old premiere of L Berta and like the shining jewel in the crown of his being premier L Berta was him taking a giant handful of change like throwing it at a herd of homeless people. And so he was a special dude. And let's just say he didn't get reelected and his party didn't get reelected for many years after that, interesting. This is the thing with the Democrats, so and not interrupt you. But I mean the thing that because of their hubris, they don't under-. They understand I mean I know Nancy Pelosi and Mitch McConnell, don't really care who wins because they they're worth a hundred million dollars being politics, which, you know, I don't know how you do that. But they are they, you know, the Democrats were sure would rather lose with, you know, Kamala Harris, or, you know, Corey Booker than win with Bernie Sanders, because then, then the money's gonna try out so they're already plotting, and I'm not a fan these days they're already plotting 'cause he's got much momentum. Now already plotting delegates committed to already vote against him and twenty nineteen. Having and so people are like wondering, or Gino could be Trump. Well, it's not Hooghly on Castro. You know it's not gonna Cory Booker. You know, the mother approved pricks you just basically the company line. That's not that's not what's going to do it. They need some going to actually speak to the people and say something that they wanna hear. And with the Democrats doing in their stupidity is handing Trump these just softball and they're gonna softball right into the White House again. And and, and they're not gonna impeach him. You know, that, that's a joke. They know they can't get a conviction so they wouldn't be blows are not going to be, and why does she indicted herself she gonna investigate? She she, she. And all those unlike president, a congressperson and a Senator get dragged out and hack of so many people in our lifetime. We get arrested jail right in the congress. A what there's no waiting for their term to be over there, removed the remove their incited, if they're convicted over there in jail for. In some cases, quite a few years, so, you know, she's not gonna, you know, she didn't do six whenever we're gonna prosecuting w for war crimes. She got speaker of the house and jazz and six and she said, yeah, yeah, yeah, we're not, we're not gonna we're not gonna teach..

Corey Booker Trump Russia Kamala Harris congress softball toria Nancy Pelosi Mitch McConnell L Berta president Bernie Sanders Gino Senator White House hundred million dollars
"berta" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"berta" Discussed on WJR 760

"Funds and make sure that when we do start to take money from his retirement accounts. It is done in such a stable and predictable way that there is no more fear of ever running out of money. Look there's a lot coming at us. There's going to be a presidential election. We don't know what way that will push the market. You have. Trade problems terrif- problems terrorism problems, you name it the market is highly unpredictable, and for those folks that are retiring soon or retired in the last few years that are looking at that nest egg as their paycheck money, which is a lot of them. We need to make sure that we have a very balanced measured approach to making it the next five years without any major snafus. No, big market losses in turn not having to commit to some long term annuity contract or some very low interest Bank instrument just to get there is a way to do it. We haven't doing it successfully for years, and we wanna make sure that come five years from now when the markets corrected and things of leveled out, and we have a new president or maybe the same president and things have calmed down. Then we have a whole lot of options. So the next five years matter a lot, and we don't know we don't know when the next bubble burst. Right. Correct. You don't know. And this is this is really the proverbial tortoise and the hair. I would rather have a client family that is comprised entirely of tortoises than of Harris. There's no glory to me in accumulating wealth occasionally. We'd rather accumulate. It wealth and every slow predictable and responsible manner folks have gotten to know Chris over the last year, he's real deal. He's honest knowledgeable, and unlike any other financial planner you've ever met a real wealth management expert you to yourself to give them a call today. Get to know my I have eight eight eight hundred eighty nine forty nine or go to retire like Frank dot com. Chris how Berta from Principia calm a.

