36 Burst results for "Bernstein"

Fresh update on "bernstein" discussed on WIBC Programming

WIBC Programming

01:47 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "bernstein" discussed on WIBC Programming

"This CNN host John Berman has the morning host. Getting into an argument with a Yale epidemiologist about Medical science. It's just it's crazy. It's crazy. The the Anytime you bring up hydroxy, Clara, Quinn and people lose their minds, and it's just not necessary. It's now we're into like Ooh, It's pure theater at this stage of the game. Now this I want to put this if you did not know Producer Ari, who produces the midday shown does work all over the station. Hey, keeps a running list. Of the dumbest thing said in America. He has. He has Sam. He keeps the clips when he hears something we anyway doesn't want the shows. I think I don't know. It's just my shows are all the shows When. Here somewhere. It's like, okay, that's too dumb for words. Boom goes on a list and at the end of the year we we run a contest to see who was the dumbest thing said that year. Well, I believe this winds. This is Carl Bernstein. Carl Bernstein, Woodward and Bernstein, The famed who is still living off of that, by the way, hasn't done a bit of reporting since. Maybe he doesn't have to. And is now an expert on well, whatever it is, they say he's an expert on because he's Carl Bernstein. Watergate. Woodward. Bernstein, Please. People read a book. Well, this is his take. On the Republican Party. And Trump and this is what he told CNN. We needed. Something has happened with another dangerous president and a dangerous moment Richard Nixon, but nothing like what we've seen now. But in the final days.

Carl Bernstein CNN ARI Woodward Yale Republican Party John Berman Richard Nixon Donald Trump SAM Watergate Boom America Clara Producer President Trump Quinn
Interview With Andrew Bernstein

The Candid Frame

04:41 min | Last week

Interview With Andrew Bernstein

"In his lengthy career. He's developed many friendships, not least of which was with Kobe Bryant with whom he collaborated the book. The Mamba, mentality how I play. And career special not because of the many iconic image he's made, but because he's demonstrated that he is the kind of man who puts in the extra effort and time to be a great photographer, a good father and a good man. This is about an ex in welcome back to the candidate frame. A first off welcome. Welcome to the show. It's have you thank you very much happy to year. Always Nice to talk to a legend. Old? I know. We talk a lot about your career as a sports photographer and that's we're going to spend a lotta time doing but I always to talk to sports, photographers or anyone who's been covering the game for a long time, always like hearing the story of the first live event smart event that they ever went to. That was like significant for them. What would that be? The first one I shot like no other one shot, but. went to maybe as a kid well, that's a great question I would have to say a grew up. A mets fan I. also a Rangers Fan growing up. I remember distinctly go into a myths game with my dad. I probably was maybe seven or eight. And, we were sitting behind home plate at Shea Stadium frankly sort halfway up, maybe third deck or something in. A foul ball team our way straight back. Identity shoved me out of the way in cod with one round. Tremendous amount it's been going. You know I'll never forget that I'm glad you remind me of that. That was fifty something years ago. An amazing that's A. Great Memory have first game. Yeah, well, it's better than getting in the head with a puck. But it would. No it was, it was a great memory. I had that ball forever I. Don't know what happened to it. In various moves over the years on the hockey side remember going to see the Rangers play in back. In the day we used to Go the old Madison Square Garden. This is the garden that was up on Tenth Avenue. I believe before they built the new garden in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy one. And the old guard, and had these pillars that you know. The new garden had the suspended ceiling. We made it so revolutionary. The Old Guard was Lee elda auditorium in at these pillars came down, and they sold seats literally behind the pillars that would call obstructed view seats. Added stamped on the ticket obstructed view. And you, literally sitting behind the pillar, and that's where me, the kid with always stupid behind the pillar. Every single time by Dan we get the tickets were like fifty cents. So that's what my earliest memories ago to raise your AIDS, I went to I can't remember which was first where there was a rams game at the coliseum that was my first, or whether it was dodger game. Experienced that I, remember was just the noise of so many people. And just it's unlike any other feeling I ever had were have dislike. Thousands of thousands of people around you at the same time, and there's something that I think is. Very lowering about that whether you are a sports fan as Lords player in your case of a photographer and talked to me about the intoxication of just that feeling at that sound. And, what it does for you especially when you're out there virtually in the center of it, it's still funny and bringing this up because the last. Or so this is gonNA sound really weird, but I've had this crazy ringing in my ear might. Equally right, it never experience, so go to the doctor. Get a hearing test the whole thing that they do. It comes back I have like twenty percent hearing loss at the high frequency, not unusual for my age. The audiologist says Mrs Wonder What kind of let me ask you. What kind of work do you do? I said well sports photographer you in noisy environments. She says I said. When's the last time we were in one? Four months ago. Well the ever experiences when you're in a loud arena or stadium I should not consciously. She's a will. Maybe you haven't withdrawal surgical. Rain you this consciously? Hearing it because it was so used to hearing it for forty years, isn't that? It's so bizarre.

Lee Elda Auditorium Kobe Bryant Madison Square Garden Rangers Shea Stadium Mets Hockey DAN Lords
The race problem in economics

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:55 min | 2 weeks ago

The race problem in economics

"The American Economic Association or the A is the biggest and most important professional organization of economists in the country, and it recently made a statement saying that it had quote only begun to understand racism and its impact on our profession and our discipline. Black economists are severely underrepresented in the field of economics, according to a survey from the EA. Only about three percent of economists are black. Nearly half black economists say they have experienced discrimination in the profession, and only seventeen percent of black economists agreed with the statement that quote. People of my race are respected within the field, and this matters not just for the economics profession it matters for how all of us understand the whole economy and. And it matters how economic policy gets made John Jones is an economic analyst and the Managing Director for policy and research at the groundwork collaborative. What we have learned right now. Is that like we have a worse understanding of the economy because we haven't been listening to economists of color like we're actually worse at economics, because we have denied a voice to folks who understand the different way, so here's an example before the financial crisis of two thousand eight, the unemployment rate for black Americans started rising earlier and more sharply than the unemployment rate for White Americans. In fact, this often happens before recessions, and if there had been more black policymakers or black economists who were advising policymakers. Who understood this dynamic black workers are often the first to lose their jobs before a recession than it is at least possible that policymakers would've reacted more quickly to help the economy, and you might have also had new in different ideas for how to help the Economy John L. Herself along with the economist. Jared Bernstein recently published one such idea. It is a proposal that the Federal Reserve should focus explicitly on the black unemployment rate when it makes decisions about managing the economy, black workers restorick starkly have been roughly twice as likely to be unemployed as white workers, so according to Gino's proposal, focusing on the black unemployment rate would ensure that everyone benefits from A. A strong economy, and as for how to get more economists of color into the economics profession, Juno says one idea is for there to be more. Black economists included among the gatekeepers of economics at universities and economics journals, who are the editors at the top journals who are the deans who recruit new cohorts Janelle release this idea to an early experience of her own. When Economists Sandy dirty recruited her to Duke University, her own career and her contributions to economic ideas, she says might have ended up on a totally different path if he hadn't done that. I was entirely recruited because sandy dairy was a tenured professor at Duke and wanted more students of color. But you know like if he's not promoted to have tenure and job security to be able to take a risk on someone else like. Students of color don't get recruited. The events of recent months have led to renewed discussion among economists and economic policy. For more ways to fight racism inside the profession and to include more diverse approaches to studying economics font, the crowd is a senior research assistant at the Federal Reserve, and she is the CO founder of the sadie collective, a group that supports young black women who want to enter the field of economics with everything that's going on now with the covid nineteen pandemic with the higher unemployment rates in the black community. With the police brutality, the issue of that and the death of George Floyd and what that has incited. We cannot afford for things to go back to how they were Fontana notes that only a tiny share of research papers, especially at the top economics, journals actually study race and racial discrimination and the fact that they don't win. Economics is a tool that's used to inform. Policy is very problematic, so a reckoning would mean that there would be a culture shift. Shift in economics, a number of block economists have also said that they were discouraged early in their careers from studying topics about race and racial discrimination, because they would not get published where they would not advance in the profession, recent study looked at the almost fourteen thousand research papers published between Nineteen, Ninety and twenty eighteen at in the most important economics journals. Journals. Only a hundred and five of those papers impurity tested for different kinds of discrimination, including racial discrimination, though fund is quick to add that there are some economists who have long been doing the work of trying to understand the effects of racism and racial discrimination on the economy. She points to journals like the review of black political economy which is published by the National Economic Association. It's just that this is not really widely read or widely embraced within the mainstream of the economics profession.

American Economic Association Federal Reserve Sandy Dirty National Economic Association Jared Bernstein John Jones Managing Director For Policy John L. Herself Duke University George Floyd Janelle Fontana Research Assistant Duke Analyst Gino Juno
The Skeptics Guide For Wearing Masks

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

The Skeptics Guide For Wearing Masks

"Roll come to this country. The Universe today is Wednesday July eighth twenty twenty, and this is your host. Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella, everybody, Cara, Santa, Maria, howdy, and Jane, Novella Hey guys I've been. Bernstein is out this week. Is Neck deep in other people's taxes. Guys Do. You know what he's. He had like a weird like mid tax break which he's never had before. Pick about it right? Yeah I, think everybody did. Last night. So like screw this finishing this crap I hate it and also I think the thing. Is Nobody really knew what was going to happen, but a lot of people got hit super hard, which is why the tax deadline was pushed back so they're like I can't afford to pay my taxes right now, but maybe come July all be in better place financially. Unfortunately, a lot of people are even worse place financially now. There's just kind of kicking. The can down the road speaking of that Steve What are the latest numbers are not good. You know especially in the United States so worldwide. We've surpassed twelve million cases with over five hundred and fifty thousand deaths. In the U, s where over three million cases and Around, one hundred thirty thousand deaths, at least that number's always because probably more. And you know it's just in the US just exactly what we warned about. We're seeing the second hump in the first wave and the greatest number of new cases per day is happening right now. This is a greater surge than we had back in March and April, and this is what we talked about. What happens when we start to open up what happens if then cases start to surge again, what will be? Do you know people have lockdown fatigue? The economy's already taken a big hit from the first lockdown. Some states opened up too quickly. They didn't do it properly with enough testing and contact tracing. And now we're seeing this really bad second wave and the sad thing is. They're having to do it kind of haphazardly like they're the states where they said. Okay we want to reopen, so they never really fully lockdown or they did, but they only stayed lockdown for like two weeks, and then they were like okay bars. We got to reopen. We got to get the economy going. And now the cases are just bananas out of Control and so they're doing this like quick quick. Quick your mask back on, and it's kind of like it's haphazard. It's not clean. It doesn't feel as controlled. And I think that's where things really do. Fall through the cracks, and then, of course we have this whole. Political Anti Mask Movement. That does seem to correlate with some of the same states where we're seeing these spikes. We definitely see in California. I mean you know in more conservative districts, but there are sort of marbled in California, so I definitely hear it even in L. A., it's not as common but. Not that Far Away San Bernardino County's very close, and you see the people. Holding angry signs and it's just. Did you guys hear that they did? A study showed that if they mandated mask you have. Made it pretty much requirement? Everyone wearing masks in public that they could save forty five thousand lives over the course of I'm not sure what the course of the period the period of time would be I think like three or four months. Five thousand I mean if that number that was that was fairly solid number. Would what else would you need but like okay, then we're. We're doing this. You have to wear a mask in public period. Almost the Vietnam War right there. Yeah, no more was fifteen thousand so imagine we could save the same number of lives lost over ten years the Vietnam War just by wearing I think it's such a profound number that we're not even equipped intellectually to really understand that that much right like I don't know forty thousand people I can't picture forty five thousand people sitting in a room I don't know what that looks like. I look like a baseball football stadium. Wouldn't that be roughly? Park, speech larger than the student body of my Alma Mater and speaking of masks. Study this week very that people might be interested in, so they just compared different types of masks, and how well they work, and of course the ones that you think should work the best do right so the ninety nine masks supposed to stop ninety nine percent of the virus were the best followed by end ninety five of course block, Ninety five percent of the virus, and their tests show that those numbers roughly accurate. And then followed by surgical masks, so they were the next, so those are the ones that healthcare workers are using, and they do work the best for the homemade ones they said was the best so actually interestingly, using vacuum cleaner filters was the best like homemade option. Just make a little pocket in your mask. You put those filters in there, and you can replace them like if they get moisture used. And that was the best using any kind of a close. We've. tight-knit cotton was good. They said what did not work is wearing. A scarf doesn't really do much to the only a slightly better than no mascot, all or a t shirt like pulling a t shirt up over. Your face doesn't work very much at all either so stick with the. multi-player cotton, and if you put a filter

United States Steven Novella California Bob Novella Bernstein Steve What San Bernardino County Jane Alma Mater Santa Maria Baseball L. A. Football
Podcast listeners 39% more likely to drive a hybrid

podnews

02:20 min | Last month

Podcast listeners 39% more likely to drive a hybrid

"Co Friendly podcast listeners thirteen nine percent, more likely to be hybrid tribe, US kind where three hundred two billion dollar opportunity for the US auto market, says Nielsen highlighting that ten and a half million podcast listeners was shopping for a new car at the height of the pandemic restrictions in the US. And exclusive APP. Company Maple Media. Which purchased PODCAST APP PLAYER FM on April the thirtieth has bought another android podcast APP podcast. PODCAST has had more than half a million downloads player fan more than five million. We're told a formal announcement is to be made in the coming weeks. Megaphone will now offer attribution standard for ads books through the megaphone targeted marketplace, following an agreement with Hod sites. taught joined a media analyst for Bernstein has decided. It's unlikely spotify will generate much earnings from podcasts and has downgraded his rating on the stock. It's not the first time. He's taught spotify down this year and he's been wrong in the past. Has Launched the third edition the Audience Awards which is open to Spanish speaking podcasts we to the rules, and if you are eligible podcast, Buf- until July twenty six to enter your show. At world says it's the world's largest online advertising advantage scheduled for November the second to the fourth with over fifteen tracks including one on podcasting this year you can get an early bird pass now for just thirty nine dollars, apparently, the final price, two, hundred, nine, thousand nine hundred dollars. Nominations are open for the podcast awards. You can vote for anyone you like. Though you know. This podcast is in the politics and news category. Just saying you've got until July, thirty first to vote dressed to to vote to vote. ANDROID, user someone I've read Hacker News is building an open source android podcast, APP, and they right I was wondering if I can add any specific features to make it more interesting for frequent podcast business. You want to tell them we give you link in our show notes and our newsletter today and Ramsey solutions are looking to grow their team of speakers, writers and broadcasters I'm in the legacy. Stage of my career has Dave Ramsey where I now get to share my success and platform with this next generation of speakers, authors, some thought leaders and helped them be successful.

