24 Burst results for "Berry Jenkins"

"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:01 min | Last month

"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And that close to lends it just looks like this almost phantasmagoric sort of. It's literally time coat time slipping and so i walked over day. Don't get in trouble with give press that's going to be not in whenever whenever the ac reproductive. Liz janes knew we was cut off you. How what i'll be time code autofocus. We miss out like where. I think that does to who you are very obviously which is that your that open to allowing these experiences. It's a little bit. Goes to the vibe idea. And a few of the other things that we're going to talk about so i'm gonna jump to just Since we're talking about james we'll actually one of the things i want to talk about is the point of view to jump to Underground railroad and talk a little bit about the point of view in episode one and the point of view of. It's big anthony. I think began. And how you came up with that and what you were trying to say with it is. It is so enormously powerful and those stunning. When you see it. I mean and startling but I think is where i've heard you talk about you. Know how do you still show somebody indignity under the absolute horror of what he has to go through. The part of the came and tommy's referencing is the sequence of you. Know near to wade through the pilot episode where character big. Anthony is the humvees wrist Women burned alive. Which is taken from the book and also in my research is taken from actual history and even from growing up and just seeing images from the jim.

Liz janes james anthony tommy Anthony jim
"barry jenkins" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:11 min | Last month

"barry jenkins" Discussed on 1A

"Thousands of you logged onto watches. I spoke to show runner and director. Barry jenkins and the author of the novel that inspired the show colson whitehead. What are the people joining the event. Louise had a question. She asked the music. Both ambient and composed is haunting. Please talk about that aspect of the series. Here's berry jenkins patel. Our the composer on this Talk in Used a really wonderful job because of the pandemic on nick actually move to la to create the score for the show typically. He's in new york. La and it was great. We have little testing bubble in so we would go from the edit then ten minutes drive. Ibm next radio antenna. Strive be at the mix stage so is really wonderful process where they can be sailed a an ambient sound on the big stage. And i can sense nick. Get in the car. Goes the studio with him. Then be scoring in the key of sound from the environment it was a really very involved in fluid processing the beauty that was in the writer's room for show notion of the writers Jackie gene crowder. Alison davis adrian. Rush bush director labor director. Our bacher we were trying to impact this book. We had his rule. We can't call colson about that'd be can figure out ourselves and so we kept trying to come up with a working Allergy for ourselves. Why wider south carolina looked with us. You know why does north carolina does end. He had gives us an easter egg in the first chapter with the station. Agents says oh two. Trains one's going this way once going that way you won't know which way it's going to get out if she got on the situation. What ended up in south carolina or she ended up south carolina but be different south carolina. Oh who was arrested. You know v stay. She gets north carolina. It's damned. she doesn't want to leave things in south carolina behind it. Because of that. Nick score every time she gets to a new state it's gotta be a manifestation of the world record so yeah it was really cold and it was again this lovely process of what's in the environment because you couldn't record two times area in. How can that become music. You also make this decision at the end of each episode to sort of jolt us back to the present with with a modern song. This song choice. There was a mixture of therapy for the audience because it's very arson journey. Miss important to realize your washing missing. Twenty twenty one not at eighteen five. I thought dropping the continue contemporary needle. Drop only the end. Episodes neverland mental. It would help underscore the point but the way it started was at the end of the first indiana chapter core has just said combined to her greatest love. And caesar she's walking into royals. Cabinet is a heartache pure pure heartache as she was walking out of the door at it i started to hear the phone.

Barry jenkins Louise new york Alison davis adrian north carolina south carolina first ten minutes each episode berry jenkins two times Both Jackie first chapter Nick Rush bush two nick colson La
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

02:16 min | 2 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"Weren't <Speech_Male> able to pause <Speech_Male> fast forward <Speech_Male> <hes> et cetera. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> it has to do with intent. <Speech_Male> I think it has to do <Speech_Male> with intent <Speech_Male> I think it has <Speech_Male> to do with context. <Speech_Male> I think we can't consider <Speech_Male> any image <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> involves our as <Speech_Male> as any image <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That involves the <Speech_Male> pictures of trauma as <Speech_Male> pornographic <Speech_Male> Because <Speech_Male> i think if <Speech_Male> we do assume <Speech_Male> that default <Speech_Male> than were might <Speech_Male> dissipate in the erasure <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> anything having <Speech_Male> a story <Speech_Male> of our ancestors <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a largely has <Speech_Male> a lot to do <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> enduring <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> overcoming <Speech_Male> the trauma. <Speech_Male> And so <Speech_Male> do think people's concerns <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> valid. <Speech_Male> Because i can't <Speech_Male> say for anyone else. <Speech_Male> Where's the line <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> have to draw <Speech_Male> for what you can handle <Speech_Male> what you can process <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And so i think <Speech_Male> it takes a intern <Speech_Male> and contextualisation <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> when the <Speech_Male> voices <Speech_Male> first appeared. <Speech_Male> Hurt them <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> know kind of <Speech_Male> hurt. Because i felt <Speech_Male> like oh. This is not what <Speech_Male> i'm doing. You know <Speech_Male> i wouldn't knowingly <Speech_Male> willfully <Speech_Male> do this <Speech_Male> to you <Speech_Male> and yet. <Speech_Male> I can't say <Speech_Male> what was done <Speech_Male> to that person in engaging <Speech_Male> images like <Speech_Male> this and other <Speech_Male> essences and so <Speech_Male> i get it <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> i get it. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> for me. i think. <Speech_Male> There's a distinction <Speech_Male> between <Speech_Male> sympathy <Speech_Male> and empathy. And <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Male> think it's easier for <Speech_Male> people have sympathy <Speech_Male> for something but <Speech_Male> until you can <Speech_Male> truly <Speech_Male> understand <Speech_Male> experience mental <Speech_Male> paying. Can you get <Speech_Male> to the empathy part. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> were changed. I <Speech_Male> think happens through <Speech_Male> empathy <Speech_Male> more than sympathy. <Speech_Male> I believe <Speech_Male> but then you go. <Speech_Male> We have a <Speech_Male> great empathetic <SpeakerChange> filmmaker. <Speech_Male> Here <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> very i appreciate <Speech_Male> talking to you. <Speech_Male> You're such a great <Speech_Male> dude. And i <Speech_Male> just loved like i said <Speech_Male> i just love your stuff. <Speech_Male> It's it's really <Speech_Male> you watching <Speech_Male> like artwork <Speech_Male> on the wall. It's <Speech_Male> moving. I mean <Speech_Male> really is just <Speech_Male> ingrate room <Speech_Male> that it ended so <Speech_Male> thoughtful and <Speech_Male> just sensitive everybody <Speech_Male> see underground railroad <Speech_Male> as berry. Says <Speech_Male> you. don't don't watch <Speech_Male> it on city. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Some of <Speech_Male> it's kind of tough but <Speech_Male> it's offering <Speech_Male> interesting and based <Speech_Male> on that great book. I <Speech_Music_Male> wish you the best m. <Speech_Music_Male> Let's stay in <Speech_Music_Male> touch and let me know what's <Speech_Music_Male> going on. <Speech_Music_Male> Yes sir. <SpeakerChange> we'll do mine. <Speech_Music_Male> It's been a pleasure. <Speech_Music_Male> The