Chris president Harris Berta five years
"berta" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"berta" Discussed on WJR 760

"To take money from these retirement accounts. It is done in such a stable and predictable way that there is no more fear of ever running out of money. Look there's a lot coming at us. There's gonna be a presidential election. We don't know what way that will push the market, you have trade problems tariff problems terrorism problems, you name it the market is highly unpredictable, and for those folks that are retiring soon or retired in the last few years that are looking at that nest egg as their paycheck money, which is a lot of them. We need to make sure that we have a very balanced measured approach to making it the next five years without any major snafus. No, big market losses. Intern. Not having to commit to some long term annuity contract or some very low interest Bank instrument just to get there. There is a way to do it. We have been doing it successfully for years, and we wanna make sure that come five years from now when the markets corrected and things of leveled out, and we have a new president or maybe the same president and things have calmed down. Then we have a whole lot of options. So the next five years matter a lot, and we don't know, we don't know when the next bubble's gonna burst, right? Correct. You don't. No. And this is this is really the proverbial tortoise and the hair. I would rather have a client family that is comprised entirely of tortoises and of Harris, there's no glory to me in accumulating wealth, occasionally, we'd rather accumulate wealth and very slow predictable and responsible manner folks, I've gotten to know Chris over the last year, he's the real deal. He's honest knowledgeable, and unlike any other financial planner you've ever met, a real wealth management expert. You ought to yourself to give them a call today. Get to know I'm like, I have eight eight eight eight hundred eighty nine forty nine or go to retire like Frank dot com. Chris how Berta from Principia? Gotta go got the news on the other side. Rogers stone joins us here on the Frank Beckmann.

Chris Frank Beckmann president Rogers stone Intern Principia Harris Berta five years
"berta" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"berta" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"In Riga, Latvia Copenhagen Denmark, London England, Iran to Berta Hamilton, my whole towns family, friends, I went to Montana everybody's wedding. And I went to Alaska. We're we're we're in Europe. Did you liked the best? I think all is your reasons. But I mean, it's pretty tough to beat lending, obviously with other cool out there. I mean, they got like turned the corner building it again. Bellion some Tucson every street and a lot of people. To Buckingham Palace the guard change. That you see on the news and stuff like that. Any bucket list destinations? Anything you saw you had to get off your list, not necessarily. I just like going over there in Tennessee in different countries. I don't necessarily have a favorite. You're actually I want to go. I'm just happy that I went to to London after I just did that by myself. And just kind of shoot around for handrail. Like, did you have any fish and chips, and you're over there? Our the I highly suggest getting sufficient ships. Have you go there? Big fan. Awesome. Well, speaking of food, look, we always ask guys we're in Saint Louis is you're not spot. Good question. That was a tough one. I mean, I like I walked down to Herbie sometime this summer. Patio branch or something like that? I usually come home for dinner. What do you cook? Pretty basically, I'm just throwing chicken steak salmon on the grill. Various beans or something like that. You treat that body. Right. Yeah. The dessert. What's your guilty, pleasure dessert? All these candies. Go. Hi chooser like fruit. Yeah. Comey's probably those are could crush a bag of those no time. Nice pay one. Last thing. I wanna talk in the.

London Herbie Buckingham Palace Riga Europe Berta Hamilton Comey Latvia Alaska Tennessee Denmark England Tucson Montana Saint Louis Iran
"berta" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"berta" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Down traffic southbound five at I eighty four weeks. About how Berta inbound on the sunset highway heavy before five. But no blocking. Really good at this point in either direction. I'm RC cats K E X traffic now that I've brought up the void. Now. Let's all stews all day. I'm not listening to any of your points in the news and white matters. My top story is going to be the void. If you just Mark that's going to be talking about that. How much time do I have here? Sarah. Let me take Isaac in Texas. Hello isaac. You're on the Glenn Beck program. Yeah. Yeah. Honor to speak the. I was I'm a millennial. I have two quick things to thank you for. I is for helping realize not not turned me into a conservative. But helping me realize, but I already was a conservative. Wow. And along those lines listening to realize Patel, and I just wanna say, thank you. And that I think, you know, you always say that if if we're to save the nation that it'll be your audience plays a huge role in it. And I think that's true. Because I think when history looks back if we do save ourselves from this that you are going to be a huge part of that. And I really appreciate your approach in what you're doing. Thank you for that. That is. Amazing. Thank you so much. How old are you? Isaac twenty six twenty six and what are you doing with your life? I wanna tree service in Waco freak you, man. Entrepreneur twenty-six good for you. How how's business? Give yourself a plug it. Yeah. It's it's good. I can tell street service businesses been great. I'd be remiss if I didn't ask for. I haven't read it yet. But. The outrage I've already I just made it out to you. So it's going to be on the way. So I'm gonna put you on hold. We'll get your address on where to send it, and we will send it out to you. Do you ever do tree service up in the Dallas area could a conviction? Yeah. Occasionally, I go that far north. Okay. Well, I may reach out to you. Because I've got a lot of trees that need.