United States Bernstein Spotify Megaphone Dave Ramsey Ramsey Solutions Nielsen Maple Media Media Analyst
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

05:35 min | Last month

The Skeptics Guide

"Loan welcome to the. Universe today is Wednesday July first twenty twenty, and this is your host Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella everybody. Santamaria Howdy Jane Novella guys and Evan Bernstein welcome to the second half of the year everyone. Let's hope it was as good as the first. This is one of the longest first halves of a year I. Think I've ever experienced in my life. Was Different. Alright the thing that I think that's happened over the last week in terms of the whole Cova. Craziness is the real escalation of the mask wars as a cultural war in the US, which is just crazy. Lutely I guess we'll fight over anything right? It's hard to be. You know to be surprised after everything we've seen. But, this is a little bit surprising people fighting against the masks. Is just well, but you know what it's not that surprising. If you know a little history, because the same exact thing happened in nineteen eighteen during that flu pandemic, there was a general recommendation to wear masks, and there was actually an anti mask league of people pushing back against mask wearing, and you're saying that specifically a here in the US right. I think it's elsewhere as well I think the UK's having a little bit of a pushback it's. Component known another. Component was not just in the US that was even more over in Europe. Interesting that this the current anti mask nonsense is mainly a US phenomenon I think, but I think it is happening elsewhere as well just not as much so I've been seeing some really interesting assertions about the fact that some of the underlying ideology really comes down to the fact that historically America, and you're right some kind of European. Nations as well especially, the UK kind of pride themselves on an individualistic society as opposed to a collectivist society, and obviously everybody falls somewhere on the continuum of those two things, but America has sort of a long history of being very individualistic, very proud of it, and that kind of mentality could have some explanatory power when we talk about these anti mask fights. Yeah I think that's part of it if you look if you look like there was famously testimony in Florida from people who pushing back against mask wearing and they you know the big theme was liberty and freedom. You'RE NOT GONNA. Tell me what to do, but there was some subset of them woven religious themes. Like this, you're covering God's face whatever you know really interesting. I know. Who you're supposed to cover your head. Whatever and then the other theme was pseudoscience, right? It was making claims that will masks are unhealthy, or they don't work. Since just exactly like the ANTIBAC- sers the same same playbook, so how much of that is just like trying to find justification for that lip? Wonderful Sam. Percent this idea that I'm more concerned about my own comfort than I. am about the well being of others? It's really representative of an individualistic view. That's hard to extricate because it's like it's so woven into society that kids in America are born thinking that way depending on how multicultural bicultural whatever you are. How many generations you've lived here, but when you look at collective societies, the idea that somebody would make a decision to for their own betterment at the expense of other people's welfare is like bananas to them. I mean I. Think I think like we were saying. There's a huge component here of it being a political statement. You know I've been doing a lot of work like you know. Heavy lifting type of work with a mask on prepping for nexus and yeah like it's harder to breathe when you have a mask on, but they've proven that you're not at a loss for oxygen like you're not suffering from a lack of oxygen because you're wearing a mask, it just restricts your breathing a little bit. It's like trying to breathe through. A Straw of a certain size feels a little CLAUSTROPHOBIC, but yeah. Has. Anything worse but Kovalev. Yeah, but yeah, you're right J does not restrict your ability to get oxygen into your blood, and it doesn't cause you to re rebrith the CO two enough of it is getting out. You know the thing is you have to keep in mind? Surgeons of wearing masks for hours a day for tire, adult career for hundreds of years, or whatever at least one hundred years you know, so, that's not a new thing, and you know what about I've gone skiing all day with Neoprene facemask for eight hours at at a time. You know what I mean. People wear beliefs essentially functionally face masks in cold environments for long stretches of time, not an issue so. It really is. It really is not since people have been passing around these fake like exemption cards, but they're totally bogus. There'd be. Frustrating because there are you know a handful of people for whom they really can't wear a mask because they have such a severe psychiatric issue Oregon some sort of medical exemption, but also probably there's a big overlap between the people who would really need a medical exemption and a severe risk of if they contract covid. They're going to not fair as well so people probably shouldn't be spending as much time

United States America UK Bob Novella Twenty Twenty Jane Novella Cova Santamaria Florida Evan Bernstein Antibac Europe Representative Kovalev Oregon
Byron ‘Reckful’ Bernstein, Popular Twitch Streamer, Dies at 31

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:24 min | Last month

Byron ‘Reckful’ Bernstein, Popular Twitch Streamer, Dies at 31

"Popular twist. Dreamer Byron wreck full. Bernstein dies thirty one. This is only Schaefer at writing. Byron Wreck Full Bernstein a popular video game stream around which has died according to social media post from his ex-girlfriend's and brother. Was Thirty one, according to blue magical, his ex girlfriend, and one of the people who who initially confirmed his death on social. Media Bernstein died by suicide. Bursting went by the name wreck full on twitch where he was, he was best known for his work restaurant world of warcraft streams, and had over nine hundred and thirty six thousand followers most recently, Bernstein had been working as a developer on his own video game ever which was set released later this year. Greg, this is a story that I saw very going up on twitter. And this one of the ones where I I wasn't really familiar with WHO wreck was, either you know read through the story and was very saddened to see that he was huge switched remarried and. died by suicide in a way that I think is the reminder like. In? The same way that any company can be I guess corrupted. By you know whatever might be going on there, in the same way, anybody can go community going through problems. Anybody can be going through depression. Anybody can be struggling and so two that like you have good oppose that you put up on the forms. Rego saying that you're not allowed to kill yourself, and if you want to expand on on that at all, but yeah I mean.

Byron Wreck Full Bernstein Dreamer Byron Greg Rego Schaefer Twitter Developer
Byron ‘Reckful’ Bernstein, Popular Twitch Streamer, Dies at 31

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:13 min | Last month

Byron ‘Reckful’ Bernstein, Popular Twitch Streamer, Dies at 31

"Popular twist. Dreamer Byron wreck full. Bernstein dies thirty one. This is only Schaefer at writing. Byron Wreck Full Bernstein a popular video game stream around which has died according to social media post from his ex-girlfriend's and brother. Was Thirty one, according to blue magical, his ex girlfriend, and one of the people who who initially confirmed his death on social. Media Bernstein died by suicide. Bursting went by the name wreck full on twitch where he was, he was best known for his work restaurant world of warcraft streams, and had over nine hundred and thirty six thousand followers most recently, Bernstein had been working as a developer on his own video game ever which was set released later this year. Greg, this is a story that I saw very going up on twitter. And this one of the ones where I I wasn't really familiar with WHO wreck was, either you know read through the story and was very saddened to see that he was huge switched remarried and. died by suicide in a way that I think is the reminder like. In? The same way that any company can be I guess corrupted. By you know whatever might be going on there, in the same way, anybody can go community going through problems. Anybody can be going through depression. Anybody can be struggling

Byron Wreck Full Bernstein Dreamer Byron Greg Schaefer Twitter Developer
"bernstein" Discussed on The Esports Minute

The Esports Minute

01:52 min | Last month

"bernstein" Discussed on The Esports Minute

"Commissioned Peace, rectal. Madrid and this is one of the most difficult these sports minutes I've had to write and hopefully the most difficult one I ever record. The game community lost champion today Byron. Daniel Bernstein better known as rectal passed away from an apparent suicide this morning at the age of thirty one. His death was confirmed by his roommate others close to him. I don't really know what to say. Other than the socks and Mike and Owens's goes to the people close to him, his family and the entire gaming community. Most of us have fond memories of watching wreck full whether it was world of Warcraft, her stone or other random moments over the years he was a talented streamer and amazing Gamer at one point inches, the top ranked player and wow six seasons in a row. Before his death, he was working with the community to create a new game called ever land. I don't want to speculate on what was going through. Rebels mind, but people close to him, if talked about his struggles with mental health. If you're struggling with your own mental health, please do call someone hell. Call me I'll put my phone number in the bio and please reach out if you need someone to talk to. I'm genuinely serious. Please call me if you're struggling. Anyway. I WanNa read an excerpt from Rebecca show at tft player who was close to rectal as he dealt. Dealt with his mental health issues and she talks about the lack of help. He received from official channels. She wrote quote. We need better support for those with mental needs. I remember Byron telling me how traumatized he was when he had the authorities called on him for being a risk of suicide, anyone that knew him knew how much it scared and affected him. This can't be how people feel about the places that should be keeping them safe. How the fuck is that okay? Friends don't feel that it's the right move to call for help. When they know the mental institutions, they get sent to treat them like animals incapable of understanding. and quote rest in peace. Byron will miss you..

Byron Daniel Bernstein Owens Mike official
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

08:32 min | Last month

The Skeptics Guide

"Today is Wednesday June, twenty, four, th twenty twenty, and this is your host Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella. Cara Santa Maria Addy Jada Villa Hey. Guys and Evan Bernstein good evening, folks. How is everyone doing? Well Steve Good question. Yeah I've realized now that I really know how well I'm doing. I'm trying to figure out like. What twenty twenty like I don't know. Should I talked to you about how? I'm feeling today or ninety eight point six? Yeah, Vega question. It is a big question because it's. Everything is so weird. You know it is yeah, it's not natural. For data, let's go over. The covert numbers is so here's the. Interesting thing because if you look at the curve for the world, we're still on the upswing. This this pandemic is is accelerating still. Yep, we haven't even crested the first wave. You know if you're looking at new daily cases worldwide that slope is still increasingly going up if Daily new cases, the greatest single number of new cases on June, nineteenth, one, hundred, eighty, two, thousand, one, hundred and eighty two cases June nineteenth. So you know that we have to keep that in mind. I think if you're on a part of the world that's past the crest of the wave. It feels like it's over, but it really isn't and the United. States is a microcosm of that right because the wave is going through the United States and the the. The northeast were four of the five of us live were passed the peak and we're on the downslope, but other than the northeast rest of the country and most states are still increasing. There's still pre crest. You know of that I believe we have like a weird thing where we were extended in California now it's like getting worse again like we thought we were on the other side of it, but then when we opened of course well, that's the other thing. Nope the opening, so it's kind of a by humped wave because we did manage to flatten up, and now it's turning, but we didn't really turn it down, but it did start in those in some states it was flat, and then they opened up cautiously, and that's good, and then some states opened up not so cautiously, and they're surging. They are spending Arizona is the worst right now, but Farda Florida. Yes, or then a bunch of other states are really spiking. You know so. We're not out of the woods yet. You know he's this again. This is the the the. This is the home stretch, but this is that part of the marathon where like you really gotta dig down and keep going? And that's challenging because. Everyone wants to be outside. We all WanNa be at the beach. We all want to be at parties and social gatherings. It's a normal time of year otherwise to do those sorts of things. But. We still have to be cautious and take all the precautions necessary so total cases worldwide nine point, five million total deaths, four, hundred and eighty, three thousand are approaching half a million in the US for a Ching one hundred twenty thousand deaths. That's what are the projection Steve? So it's really hard. Yes, we're. We're at at least one hundred nineteen thousand. They're saying in the US alone two point three million cases. This is almost certainly an underestimate underestimate. The states that are that are spiking the most South Carolina Florida, Texas Oklahoma and Idaho. Rope I've read. One model, one analysis that says that this I wave is probably gonNA, and with about two hundred thousand. That's about where we're going to land and then second waves. Anyone's guess right? It depends on what happened at that point, but given that we're at one hundred nineteen now and most states are still on the increase that seems like a reasonable estimate. But then you the farther out you go. Obviously, the more variables there are so becomes harder to predict and like there's still the big unknown of. When a vaccine is going to become available here, conflicting things so I think the experts are just making their best gas based upon where we are right now, but nobody could really say for sure, but that could be a game changer will see. This is getting a lot of variables there and don't forget. Some people estimate that or estimate that our numbers now one hundred nineteen thousand could be off by thirty fifty percent could be low by thirty. Really did yeah the. Be. Fifty one specific thing I wrote my my science based medicine blog this morning on this mess event held in Phoenix Mega Church. Because heard about this. Yeah, I was actually interviewed for inside edition which they would last night and I wrote about it today as well, and they're holding a trump rally. They're actually they did yesterday, right? But the the the owners of the Church said. We're good. We're okay because we've installed this special air ventilation air filtration system that will remove ninety nine percent ninety nine point nine percent of the covert virus within ten minutes. So everyone is saw every leasing. Why don't we have? Every plane if that works, yeah, the church is a massive complex, but it has a main auditorium that can hold several thousand people at one time, so it's it's bad. 'cause like this big kind of some somewhat circular auditorium. So you know I wrote an article basically breaking down why that claim that is total nonsense the idea that if you have an effective air filtration system. That you can mask either in side so a couple. Quick points hit. The highlights the idea that it removes ninety nine point nine percent of the virus that. Isolation is plausible because filters can do that, the question is how much time would it take to do that now? They said ten minutes, but that's based upon study of a small closed, sealed off room,

United States Steve Good Twenty Twenty Cara Santa Maria Addy Steven Novella Evan Bernstein Church Bob Novella California Arizona Wanna Farda Florida Phoenix Mega Church South Carolina Idaho Oklahoma Texas Florida
Black Workers And The Fed

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:53 min | Last month

Black Workers And The Fed

"Back in December of two thousand fifteen, the Federal Reserve decided to start raising interest rates. Just another way of saying that the Fed had decided to remove some of the support that it was giving the economy. The idea being that overall unemployment was low and economy just did not need as much support anymore. At the time, the unemployment rate for white workers was a very low four point four percent. But for black workers, it was eight and a half percent almost twice as high. So the Fed was taking away support from the economy when the labor market for black workers was still kinda scandalously tough, and that was not the first time this had happened John Jones is an economic analyst and the Managing Director for policy and research at the groundwork collaborative. The Federal Reserve whose job it is to. Make sure economy is working for workers has never done that for black workers. That is that is terrifying also that. A policy choice in a decision that we can make differently. And at the moment the Fed is once again providing support for the economy to help fight the recession from the coronavirus pandemic, which has been especially devastating for black workers as do now points out. It took ten years for black workers. Employment rates to raise by ten percent, and that will be wiped out in two months like that is how. That is how susceptible black workers are changes in the labor market. Something that takes a decade is wiped out in sixty days so naturally. Journal is worried about what will happen in the future when the economy starts recovering. Will the Fed once again start removing its support before the labor market for black workers has fully recovered. To avoid that outcome journal along with economist Jared, Bernstein has come up with a formal proposal that would compel the Fed to directly target the black unemployment rate, not just the overall unemployment rate,

Federal Reserve Journal John Jones Managing Director For Policy Jared Analyst Bernstein
Analyst says that Apple needs to buy this search engine before it's too late

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Analyst says that Apple needs to buy this search engine before it's too late

"High an analyst that covers apple says the iPhone maker could become an influential player within the internet search arena if it were to buy its own search engine and make it the default choice on products like the iPhone the analyst at Bernstein suggested that apple could likely by the privacy centric DuckDuckGo for less than a billion