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"barry jenkins" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

03:50 min | 2 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"The north carolina episodes a good example. You know that yeah it could. It could push the platform there may be but it does something to kara core. That was one of the ones where i wanted to. I went to punch colson. Because i'm like she's in the attic for seventy pages. If i can't have a four hour or the attic it's not an frank because exactly i can't even have a sixty minute. Episode was just her alone in the attic. I would have to do things she have to have visions and be talking to people. And that would kind of break like what we're doing here But a limitation became an opportunity owed. She's forced to go through this process of learning about maternity of having to live out the active mothering because his little girl. Little girl is tough as hell. It almost doesn't need mothering. Which is because core is also very headstrong and thinks she doesn't need anybody thought it was a really wonderful opportunity men. There is some scenes in the episode that we filmed and we had to. We had to cut that. Which is so after martin goes in and dynamites the mine he comes back home and he calls the because core in grace down from the attic and he's sitting there he's sweaty. He's covered muddy just rocking and he tells the three and a half minute monologue about how his father more or less forced this legacy absolutely no. He doesn't think he is strong enough to do it. And at the very end grace looks at him and she goes you. You feel like a slave in core looks at her and goes just looks at her. Doesn't say anything up in the attic and we had to cut it bro. Red carpet to damon damon heron. But i do think you're right. I mean she's physically stuck but emotionally intellectually. I think she's making these huge leaps in took so much that she sacrifices herself at the end of that episode. She comes down and tells a little girl to stay. Yeah there's yeah you don't need a lot of platt. You know to be telling that starting sometimes i teach writing and that kind of stuff i try to get writers to understand the difference between platin- store and i say this definitions. They're not necessarily difference out there. But i would say the. The story to me is the emotional journey. Character takes on the plot events to tell that story and sometimes you can have movies with very little platinum story and sometimes movies with a lot of platinum very listeners. Well what do you mean by that. And say we'll give. I'll give you the example. I'll use to spill big movies. Close encounters and raiders of the lost art. Same director that said Raiders of the lost ark is a platform. Removing all kinds of stuff. Happened to indiana jones. Snakes come in all. But he's basically the same indiana jones. The beginning of the movie is at the end. So there's very little story in my mind up. But that's kind of the form of the saturday morning syria which is based on. You don't know a story. That's why they're hard to write because it's hard to write good plot twists that keeps an audience engaged. That's not yes it is. It's really different close encounters on the other hand. There's very little platte. You know you know. Richard drivers sees something and then he goes to a mountain like that's about it in terms but he is almost a different richard dreyfuss in almost every single scene of that movie that anyone even more. The story is amazingly complex of the journey that this character takes macaire took. The end leaves his family and his kids. The character getting would never leave. His kids are gonna spaceship with alien. It's crazy larry wilmore's exactly here for that's fucking perfect. I mean it but understanding those tools you can write a.

seventy pages sixty minute indiana jones larry wilmore martin saturday morning Richard four hour three and a half minute Raiders of the lost ark richard dreyfuss one damon damon heron single scene colson north carolina macaire core
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

08:18 min | 2 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"It is my pleasure to welcome his gentlemen to the show. It might as work for a while. now. I mean from beautiful midnight bill street. I mean everything he does is like this beautiful. Just lush portrait. And he's done it again with the limited series amazon. The underground railroad based on colson. Whitehead book that was pose prize winning. I believe and mr barry jenkins welcome to black air. Hey thank you for having me man. It's a pleasure it it's such a pleasure You know i'm a big fan. I gave you got the dvd or berry. Go take take the man. What an achievement. This is you have to feel proud to have this On the air right now and yeah. I am proud man especially because it was It was such a heavy Such a heavy to bear the living. And yet i do think that you know when i watch it or when when people watch it you know all that effort is very clearly on the screen. So yeah i am. Proud of is the best way to describe the feeling i have towards it. Yeah that's great when you can get it on the screen and all that effort is not off the screen that is a winning thing It's funny because i hosted the national book. Awards the year that costa one for this for underground railroad and I remember at the time you know it was such a different environment. You know than it is now yet. We were just coming out of that. I just finished in the nightly show but we had just come out of a lot of things with police in other kind of stuff until a lot of You know. I would say the undercurrent of racial issues was kinda blowing this summer. Kind of in that right now. You know not not bad. It's ever gone away. My lifetime you know so to speak How did you know you wanted to make this. We were you a fan of the book when it came out that you get a did you know about it before. It was kind of a combination of all that. I had been a fan of colson since his first book. Intuition is not actually tried to adapt intuition us around two thousand nine to ten clinton get a hold of it and as a kid always been obsessed with the concept of the underground railroad. At when i heard the words. I saw black people on trains underground because the education system didn't fill in the gaps. I was allowed to have that vision For maybe a couple of weeks and then we got to that chapter during black history month. And i realized that. Oh this is what the underground railroad actually is But that feeling. I a kid always stayed with me and so i heard about colson book before reading it. I just heard colson. Whitehead wrote a book about the underground railroad where the railroad real and i was like. Oh i have got to get my hands on that. I actually read the book before it released and before. Moonlight released as well alone jumped on costa as bra. You gotta let me have this And so we met. And i told him. Don't do it as a film. I wanted to it as a limited series and that was even before moonlight premiered. And so this thing has been with me since before. Anybody was aware of who barry jenkins was which i think is a thing because it wasn't dictated by the success of that film. It was already in process absolutely which is great. Which really shows. Because you bring such a ano- there's a familiarity may be is the right word with with wanting to destroy. I mean it's such a. it is such a live metaphor anyway. Underground railroad in the movie works on so many different levels with. I don't wanna use the word fantasy as much as i think. Alternate is probably a better word But this notion of that. Underground road has fantastical elements that have to be the right tone in the same movie with the realities of slavery. Correct yeah correct and you know as you said the book warm pulitzer prize and national book. I believe so. It's a damn good book you know howson's done a lot of really diligent work to make sure that in the you know alternate Alternate reality or the alternative history still based in some element of truth and so. I love that. No-one libra tastes in this book to a certain degree And i even said we were making the film or making the show. Excuse me yeah you. No one's going to levitating are what real trains running through actual tunnels Again because when i was a kid my granddad was a longshoreman. Him put on his hard hat and the steel toe boots and go off to work. And i thought oh. Yeah people men like him. They built the underground railroad in. I think in adapting the book to the screen. Visually wanted to translate the things that i saw a child and it is a challenge. You know as i'm watching and the book is so fascinating too and it is funny how you think something's might be able to work in a novel. Pecan they really work. When you dramatize it because there is and you know this as director putting something on its feet is completely different than when it's on the page every rehearsal you find that out right. Did you have any concerns about like. Were you intimidated by any of this berry when you were first a putting pen to paper and and kind of planning out this whole limited series. Yeah i was intimidated by two different ways. The scale of it for sure you know i think of a feature film was very bespoke of process. You have four months to try to figure out forty scenes So you can give each seen. A great level of detail is almost like to jail. Just going to a private school where you have one teacher for every fifteen students. The eagles the big public school. Now you've got one teacher for every fifty students and so it's much more difficult to keep that same kind of bespoke education. The give the same attention so in that degree thought. Oh this is terrifying. I know how we're going to manage this. And then of course. The subject matter itself is very very delicate. Very triggering very explosive. And i knew even though. I don't have the same amount of time that i normally would have to work each of these things. This was a feature film. I have to almost get the more time Because the themselves are so incendiary the images so triggering that they demand extra special attention. What was the writing process like. Did you work with carlson on the writing process or did he advise you at all. Was he just there as a safety beacon if you needed him. What was that like. He was there as a safety beacon. You know he was really cool. You know one. He was writing another novel. That would get him a few was. But he's a fan of of cinema and colson is very very good about. What are the kids. I stay in your lane. You know he was like the book is mine and the show is yours as you said as you put us quickly i will be a safety beacon if you need to know more about this and more about that or of questions about anything. Reach out to me. And so we We adopted or adapted but we began the process in a writer's room. There were about five or six of us in it was eight weeks. This is a really intense writing process. And we just pull the book apart and tried to figure out as you were saying what can go from the pace screen and travel transition intact and then what else can we extend off of it. And anytime we're going to veer away from the narrative. I would reach out to colson and go. What do you think of this. It's your world your characters. does this fit in. In every time he was very supportive. There's only one idea at that. He that he shot down. It was a terrible idea. They now in hindsight the there's like the character grace Fan rigs great care the show. I just thought oh. Maybe there's a world where she in this kid homer are fraternal twins Because there were these instances were there were brothers and sisters who were separated. Families were split up all the time. What if there's a way that you can draw this line where you realise very late in the narrative that these two were these twins were separated at birth and grace ended up on the run and.