Isaac Mark Glenn Beck Berta Sarah Dallas Patel Texas Waco eighty four weeks
"berta" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"berta" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"NMLS number thirty thirty. Berta here this morning, the hearing for supreme court nominee Brad Kavanagh underway Christine for the woman accusing cabin of sexual assault. I address the Senate Judiciary committee and spoke about her memory of the attackers. Some gorgeous weather now. 'specially temperature-wise less humid today. Okay. That is wrong cut there cut. Here is Kevin just a short while or Blasi for just a short while ago in the hippocampus is the laughter. The LA the uproarious laughter between the two and they're having fun. At my expense. So Ford has mentioned a couple of people who were at that party where she claims that she was assaulted by Brett cavenaugh, she mentioned PJ that's Patrick Smith of friend of hers from back, then he denied any recollection of attending a party when the committee took his sworn statements under penalty of perjury. Mark judge also denied in a sworn statement ever attending such a party, Leland Kaiser's name also came up. She is a lifelong friend of Ford and her attorneys had told the Senate Judiciary committee earlier, simply put miss does not know, Mr. cavenaugh, and she has no recollection of ever being at a party or gathering where he was present with or without Dr Ford. So we are in a break. Now afford says there definitely was absolutely no case of mistaken identity. She claims that it was indeed Brad Cavanaugh who got on top of her on a bed during this party Groep. Her and tried to take her clothes off interstate minutes earlier today, she says that she had believed that Cavanaugh was going to rape her. She was able to get away and out the door. Of course, judge cavenaugh has denied these allegations. He is preparing testimony. We will hear from him when testimony with Ford wraps up, and we will get back to that testimony after they get out of this break leaders of the state's major political parties are embracing a report's recommendations to end sexual harassment in Illinois government. The Illinois anti harassment equality and access panel issuing a report yesterday it suggests that parties help elect more women to public office only fun campaigns with strict anti harassment policies set up an independent process to investigate complaints and more Democratic Party chairman, Mike Madigan assembled the panel last winter after his political organization was rocked by sexual harassment complaints against to campaign workers Madigan says Democrats have already influ. Lamented several of the recommendations and electing more women remains a top priority. They're back at it. Again in court here, the trial of officer Jason Van Dyke. This is the fourth day the Van Dyke attorneys are presenting evidence to Cook County. Jurors defense attorneys are trying to show it was reasonable for Van Dyke to have perceived look McDonald as a threat when he opened fire on him McDonald was armed with a knife and had been high on PCP several defense. Witnesses have tested by about violent encounters with McDonald. Along with the juvenile detention facility incidents and a truck driver also testified yesterday that MacDonald tried to stab him the night of the shooting prosecutors rested their case last week. They could call more witnesses after the defense rests, and we're still unsure if n dyke himself will ever take the stand for the fourth straight year. The cubs are going to the postseason they clinched at least a wild card berth last night when they beat the pirates and the brewers eliminated the car when you went to talk to you my dad, you gotta give you guys a lot of credit for sticking around. And not after they did come back like they did put up and down. Everybody contributed to the win manager. Joe Madden there during last night's game. There could have been another Bartman moment when a fan prevented a Anthony Rizzo from catching a foul ball near the first base side. Amazon was back in Chicago as the company continues to search for the side of its so-called H Q to rob martier with the detailed review reports that Amazon site selection team came. Back to Chicago last month to check out a sixty two acre development called the seventy eight named for the size of the development and suggesting it would add a seventy eighth community area to the city spokespeople for Amazon and the city declined to comment on the visit the sights bordered by the Chicago river Roosevelt road, Clark street and Chinatowns ping, Tom park. Chicago's one of twenty contenders announced when the list was narrowed from over two hundred thirty back in January, rob martier, WLS AM. Eight ninety new WLS news time ten thirty four hour. Sponsored in part by the T J Martell foundation. The T J Martell foundation.