Apple Analyst Bernstein
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

06:24 min | 2 months ago

The Skeptics Guide

"Hello and welcome to the skeptics guide to the universe today. Is Wednesday June third twenty twenty and this is your host. Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella everybody Cara Santa Maria, had a Jay Novella Guys Evan? Bernstein good evening. Folks you all doing today well pretty. Trying hard, it's been a tough week and a tough week. That's happened since our last show. A little bit co vid. UPDATES I like we usually do so. The numbers are continued to increase of course, but you know in the US definitely is a leveling off. The parts of the country that peaked I are starting are the the new cases, the number of new cases are declining, but some other parts of the country where that peaked later are still on the upswing, and some are even spiking a little bit, and so we're you know again as I said before beginning that transition to the next phase where we're starting to partially roll things out, and I think the next month or two. Two is going to really tell a lot about how things are going to go, you know. Do you think that's because like the most populated cities it did tend to peak I and so even if like the more rural areas or suburban or less populated areas are now starting to see their cases peaking, it's just like in terms of gross numbers. Fewer people yeah I. Think so. Yeah, this is Dan. We're definitely getting into the more rural phase of the spread of the virus now right absolutely plus also in the news. No zombies have showed up yet Let's get. Out about that a little of both j little both all right Bob I'll I'll surprise you. One of these nights I'll come over your house. I'll dress up. I'll do the whole thing. But I imagine. How another hydroxy chloroquine study came out. This one showing does not protect people from acquiring Kovic. So you can give it as a preventive to people who are not does not reduce their risk of getting it. On the good side the study, the first study of convalescent convalescent plasma plasma from people who are who covered nineteen and got better. Show that it was safe. This was an open label trial. Not Out of control try. This is a phase. One safety trial showed that it was safe, and the I think it was like twenty people, or whatever in the study they rose more than ever one thousand nine of them recovered, so they they did. They did well the. Test, yeah, yes. This April plasma is with antibodies and so again not wasn't an efficacy trial, so we can't say really that it works based on this trial. We didn't feel them, but yeah, but it looked. It looks preliminarily positive, but we'd now. This will pave the way for for an efficacy trial where we compare it to. Control. So that's good and. Now half with you my second week working in the hospital and he'll nap. Have you had a recent test? Now? I've been tested. They're only testing happy only testing symptomatic hype. Initially we record the show last week I'd only were there for a few days and it is a bit of a shock know after two months of being in lockdown to be stroll around the hospital. Full of sick people was. Different experience. Culture shock yeah in a way, but now I'm sort of seeing the other side of it. Yeah I think we got this lockdown pretty tight in that. The people working in the hospital are all really diligent. What I mean like everyone's wearing a mask wearing gloves washing in and out of patient rooms are guarding the protective gear you know. Doing doing social. And and you know we've made lots of workflow changes. You know we're not doing the on mass rounds that we used to do. We've really changed how how we're doing things and they'll probably be like the new normal for quite some time absolutely. The next year's fair Paris fashion show is going to be you know gowns and masks, and all sorts of protective equipment might be you never. Know. What it! Might be, that's just how how interesting so I mean this is this is. A risk of four hundred and fifty thousand people, healthcare workers have contracted covid nineteen around the world. Aches so. Out Obviously it's a higher risk than. Being in the hospital I. Mean you think about it? A hospital is the worst place to be. Spreading disease covert, which was thinking about it, so it's a space. Building. Con- confined to some extent with tons of people. Many of whom are sick and you're people, large groups of people are moving around the hospital like literally going into different patients rooms. You know what I mean, so it's like it's a complete setup for the trainer allows all of totally this is why. The precautions have been have been increasing over the course of my career. You know over the course of historical time as infectious diseases get more menacing, and this is just the latest iteration of that, and I do think that there's going to be permanent changes to how hospitals functions function in response to covert one, thousand, nine, hundred, probably because over nineteen, going to be a permanent addition to our Germans fear so. Did you like there were changes after after Mersa started to become A. Hundred thousand people are in hospital. I mean there's there's specific protocols. If someone's mercer positive as specific protocol associated with that I, have one patient on my service now. WHO's positive? It's a gown and glove. Every time you go in, and that's always been the case since mercer was discovered. And it's very common so same things same things with other antibiotic resistant. Bacteria and also certain respiratory. Infections and tuberculosis like every time there's a new big infectious disease pretty much permanently changes practice, so, but the thing is so i. am feeling better I. think in a way is like we got this. You know we're doing everything we can do. We're of minimizing it. The professionalism is definitely there and I think. Healthcare workers is getting more experience with covenant. We're learning a lot about it, so we're sort of getting a grip on it, but there's just no way around the fact that it's a risk and that already there's been a huge price paid by healthcare workers for for being on

Bob Novella Steven Novella Mercer United States Bernstein Cara Santa Maria Chloroquine Evan Paris Kovic DAN Infections Aches Tuberculosis Mersa
World Press Freedom Day amid a 'coronavirus crackdown'

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

01:50 min | 3 months ago

World Press Freedom Day amid a 'coronavirus crackdown'

"Today is World Press Freedom Day every may third back since the nineteen nineties the UN and advocacy groups have used this day to promote and preserve press freedom to promote the importance of a free press all around the world. Now it's a notable this year this time in the midst of an emergency and much of the world involving the coronal virus whenever there's a crisis some countries try to use the crisis to curtail news coverage or access to information and we are seeing happened. Right now The so-called Corona virus. Crackdown has been happening. In some countries with journalists feeling the pinch Being affected by this Miller. The CEO of the news literacy project wrote about this in a new op-ed foreseen dot com. He talked about the pattern of dictatorial regimes. Using covert nineteen to quash press freedom. We need to sound the alarm about that. Make sure we know it's happening and call it out. Let's all a part of these broader efforts to promote world press freedom day the Guardian. The paper based in Britain is out with its own ad showing support for the press. Says just like food? Facts are essential. Supplies Katharine Viner. The editor in chief of the Guardian joins me now covering your reflections. On why World Press Freedom Day matters it always matters but as he said he introduction. Brian I think it matters more than ever. Whenever there is a shock to the system governments will try to use that unless we keep an eye on we try to use that to crack down and it's essential that we try and stop that happening or at least attention to the fact that freedom of expression and freedom press is crucial to any democratic society and I think transparency matters a lot right now when good information and how you come to come to come to the facts can really help save

Miller Guardian UN Katharine Viner Britain Editor In Chief CEO Brian
Eating the Rainbow: Why Color Is Important To Food

Gastropod

06:01 min | 3 months ago

Eating the Rainbow: Why Color Is Important To Food

"Nadia Bernstein is a flavor historian. You might remember her from our episode on flavor called Saver Flavor. If you didn't hear the first time you should go check it out and that episode we talked about how flavor is mostly taste plus smell. But actually Nadia says. That color affects the flavor of food. To more than you'd think when people are served sprite. That's colored Brown. They think it's Cola. This trick even works on famous wine. Critics give them white wine colored red with food coloring and most of them will think it's red wine and the wax poetic about its berry notes in nineteen thirty six. A Scottish Baker tried to this experiment with jellies among his own staff. He was trying to find kind of like a worker in his factory or workers in his factory who had reliable senses of taste so he gave them For instance Redd died. Pineapple jellies and green died a lemon jelly and tried to find the people among his staff who could correctly identify the flavor even though the color contradicted their understanding of what the flavor should be and he was actually surprised to find that very few people could pull this off. Color can change the perceived flavor of a food so much that it actually becomes inedible. There was an experiment in the seventies where people were fed a meal of steak fries and peas and the light masked the color of the food but then that color masking light was turned off and normally was turned back on and the steak was blue. The fries were green. The PS were red and the subjects got sick to their stomachs one puked but it's not. The color is traditionally being more important than other senses. When it comes to food after all vision is just one of the ways our senses of to figure out what was good to eat in the past. When you were deciding whether to eat say a beach you might smell it and feel. It's weight in your hand as well as look at the color of skin to see whether it's right you wouldn't just judge with your eyes. Even though color has always been one way that our brains of made sense of what we're about to eat foods appearance started to become particularly important over a century ago so late nineteenth early twentieth century when all kinds of foods or foods packaged or produced in new ways. Right in distant factory is rather than at home started to appear on the market and the question with those was not. Just how should these new kinds of foods taste but also should they look like by the late eighteen? Hundreds America's foods gape was changing. Really as you've heard US talk about this before. But this was the time of the rise of industrial food processing and manufacturing and then thanks to Refrigeration Aka. My Life's great passion. Food was increasingly shipped long distances from where it was grown to the people who are going to eat it. All of that meant that people didn't see food growing or picket or hunted themselves. They might not have had any way to know what something should feel like when it's ripe and so they had to rely even more on the look of food and they were soon helped out by another new technology so people had been using printing technologies but the important change was the invention and increasing use of color printing which became a popular in the nineteen twenties and Nineteen Thirties. In the United States. I know is a lecturer in economics at Kyoto University. And she wrote a book on food and color called visualizing taste how business changed the look of what you eat. Her book tells the story of how color became increasingly important over the last century. And how big business? Actually shaped our expectation of what? The color of our food should be hand in hand with the rise of affordable color printing. Came the rise of national magazines and these magazines were filled with full color ads for food and distributed from Costa Shining Coast. So consumer ads say in New York City and in San Francisco. What looking at the same image in the same. Carter around the same time food. Packaging became more common. Yes we did an entire episode on that to called outside the box and then cellophane was invented so now packaging was also see through of course cellophane meant you could no longer touch or smell your food before you bolted it but you could definitely see what color it was like. We said we'd always used colors one of the ways. We figured out what food should taste like. Just think about the color of a ripe strawberry or the disgustingly blue steak or the white wine. That was tinted red but now with this new long distance package food color was everything and then finally one less technology was invented a way to actually measure color new machines such as the spectrophotometer could evaluate the very particular and specific color of food and so they replaced the subjective and individual judgment of some random person is suddenly. You could actually scientifically say whether your apple was redder than the apples from upstate than that is Inkatha. Kara allow traders to communicate easily and also give them the standard for reference to great the records to produce in processed food products and so the more perfectly uniformly red apples could get a higher grade which meant a higher price. These tools these spectrophotometer as and color grade charts. They were all part of the process of making something as inherently variable as food fit into a modern industrial assembly line kind of system what feed manufacturers and the research industries that support them are aspiring to do is to quantify and measure and control all of the sensory properties of food in order both to guarantee standardisation. Right to make sure that every oreo every can or bottle of orange crush that rolls off the assembly line is indistinguishable from the previous. And from the after but also not just to standardize but also to optimize right to create flavors that are memorable and perhaps even irresistible that kind of create the the sort of maximum amount of

Nadia Bernstein United States Apple Redd Costa Shining Coast Kyoto University Lecturer In Economics Baker New York City America Inkatha Carter San Francisco
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

08:46 min | 3 months ago

The Skeptics Guide

"Today is Wednesday April Fifteenth Twenty Twenty. And this is your host even Avella joining me this week. Or Bob Develop. Everybody Cares Santamaria. Howdy Jay. Novella Guys Evan Bernstein. Well good evening. Everyone not tax day. Every that's not tax day. It goes to tax day. Okay so this has never happened before in the history of our country tax day for as long I think since nineteen well since they adopted April fifteenth as the Tax Day. There's never it's never been postponed until this year. Yeah it's never been moved. It's always been April fifteenth. And we're talking wars. You know we're talking anything everything you can think of. The last seventy years that is that has happened but this virus did it well. I know it's amazing is necessary. Is that definitely definitely necessarily people. Need all the help they can get right now. Financially and otherwise. Yeah that's true because it's not just about filing paperwork on tax day it's about paying what you owe right. I think I probably. Oh quite a bit. But if you're getting a refund you could file whenever you want absolutely yeah. And we've encouraged our clients. They're expecting refunds. Don't wait do not wait. No no point in waiting so those are the ones I've heard from and the people who oh I have not heard from January right. Guess you guys. I got the funniest well. I shouldn't say funny cause was actually very depressing. Email today from a local massage studio here in L. A. Says Cove in nineteen update. Now is the time. We're getting so many. E mails and some of them. Amazing some of the super arbitrary from companies being like in these times of crisis. We're here to tell you that we exist and you're like what I don't need this update but this one is so strange. It says to our massage clients effective today all massage treatments will be cancelled through April fifth. This comes in recommendation from the city. The state and the California massage therapy council safety in wellness of our clientele staff and massage therapist. Our number one priority will be here when this passes in the meantime please be gentle with yourself and practice self care at home. Oh I love that and then immediately after it says. We are still treating chiropractic acupuncture patients. Oh good as your right. Oh and then you have symptoms of Blah Blah Blah. What the heck that makes no sense. Okay Oh it makes zero zero. We'll just keep this in mind. Guys there are people out there who are one hundred percent assured believing that this stuff is totally legitimate. Just like we think like going going physical. You know it's like it's part of their mill you that's it they believe it. Yeah but they're totally exploiting this platelet to promote themselves chiropractors. Some chiropractors are explicitly promoting themselves as a way of boosting your immune system or whatever to treat or prevent covert one thousand nine hundred. Yeah that's pathetic. That's horrible. Yeah not that any of us are surprised me. We've come to learn at. This is what they do. Well it's also just taking advantage of fear and uncertainty. That's out there. You know is basically snake oil salesmen. Do Right. Oh Yeah I'm actually seeing you know. We talked about this. Sometimes that in order to prep for new or in order for me to share kind of like I try to curate different news stories on my twitter feed. I'll go through feed reader every week and it's just been all cova one thousand nine. That's like you know it's hard to find a story. That's not covert related. So I get really excited when I see them but the cool thing is. I'm starting more and more to see at some of the outlets that I really like. People writing about the history of snake oils the history of harmful practices during times of fear and pandemics. And it's really cool that a lot of scientists story ends or digging up some of the things they saw during the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic or when Ebola. I came on the scene and how people were responding to them and writing about that so that we can learn from them. There's some really cool news articles out there. Yeah I mean. Obviously we're using the opportunity to get our message out as well but our messages. Listen to the experts. Yes it's early days. Still you can say novel Corona Virus But even pouching she and others are saying yeah. We're we're two weeks behind reality by the time we sort of get a handle on. What's happening that information's two-weeks-old so we're always playing catch up in a fast moving pandemic and people have gone back and said look there. Statements are changing. Of course they're changing very dynamic lurid situation. They're they're giving show your best information. They can at the time with caveats with the unknowns. You know it's as if it is if like in the middle of my dissertation. My My dissertation chair expected me to stop in the middle of Data Collection. And Give a press conference about all of my find. It like that's happening right now. We only just now collecting the data. We have not had time to analyze it. We're not at the end of the thing yet to be able to say with any certainty that this is how things are over such an impatient society up very much so the thing that drives me insane. Are The people who are critical on? I don't WanNa say guestimations but you know they're critical on projections. As an example. We take the best information we have. We use the the best methodology that we have to try and figure out what the future holds for things that are inherently very chaotic and they turned those types of predictions into they got it wrong and got well. Well we're trying to do. We're trying to make the best damn guesses and projections that we can. That's all that we have other thing is i. I hate it when you make a probabilistic statement you could say like it's ninety percent likely a is going to happen right and ten percent that not a will happen right and then he doesn't tap into you were wrong no are you said it was. It was one hundred percent ninety percent which means ten percent of the time. It's not going to be a right you have to look at the actual statistics say if those how accurate those and be where people who speak in absolutes anyways that's red flag thank you. Yeah that they're trying to sell you something. I think the part. That's so frustrating for me sort of to what you were speaking about. Jay is where individuals and you see this all the time where individuals will say okay. The warnings are out there. We have to social distance physical distance. Sorry we have to do X Y and Z. We have to get out in front of this thing and if we do that we'll be able to reduce the number of deaths because you know the the probabilistic statement is that will lose between X. People and ex people and then we do that. It starts working and they go see. It wasn't that bad every making so and you're watching that properly to to measures that were put in place recommend or the guidelines and recommendations by who the experts. It's amazing. I mean it's just incredible like you cannot get through to some people know. Look at its core. We as critical thinkers have established a trust in science We have a relationship with the methodology behind science and the people who practice that. And that's that is my baseline. That's my core. But the thing that just you know it's such a this is such a basic skeptical tenant that I don't care what the truth is. I just want to know what the truth is. My mood. I believe can change quickly with the right amount of information and proof right. That's that's the part. That's immutable here right. You're invested not invested in the end result. You're invested in the process and you're not sitting here trying to negotiate with truth to get a better outcome or one. That feels more when that feels like more politically salient. And that's a really difficult time. Right now is that there are world leaders there many world leaders and many governments or I should say governors and mayors here in the US who are looking at this thing an evidence based way and that's incredible to see in a time of crisis. They're saying I want to understand what the experts have to say. I want to talk to the garage. Epidemiologists I wanna see what these projections are and I want to do. What's right by the people? The problem is there are a handful of other world leaders. I don't think I have to be explicit. Who are just not interested in evidence and they wanna make decisions based on whether it either be their feelings whether it be what they wish. Were true what what would be more convenient to be true. None of us wish it were like this out there but we know the only road to getting past. This is to look at the