eight weeks forty scenes carlson Moonlight amazon two each first book one teacher one idea four months six barry jenkins this summer two different ways fifty students about five Whitehead fifteen students pulitzer prize
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

02:55 min | 2 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"Listen to as always tried to have fun smart conversations with things. I'm primarily interested in hope that you are to. You never know what you're going to get here. We seem to be having a lot of directors lately. But you know i love talking about film and writing and that and we have another one this week. This one of my favorites you guys buried jenkins who has directed limited series called the underground railroad based on colson heads. Brilliant pulitzer prize. Winning a man who. This thing is amazing. it's amazon prime. You guys really need but our conversation so much fun. I can have conversations like the one that i have with berry. I just had recently just just forever as you could tell we going for about an hour so i hope you enjoy that especially for the people that are kind of interested in that area and everything very. He's such a interesting filmmakers such an artist too and i think you'll enjoy that conversation. Yes since it over an hour. I won't take a lot of time right now. in fact i'll keep it kind of like next week though when we come back next week but when we come back i wanna talk about what's going on in texas. There's a lot of shit going on there in. i believe there. There's an attack going on in the country right now over women's reproductive rights and that is very concerning to me. Something's going to happen in the next couple of years with the supreme court and everything i think. The right definitely has their targets roby way in an aggressive way that i've never seen in a while and that's a premium courtroom. The you know conservatives. They were not fucking around. You talk about packing the court. They packed that mother. Fucker man with mitch. Mcconnell just change in the rules and not letting obama habits pick because of course it should have been an obama pick and then Change the rose again. So trump got the extra pick for any conybeare that should have been a Biden pick there should be to liberal judges instead of conservative runs and believe me. That is no accident its purpose foam. It's one of the reasons that i think conservatives get out to vote with the most fervor i think they get out to the mercy fervor for the issue of abortion more than any other issue and connect that to conservative judges. Because that's the issue that the care about most there's other issues too that they want the conservative of bench to be leaning right but that one man they are not fucking around and if we have that same that same type of thing on the left. But there's gonna be. I'll talk about in detail. I i'm going to do some more research. And what's going on before i start talking about him but texas is kind of where it's pretty berry now. But it's him and other places so we'll talk about that next tempering. Now guys my lakers are in the playoffs. You know this is a happy time for me and it's fraught. I got a lot of.

texas jenkins trump next week Mcconnell obama amazon mitch this week prime over an hour colson about an hour next couple of years railroad Biden one one man pulitzer
With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

"Underground railroad was a network of abolitionists routes to free slaves. But what if it was an actual railroad with a train chugging toward freedom? That's the premise of Colson Whitehead's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, now adapted by Barry Jenkins into a 10 episode miniseries. This isn't a straightforward, inspirational narrative like Harriet. This combines the brutality of roots with the social commentary of watchman and a hint of magical realism like the Polaroids. Press to some ADO is empathetic as the lead Joe Edger tennis sinister as the villain, slave catcher and child star chased Dillon is his precocious psychic. I still have eight episodes to go. But judging by the first two were in for a powerful train ride by a master conductor. I'm Toby Toby film critic Jason Fraley, giving the underground railroad for five stars. So far, dolphin