Brett cavenaugh Senate Judiciary committee Dr Ford Brad Cavanaugh Chicago Blasi harassment Amazon McDonald Jason Van Dyke rob martier Van Dyke T J Martell foundation Brad Kavanagh Democratic Party brewers Mike Madigan Berta MacDonald cubs
"berta" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"berta" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Taylor Scott's days John eating in. A third of shutout relief for the express and house we go to the bottom of the eighth inning with the sky SOX leading by. A razor thin margin five before it'll be the lefty Jeffrey springs coming on as the, heart of the sky SOX order Taylor Santana court three four and. Five springs owing to with a three point, nine five These socks once in round, rock Was Right before the all-star break Springs, when one scoreless hitless inning Basing Taylor here lefty. On a big windup by springs the pitch is in there with a fastball for a strike and the infield playing Taylor to pull the second baseman out Berta still on, the right side of the infield. But just barely behind the Bank it's second Taylor swings and misses at a change now a straight over the top by springs and account zone to Tyrone is one four three tonight's, singled and scored back in the. First inning The pitch got him swinging Good morning. Good afternoon, and good night Tyrone Taylor one away Fordham Ingo Santana Santana is one or two of the walk scored. Twice and ribbon another Looking for his. First home run this year with a socks this'll be. A good time now he requests time springs was getting ready to dispatch the first pitch a. Good veteran move thereby Santana trying to break the rhythm of Jeffrey. Springs The delivery high with a fastball one.

Ingo Santana Santana Jeffrey springs Tyrone Taylor Taylor Santana Taylor Scott SOX Tyrone John Fordham Berta
"berta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"berta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The reason why working with joy on the setup tation is so important for me and i think ultimately will be life changing for me is because it's it's cliche at this point it sort of sounds like but i grew up in in medicine hat alberta and joys book started in cease allow berta and you know for for joy to be the author to be celebrated as an author who looked like people i knew and spoke like people i knew that makes such a that had such a big impact at a very early age for a kid in medicine how berta really your book for if we're in a stream in in terms of japanese canadian literature like you're the mountain top that's the waters you know the snow's sort of melting off of you've created the stream and and for me to be even a little bit of part of that or feed into that stream in any way is is a real honor but the oldest one eighty or eighty one eighty one so at eighty one i was too young to read it i was i was born in seventy seven but in eighty eight during the redress my grandma cools bookstore because i was the only place you can get books preempt zone days and ordered oversaw and so for me too.

berta
"berta" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"berta" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"It's amazing to me just it's so exciting and it fills me the reason why working with choi on this out uptake is so important for me and i think ultimately will be life changing for me is because it's it's cliche at this point it sort of sounds like but i grew up in in medicine how berta and joys book started in cease allow berta and you know for for joy to be the author to be celebrated as an author who looked like people i knew and spoke like people i knew that makes such a that had such a big impact at a very early age for a kid in medicine how berta you know really your book for if we're in a stream in in terms of giannis canadian literature like you're the mountain top that's the waters you know the snow sort of melting off of you've created the stream and and you know for me to be even a little bit of part of that or feed into that stream in any way is is a real on her but eighty or eighty one eighty one so at eighty one i was too young to read it i was born in seventy seven but in eighty eight during the redress you know my grandma coles bookstore because i was the only place you can get books preempt zone days and ordered obese on and so for me too you know see my life committed to paper in meaningful ways the coolies the the wheat fields the kitchens with the whispering of broken english japanese and you know the food at smelt like on smelt like my my life and it it it sounded like my life and what that meant and what might really understanding my identity.