JAY Twenty Twenty Avella Evan Bernstein Santamaria Bob Develop California L. A. Says Cove United States Twitter Ebola Data Collection
"bernstein" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

You Can Heal Your Life

08:21 min | 4 months ago

"bernstein" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

"Tracy welcome back to the hill. Your Life podcast. Were continuing our series of thirty days in a row of all our wonderful Hay House authors to help us through these crazy times that we're going through right now and today we have with us Gabby Bernstein how are you gabby read? I'm good I'm hanging in. How are you? You're you're you're busting through with a lot here. There's a lot going on there. So many things happening right now and and one of the things that we're seeing lots and lots of people are getting books to get them through and listening to these podcasts and facebook lives and they're trying to get connection with people because so many people. Are you know in their house by themselves and trying to cope with what that means in today's world and and one of the things I'd love to start with is just having you tell how you're dealing with all this right now and there's so much to say about this? I think I first and foremost I just want to send a prayer to everyone out there who is suffering in any form physically mentally emotionally feeling over overwhelmed with responsibility at this time. I just want to send my love and prayers and we can do some prayers today on this interview as well but I feel that right now while I'm in isolation with my family my house not going anywhere really. I'm not even really. I've got a groceries for few weeks. I'm not going anywhere if I can help it. But I- strangely feel more connected to people right now than I ever do. I think this is a different perspective that we could potentially take right now. Which is that with. All these people rising up doing podcasts and doing instagram lives. Just didn't instagram live last night with a girlfriend. My Friends Sophia Amoruso. And she's the founder of girl boss and you know we were laughing because we don't actually take the time to facetime and talk and so it's like right now or on instagram. Live and it's the first time we really connected for an hour in a while right so people are really using the tremendous beautiful resources that we have to connect. There's another thing that's happening psychically energetically which is that. We're feeling a greater connection and oneness. Then hopefully people are feeling that I'm feeling this a greater connection and oneness than I've ever felt before this is the first time that the whole world is truly in it. Together all experiencing people are. I definitely agree. More and more people are reaching out and connecting. Like I know like even me like I'm calling my mom more all the talking to way more of the author's era than I have in a while. So you're right like more and more people are trying to try and define connection for sure and also people are reclaiming their community. Hey House is a family. It's a community. I just got off the phone with with your your team members Michelle and Patty and just just feeling like Howard and seeing myself as part of a messenger in your community and saying well. How can I support the community right now and anyone? That's a Hey House. Reader can can support the community right now from sharing opposed or listening to a podcast in letting somebody know about it and so there's just this this level of spiritual activism that's occurring in anyone who is on a spiritual path. Anyone that is a hey house. Community member has tremendous. I WANNA use the response of the word responsibility but not with any pressure but we have a responsibility to use the foundational spiritual tools that we've been cultivating over the years years decades rate. Now we have to rely on those tools more than ever. We have to rely on them for ourselves. You know you asked me. What am I doing right now while? I'm meditating twice a day. Devoted meditation to my transcendental meditation practice. I am doing energy healings. Actually investing my M- people may think you always should probably stop my therapy right now. Actually no I'm doing three therapy sessions. A Week I've got an energy healer. I'm tapping I'm I'm doing. I'm doing talk therapy I'm doing. Amd are because I knew I know an and by the way nobody needs to pay for any of that if they have resources that are free right now for them on social media but using the tools that I have using the team that I've built to support me using the. Hey how's meditations and using my own practices like a fulltime job at the moment because in order for me to continue to show up for my community for the House community for my local community for my son my my fifteen month old son my husband my business. I have to be grounded and centered in my own Foundation Spiritual Foundation Faithful Foundation. So anyone listening we have. We have a lot of with a huge leg upright now because we've been on a spiritual path and now is the time to use it books that a lot of people are turning to right now is universe has your back like big like spike and people wanting that book buying that book and I think they're looking for connection there and trying to maybe understand and believe that the universe does as their back even in this time. Yeah you know. The subtitle for that book was transformed fear to faith. That's the message for this time. The message for US spiritual activists in this time is to transform our fear into faith that comes with prayer that comes with meditation that comes with the power of having the ability to re organize our belief systems as I write about in. The universe has your back to also really be clear to see our obstacles as opportunities to recognize the spiritual assignments that have been placed in front of us a great example of a spiritual Simon. Is You know if you have have someone living in your home that you you know. Otherwise might be frustrated by. What is it that you can learn from that experience in that relationship right now right And and really Transforming our fear to faith means that we double down on our spiritual condition at this time. Whatever form that comes for Yeah Yeah. We did a interview with one of our house. Authors Rabbi leader and he came up with a good idea that You know like how we were talking earlier so many things are changing for us right now and some of those things are really good. You know that it's making our lives different simpler easier. Better like staying connected. He said make a list of ten things that you're doing different that you like and then make sure you keep at least one of those things in your practice going forward totally because we don't want you know I did an interview yesterday with Glennon Doyle and she said something really interesting she said. Do you know it's it's like we're living in this snow globe and it's just where we've constantly got the snow all over the place and that's how we function moving forward and living and avoiding and just being in the snow globe but right now. The snow has settled so relaxed with ourselves. So what are we going to do with that right? And many of us you know sitting sitting not distracted by people or obligations or whatever it may be feel very overwhelmed and so that may lead people into addictive patterns that may lead people into anxiety attacks that may lead people into a lot of suffering and so the question right now is what is that list of things like the Rabbi said. What does that list of things that I can do? For my condition right now to develop my inner world and find ways to regulate my nervous system and lower cortisol levels and just be a ground being at this time and then the bigger question is and what will I take.

Hey House instagram Foundation Spiritual Foundatio Hay House facebook Gabby Bernstein Tracy Sophia Amoruso Glennon Doyle US founder Michelle cortisol facetime Amd Howard
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

09:25 min | 4 months ago

The Skeptics Guide

"Hey guys and Evan Bernstein practicing social distancing via podcasting since two thousand five fifteen years of preparation to this moment paying off talking about the fact that it's good that we have is entirely. I accept that stage. Show thing that we're training up around the time. Hot cast over the A lot of it is online so evan. We missed you last week but I missed you guys. She is doing well thank you. I appreciate the people who have written to me privately and sent well wishes and everything. I've expressed the Jennifer. She very much appreciates it as well. She is on the mend so nice. Yeah so we're getting to the end of our second week of lockdown You know we're managing. We're making adjustments. I think I think a lot of people are learning ways to keep busy to restructure their life. You know I do think that You know people are settling in for the long haul. You know like the First Week. You're like all right. I can do this. You know this is just. You're thinking a week you know like you're not really wrapping your head around the fact that wow this could really go on a long time now. In the second week I'm hearing from a lot of people started to really hit them like this could be while we gotta really make adjustments to our day-to-day structure. You Know Yep yeah I mean bottom line is it's just a life changes and Cara was saying before the show that she's off her schedule right. Everybody's off their most people are off their normal schedule. And you gotta you gotta get creative. And you've got to work with everyone you know you gotta you're cooped up with whoever you're cooped up with maybe up. God forbid you're alone you know some people are alone. A lot of Get on Google hangouts in touch with people like that. They are actually starting to try and like I think the. Who and a lot of larger organizations are wanting to start to phase out the phrase social distancing and phase in physical distancing because you need to be social Right yeah because we don't want to encourage people to not have psychological wellbeing like we need to be in touch with people that we love just not physically in touch because it is hard and also I struggle with this like if I don't have to wake up for on the calendar I will sleep. I will just sleep and sleep and sleep on the couch rolling over like A. I'm going to eat. And then Rollover Watch. Tv Rollover and fall asleep. I Know Har- of a alternates. Cara in some alternate universe. If only you knew somebody who works from home. I have the worst kind of like work from home hygiene and Yeah. I know people who are so good at waking up taking a shower putting on shoes like into their clothes and put. That's crazy talk. That's and that's how they maintain a sense of kind of sanity. Shoes on negative measures are no shoes onto underwears completely optional. This point seriously like three days I should probably change from. It show. It's interesting. Those are all day day schedule is actually not different. This is nine Donald quite as many patients and their online. It's all telehealth but I have to be dressed professionally so I have to. I'm dressing the same way I do for work just sitting in front of my computer rather than going does structure my day. Who there's a. There's a joke there with Dr above the Waist Party boy on the. I don't know something like that can. I'm doing therapy online. But no I'm doing therapy over the phone. I'm doing therapy but but it's over the phone so it really doesn't matter what I look like which it's tough. I still go to office because yeah I'm considered essential. Yeah as an accountant. Yeah they carved out a notch for us at least in the state of Connecticut. They did in which we can go in and I do have clients who still want to see me. They're all in one on one appointments and we're doing all the correct things keeping the ceiling wiping down. Definitely the six foot rule and limited contact. There's even elbow bumps at this point you know we've just stops all all touching right. How typical is Yale's stash of tests across lake other hospitals because I have been the most insane horror stories of people going into the hospital with a fever and a cough getting tested for strep and influenza and when they find those negative saying unless you've been exposed to somebody who traveled outside of the country? We cannot afford to give you a task. You my is sick in bed with what I think is Tova. And they're like can't do it. We don't have enough test to go around. A friend of mine from medical. School is on the front lines in New York State. That has the most cases each other's zoo that they're basically just trying to separate the covert cases from the non code cases. And they are. They are overwhelmed. So yeah and there's a critical shortage of PPA the personal protection stuff. So don't definitely don't hort. Don't buy masks. If you're not a healthcare provider we're going to be talking about some specific things you know in the beginning of the news items as well but really don't anything you feel like you need to do to to protect yourself that involves You know hoarding something or getting something. You probably don't need to do it. And you're probably taking away a critical resource from healthcare providers. So you really should only be doing it. Under your doctor's advice is a sort of good rule of thumb. You don't try. Don't try to short-track anything. Feel like you've got like the inside scoop on something and you're going to be doing something to give yourself in edge. You're probably going to be doing something counterproductive if you do that you know. I've been in lockdown now. I think almost three weeks here in la it was only mandated within the last week or two. But I self quarantined early. Just because that's what health officials were saying we should do. I left once for the grocery store and that was it. Been getting my groceries delivered but last Friday. I was actually asked to go into the studios. Kcet which is one of the networks involved in the kind of family of networks here in Southern California and I filmed a bunch of content for their at home learning initiative so between KCET PBS. Oh Cal and The LA USD The Los Angeles Unified School district. They came up with a bunch of great curriculum for all kids like starting in kindergarten. All the way up to twelfth grade and I got to film a bunch of stuff for all of the math and science content so if you're in southern California highly recommended if your kids are home and they need you know. They're not in school yet because school hasn't come back online yet. Show them show them case. The there's a lot of great programming at home learning. I think it's like pbs dot org slash at home learning to learn more about it. I'm not sure if outside of southern California it's available it may be online though so I would still give it a try. Lots of also a good time for the teaching company and this is just kind of but they have lots of content. They are producing some special content. Because you know people are at home and hungry for it and that's good quick quick update on the numbers so as you're recording this. The number of confirmed corona virus cases. Four hundred sixty eight thousand two were approaching half a million number of deaths is twenty one thousand one hundred and eighty five so unfortunately the death rate is going up The the current death rate if you just count completed cases closed cases is sixteen percent. Wow if you look at all cases it's four point five percent so that the death rate that's probably because of Italy because it'll really hit hard and Italy has. I was really. I was interested in why it leaves getting hit so hard and we know that a lot of it is the way cultural edged but but we also know that they have a much older population. And that because it's not so much. Why are they getting hit so hard? It's wise their death rate so high compared to everybody else's her number of cases and yet it seems to be the case that they have a very aging population lack of two. Yeah they don't have enough they don't have enough just like everybody else doesn't have enough. But they were severely short in as far as ratios goes my understanding but I also was reading across the board that they actually have a pretty decent health in frustration last year and it was really good And north heads like we might not even have beds but the fact that they so. It's a combination obviously of factors but it does seem to be the case that like the actual age of the general population skews significantly older and Italy and we know older. People are at highest risk right and so that that does seem to affect the number of people who who die per the number of people who get the disease and also as we know this may be an underrepresentation. It may be an overrepresentation because there is we absolutely. Don't know the real number of people with With Co with

Cara Italy Evan Bernstein California Google Los Angeles Unified School Dis Connecticut LA Accountant Waist Party Southern California Donald Trump Tova Influenza New York State Fever Yale Cough
What We Inherit: Marie Kondo and the Security of Stuff