Colson Whitehead Barry Jenkins Pulitzer Prize Harriet Dillon Tennis Toby Toby Jason Fraley
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:49 min | 2 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Let's get back to my interview with barry jenkins. He directed films moonlight which won an oscar. For best picture. And if beale street could talk which was adapted from james baldwin novel jenkins directed the new ten part series the underground railroad which is adapted from the pulitzer prize. Winning novel by colson. Whitehead it tells the stories of a teenage girl cora who escapes enslavement on a brutal georgia plantation and the slave catcher who is pursuing her in the story the underground railroad is literally a train that operates in secret underground and transports people escaping slavery to other states. Each of those states has devised its own obstacles to prevent black people from truly achieving freedom. We last spoke after you directed the film moonlight which won the oscar for best picture and the mother in that story is dealing with addiction which leaves her son basically without a parent and so a a drug dealer and his girlfriend become the boys parental surrogates and they both seem like wise and generous people but we later learn that the drug dealers the same dealer who's selling to shira's mother to the boy's mother and keeping her addicted Your mother was addicted. And that's why they were years of your life when she she really wasn't available to you as a parent. Can i ask how your mother is. Now she's good man she's good. She's vaccinated she's good. I mean as good as anybody can be In this time right now you know. I'll say this i think making that film. It opened up A line of communication between us that not that it had it not existed but it had become frayed. And that's what i'll say about that. But yeah she's good man. She's good who who raised you during the years. I know your father died when you were twelve. Yeah i was raised by a woman named minerva hall My grandmother Who i'm pretty sure. There's no blood relation to me but was a was a caretaker from my mom during her very very rough years is actually a character in the underground railroad named after her Ingles wife is named minerva. After my grandmom and overhaul she was awesome. She was the kind of woman who there would be twelve people in a two bedroom apartment at different periods. Because if you needed a shelter she will provide it. It's it's interesting. I didn't i. Don't make these connections as making work. I'm just about the characters. But i mean there's a direct line between the way manoeuvres to care. I mean in the way these kids these children who was put off their families. Where taken care up on my ancestors..

twelve people barry jenkins moonlight james baldwin jenkins twelve Each colson minerva ten part both two bedroom georgia shira Whitehead Ingles street those beale cora
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:04 min | 2 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Today berry jenkins director of the new series the underground railroad adapted from colson. Whitehead's novel about a teenage girl who escapes. Enslavement jenkins also directed the films moonlight which won an oscar. For best picture. And if beale street could talk adapted from the james baldwin novel also francisco goldman tax about his new semi autobiographical novel. Monkey boy the son of a jewish father guatemalan mother goldman grew up mostly in working class suburbs of boston. Who reflect on the impact of physical abuse from his father and the assaults and insulting endured from kids because of his ethnic background and maureen corrigan reviews to monda and goes the latest book notes on grief. It's an exploration of grief after her father's sudden death iowa shaw. I'm kiam mac and cheese where the hosts of the npr podcast invisible. Yeah you can think of invisibility. Ah kind of like sonic black light. When you switch us on you'll hear surprising and intimate stories stories that help you notice things in your world that maybe you didn't see before listened to the visibility. Podcast from npr. My guess barry jenkins directed the film moonlight which won the 2017 oscar. For best film. He also directed the twenty. Eighteen adaptation of james. Baldwin's novel if beale street could talk now. He's co adapted and directed the new ten part series the underground railroad. The series is based on the two thousand sixteen novel by colson whitehead which won a pulitzer prize was an oprah book club selection and was excerpted in a special standalone section of the new york times. It's a reimagining of slave times. And the underground railroad the main characters in the story are cora an enslaved teenage girl who escapes a brutal georgia plantation and ridgeway the slave catcher. Who pursues her. Cora escapes through the underground railroad. Which in the novel and the tv series is literally an underground train that secretly transport's people who have escaped enslavement and make stops in different states. White people in each state have devised a system for dealing with former enslaved people. North carolina has simply band black people but even in south carolina where white people appear to be helping black people succeed. The motives are sinister. Barry jenkins spent four years making the underground railroad and says it's the most difficult undertaking of his career. He says there were times. He wept onset depicting slavery devoured by the barbarity truth. Barry jenkins welcome back to fresh air. It's a pleasure to have you back on the show. Congratulations on on this enormous undertaking. You know. I interviewed colson whitehead. When the book the underground railroad came out and he told me that he had been reluctant to immerse himself in the history of slavery..

Barry jenkins North carolina south carolina barry jenkins james baldwin Baldwin Cora jenkins four years boston Whitehead jewish twenty berry jenkins colson whitehead Today each state ten part 2017 james
‘The Underground Railroad’: Barry Jenkins’ Journey Into American Darkness

Filmspotting

01:22 min | 2 months ago

‘The Underground Railroad’: Barry Jenkins’ Journey Into American Darkness

"Was certainly excited. To see the underground railroad josh least be couple episodes. I was able to fit in this week for this discussion. Because as you know. We're both big barry jenkins fans on the show. Moonlight was in my top five year. It came out of beale street. Could talk was my number one film of its year twenty eighteen but i have to confess i was also reading it a bit just based on the title just based on what i suspected the subject matter would be. There's that element of brutality. That i imagine would be part of this show but i was less worried about that and really more focused on the toil of watching people emotionally suffer and suffering along with them. And that's certainly something we've come to expect from berry jenkins work and then you said something last week on the show josh. I think you'd already caught up with an episode or two. The gave me hope. You said it's not really what you think. It will be or something to that effect and i thought okay. Maybe i'm in for a big surprise here and maybe it will be a relatively pleasurable watch. And then when. I admitted to you today in our slack that i was going to have to binge these two episodes just prior to recording. You said binging may be harmful to mental health. And i knew that. I was in for an experience.

Barry Jenkins Josh Berry Jenkins
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:26 min | 3 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Fresh Air

"By colson. whitehead jenkins also directed the films. Moonlight and if beale street could talk. Did you get to see a lot of movies when you were growing up. I didn't i. Didn't you know we would go to the movies. A saw really big budget American films at the army plaza You know i remember seeing things like Coming to america the color purple you know kid. Play was big. You know. I remember seeing house party in class act and things like that. What did you want to become a filmmaker. It was interesting. We were just talking about my mom so much that first semester film school was really brutal at florida state university. I entered the film school and in the first semester realized. I was a bit in over my head. I didn't know you needed light to expose film and some a technically i was Far behind my peers. You know. I had to question a lot of things you know. The question was not good at this. Because you know. I'm black and poor. And i grew up in the projects with a moment to crack cocaine or do i just not have access to the tools. These kids have had How about just not been privileged. These kids have been and i took a year often. This was around nine. Eleven and came back and i made a short film. People were saying being apple being muslim and america's the new block. I knew what it felt. Like to be black in america and through my research reading and and watching these films knew that films and empathy machine. I thought. Oh if i can figure out a way to empathize with these people and make a film. Maybe there's a way that i can hold us my voice and so i made a film about this arab american couple washing american flags for free. You know as a sign of a patriotism called it my josephine and i made that thing And it worked. I'm really proud of that short and In right away. I realize the first time in my life where these perceived handicaps that i thought i had I just i just blasted through them. I disprove those thoughts. That i have in the back of my mind about myself and i thought oh i can do this for a living. Hell yeah i just been chasing it.