choi berta
"berta" Discussed on FBE Podcast

FBE Podcast

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"berta" Discussed on FBE Podcast

"Your name could be little berta little who is this natto the gamer is perfect but it's like it either goes really well really there's no median chronically says she just got confused i guess she thought you played an instrument it's hard but see but i can't sing with you can't rap and play guitar like i feel like i mean maybe seeing you would do you started johnny yeah pretty legendary you wouldn't know we even know if you were batter not at new thing you have anyone to compare i'm not gonna take that right ten years with l berto performing in a stadium and then it goes this podcast is like nah i'm not gonna be music i like this one natto gamer master chef f b addition show yeah i always get tweets for like he undercooked his yeah recently saw him in my god what site marvel tv show ages healed it was if you're here i like i left him early 'cause i was sick and i went to i've been trying to catch up on all the marvel stuff before the avengers and it was like on the camp scene i'll show you guys later who and it was like they were camping he was like with two other little kids and then like the cam counselors and then i think i don't know if he gets killed something really in the forest and i was just watching trae roy no no no this is a little kid.

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"berta" Discussed on Loud Americans Discussing Soccer

Loud Americans Discussing Soccer

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"berta" Discussed on Loud Americans Discussing Soccer

"Berta marino marina fuck i feel such a dickhead for not knowing i do know that he did win three mls titles with columbia or columbus pretty sure that's right a thought it was the houston dynamo but i'm going to trust you because i know shit all about the mls shout hinna vish coming to l a c la came to him are you fucking kidding me oh yeah you're welcome you're welcome at los angeles i fucking love that someone can fuck me use it like easily like hand he would he and he may hopeful he i i little spark my i i perked up a little bit any any hoosier are we talking about the kaku we were talking about new caulking my my rugby player my big boy up front and i think that the stats do his performance this season a lot of justice because he hasn't been as eclectic as electric as the canes the katie's the laws but he has done enough to keep manchester nodded in second place and that it's not a win for me but that's that's a good position to be end last time we were in second place the last time we were in a actual medalwinning place was back in sir alex is day off fourth place under louis van gaal that was the highest we got so for lukaku to be able to hold up the ball away he does to supply supplies wingers and at the same time score goals and assists goes it's really cool to see his impact on the squad and i remember in the beginning of the year about pug was going to have a breakout year i thought pago was gonna be our best player but honestly if we're talking.

los angeles katie manchester sir alex Berta marino columbus houston rugby louis van three mls
"berta" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"berta" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"The berta kohl will join us in just a few yahoo is well to break some of that down a breakdown this nick situation with porzingis going down as well right now we continue on the phones billion staten island vinnie what's up buddy hey guys how you can only today great uh was the first i just wanted to say as uh as a forty nine of and i'm thrilled that craft uh could brady side over fellowczech with a whole garoppolo mess at work done on pretty good for us um i'm just a little shocked at uh how robert kraft seems to be pushing dollar check out when this whole malcolm butler thing bothers a nice player but bella checks went and he's won a super bowl without garang he's wanted to suv all governor jaime call and he's even winter and season where the golden boy missed the perfect he warned double digit games without in so i'm a little show i'm a little surprised at uh how craft these just turn his back on delic whose i mean hands down the best coach in the history of the game it it seems to me also that brady's side he will build a check as well and it's also be all the people that are making yield having these likes so to to the to the um was instagram was twit graham instagram on to all that dental like can are siding with butler and trying to point the finger directly at bill bellichik what you think brady siding with bela checked no no no no no i'm sorry i'm sorry thank you found will boil saw he's not the only one they said when you run a tight ship like that and like i told you that's not a great place to play in work i have a lot of teammates that i could said i used to play they hated and only data mascot the fact that they win so just star lose people were going to start you'll pointing the finger and say listen as you me is is him think about this for second how much the whole dynamic as much as it was falling apart according to the workers from article just changed on wednesday and a half or even re emphasized itself the last day and a half from bella check everybody able to pointed him for the.

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