Asian Americana

09:39 min | 4 months ago

What We Inherit: Marie Kondo and the Security of Stuff

"Parents are preparing to remodel my childhood home. They want to add a room to the house. So that my mom's mom my paw-paw can stay with them. She's been in and out of the hospital and at ninety three. The family doesn't think she can live on her own anymore. The first and last time we remodeled our house was sixteen years ago. And I'm pretty sure that's the last time or house was D- cluttered at any in-depth way since then. My mom has made several attempts to clean the house. But it's never really worked now that my mom's busy taking care Paul. I thought I should fly home to help. Assess the situation okay. So this is the most this what we're looking at right now. Is the most thing that gives me the most headache when I come home. What are we looking at mom and are standing in the living room looking? Glass Window that spans. The back wall and overlooks an enclosed patio inside there are cardboard boxes plastic bins plants. An old fish tank and a bunch of other stuff large clear plastic sheets cover the boxes and another sheet for some reason is taped to the ceiling. How many would you say that? There's in patio. Oh some of the some empty boxes but how do you? Why did you because I don't have time to go? Charging the go on the cops can so they put it in here? Just get away from my side and it's also kind of an eyesore eyesore. I mean is is so I I would have WANNA clean up a couple of time. I tried to let them know is paper cannot just toss it. I had to look at by details a lot over the sweat a lot. Even when there's a task at hand like cleaning our house my mom always has to multitask. Since I'm only visiting California for short while I thought we would be able to spend the weekend decluttering instead. Mom had other plans money doing. I'm pure and the ginger could make some Sephora Papa and knife family. Whenever anyone sick we make soup. It's something that my papa always does. But since she sick herself it's my mom's job to make and deliver it to her. Which is why I guess. Mini cleaned up pasta sauce jars. That mom's saved over the years are finally coming in handy. Mom is the Middle Child. She's the third five she and three of her siblings emigrated from China to Hong Kong to Sacramento California with Paul when my mom was just eleven when I was growing up. That's all I really knew like a lot of other children of immigrants. I knew a lot about my mom's immigration story while also knowing nothing everything she told us was very matter of fact. Papa sacrificed a lot and worked in sweatshops. So you and your brother have to study hard. Mommy had to take care of her younger siblings. So you and your brother are lucky. You don't have those responsibilities. Are FAMILY HAD LITTLE MONEY. So we had to save everything. And even after my mom escaped the Clutch SA- poverty moved out of Papa's house and started a family of her own. She held tight to this rule. Anything that came into our house rarely left so we did toss something out. I mean not top. We put in a box and then we put it in the uncle Terry and he says garage okay so so you didn't technically throw away anything we when you were modeled. We was in a hurry so he everything that box. We originally remodeled the house. When I was ten I guess I was so young that I never realized what my mom's main cleaning technique was putting things in boxes and shoving them into my aunt and uncle's garaged. Okay what happened to the VOX? After year we moved to think that in so some of the box be opened up. Nba Use it and some of the box. Do in the in the patio thing. Yeah so can you. The patio is filled with boxes from our first remodel. But also things for my dad's parents my union and yeah from when they passed away many years ago aside from the patio. Our House as a whole is just so full of things even before we planned this newer model to add a room for Papa. My Dad and I had been trying desperately to help my mom. Clean her closet. We thought we could start small before tackling the whole house after Marie condos the life. Changing magic of tidying up was released and translated into English in two thousand fourteen. My Dad bought a copy for mom a Christmas present. Murray condos hopeful osophy is that if an object to spark join you. You should get rid of it. I thought that there was no way that all the things in my parents house could possibly spark that much joy. I was hopeful that reading this book with somehow enable both of my parents to turn into something worthy of hgtv show but simply put it. Hasn't okay well. So so dad bought you this book. The Mary Condo Book for Christmas copiers. We use did you. Did you read it? Sure did I did. Did you learn anything from it? You Go Clo- make it nicely and I love this. I kept it and I found out. I love a lot of close i. That's why we did make it like that but the problem is one. I had too many close to the way they set out after two. We have our mess up again. That the purpose of that is you have to keep it up every day. And I don't have time to do that. I don't but I don't have done it before. That's when they don't have like five pair of jeans ten pair you know or they have won. T shirt I had twenty one t shirt male one of my friends too gene. Naturally he could do it I have. I do have to go over my plant pans now. I have pobably thirty pair or more clearly. The MARIKANA book didn't drastically changed my mom's cleaning habits and because I live on the other side of the country for my parents. I can't be there to help clean every step of the way so I thought that having my mom watch Marie condos new Netflix. Show tidying up with. Murray condo would provide her with some tips aerial Bernstein a professor and journalist whose parents fled to Cuba then to the US refugees from Eastern Europe also thought that when she told her mother about the show You know we watched episode or two of the show together and then we went to try to do some of the Actual tightening and it's just really hard for her You know it's just very difficult to to think about getting rid of things You know my mom is living in the US now for for fifty years so it's not necessarily that she's not used to American culture. But I think that I think that just about legacy of having to to give things up almost sixteen when she came to the US. And I think that's for her. They're still idea that giving up something that's very integral unimportant. Throughout my mom childhood anything that could possibly get a second or third or tenth use did but I never really contended with the idea that this history this life of immigration impacted my own childhood as a kid I really resented how're cabinets overflowed with tupperware or how. We had an entire room in our house dedicated to storing stuff that I thought was junk photo albums. My Dad's records and broken record player kitchen gadgets. I was always embarrassed that we couldn't just get rid of things like other families. Why you think it's so hard for you with stuff like everything I buy like it. So that's why why would I taught away the thing that I you know. I like okay. Let's talk about some of the things that you allowed things. You have a lot of your tupperware though. Oh my mom has an obsession with tupperware. It's mildly unhealthy. When I was in elementary school she's to sell Tupperware to friends and coworkers but mostly to herself so she could get rewards points and get even more tupperware. Oh I love tougher billy. I do why because I don't know because I am over my end. Shoo Shoo Shoo introduced me to upper. Because you make a lot of cookie Dune a holiday and she put it inside a separate and she just eat it you know and give it to friend and so I think from there on I found out you know. That's good to use tupperware. This is the first time my mom has mentioned the story to me. Despite knowing tidbits about mom's immigration she never talked about her early life in California and any emotional sense. But it's something I've always wondered about. Why do you think that we have so much stuff? Because it'll be good furniture and those they last a long time and then Miko Shah Gobi. -CATION BE BY A souvenir and which I haven't done lately. Yeah Yeah but but all those good we cannot just toss it and you not quite sure what my mom means by good. No one in the house uses those things anymore but saying something is good has been excuse for not getting rid of a lot of our

Tupperware California Shoo Shoo Shoo Family Murray Condo Papa Paul Marie Condos United States NBA Wanna Miko Shah Gobi. Billy Terry Hgtv Netflix Hong Kong China
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

09:11 min | 5 months ago

The Skeptics Guide

"Today is Wednesday March Eleventh Twenty Twenty and this is your host Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella. Everybody Cara Santa Maria. Addy Jane Avella. Hey guys and Evan Bernstein. Good evening folks. So it's official the World Health Organization who has declared a worldwide pandemic. Welcome APPS. Well yeah we were. Just I mean we were at this point. We were there just still. It's a milestone only. It is at some point like it's like a certificate you would put on your kids wall. I survived the pandemic t shirt when he wanted story. It's only the third time right. You got the Spanish flu in the late. Nineteen we have the wealth twenty eleven and this burglar twenty eleven. No it was a big enough current pandemics HIV AIDS in Corona virus recent pandemics include nineteen eighteen influenza and the two thousand nine flu pandemic. You're right Steve H. One and one bird flu right or is that swine flu swine flu swine flu and then HIV AIDS. Though it is a global pandemic. It's been categorized. Okay all right we're will make sense. It makes sense so thousand case three thousand cases in the US. Italy is you know they're in the middle. I think of their epidemic China's on the other side of their heirs right. We're just gearing up so now we're in. The phase of social distancing is kind of the word of the day for the US so you know events are being canceled left and right no non essential travel. People are starting to talk about taking their kids out of schools now ours our high school. They're basically gearing up there sending emails out saying that you may have to shut down. We haven't decided yet. But this is what we're GonNa do if we do. And there's sort of laying out the plan threes and it seems inevitable. A lot of colleges are saying we're doing all online classes for the rest of the semester. I'm lucky that I go to school. That's mostly online anyway so I feel like my professors are really prepared. They know what to do. They've been really up to date with everything getting the emails out about plans for in person meetings but I feel bad for a lot of the professors who have never taught online before because it's a totally different skill set and you have to know what to do. Yeah and they're just going to be thrown into it and also the students who have never done online classes like it requires a different amount of self efficacy. I don't know what are we gonNA have older professors taking pieces of chalk and trying to write on so it looks like as of today today the eleventh. Yes yeah one hundred. Eighteen thousand three hundred twenty six confirmed cases globally and four thousand two hundred ninety two deaths. That's that's alive sewer. We'll be talking about a couple of corona virus related news items a bit later in the show. But yeah this is. You know we've been talking about it. You know obviously for months giving the updates and now we were just hitting. I think we could see the peak coming now. You know in. Us As least and a Lotta experts are saying now. Basically everyone's GonNa get exposed. You know it's really just a matter of. How quickly is it going to happen? The key is we want to slow it down as much as possible so it doesn't overwhelm our resources so it's not that we're GONNA keep it. We're not going to keep it from spreading. We're just going to slow the spread because that's a huge difference there were some jackass on. Tv saying just to expose everybody now with opposite. WanNa do we because then the mortality spikes when you run out of things like then a laters beds. It's not going to be literally everybody. It's going to spread through the population. But that doesn't mean everybody's going to be exposed right. I think that everyone is not going to necessarily contract it. The infectivity is not one hundred percent now. But unless you're like seriously isolated you're probably going to get exposed there whole countries where there's only like three cases. Yeah it'll get there eventually. That's the point that's what they're saying it's GONNA it's the human population has no immunity right. So it's a naive population. And it's going to make the rounds. It's going to eventually. Just make the rounds all over the world and then it'll slow down mainly because people will have either most people have already been infected. They won't be enough new. You know naive hosts to keep it going and do we know that you can't be reinfected. Well you'll have. Some level of immunity may not necessarily be one hundred percent of your no longer naive host. You have an immune system that seen seen this virus before the other thing is we want to slow it down and maybe an Iraq seen in twelve to eighteen months we have a vaccine and maybe we further slow it down and also. Maybe it'll be a seasonal situation and it actually will naturally slow down over the summer and give people some relief up until the new season starts if it operates seasonally. Yeah so any of the other thing that everyone is saying which is correct is don't panic but use your commonsense. You know just to avoid unnecessary contact with lots of evil face mask in the. Yeah yeah at least. Some Clark's wipes for the rest of us. Please honks toilet paper yeah please? The Toilet Paper Discusses Shelves Empty. And also don't be getting into fistfights over toilet paper at Costco. It's embarrassing yeah. We don't need a Thanksgiving Black Friday incident. Oh they're all over the world embarrassing. Okay Kerry you're going to give us a what's the word? Yes Oh. This word was sentenced by Linda from Petaluma California. She said I teach chemistry in high school and this term came up recently. So I figured I'd share with you and the whole crew. It's one I've always loved for the simple fact that I find it fun to say out loud. Always a good one to bring up in casual conversation and the word that she recommended is. Moity and Moya and many many of you have asked that we spell the words each week and this is an especially. I think. Necessary one dispel M. E. T. Y. Yeah it's a good one right and so I'm going to start a little bit with the etymology. Because then I think it makes more sense. When you look at all the different usages. Because it's true I had only ever heard of this word in a chemistry context but it apparently also has a sociology context as starting Brooklyn. No it's okay kind of were all French and it also has a property definition so the etymology of the word. Yeah it's from the Latin originally but the first time that has started to look like is old French around the fifteenth century in that usage it meant an equal half a half part or a share which is basically still its definition is just become a little bit more specific over time so if you look in like a dictionary definition you're gonNa find that it means let's see Miriam Webster. Which is kind of the American standard will say one of two equal parts. A half or one or two approximately equal parts or one of the portions into which something is divided or one of two basic complimentary tribal subdivisions and if you look at Cambridge Cambridge Dictionary. You'll see something similar. Apar- share something especially when it's divided into two parts but there they've added the chemistry definition but they just wrote a part of a molecule which is honestly not very specific. So if you really start to dig deep into the term you'll see that again. There are basically three main utilizations. There's the chemistry. Utilization Utilization Kinship and then a Moi early title which is a legal term that describes a portion of title ownership. So if it's like a divided tidal which is kind of interesting make sense in kinship. You'll see it. Referring oftentimes to tribal groups usually native American or specifically Iroquois or Australian aboriginal kinship groups. And also. I think there's a native Hawaiian kinship group and with that respect. Moi Eighty is like when there's a group that descends from a larger group and only hangs out with one other group

United States Twenty Twenty Cara Santa Maria Steven Novella World Health Organization Jane Avella Evan Bernstein Bob Novella Aids Official Cambridge Cambridge Dictionary Italy China Moi Eighty HIV Costco Miriam Webster
"bernstein" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

04:00 min | 5 months ago

"bernstein" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"Tests with the call and it was just total complete domination. And Al Bernstein's GonNa call in just a second. Let's take a phone call of our Fan Of Of Our program. David Lanta here on the rich Eisen show. It's up David. What'S UP David? Hi Rich. It's an honor to speak to you. Thanks for calling brother. What's on your mind. I wanted to give props to taste and Fury I. It's been a long time since I plopped down eighty bucks for a paper you but I think I got my money's worth. Because he he kinda showed up the big mouths a good guy I think on this one and I think Tyson fury's is going to be champion for for a while as long as he wants to really because he's a mammoth man and he really exposed wilder for who he is and just as just the puncher and not a boxer and I really enjoyed those Those those seven rounds David I appreciate the call and I think you're giving voice to it. A lot of people thought it was a compelling matchup coming in because of what we saw between the first Iteration of these fighters and then again. These are just too massive. Individuals were just dynasty heavyweight. Boxing have a tremendous long renaissance. And obviously these two guys have been leading it in a guy who know all about that is hall of fame. Boxing analyst for Showtime Television Author Stage Performer Artists Renaissance Man. Good friend Bernstein. Rich with you got to reverse his will give you the floor. Sir and what we saw on Saturday night. What we see charted performance by a Tyson. Sure it and the reason it was extraordinary is the way he went about it. You know the first site which I was privileged to announce the first pay per view where they fought Tyson. Fury did what he does. It was an exceptional boxer. Good defensive fighter. has a long gap and he boxed against the slugger beyond to wilders survived. Shootout Dallas astonishingly the second knockdown. He got up from the most amazing thing. I've seen in forty years of announcing boxing and yet for this flight he pressed forward from the moment the fight starting Tolbert. He was going to do that and advanced. I certainly didn't think I thought that was just using gamesmanship. He pressed for over used his JAB to walk his way to walk down the after wilder and and bullying which is with to me. It was extraordinarily part. I mean he also I mean. We're seeing him singing and dancing and just like like he was getting ready for a stroll through the park not a not a prize fight in front of the entire universe. Ow I mean that was amazing to witness that fascinated. I I for But five years that box for channel five inches and over the network in the UK. And I did a number of types. Insure fights issues. Come up and you get to know somebody at that level. A little better. Because there's not all the trappings around namen your you'd have uncensored on you know being available to be with him and so as a result. I got to know him a little bit and he is extraordinarily individual heat. He has he's leave. He has a hurt court. We can also do that. And so when you look at it if I was GONNA make analogy remember how relaxed and easy going event. Holyfield was before I think it was before the the the Tyson fight. We saw singing his way. I mean in a way. It was like that well. And you're the perfect person to ask this question since you've seen all these fights and you are in the International Boxing Hall of fame for that. Have you ever seen anybody lick the blood off the nape of the neck of an individual whose ear he might have pumped up to the head? Look.