colson Coming to america Moonlight josephine first semester Eleven street first time whitehead jenkins American behind couple america muslim american florida arab american university plaza around nine
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:00 min | 3 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Do you feel like you understand your mother. More i do. I do feel like creating these. Three works has made me understand my mother more know. Actually i kind of regret some of the way up spoken about my mother in the press. Because you know. I talk about her as regards to moolah in a talk about her in regards to the underground railroad. I've never talked about her in regards. The character regina king plays in bill streak at talk. But i think the were moments in my life where my mom did go to baffling and there were these moments where she did she did find a way to correct the ills that were painting her and and she was there and she was president. You know. I had my mom pretty much for my high school years. I have my mom from high school years. We didn't live together but we had a very good relationship. If i need it because again. The greatest octopus elective parenting. The world has ever seen. There is nothing black. Parents won't do for their children. This is something that we found a way to conceptualize as being bad or being negative. I'm going to definitely have that experience with my mom Through high school so more about her. The bill street press. But maybe i should talk terry gross. Who build street. And that would correct it. That but i do think it has brought me a greater understanding of her. Can you talk more about how your understanding of your mother has changed over the years one. I just i'll tell the short version the man of named after my father berry. I'm pretty sure is not my actual father. And yet i learned after about twenty five years of life That barry raised my brother and my sister as his own children. Four the ten years before i was conceived And i believe it was an act of infidelity. That calls this break between my father and my mother and this thing is what. Let my mother down the very dark path that she had to deal with the demons. She had to wrestle with For the fracturing of this family knowing that knowing that was it was not that. I should have needed that information To reconcile the sense of obamacare fell but but knowing it learning it it just completely shifted so many things so many things and even though we're not kind of people who communicate as forthrightly as you and communicating right now Think emotionally and spiritually Ah did shift the access about a relationship. Was i right in saying before that your father died when you were twelve. You were yes. Yes you were However it's just it's just a tricky thing. That's a tricky a. Because i'm not sure who who my father is so so it's a tricky as a tricky thing so tricky thing was buried. This is barry who died when you were twelve. This was this was berry. Yes ma'am were you living together at the time. no i have. I have never Have been in the same room with berry multiple times over those twelve years and we never said a word to one another or he never said a word to me And even that. I didn't understand but But then when. I got that information around the twenty five. I understood man i understood. That's a lot to take in. It can't be maybe a working it out through through creating these images You know. I do think that the journey the core goes through and the show through her ordeal With north carolina with where she ends up at the end you kind of learn to doing and you kind of prepare yourself living life and i think that's what i'm doing The living my life and creating this art..

twelve regina king twelve years Three works north carolina about twenty five years twenty five so many things things ten years Four
'The Underground Railroad’: Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins Returns With Limited Series

The Takeaway

01:19 min | 3 months ago

'The Underground Railroad’: Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins Returns With Limited Series

"Miniseries adaptation of the Colson Whitehead novel, The Underground Railroad premieres on Amazon Prime Both the book and the Serie Center around Cora and enslaved woman who escapes from a plantation in Georgia and travels through a literal underground train system in search of freedom. And while the series does depict the traumatic reality of slavery, early reviews have lauded it for not sensationalizing the violence shown on screen as well as for emphasizing the humanity of the enslaved characters. Much of the project success can be credited to Barry Jenkins Theosophy are winning filmmaker behind Moonlight and If Beale Street could talk here he is on the take away back in 2018 talking about his plans for the underground railroad. Most clearly I can say about it is, you know the hero's journey, and I remember as a kid, you know, hearing about the underground railroad for the first time and really literally imagining to two trains. Running underground. And so I think that reading Coulson's book kind of reactivated the childhood kind of off, you know, around just like the power the ingenuity, you know of black folks to create this path to freedom, and I thought the best way to tell that was to go on the four hero's journey. So I was really happy to partner with Amazon and find a place where we could tell the story on the course of 89 10 hours.

Colson Whitehead Serie Center Barry Jenkins Cora Georgia Coulson Amazon
The Lion King 2 Is Coming And Here's Everything You Need To Know

Direct from Hollywood

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

The Lion King 2 Is Coming And Here's Everything You Need To Know

"Twenty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, a photo realistic remake of the Lion. King is officially getting a sequel and they found the man who will lead the project Oscar winning moonlight director, Barry Jenkins who says in part helping my sister raised two young boys during the nineties I grew up with these characters the opportunity to expand this magnificent tale of friendship. Love and legacy is a dream come true. Particularly interesting about the project is that last year's film was incredibly faithful to the animated classic it was based on, but there's no animated lion king to to follow in the footsteps of so this film will naturally by design and more unique story details are being kept under wraps but according to deadline this movie will flash back into move fosters origin story and possibly other characters origins as well while also moving the story from the first film forward, the project is getting going but expect Disney to put on the front burner as the first film raked in a staggering one point six, billion dollars.

Barry Jenkins King Oscar Director Disney
Barry Jenkins to direct 'Lion King' follow-up

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 11 months ago

Barry Jenkins to direct 'Lion King' follow-up

"A live action version of one of Disney's most popular animated movies is getting the sequel treatment you have to take your place as king Disney hopes to get lion king another place among box office giants it is doing a follow up to last year's live action version of the movie at the helm will be Barry Jenkins who directed the Oscar winning movie moonlight Disney says the movie will be kind of a prequel to the photo realistic remake which was popular with movie goers though not a favorite of critics still alive version of lying king which starred beyond say Donald Glover and James Earl Jones raked in one point six billion dollars internationally and it ranks as the seventh highest grossing film ever I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Disney Barry Jenkins Donald Glover James Earl Jones Oscar Oscar Wells Gabriel
In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:40 min | 2 years ago

In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And Bryce Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, Sunpro online software makes it easy to save time and money print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p dot com slash tech. That's PB dot com slash tech. With all these streaming services films knobs have to be in seventh heaven, right right from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. It's Oscar season a time when we celebrate the history of film, but what if you want to actually sit down and watch some classics that was the selling point of one streaming service film struck that AT and T recently shuttered fills drug showcased directors like Fellini, Kurosawa Kubrick. It was the darling of Sinophile for the two years it existed given that streaming giants like Netflix and Amazon seemed to be focused on making their own original content. Could the golden age of streaming actually mean that film history falls through the cracks and Hornets is senior film critic for the Washington Post. She has high level thoughts on the death of film strike and the future of classic film. She says film strike never released its subscriber numbers her best educated. Guess is about one hundred thousand compared to about one hundred and forty million Netflix subscribers that's tiny. But Hornets says the fan base for classic or indie films has. Value beyond sheer size. It's a highly engaged audience. It's a very loyal audience. I mean, they have value. So whether the movies themselves, quote, unquote, don't have monetary value. I would maintain that they do have value. You know, in terms of the people who watch them, and what they are willing to pay to watch them, and it's not just everyday viewers, but also filmmakers who care about access to a rich array of film history the day after films struck announced it was closing. I happen to spend time with Barry Jenkins who won the Oscar a few years ago, his movie moonlight won the Oscar for best picture. He's just out this year with an exquisite movie called spiel street could talk he is an ecstatic student of film, he's constantly reaching back into the cannon into the history of the medium to enlarge and elaborate on his own emerging vocabulary and language and so for someone like him he was Crespi. On that it was going away. Because you know, when you talk about people like Barry Jenkins or Paul Thomas Anderson or Guillaume or del Toro, all of whom came out very very vociferously to support the site a resource like film struck helps these emerging artists to find their voice. And then it's also educating all of us viewers in terms of what they're doing. I think it was sighted of Warner Brothers and their corporate overlord AT and T not to kind of see the value in that. As the new streaming giants court the best in the business to make their original content or today says showing support for the canon of great film could be a hook. I think that's what Netflix has proven this year so aggressively going after people like I'll find so Koran and spending so much on the Oscar campaign for his movie for people like Martin scores says he will these are film lovers. And I mean, I think as they're trying to impress these tours and convince them. To come with them because they love art, and they love or tourism, a show of good faith would be to express your support of this archival legacy work. I mean, I think that could really sway somebody. She says despite the demise of film strike. There are other ways to stream vintage movies art house and cult films and other non mainstream cinema. There's a subscription service fan door. Also, canopy with a K available with your public library card and the library of congress L O, C dot gov. I got admit I'm not a major film buff. So I asked Hornets for suggestions on what to watch something. That's not a superhero movie, she suggested not a film, but a TV show on stars. And I kind of freaked out. Can I tell you what I'm obsessed with it's it's it's not even the one. I'm obsessed with speaking of stars is counterpart. I'm totally caught up on her part. We did this last week. I just don't know what I'm gonna do. I'm beside myself. I it's so good. Yeah. There's out. I've pretty good taste. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, San pro online software makes it easy to save time and money, no matter what you ship or mail print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit PBA dot com slash tech. That's PBA dot com slash tech.

Hornets Oscar Pitney Bowes Bryce Sunpro Netflix Jed Kim Barry Jenkins AT Washington Post Warner Brothers PBA Molly Crespi Sinophile Fellini Kurosawa Kubrick Paul Thomas Anderson Martin Amazon Guillaume
"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"We're looking forward to in January twenty nineteen on the eighteenth will be opening if Beale street could talk which is the latest film from Barry Jenkins Oscar winner for moonlights and based on a story by James Baldwin. So we're really excited for that. Lou twenty working on these days continuing project is sort of being Facebook and someone for marks oilfields questions on mocks. Oh, foles do keep coming in. And I'm trying also in that same. Area to get myself ready for all you commentary for the exile, which is showing signs of life. It was screened at Walter Reed theater. One of the best theaters. The on the big screen, which is one of four spectacle, film like that. Yeah. So I'm hoping that'll come it'd be the last one for me to do and they Merican foams and Cam, what's the latest Abusir? I've actually been trusted ended a video for an art installation. That will be coming up in January. But I can't give too many details because I'm not sure of the participants for one thing. I don't know if this is gonna air before after so doesn't really make sense. I'm just laying guys that know that I'm not a good for nothing L. Okay, involved in something you not a gave out again about I try to get about as much as possible. Not totally useless. And I expect I will be on an upcoming episode of the projection. Okay, good. Well, you will be on hair next week for sure. Well, thanks again guys for being on the show. Thanks.

Barry Jenkins Walter Reed theater James Baldwin Facebook Lou Cam
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Amanpour

"Just it all the way. And Barry Jenkins joins me now from new Oakwell come to the program. Thank you. So we just showed a bit of the trailer. But even in the trailer, you can see sort of an exceptional lens on black experience in America. There's so much joy the focus on this love that you focus on. There's a certain naive Ted that you focus on. What was it that made you want to adapt this particular Baldwin novel? For me. I've always been a really big fan and Mirer of James Baldwin's work, Mr. Baldwin had quite a few voices. He wrote in but two of those voices in particular that always stood out to me was one voice that was obsessed with romance romanticism interpersonal relationships and the other boys that was just as obsessed passionate about pointing out his stomach injustice, and I felt like in this book, if they'll streak a talk those voices were perfectly fused, and the story addition Fani, I mean, they really are perfect. If you so tissues, the young go. She's nineteen phony is her boyfriend. They've known each other from when they were little little children, and they grew up into this really deep and sweet and wonderful love. And then he gets framed full a rape that he didn't do that his family is trying to get him out of jail full. But his this moment we wanna play a fairly lengthy clip of tissues family, telling funnies family that she's actually pregnant. Just listen. A child is coming. His cringe. Understand you. It's your grandchild. But differences and make how it gets here to challenge got nothing to do with that. Ain't none of us got nothing to do with that. Take your which you..