Tyson fury Tolbert David Lanta Al Bernstein International Boxing Hall of f Boxing Tyson Dallas analyst Holyfield UK wilder
"bernstein" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

13:00 min | 6 months ago

"bernstein" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"The PODCAST. I'm excellent game here with my co hosts Aaron Lamour and Ratliff Gentlemen. Hello hello good afternoon anti Sir and to you and what about the program today this week on the show Andrea Bernstein she is the Co Co host of the podcast trump inc.. And she's got a new book out. It's called American oligarchs the Kushner's trump's and the marriage of money and power. It's it's about The trump's in the KUSHNER's in marriage money power take is what this book will not make you feel better about the world crate crate. As my experience reading it did not. I did not feel more optimistic. Afterwards is I do think though it is a large segment of the last year's media psycho. We haven't actually had anyone on. Who's just sort of gone? Full trump in their reporting getting except Maggie Haberman. Of course. Yeah well I mean the thing. Is She actually hasn't gone. Full trump in her reporting she has been reporting about political corruption corruption and business in New York. For years and years she was at the observer for a very long time and now is at WNYC and that's kind of been her beat so like her beat became on this corner national story in this sort of and then you'll hear about in the interview but basically I think right after the election she felt felt like I know this world that now is everyone's world and I have some Responsibility get in there and one thing I will say about the book which is also true. The podcast is I feel like Despite everyone in the world being on this story it feels sort of random a lot of the time time and the book really grounds what is happening and how Donald Trump became president in like decades and decades of family history the and New York history and tristate history and it was the first time that it felt like cohesive to me. Well you've answered in my questions. If you're looking to answer other people's questions maybe start a queue in a newsletter with mail chimp. They make it easy to start any Dang Kinda in a newsletter. You want You won't even have to start paying until a certain number of people subscribed so dip a toe dip that. Tell Jim now. Here's Max with Andrea Bernstein. Hi Andrea Hi so great to be here. Thank you for coming to do the PODCAST. Can I say that it's the thing that the trump team has most wanted to do was to talk with you. Well I will say that That's great and a little intimidating but There's one piece of that which is not surprising. which is that so I like emails a fairmount from people who think that they would be good guests on the podcasts Taylor like I you know who I think should be on the show is meek and I got a different one from your co host? Who remained said I think she'd have Andrea on the show? But it wasn't just like hey I think should have Andrea on. It's pretty interesting stuff. She doing he had a like a real like Tower Bernstein like the nine pillars. He didn't send that to me exactly would then I followed him and was definitely. We should do this and I was like. What do you think I should ask? And then he seventy nine pillars and it's rare that someone both nominates a colleague of theirs to come on the show and has such a like a a clear way of thinking about you've never met Elliott out of the blue. I just emailed me out of the blue and then put together this thing and I think it might help us talk talk about the book a little bit. The first pillar Bernstein is Everyone wants to help you. CEOS public information officers other journalists rival outlets people on the street. Anyone could be a source. That just don't know it yet. Your job is to let them know. Yeah anybody can be a source and it is. I mean one of the interesting things about reporting on the trump's in the Kushner says they seem so distant far off there in the White House but here in in this area the New York metropolitan area. Almost everybody knows one of the families and has had a personal experience with them so in many cases this is all I had to do was tell people. I'm writing a book and people said. Oh well I happen to know so and so and maybe so and so can help you so many people were afraid to talk to me so I wouldn't say that everybody wanted to help but it's true anybody could help. That was one of the questions I had reading the book which was this is among if not the hardest beat in the world. Lots of people are covering these folks. Lots of people are trying to figure out how Donald Trump's business works and I'm interested in how you get the main figures in this story to engage gauge with you when dozens of reporters are asking these questions. And then how you find the people who no one has talked to yet and then the third part of that question I guess is is like how do you find something new when everyone's trying to find the same thing so I mean one of the things that gave me pause was not an obvious thing because is one of the ways that I have covered. Corruption is by happily looking in the dark corners where nobody else is looking when we WNYC Z.. And when I started covering the bridge gate scandal with Chris Christie I had covered transportation so when they said that they had realigned the lanes to have a traffic study. I was like that is definitely definitely not a traffic study so I knew immediately. I knew immediately that there was politics and I had covered the port quarter therapy and I knew how to extract information from them so I cry. Let's go back. Yeah how do you extract information from the Port Authority so so one of the big ways you extract information from the poor thrice by showing up so you go to the meetings and you ask the questions but also I serve. They don't like to respond to freedom of information requests but the thing about the port authority is a state agency which is controlled by two governors. So in in any situation where there is a tension. Somebody is going to want to help you. Because they think it's going to thwart their other side so that is one of the ways that there were people who were unhappy with the way the other side was doing things that they would be willing to talk but then at the end of the deaths of everybody wants to talk especially when you're an honest broker occur and they understand that you're going to be fair about things so persistence is another thing. Just sorta hanging in there until people realize you're not going away and it's better to talk to you. visit potentially naive leave question but how important how big a part of that process is being able to suss out people's motivations that way and play to them. Well I think that you know in All journalism you're always looking for where's the oversight whereas the tension. Where's the places where people might disagree? So it's one of the reasons sway former employees organizations tend to be really great sources and there's a lot of people that really know how to work-linked Dan rea well and can find out everybody that used to work at a company and I. I don't do this so much but I mean like if I work with or they'll just call a list of people you get a bunch of names in the just call call so looking at those sources of tension is one way to extract information but anyway just to get back to your main question about some six everybody. Nobody else was covering it so it wasn't my natural inclination but also I did feel like I had a long view on this world and and also because I've been covering corruption in New York and New Jersey politics and also national politics. I had covered six presidential campaign so I just felt like I knew to all the elements of this particular world so I thought okay. Even though a lot of people are looking at it I need to look at it because I have a perspective on it. That is is not precisely the same as anybody else's so that was one reason why I thought I should do it. Even though it's a sandbox at everybody is playing in but one of the things that I really discovered as I went along is that most people don't read things multiple Arabi things very quickly so you can find out so many things by reading up to the end. For example I was reading the Ukraine testimony recently and on page three hundred ninety four there was great anecdote about one of the corrupt prosecutors. That Rudy Giuliani met with was so corrupt that. US officials helped arrange for a bug to be placed on his fish tank so he could be recorded and he was indeed recorded coaching suspects so that was something that was there but that most people didn't really have the patience to read through the documents to find. Does the second pillar must the second pillar read every document talk every document. Yes read the Mola report four times helping you is I mean. I think it's true because it's sort of like you do need to be open to learning information from everywhere which many people are not at any time so I think there's a lot of that in the book because things come from all different places. They come from government officials and instagram program accounts and videos. At the trump organization posted and documents submitted with court cases in California and Etcetera et Cetera. So that is important to sort of think your information can come from anywhere and read. Everything is the reading of everything. Isn't that a boring. Oh my God now I I mean no I mean just the Ukraine testimony itself just to take one reason example. All I was like wow. This is like a movie. It's so interesting so most of the time when I was reading stuff I was literally feeling really thrilled. Wow I am just finding out stuff. I didn't know in many things. I read more than once because I feel like if I read it just once I might not remember it so I read it twice the Mahler report. I knew that I read it four times. I read three-time but I I had to because I really wanted to have the whole thing at my command and I just feel like that process of reading over and over again. This is important. Some some things were less exciting than other things. I read so many books including books written by trump's and a lot of those are very sort of self promotional so some of those. Well I mean I. I found a lot of great material for example in Ivanka. Trump's book the trump card. But it's not written as a narrative so you know that was sort of a case case of I would say it was barring I would say it was not I mean there were there were times where I just literally turning pages and couldn't put stuff down so part of it is literally just is doing the work that other people might not be doing. It's kind of simple but yes I mean I think one of the big secrets to investigative journalism is just actually knowing what's there and ingesting and really looking you know Bob had this wonderful anecdote in the New Yorker. Did you read it about where he goes to the spile cabinet and and he sits there and he reads the whole file cabinet. And I'm like yes that is exactly it because you just don't know on which page the incredible information is going to be. You don't know where you're GonNa find the Mike and the fish tank. It could be unpaid three ninety four to be on page one and it could be something that you practically typically have already. I mean there are many times I've gone back and looked at something that I have and it turns out to contain a giant clue order the final piece of the puzzle or the thing that I need to know to make it all make sense. This is not one of the pillars but this experience since twenty sixteen the volume is so relentless like the yeah the stacking of of scandals incidents and leaks and drama an indictments it's so relentless list that at some point at least for me a little bit like the volume flattens and it's hard to tell like where the real spikes are where the most serious serious ones are and just kind of becomes like home like this at home..

Donald Trump Andrea Bernstein New York Kushner Ukraine WNYC KUSHNER Port Authority Aaron Lamour Tower Bernstein Co Co Chris Christie Maggie Haberman Dan rea Ratliff Gentlemen instagram Jim US Taylor Elliott
Andrea Bernstein

Longform Podcast

08:39 min | 6 months ago

Andrea Bernstein

"Andrea Bernstein she is the Co Co host of the podcast trump inc.. And she's got a new book out. It's called American oligarchs the Kushner's trump's and the marriage of money and power. It's it's about The trump's in the KUSHNER's in marriage money power take is what this book will not make you feel better about the world crate crate. As my experience reading it did not. I did not feel more optimistic. Afterwards is I do think though it is a large segment of the last year's media psycho. We haven't actually had anyone on. Who's just sort of gone? Full trump in their reporting getting except Maggie Haberman. Of course. Yeah well I mean the thing. Is She actually hasn't gone. Full trump in her reporting she has been reporting about political corruption corruption and business in New York. For years and years she was at the observer for a very long time and now is at WNYC and that's kind of been her beat so like her beat became on this corner national story in this sort of and then you'll hear about in the interview but basically I think right after the election she felt felt like I know this world that now is everyone's world and I have some Responsibility get in there and one thing I will say about the book which is also true. The podcast is I feel like Despite everyone in the world being on this story it feels sort of random a lot of the time time and the book really grounds what is happening and how Donald Trump became president in like decades and decades of family history the and New York history and tristate history and it was the first time that it felt like cohesive to me. Well you've answered in my questions. If you're looking to answer other people's questions maybe start a queue in a newsletter with mail chimp. They make it easy to start any Dang Kinda in a newsletter. You want You won't even have to start paying until a certain number of people subscribed so dip a toe dip that. Tell Jim now. Here's Max with Andrea Bernstein. Hi Andrea Hi so great to be here. Thank you for coming to do the PODCAST. Can I say that it's the thing that the trump team has most wanted to do was to talk with you. Well I will say that That's great and a little intimidating but There's one piece of that which is not surprising. which is that so I like emails a fairmount from people who think that they would be good guests on the podcasts Taylor like I you know who I think should be on the show is meek and I got a different one from your co host? Who remained said I think she'd have Andrea on the show? But it wasn't just like hey I think should have Andrea on. It's pretty interesting stuff. She doing he had a like a real like Tower Bernstein like the nine pillars. He didn't send that to me exactly would then I followed him and was definitely. We should do this and I was like. What do you think I should ask? And then he seventy nine pillars and it's rare that someone both nominates a colleague of theirs to come on the show and has such a like a a clear way of thinking about you've never met Elliott out of the blue. I just emailed me out of the blue and then put together this thing and I think it might help us talk talk about the book a little bit. The first pillar Bernstein is Everyone wants to help you. CEOS public information officers other journalists rival outlets people on the street. Anyone could be a source. That just don't know it yet. Your job is to let them know. Yeah anybody can be a source and it is. I mean one of the interesting things about reporting on the trump's in the Kushner says they seem so distant far off there in the White House but here in in this area the New York metropolitan area. Almost everybody knows one of the families and has had a personal experience with them so in many cases this is all I had to do was tell people. I'm writing a book and people said. Oh well I happen to know so and so and maybe so and so can help you so many people were afraid to talk to me so I wouldn't say that everybody wanted to help but it's true anybody could help. That was one of the questions I had reading the book which was this is among if not the hardest beat in the world. Lots of people are covering these folks. Lots of people are trying to figure out how Donald Trump's business works and I'm interested in how you get the main figures in this story to engage gauge with you when dozens of reporters are asking these questions. And then how you find the people who no one has talked to yet and then the third part of that question I guess is is like how do you find something new when everyone's trying to find the same thing so I mean one of the things that gave me pause was not an obvious thing because is one of the ways that I have covered. Corruption is by happily looking in the dark corners where nobody else is looking when we WNYC Z.. And when I started covering the bridge gate scandal with Chris Christie I had covered transportation so when they said that they had realigned the lanes to have a traffic study. I was like that is definitely definitely not a traffic study so I knew immediately. I knew immediately that there was politics and I had covered the port quarter therapy and I knew how to extract information from them so I cry. Let's go back. Yeah how do you extract information from the Port Authority so so one of the big ways you extract information from the poor thrice by showing up so you go to the meetings and you ask the questions but also I serve. They don't like to respond to freedom of information requests but the thing about the port authority is a state agency which is controlled by two governors. So in in any situation where there is a tension. Somebody is going to want to help you. Because they think it's going to thwart their other side so that is one of the ways that there were people who were unhappy with the way the other side was doing things that they would be willing to talk but then at the end of the deaths of everybody wants to talk especially when you're an honest broker occur and they understand that you're going to be fair about things so persistence is another thing. Just sorta hanging in there until people realize you're not going away and it's better to talk to you. visit potentially naive leave question but how important how big a part of that process is being able to suss out people's motivations that way and play to them. Well I think that you know in All journalism you're always looking for where's the oversight whereas the tension. Where's the places where people might disagree? So it's one of the reasons sway former employees organizations tend to be really great sources and there's a lot of people that really know how to work-linked Dan rea well and can find out everybody that used to work at a company and I. I don't do this so much but I mean like if I work with or they'll just call a list of people you get a bunch of names in the just call call so looking at those sources of tension is one way to extract information but anyway just to get back to your main question about some six everybody. Nobody else was covering it so it wasn't my natural inclination but also I did feel like I had a long view on this world and and also because I've been covering corruption in New York and New Jersey politics and also national politics. I had covered six presidential campaign so I just felt like I knew to all the elements of this particular world so I thought okay. Even though a lot of people are looking at it I need to look at it because I have a perspective on it. That is is not precisely the same as anybody else's so that was one reason why I thought I should do it. Even though it's a sandbox at everybody is playing in but one of the things that I really discovered as I went along is that most people don't read things multiple Arabi things very quickly so you can find out so many things by reading up to the end.

Andrea Bernstein Donald Trump New York Kushner Wnyc Tower Bernstein Port Authority Dan Rea Co Co New Jersey Maggie Haberman Chris Christie JIM Taylor President Trump Elliott White House
"bernstein" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:53 min | 6 months ago

"bernstein" Discussed on The Book Review

"He appointed quite a few blacks to the administration addition. But you have to remember. This was the summer of the Spanish American war and he was consumed by the negotiations with Spain. which we're going very reportedly and his administration was under fire for the deaths of American soldiers in Puerto Rico Cuba and the Philippines? We're dying of yellow fever and they were charges that the soldiers were poorly supplied. There were poor sanitation so he was under a lot of pressure at the same time he was assumed to be running for re election so so I think he made the calculation that he did not want to antagonize not only whites in North Carolina but across the south and I think he made a calculated decision. Decision just to Just to keep quiet. What was Wilmington's lie that the title of Your Book? The lie was for more than a century. The leaders offers of the white to openly boasted about it they wrote letters and diaries and memoirs and they portrayed one as a quote good government limit initiative that was necessary to remove ignorant and corrupt so-called Negro rule and at the same time they also said and falsely as the newspapers had been reporting all summer. That blacks were planning to rise up and riot and kill all the whites. And that's the way it was portrayed for well over a hundred years. Why is this story not better known? I think for one reason while they brag about in boast about it was barely mentioned for instance in the state's history books almost never in a one it was mentioned it was the white supremacist narrative. And I think it was just buried up until nineteen ninety eight. When the University of North Carolina Wilmington decided to try to bring whites and blacks together and uncover what really happened and try to have some reconciliation in the city and in two thousand and one I believe a state commission was formed? Mm to investigate the causes and the impact of the riot and they spent five years and came up with a four hundred in some page report that concluded that this was this was not a riot. This was a premeditated calculated political coup and massacre that had repercussions for for the next seventy years. What brought you to the story? Well I went to high school and College in North Carolina and I had never heard about this no professor ever mentioned. It wasn't in any history book I ever ever read. I did not hear about it until nineteen ninety. Eight during the centennial when they had the This program in Wilmington and so I decided that that time but nobody knows this story. Certainly not across the country and most people in North Carolina didn't know about it so I decided that that time was gonna put it aside and at some point I would write a book about it. You interviewed descendants on both sides. How did you track them down? And what was that like. That was fascinating and I have to say. Every one one of these people were very open. Very gracious and talked at length was the The grandson of juiciest Daniels Frank Daniels junior and I in my first job out of journalism school was at the news and observer and while I worked there there were all these tributes Josephus Daniels this crusading journalists the wonderful progressive and no one ever mentioned that he called himself the militant voice of white supremacy in and he had the central role in eighteen ninety eight and and I did talk to Frank Daniels. Junior it was quite interesting is essentially said. His grandfather was a man of his times at the time. He thought he was doing the right thing and I asked him well. Do you feel like you should apologize. And he said No. I don't think there's any need to apologize. He said whatever our paper Stood for back. Then it stands for something completely different today and today the news and observer editorial is very mainstream liberal democratic. It's completely different newspaper than it was back then he he just said there was no need to apologize. After the Daniels family sold the paper to mcclatchy in two thousand six the paper ran a thirteen part series telling the truth story of the Rebane and really focusing on just CPAs Daniels role and on the editorial page. They ran along apology. They call it a a shameful period and they apologized for his actions. I mean clearly. These kind of racial divisions obviously have not entirely healed. I mean what did you hope that readers could draw from it today. My main reason was obviously correct. The historical record and I also believe we really do have to confront the ugliest earliest and most shameful episodes of of our history especially ones like that aren't well known and what I hope. Readers tape from this is it's just how dangerous and combustible it is when autocrats and demagogues these racial scapegoating and demonizing of people of Color. Where people of other ethnic groups is very dangerous and it can explode into violence a- as it did in eighteen ninety eight and we're seeing some of that same demonizing today and marginalizing and social media by politicians and particularly with the rise of the white nationalist movement? So I think it is dangerous. It's very much alive. Today there are thirty buildings on the UNC Chapel Hill campus named for White supremacists and many of them were involved in eighteen ninety eight riots student stores at the UNC is named for Geneva standards to this day right and necessary corrective. David thank you so much thank you. It's great talking to David. Zucchini was a Pulitzer Prize. Winning foreign correspondent spawning. He's written for the Times from South Africa. Lebanon Iraq and is currently reporting from Afghanistan. Has Book is Wilmington's lie the murderous coup of eighteen ninety.