James Baldwin Fani Barry Jenkins Ted rape America
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"There are moments of just extreme abject beauty in my memories. And it's why moonlight looks the way it does. And it's why Bill street looks the way it does feels the way those films do, and I think if there's anything about Baldwin's work that I've been able to really really ingest in take with me and apply to my work. It's this idea that despite the bitterness in the the anger of the things Baldwin is talking about how those things make him feel if you ever hurt James Baldwin laugh, then you would know that he also understood that there was such such extreme beauty. Enjoy in living a life this way through the prism of so much suffering. And yet here, we are, you know, you cannot break us and be us when speaking of of black folks myself, and Mr. Bauman and the subjects of our work. So it's been really. Really lovely run with these last two films things I was maybe trying to get away from and now understand that. We're always a part of me when you hear James Baldwin talk. It comes across as though because you referenced the fact that he obviously was quite angry and frustrated in the back of his mind often. And yet when we heard him speak to those young people in San Francisco early, you get this idea that he's he's speaking in a sort of fatherly turn like he sees himself as a mental he understands that because he's in the public eye. He has voiced that a lot of people don't have and he can speak in a way that particular point that a lot of people can't do your in the public eye. Now, how do you deal with that idea that you to have a voice that not everyone has? And maybe there's a responsibility that comes with that too is not something that that you feel that that weighs on you. Sometimes. Yes, something I've had become more aware of and take more notice of especially in the wake of everything that happened with moonlight. It is something that I don't enjoy like to say, you know, voices and well. Work the films, but I also realized too because of the very privileged position. I find myself in that that's not enough, and it's not acceptable. So it is something that I'm very aware of and I'm trying to be more responsible west sitting down in being very open and honest with folks like yourself, you're an Oscar winner, obviously. And you've just adapted James Baldwin, which my understanding is almost laughed. He said, obviously, it has not so obviously, but in the end, obviously you've fulfilled one of your big dreams now. Right. I mean, obviously standing up on stage would be at the Oscars would be a dream for little people. But I think perhaps the bigger dream few adapting James Baldwin into into the film that you releasing now what inspires you now. What comes next full? Barry Jenkins way to you see you'll craft taking you I just like telling stories, you know, I love being said I love collaborating with I'll say my friends, you know, but the friend group is expanding. Now, I've always worked lucidly with my friends case in point. I was up till two AM last night. I. College is if I'm not as fresh with it as I should be in this interview, I'm working on other projects, I just had to get the pages done. And so I think I'll always be someone who just wants to tell stories and wants to tell them in a think a very visceral and for me cinematic challenging way I often want to keep challenging myself. There's a sense of wonder and all that I get from watching movies in. I'm always trying to reflect that feeling that movies. Give me to the people who are watching the work that I create and when the time comes when I don't have that sense of. Aw, I don't have that sense of wonder when I don't derive it either from the work on creating from the work. I'm watching the go sit down, you know, in L teach folks how to create the same sense of wonder an that cinema is given me in you'll films as a feeling of acceptance of forgiveness in coming to grips with wear one is in their life..

James Baldwin Mr. Bauman Oscars Barry Jenkins Aw San Francisco
"barry jenkins" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on /Film Daily

"The other one is so odd game Suber melodramatic lush and saturated but not the book Avetissian funny. Get this get the apartment they have is conversation of the day Prego Calgary. Maybe they're walking down the street, and they just yell to the sky and that to me is peak gooey sentimental like soft. Barry Jenkins, which is an impulse. I try to reject, but I think people need to especially young black people need to be able to unleash joy in an unbridled way. And in that moment for me. It's it's I've never is my favorite moment in the film. Because I think you I want that for those characters so badly. Yes. Oh, badly the phone and KiKi you're so committed to it. It's just you know, when you grow up as a child, and you understand what relationships are families you the Brady bunch. You know, that will live what they do when that seem is the embodiment of it in, you know, some that's not in the novel. And if like it had to be in the film, and it's not my best impulses. But fuck it. I just love it. And there's like that's like one of the most heartbreaking it's in the movie like right in that scene. He says we've got all the time in the world Jack del because of what you've seen already that. It's not true, though, he says he says he says on a few things I'm thinking about you believing all make it. But, but he also says are you ready for this which is a mirror because in the opening scenes, she she he had she asked him. Are you waiting for this already anything my life and says and then because the whole movies of frayed her consciousness that it's flipped? He has. Her on this. She says Moore ready having them a whole lot. But auditing, but are they ready? How could anybody fucking Gina ready to go to Puerto Rico? Yeah, she has to go. You know, these kids have to live their lives. Graduates plenty, but what's been than what slash on dot com. I told him not to do. So. I have not but I loved it. But I think we have a rebuke from from Toronto great, thanks thinking there, you have it. I hope you enjoyed our conversation with Barry Jenkins. And I encourage everyone to go see this movie if you can if Beale street could talk has already opened in Los Angeles and New York and it arrives in theaters nationwide on December twenty fifth, please go support this movie. It's tremendous. It's it's heartbreaking. It's quiet. It's intimate. And it's one of the.

Barry Jenkins Moore Prego Calgary Gina Suber Jack del Puerto Rico Toronto Los Angeles New York twenty fifth
"barry jenkins" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on /Film Daily

"The challenge of adapting such a beloved novel and much more. Without further ado, here's our interview with Barry Jenkins. Well, congratulations movie, it's lovely heartbreaking. And really enjoyed it. Also, congratulations on moonlight. I haven't spoken to you since one best picture. I'm curious about directors after they win best picture. Have you noticed a significant shift in opportunities being available to you since the Duffy shipping opportunities being available like to say is, you know, if I sent an Email now actually know that there will be a replied unbelievable, smell somebody will return, which this industry in this town on your careers often jeered around it, I try and get people to say, yes. And now a think much we're is geared around trying to be very diligent wise about how often say now. So that's been the biggest change. This movie is like sensual in a way. But I think most American movies are not is that is that vibes that feeling something that is like inherently baked into you as a storyteller where where does that come from you? I can't say as victims me as a storyteller, you know, both these films have been hesitations of other people's work James James, Baldwin, Terrell avenue mccranie. So I think the credit you must originate with them for creating these pieces that won't speak to something very vital about American life. But without without sacrificing the sensuality of everyday experience. I don't know. I can't I can't say that, you know, unlike most American films that you said that. But I think it is something that that we all sort of encounter in our everyday life just goes many different depictions of sensuality. And so I see no reason to take that out of the work or to be afraid to revel in it in the works. I think at times both these films, we do, and what kind of visual influences, did you have going into this the biggest one with this? And you know, James was in Memphis yesterday, giving a masterclass on own cinematography and talking about this film in particular. Indie Memphis, and he was saying, and I agree that the energy of James Baldwin the way he writes, especially in this film on this book the detail, which he writes with the primary inspiration, the primaries, we'll specification, and then we would try to the film is not a documentary, but we wanted to find references that really have the -delity to experience of Harlem, you know, in the sixties in the early seventies. And we found that mostly still autocracy when work by ROY decarava in Gordon park. And so it was a blend of the lushness of Mr. Baldwin's literal syntax the way he constructs these sentences and then this beautiful photography of the period. As why the film is presented to buy one. That's opposed to the more the more common aspect ratios of one five or two point five. Okay. I think my favorite shot of the movie is of Titian Fani walking down this really gorgeous lit street under this red umbrella, and they've turned down a one way street yet. And they go the wrong way. And we're those signs written into the script. Or did that just happen that this is what I love about making movies all of that? It wasn't an accident. But you know, we didn't bring in rain. It just poured rain the day. Really? There was not meant to be an umbrella. You know, like so much of that of the way we frame that was not meant to be. But, you know, even though it's movie had more resources in the moonlight. You know, it's still, you know, a small small budget or a modest budget. I should say, and so we had to work with the elements. And so I just poured Raimo day. And so once we got to the setup just seemed like well, what's the best way to film this now gorgeous free a free rein? And it was Diego was like a Bhagwat says how you say umbrella in Spanish, and the whole thing just took on this life of its own as far as walking left versus right..

James Baldwin James James Barry Jenkins Memphis Titian Fani Duffy ROY decarava Gordon park Diego Harlem Bhagwat
Discussing 'If Beale Street Could Talk' with Director Barry Jenkins

The Frame

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Discussing 'If Beale Street Could Talk' with Director Barry Jenkins

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"We got Sinophile hats for you in the past Danson three of these quizzes, much like Goldilocks and the three bears. One was too hard. We'll miss too simple right in the middle. So this time I request when fairly easy because I wanna see people get these hats and star pump them out there. So Sinophile hats. We'll give them the I ten I five ten. I ten correct responses. He got a tweet us Sinophile ESPN C. I N E P H eilly ESPN, Dan, Donald the quiz. What have we got? Okay. It's a five question quiz. And for many of you that don't know. I watch jeopardy may mostly every night, you're becoming seven thirty get ready for bed. Wake up super. I mean, most viewed show certainly over the years, we'll be we'll be your favorite show. But I mean, it's hard to judge like a game show and a drama or comedy. I love Seinfeld that kind of stuff, but so jeopardy mostly every night. Okay. Seven o'clock. So I wrote these as if they were jeopardy. Question. One this famous actor writer, producer director and citizen was likely misquoted as saying the love me when I'm dead. Nice question too. This commenter roasted Rick with a midday rebuke calling him a bag of hot air. Hey, if you're an avid listeners to file this was a memorable moment of two thousand eighteen question three Steve Levy recently gave his stamp of approval on doing upwards of twenty five takes because of the residual checks including the most recent one he got for this amount. Great. Great question. Question four, Ben Lyons met his future wife on the French Riviera thanks to a film about Russians made by this genius director love it genius directory when okay, very good good. Guess we had. Yep. And finally Adnan's one. Critique of a recent film was not that it was flat. It's that the spotlight wasn't on this actor enough. Dedicated fans of Sinophile will know who that actor is very good. That's a quiz. I ten responses. You get a free Sinophile had put it on the Graham, put it on your Twitter. Let's get it done and committed to Michael Stein. Who won the Nick Nolte book? That's right. This is my autograph. It's not by Nick, it's autographed by me. It's an autobiography of Nick Nolte, and he wanted the question was nNcholas his voice sounds like what according to Jack for Toronto Star. Film create the answer is like a talking ashtray several people tweeted and other stuff if you look at other of us said this about Nolte, but talking Asha was correct. So the finished Sinophile and the quiz, and we're gonna shut out west. I don't know if it's brilliance Everts or efforts. But he's a superfan of signify tweets this show all the time. He tweets me all the time. Susan emory's. Here's fantasies tweets all the time. So thanks as always for supporting us passport your noticeably. Silence. This time, I think that the I have gone to you didn't you didn't do it. In defense of your your your sensitive after people are criticizing, you know, we had a full slate today you had seven reviews we have led we had Barry Jenkins. Come. On through. You know, Dan's got this awesome three movie. Every man like, hey, man. I'm cool. Go and silently into the good night that is twenty eighteen supporting actor knowing when to step aside. So the next podcast will be next week at some point. We'll be reviewing such films as Mary Poppins returns definitely gonna see Roma..

Nick Nolte Sinophile Danson Dan Steve Levy director Ben Lyons Adnan Barry Jenkins Rick Mary Poppins Seinfeld ESPN Twitter Michael Stein Susan emory Graham Toronto writer Donald
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"Laxer Motagua for liquids Patel who did our score who who both honored last night. You'll addition to regina's I think he's about empowering people and power collaborators and trusting and also not being afraid of space. I think when you read James Baldwin there is a meddlesomeness quality. You know, there's a almost zero quality to it. There's his language is very active, and I think the way that hits his through this this this space. And so I'm always going to be actors. You know, you don't have to rush. You know, there is a rhythm to what we're doing. And that we can happen. You know, at this many BPM's, or it can happen very few BPM's, and it's all it's all to be good. And so. I think what we try to do is really get inside the consciousness characters, and then try to relate that to the audience in a way unfairly as poetic what I think that has evolved to me, it's all about divide. Then if he'll streak a talk as opening in theaters this fight over talk with Barry Jenkins is also massive sports in the last time. We had we talked to the fact you've played football. I know you recently tweeted that article is very cool said, hey, don't don't get full embarrassing, man. Don't token fooled by the glasses and the nerdy. Look, very Jacobs was a a tough guy running back, which I hope people realize your sports pedigree World Cup. Nobody was tweeting more than you. I feel like you took a break from whatever you're doing just to watch three soccer matches a day. And of course, I know how much you love college football. Even the other day, you're doing a junket. I'm falling your Twitter, you're tweeting about like, Oklahoma. Like the the big toe championship game. How big a sports fan are you? How are you able to balance that with a world of filmmaking? You know, I I I grew up. We only structure I had in my life. But I could depend on west west lettuce to be honest. You know, that was where, you know, a London things about manhood that I've taken into adulthood with me. You know, I didn't have a father growing up. So my coaches where way my father's, and I think understanding how to work, you know, in a collaborative effort. I learned you know, football teams into I think I I try not to keep those things separate from my art because so many of the things that I do, especially however, my phone sets, you know, are taken from you know, how I saw my coaches the best coaches I had running innovations, but I'll depart of particularly high school football team. I mean of western which just won the class six as they championships in in Florida man, we would three and five at one point the season. And we ended up winning the state championship because I think every team you often made the playoffs. So. Yeah. I exactly I think a lot of stuff. You know, I take with me. And I think there was a very brief moment in my life. I thought I had to separate those two. But I don't think that's the case at all. And case in point. We'll get yourself, you know, going from Sinophile to, you know, you know, choosing the the playoff teams because like, you know, you can use the muscle, you know, in both realms. Now, there's no question, man. We're we're polymath is a nice way of putting it we we have interests that are all over the backwards. What would be better? Listen, you have one picture won't be better. If you actually been running back who made the NFL and actually won the SuperBowl. What do you think I know this is extrapolated here? But why do you think it'd be better winning best picture or winning a Super Bowl? You know, it's interesting. I think because of the movie that we won best picture with and to this day. I still run into kids. You know, kids. I mean, people who are who are twelve to people who are eight who found such me in that movie in new light and that character's journey, but I wouldn't trade it for the world..

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