North Carolina Wilmington Frank Daniels Daniels Josephus Daniels University of North Carolina W David Pulitzer Prize Philippines Puerto Rico Cuba Spain. South Africa scapegoating UNC Chapel Hill professor Lebanon White Afghanistan Iraq
"bernstein" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

07:37 min | 9 months ago

"bernstein" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"So to public impeachment hearings are underway seven witnesses Nisa testified so far including tenant Colonel Alexander Vitamin former special. Envoy Kurt Volker in Eland Bassett or Gordon Sunland two more. Witnesses are set to testify today. Thursday a Foreign Service officer David Holmes than feel a hill the former National Security Council official responsible for Ukraine policy. As you'll hear my interview with Carl Bernstein we spend a little bit of time talking about Lieutenant Colonel Vitamins testimony. But there's a lot to take in and to make sense of so in many ways. Gordon Sunland is at the center of key events impeachment. Investigators are focusing on. He's one of the few witnesses who had direct conversations with President Trump about Ukraine delivering specific investigations. And there's this very interesting incident that he initially seemed to have forgotten about a phone call with President Trump on on July twenty six Saturday giving him an update on how much presence alinsky loves trump. You confirm to president trump that you were in Ukraine at the time time and that presidents alinsky quote loves your ASS UNQUOTE. Do you recall saying that. It sounds like something I would say. Here's some of what's Onlin said in his highly anticipated testimony. First Secretary Perry Ambassador Volker and I I worked with Mr Rudy. Giuliani on Ukraine matters at the express direction of the president of the United States. We did not want to work with Mr Giuliani simply put. We were playing the hand we were dealt. We all understood that if we refuse to work with Mr Giuliani we would lose a very important opportunity to cement relations between the United States in Ukraine so we followed the president's orders. I know that members of this committee frequently frame. These complicated issues in the form of a simple question was there a quid pro quo. As I testified I previously with regard to the requested White House call and the White House meeting. The answer is yes Mr Giuliani conveyed. The Secretary Perry Ambassador Volker and others that president trump wanted a public statement from presidents Alinsky committing to investigations allegations of Barista and the two thousand sixteen election. Mr Giuliani expressed those requests directly to the Ukrainians. and Mr Giuliani. I also expressed those requests directly to us. Simelane made news when he said this everyone was in the loop. It was no secret. Everyone was informed via email on July nineteenth days. Before the presidential call as I communicated to the team I told presidents Alinsky in advance that assurances to run a fully transparent investigation and turn turn over every stone were necessary in his call with President trump. I mentioned at the outset that that throughout these events we kept State Department leadership and others apprised of what we were doing. State Department was fully supportive of our engagement in Ukraine efforts firts and was aware that a commitment to investigations was among the issues. We were pursuing and there was this exchange with Dan Goldman. I'M GONNA move ahead in time to the end of August early. September when you came to believe I believe as you testified that it wasn't just the White House meeting that was contingent contingent on the announcement of these investigations that the president wanted but security assistance as well. You testified that in the absence of any credible explanation for the hold on security assistance. You came to the conclusion that like the White House visit. The aid was conditioned on the investigations. Investigations that president trump wanted. Is that what you said. In your opening statement it is so. Let me break this down with you by this time. You and many top officials officials knew that that coveted White House meeting for presidents Alinsky was conditioned on these investigations. Right the announcement of the investigations nations. Thank you and that includes Secretary Pompeo right many many people and secretary bumpy. Oh yes and acting chief of Staff Mulvaney. Yes and you testified that this was a quid. Pro Quo is that right. I did at this point by the end of August had knew that the aide had been held up for at least six weeks is correct. I believe I found out a through ambassador Taylor that the eight had been held up around July eighteenth because when I when I heard originally and even though you searched for reasons you'll never given a credible explanation that right that's right and no one. You spoke to thought that age should be held to your knowledge. Is that right. I never heard anyone advocate for holding the aid and there was this exchange exchange with Steve Caster. Just getting back to the irregular channel. Did anyone else express any concerns to you about this so-called a regular channel. I'm not sure how someone could characterize is something as an irregular channel when you're talking to the president of the United States Secretary of state the National Security Advisor Chief of staff of the the White House the Secretary of energy. I don't know how that's irregular. If a bunch of folks that are not in that channel are are aggrieved for some reason for not being included. I don't know how they can consider us to be the irregular channel and they'd be the regular channel when it's the leadership that makes the decisions. Yes we have all this you know back and forth but you know as as we get to the end here. You don't have records. You don't have your notes because you didn't take notes. You don't have a lot of recollections. I mean this is the efecto of unreliability isn't isn't that true. Well what I'm trying to do today is to use the limited information I have to be as forthcoming as possible with you and the the rest of the committee and as these recollections have been refreshed by subsequent testimony by some texts and emails that I've now had access S. two. I think I filled in a lot of blanks but a lot of it's speculation is your guests and we're talking about a you know an impeachment of the President United States so the the evidence here ought to be pretty darn good. I've been very clear as to when I was presuming and I was presuming on the aid on the other things things Mr Castro did have some texts that I I read from so when it comes to those. I'll rely on those texts because I don't have any reason to believe that. Those texts were falsely sent or that. There's some subterfuge. They're they are what they are. They say what they say. Okay thank you sir. And there was this exchange with chairman. Adam Schiff Jeff in August when you worked with Rudy Giuliani and a top Ukrainian aid to draft a public statement for presents Alinsky to issue that includes announcement investigations into Baraza. You understood that was required by president trump before he would grant to White House meeting to presents. Alinsky that's correct and the Ukrainians understood as well. I believe they did and form secretary pompeo about that statement.

President Trump White House Alinsky Rudy Giuliani Ukraine Secretary Pompeo Mr Giuliani Perry Ambassador Volker Kurt Volker Gordon Sunland Carl Bernstein Lieutenant Colonel Vitamins Mr Rudy Colonel Alexander Vitamin State Department Nisa
"bernstein" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

02:17 min | 10 months ago

"bernstein" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Of it not just brain but to your body as well in the sleepless are more prone to accidents weight gain depression with calm you'll discover a whole library of programs designed to help you get the sleep your brain and body needs so if you want to seize the day sleep the night with the COM APP right now school greatness you guys can get twenty five percent off a calm premium subscription at calm dot com slash greatness that's C. A. L. Dot com slash greatness forty million people have downloaded com find out why ADT COM dot com slash greatness and a big thing you're sponsor ham fusion now there's a lot of confusion around cbd these days and not all CD is created equally adding hemp fusion CBD to your daily routine adds up to a lot of benefits for your health and our bodies already make Canada and plant based CB helps naturally balanced our body but unlike other seaweed he brands just offer CD hanff fusion is CB plus omegas plus Turpin is to help you feel one hundred percent they do this because CBD works best for your body when combined with other powerful nutrients anad other natural ingredients to create products that help specifically with stress sleep and energy everything they do as up to a better product that adds up to a better day for you hem fusion it all adds up available both online and at natural product retailers near you and shift in the US and if you're listening to the school grains podcast use the code greatness for twenty percent off your first order and free shipping at hemp Uson Dot com again check it out right now for twenty percent off your first order that's Promo code greatness get hemp fusion shipped anywhere in the US right now a big thank you to our sponsors today without further ado let's dive into this episode with the one and only Gabby Bernstein the the walking back more to the school greatest podcast we've got my dear friend Gabby Bernstein in the House.

Canada CB US Gabby Bernstein Turpin twenty percent one hundred percent twenty five percent
"bernstein" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

01:59 min | 10 months ago

"bernstein" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Wrote Gabby Bernstein is a dear friend so number one New York Times bestselling author of six books and International Speaker and Spirit Junkie suit lower yell philosophy and the Huffington Post and many others gabby appears regularly as an expert on the Dr Oz show and Mashal Gabby in its list of eleven must follow twitter accounts for inspiration and her latest book will blow you away diving in and loving it it's called super attractor tractors out right now and in this episode about why people feel they need to constantly defend themselves man I have been there in my past especially when you feel unjustly attacked right we want to defend ourselves gabby personal struggle with postpartum depression and how it's drawn her to working with new mothers the power of having gratitude for life challenges the differences between having spiritual guides and intuition the big lesson she learned from Motherhood and her important advice for young women this one is powerful and Gabby opens up about some very very personal intimate things in this episode so please be aware and share her some love when you listen to you hear what she's talking about feel free to spread the message other women who you think might be going through similar challenges listen to this episode as well you can just send them direct link on Apple podcast.

Gabby Bernstein Huffington Post Mashal Gabby New York Times International Speaker and Spir twitter Apple
"bernstein" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

11:26 min | 11 months ago

"bernstein" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"I am so excited so excited because Gabby Bernstein is here today a and I cannot wait to get into that but before we do I just WanNa say really quickly. Thank you so much for all of your love all of the comments all all of the emails yes we just celebrated our two hundred episode on Monday and so this is episode two hundred one and it's just been such an incredible week. Evan in Carmichael was here on Monday. Gabby Bernstein is here today and I just want you to know I feel so incredibly lucky and blessed and grateful to have gotten to know all all of you and to be in your life and that you make space for me to show up. I know that there's so much you could be doing right now and instead you're here and I started this show two and a half years ago sitting on the floor of my closet in my old house and to think that now we have almost almost nine million downloads and I've gotten to meet so many incredible soul like Seth Godin and Martha back and Bobby Brown and Howard Schultz and it's just been such an incredibly uplifting inspiring learned so much girl in so much and and then to meet all of you in to connect with all of you and to have you in my life as such a source of unconditional love I just feel so blessed in so grateful and I wanted to say really really quickly that one thing that I love for you to do sometime today or whenever is going to the notes on your phone and just type out these words. I have done harder things than this. Because it's true you have survived so much you have weathered some of the darkest nights some some of the loudest storms and you made it here. You made it here and whatever this thing is right. Now that's in front of you. It is nothing compared to what you've already overcome with so much grace and I think that sometimes you forget how capable you are. I think we all forget and we I forget how brave we are because you know what everything we've been through everything you've been through all of it all the scars it only makes you that much more for the right person to be in this moment and to show up in this moment and I just feel like everything I've ever done. It was always overwhelming still. I was scared to start writing music. I'm still scared to write music. I was scared to start the podcast. I still get scared to record the podcast. I was scared to get married. I'm still scared of being he married. I was scared to be a mother. I'm still scared of being a mother. I'm scared to post vulnerable things. I'm scared to share this right now. I'm scared to price offers or speak to crowds crowds of thousands or hundreds. I'm scared to travel to new places. I get anxious about that. I'm scared to speak my truth to people in my family to people in the world and yet I do it. Do it anyway and I do it because I want to push myself beyond the limits that I'm setting myself. I want the things that were once. It's my ceiling to become my floor scared as hell and doing it anyway so I just I. I want you to know that whatever this moment is for you boy have you soldier through so much harder than this and you got it and it is scary but what Evan Carmichael Carmichael say he was so great it was successful people start right and he said all you're missing is that momentum and he talked about how it's all about like okay so you feel like throwing going up and you do it anyway. And then you start to do more and you start to see boyer you capable of all of this. I also want to let you know we are doing a giveaway and the last last day to enter the giveaway to celebrate the two hundred episode. We're doing this big giveaway in the last eight enters tomorrow. We're giving away five two hundred dollar gift cards. We're giving away signed copies as of my book five of those and every single person who enters by tomorrow you get my class how to create a successful podcast and actually tomorrow. Oh I'm doing a live session of that so not only do you get the videos in the cheat in the workshop but then you get a live workshop as well. which is tomorrow so if you enter the giveaway by tomorrow you get that that's what you get for sure and then you also might be chosen? We can be choosing five additional winners so everyone gets the podcast course and the free session tomorrow and if you can't make it to the session tomorrow if you enter because you win it you'll get sent the replay but everyone who enters gets it and then we will be choosing five people to win a two two hundred dollars gift card as well as people to receive advanced copy of my book and those five people not only to get advanced signed copy of my book and to a dollar. Gift Card but will will be giving shout outs on the podcast to you talking about Your Business Talking about your instagram shouting you out and sending people over to check out whatever it is that you're working on so you can go to my instagram and read about all the details to this giveaway you'll see post in my feed with me holding a glass of champagne and if you read in the bottom of that feed you can enter the giveaway there there so go to Cathy Dot Heller on instagram and will link to it in the show notes and then you could enter the giveaway but the giveaway consist of just a few simple things which is sharing your favorite episode. Soden tagging me on Instagram as well as buying a copy of my book this week either for yourself or for a friend and then you get all the goodies all the good stuff all right so I really can't wait. I can't wait to introduce you to today's guest. I'm sure many of you already know her and you're familiar with her work. We have here today. The fabulous incredible edible Gabby Bernstein. She is the number one near Times bestselling author Entrepreneur International Speaker Coach self-proclaimed Spirit Junkie. She's written seven incredible books. The universe has your back Spirit Junkie Judgment Detox. Her newest book was just released on Tuesday. It's called super attractor methods manifesting life beyond your wildest dreams and we're GONNA talk about some of the really meaty pieces that you're gonNA find in there along with her books. Gabby has blog courses meditation albums in journals. She's also one of the magical humans and in Oprah's super soul one hundred and Gabby spoke on Oprah stage at her super soul sessions in two thousand seventeen and I was there and I saw her live and she was phenomenal. She's also given lectures that Google Fedex women the Chopra Center the Huffington Post and so much more plus. She's been featured on a ton of places like L. Own Today's show women's health and Cosmo just to name a few she is just one of those very wise human beings who speaks from the heart and speaks truly like in this moment in real time and this was such a surreal gift to have her here because because I have personally been following her work for years and I just don't have the words to express what a blessing it was to have her. I won't keep you waiting any longer so without further ado please welcome the one and only Gabby Bernstein. Hey gabby. Thank you so much for making the time to be here today so happy to be here. Thank you for having me so for anyone anyone in case for some reason they've been living under a rock or in some part of the North Pole without Wifi and never found out who you are. Let's just talk a little about out your journey and then we'll dive into all the delicious things that you are sharing now with your new book. I started my career as a self-help book look author and Motivational Speaker out of a bottom really I hit bottom when I was twenty five when I was in early twenties was really living in the opposite of the way that I lived today which was very obsessed with my credentials my outside persona and right back that Iran. Pr Company owned my own Pr Company the at Twenty One and really thought it was very cool and that outside search led me down some dark roads including drug alcoholism and that was one of the greatest gifts ever given because I had a very strong sense that there was more even annette my darkest moment when I was doing drugs and alcohol and really partying addicted to the outside perception of myself. I still had a stack of self-help books next to my bed. I still had the journal there waiting for me to open up and I was seeking king and longing for something more and thankfully I woke up to receive that I got sober. I I really hit bottom on Stober second of two thousand and five and I just prayed for guidance in a miracle and I heard my intuition say get clean and you will live a life is beyond your wildest dreams and so that was the day it's fourteen years now that I chose to get sober and in my sobriety I got very committed it'd and devoted to my spiritual practice because I knew that was what was going to heal me. Among many other things along the way so I was so excited to be so broke so excited to I feel good. I was so excited to be able to stand behind the messages that I believed in so deeply and we're very quickly started putting on my own talks and coaching people and have since authored seven books writing my eighth as I launched my seven things m super inspired and infant having a big journey and listen to that journey hasn't come without a lot of items but the reason I've been able to hit those bottoms is because I've had such a strong spiritual foundation that I've been brave enough to go to the places. Is that scare me. That's a whole book in itself. Let me tell. You Oh yeah I mean it's just incredible how much is just pouring out of you and how you're just in that flow and and how you had the courage to really bring the darkness into the light and then move past it yeah. I'm curious since you've talked to hundreds of two thousand millions of human beings what seems to be the through line in what you find keeping people stock fear is the through through line fear of not being good enough fear of being inadequate or unworthy fear and how do you help somebody to move through that so all they work is about helping people undo the habitual pattern of fear an in addition might main purpose the reason here the reason. I I showed up in this body at this time was to crack people people open to a spiritual connection of their own understanding and what I believe happens is that baby come to me and they get cracked open. Ni- give them lots of methods and tools and might tools are keeping them consistent on their spiritual paths personal growth work and I could be the the final stop for somebody but my biggest prayer is that I crack crack them open and then they continue to develop and grow their personal growth practice healing and awakening through whatever whatever they are guided to once they made that commitment but my hope is really that the books work will keep open to go deeper work because we are so many of us are traumatise than we don't even know it and that deep work requires a spiritual foundation in order for us to be like I said brave enough to go there but I don't WanNa diminish that that deep work the spiritual path is very very uplifting and elevating and also can guide us to uncover things that we never wanted to face.

Gabby Bernstein Evan Carmichael Carmichael Times Seth Godin Howard Schultz Cathy Dot Heller boyer Google Stober Motivational Speaker North Pole Chopra Center Huffington Post Bobby Brown Martha Iran Pr Company Twenty One
"bernstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"bernstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Playing divorced Bernstein we go there late at night What? Made it special was the talent In the fact that it was interesting A unique experience it didn't matter who you were just came gotta table enjoyed the show So if we, fast forward just a little bit in on the town that Broadway musical Bernstein and Jerome Robins I think they were really. Trying to paint a picture of what America could certainly would our armed forces could be Because. At the time was segregated So in on. The town the cast was, integrated so you've got black man dancing white women on stage holding hands do that was scandalous Another thing on the town was the hiring of Everett Lee So everybody was a black. Conductor who was from.

Bernstein Jerome Robins Everett Lee America
"bernstein" Discussed on The Documentary Podcast

The Documentary Podcast

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"bernstein" Discussed on The Documentary Podcast

"Welcome to the documentary from the BBC World Service where we report the world time ever difficult to the issue. However, hard to reach podcasts from the BBC World Service are supported by advertising. A hundred years ago on the twenty fifth of August nineteen eighteen. One of the greatest musicians in American history was born Leonard Bernstein. The original energizing mood that lakes compose is the urge to communicate and communicate with as many people as possible. Composer conductor pianist and icon of the twentieth century. Leonard Bernstein is perhaps the most influential American musician of all time is extraordinarily diverse array of talents, saw him become the first American celebrity conductor. By the age of forty. He was a household name partly due to his enormously successful, hit the nineteen fifty, seven musical west side story. Bernstein Lenny as he was affectionately known offered the world, dynamic new model of what a classical maestro be. He told down musical barriers to declare the symphony hall open to everyone for him. Music was a means of creating mutual understanding, and it was part of his lifelong commitment to social change his belief that music promotes tolerance and inspiration to try to be the best citizen of the world. That one can be motivate me every day Bernstein died in one thousand nine hundred ninety, but his legacy isn't Odeon his music or his many hundreds of recordings. His charismatic way of conveying his own excitement about music has left a lasting impression on everyone who encountered him. He heard him Sarbaz of meat if I couldn't possibly there or possible to celebrate the teen of Leonard. Stein's birth in this program, I'll be talking to some of the people whose lives were touched by him. Some of his friends and some were taught by him. Others never met him or even heard him perform live, but all were inspired by him to take palm. So they might otherwise never have imagined. I really don't know how I would have made it through that period. If I hadn't had it, they come saved me without knowing it. I'm John Lansky and you're listening to Leonard Bernstein in me and the BBC winds. So. Sensational. That may be my favorite song. Oh. My own first encounter with Leonard Bernstein was watching one of his young people's concerts. Those were his series of family concerts, the New York Philharmonic of which he was the music director, Carnegie Hall in New York City. Today's event is one in a series of New York, though, harmonic young people's concerts. They would televised in America and also a brawl between nineteen fifty three to nineteen seventy-two. They made the complexities of orchestral music engaging accessible to millions of people. Each one tackled a different musical question. I sold the constantly called what is impressionism for nineteen year old me that was the revelation and that was because of the riveting imaginative way that Bernstein explained the artistic concept of impressionism in music. And then the waters begin to stir and rock as the first breeze comes up. Listen watching that concert. I thought about music in the way that Bernstein had showed me seeing it in a wide range in context. When I was about nine years old, my dad took me to one of his concerts. Someone else who I came across Leonard Bernstein in one of his young, people's concerts is the conductor Marin Alsop. She's the music director of both the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and the Sao Paulo, state Symphony. Orchestra played the violin. I especially love playing in the orchestra, but I was often getting into trouble because I moved around too much, or I talked too much. So when I saw Leonard Bernstein conduct in person, it was as though a light bulb went on because he was jumping around and talking to the audience and having a good time. And I thought, oh, if you're the conductor, your loud to have fun. So I turned to my dad and I said, this is great. I want to be the conductor and I never changed my mind. Grownups or good at your kids already. It was claimed of for grownups too because they would be watching with their kids and examined Bernstein Leonard Bernstein's son. He just knew what might ignite interest in. He would play Beatles music in those days that was unheard of of pop music in the concert hall. An as section and singing. Terrible boys. That's all I do. And if you. Saw my love. You'd love her too.

Bernstein Leonard Bernstein Bernstein Lenny Baltimore Symphony Orchestra BBC Stein Marin Alsop symphony hall New York City Beatles Carnegie Hall New York Philharmonic America John Lansky Sao Paulo hundred years nineteen year twenty fifth nine years
"bernstein" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"bernstein" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"As you can hear the music for west side story is very dramatic in nineteen fifty seven. When the show opened Broadway had never seen or heard anything like it, the plot was familiar enough. It's based on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet that to fourteenth century Italian teenagers who fall in love, even though their families are at war. But west side story takes place in New York City and the teenagers are caught between warring. Gangs. Tony is a polish American who falls in love with a Puerto Rican girl named Maria. Joss manteca neymar. And suddenly that name will never be the same. The lyrics for west side story whereby young man who went on to write both words and music to his own shows Stephen Sondheim. Okay. By seven ingredient stocks, Florida smoking. Not all of fern Stein's theater music was composed for the Broadway stage in nineteen seventy one. The John f. Kennedy Center for the performing arts opened in Washington, D, C, with a new theatre piece by Leonard Bernstein called mass. Speaking of Washington Bernstein also wrote a musical called sixteen hundred Pennsylvania Avenue. Some incidental music for the play. Peter Pan and two operas that were eventually combined into one trouble into Hiti and a quiet place. Another Bernstein theater piece candied has been revised so many times. No one is exactly sure which version to perform. That's one of the tunes Bernstein put into the overture of candy which is based on a book by the eighteenth century French philosopher Voltaire the candied aria glitter and be gay is sung by cholera. Torah soprano someone who can sing very high and very fast. Leonard Bernstein's candied polls more into the category of an operetta than a musical more about operas next week. I'm Naomi Lewin. I ride classics for kids and produce it with Tim Lander at w. g. UC Cincinnati. Please join me again from more classics for kids.

Washington Bernstein Tim Lander Joss manteca Stephen Sondheim Kennedy Center Naomi Lewin New York City fern Stein Florida Shakespeare Cincinnati Tony Juliet John f Peter Pan Washington Maria Hiti
"bernstein" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"bernstein" Discussed on Triangulation

"We're we're we're going with this space but again misty's small very cute friendly one of see what kind of skills people start to create and then with future versions will start to you know make a little bit bigger and start to add arms and other stuff to really really excited about where consumers the consumer readiness for a device like misty and just the amount of technology that you can get now is incredible yeah yeah it really is something something special to see the mri to here in person to get to talk with you in person really appreciate you coming up to the studio to to be here today because it's what they talked to people on skype it's another thing tirelessly person live up here with with it super fun yeah soon as soon as i heard about this like yeah definitely going up there awesome maker faire this weekend i wish the very best lock showing off the misty to day come by maker faire find us and finder booth awesome that is this this weekend well today yes starting today today today the eighteenth through the twentieth so if you're in the bay area check it out right on in is really nice talking with you thank you so much in bernstein founder and head of product at misty robotics mr robotics dot com thanks again and like this weekend we do triangulation every friday normally we do it right around of three pm pacific six pm eastern this was recorded a little bit earlier in the day but generally you can go to twit dot tv slash live at three pm pacific six pm eastern and catch us live for the recording.

bernstein founder head of product
"bernstein" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"bernstein" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Of people think of racism and in fact andrew bernstein noted later on in his talk that one of the cognitive errors that a lot of people make when they think about this concept of race and racism is that racism is merely hating people of a different racial group but it's bigger than that it's it's as dr andrew bernstein put a cognitive error it's thinking in racial terms and when you think in racial terms you biological determinism where you decide that by by looking at somebody's superficial characteristics by categorizing them as a member of a group you can determine without any further examination whatsoever of any sort of presented evidence you could determine what kind of person they are there character how what types of choices they make how they make them what their values are based not upon a single declared value from them as an individual but by their association with a group this is what racism it and you know i was thinking about it as i was driving here from the lecture you know why is it that we tend as a culture to even those of us who reject racism even those of us who are not racists in reject collectivism generally nonetheless we our brains tend to work in such a way that we draw generalizations we develop stereotypes we like to categorize people and i think there's a couple of different things going on there one is innocent and the other is not the i think the innocent thing that's taking place is that our brains are simply wired in such a way that we we attempt to to filter her information and digest it in in bite sizes that we can actually handle and we try we engage in all these these cognitive shortcuts throughout our day and in the course of our thinking in order to be able to cut to to skip to the chase so to speak in order to get to the point where we can make our judgment that's necessary in the in the moment in the context that we're in and then move forward without being bogged down in unnecessary analysis and to the extent that in that type of process and that type of cognitive process we end up making errors in judgment about individuals by associating them with our experience with a with a collective inexperience with the statistics of.

andrew bernstein dr andrew bernstein
"bernstein" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"bernstein" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Of people think of racism and in fact andrew bernstein noted later on in his talk that one of the cognitive errors that a lot of people make when they think about this concept of race and racism is that racism is merely hating people of a different racial group but it's bigger than that it's it's as dr andrew bernstein put a cognitive error it's thinking in racial toms and when you think in racial terms you it's biological determinism where you decide that by by looking at somebody's superficial characteristics by categorizing them as a member of a group you can determine without any further examination whatsoever of any sort of presented evidence you could determine what kind of a person they are there character how what types of choices they make how they make them what their values are based not upon a single declared value from them as an individual but by their association with a group this is what racism it and you know i was thinking about it as i was driving here from the lecture you know why is it that we tend as a culture to even those of us who reject racism even those of us who are not racists in reject collectivism generally nonetheless we our brains tend to work in such a way that we draw generalizations we develop stereotypes we like to categorize people and i think there's a couple of different things going on there one is innocent and the other is not the i think the innocent thing that's taking place is that our brains are simply wired in such a way that we we attempt to filter her information and digest it in bite sizes that we can actually handle and we try we engage in all these these cognitive shortcuts throughout our day and in the course of our thinking in order to be able to cut to to skip to the chase so to speak in order to get to the point where we can make our judgment that's necessary in the in the moment in the context that we're in and then move forward without being bogged down in unnecessary analysis and to the extent that in that type of process and that type of cognitive process we end up making errors in judgment about individuals by associating them with our experience with a with a collective inexperience with.

andrew bernstein dr andrew bernstein
"bernstein" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"bernstein" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"People chuck what ellen bernstein the head of the local teacher's union here in albuquerque having problems with the idea of paying exemplary teacher so little little pay raise that the public education department is suggesting she says it's the union's job the bargain for everybody we represent in the most fair and equitable way this is the opposite of what a union does this is divisive we are a collective.

ellen bernstein albuquerque
"bernstein" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"bernstein" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The park the bernstein's put out a statement saying uh we won't succumb to hate bitterness or disillusionment or heartbroken when we stop crying will start to do positive things to effect change as it every everyone work towards something good stopping complacent do something now in the months to come as part of our healing process we too will act to heal the world that is what blaze would want we still believe people are good we've seen this first hand at the tremendous amount of support we received from people everywhere still no motive i don't know what happened but two guys in a park after hours you wonder if there was a relationship or may be a possibility of a relationship between the two i'm assuming we will find out this is a year in the we've said from both the beginning when we found out more information about this guy before he was named as a suspect that the was weird reactions that he would have to the questions that he didn't know his girlfriend's last name that he didn't know where she lived the even though he claimed to have gone there after he dropped off delays at that park there is a there is a side to this i think that his getting i mean in any case like this there's a side to this that is the hardest to talk about and that is the way that the the family now has to deal with us blazed was the oldest of three kids i think so he's got to younger siblings his mother wrote an obituary for him and i don't know she's planning on delivering this whole thing uh at the memorial service but it starts out meets a beautiful picture ablaze and it it says blaze was a brilliant teenager with a noticeably sharp sense of humor and a generous and gentle heart he was often referred to as they renaissance man by his family he left cooking music art performing writing and experiencing firsthand the beauty of all cultures of the world he was known as a puzzle solver quickwitted outstanding communicator strategic game player budding scientists thoughtful gift give her a helper and a volunteer wherever a problem or need arose it's been said by those who knew him well.

bernstein