17 Burst results for "Bernice Young"

"bernice young" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"bernice young" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"To station New Jersey one a one point five news starts all of our witnesses come forward with a description of a man who has been reported to have been in bridged in city park at the time five year old still see Alabama's went missing the Cumberland County prosecutor's office has released a composite sketch of this individual he has been reported to have been with one or two children under the age of five at the time the man was reported to be a Hispanic male around five seven slender build about thirty to thirty five years old wearing a white T. shirt blue jeans and a white baseball style hats the prosecutor says this man is not a spot not a suspect or person of interest just simply a possible witness you can find that schedule NJ one a one five dot com in order to distract policemen ongoing drug investigation authorities say a man called in a bomb threat for Burlington county elementary school twenty eight year old Sharif Brooks was arrested and charged with multiple drug and weapons offenses they say he made the bomb threat to be Bernice young elementary in Burlington township as cops were in the middle of a drug pro but a mile away they found bags of crack cocaine and pot along with a stolen nine and and loaded nine millimeter handgun although only one third of New Jersey adults approve of how president trump is handling his job and have support impeachment inquiry professor Kristin Jenkins says the new fairly Dickinson university poll doesn't find evidence of a trump affect in the state assembly elections so to the extent that we have these off year elections as a way to try to protect our election from national forces it looks like they're really does appear to be a very localized influence to test whether from spectrum for impeachment influence voters views of state politics half the people polled were asked about national politics first half for Assabet state politics verse and Jenkins says it didn't matter actress Felicity Huffman has reported to federal prison in San Francisco California to serve a two week sentence in the college admissions scandal of men must serve fourteen days behind bars pay a thirty thousand dollar fine perform two hundred fifty hours of community service and serve a year's probation the desperate housewives star pleaded guilty to paying admissions consultant fifteen grand to have a proctor corrector daughters as A. T. answers the state D. E. P.'s guard your backyard campaign is aimed at helping communities manage fill material being trucked in for projects spokeswoman Karen Shinseki says at the heart of the campaign is a dedicated website with the model ordinance which offers guidance property owners that is having soil brought in must first obtain a permit their supplier has to complete some paperwork that describes things such.

"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"E D news. I'm Tiffany Cam high Oakland police say they want to prevent a repeat of sideshow activity from Sunday night when a crowd surrounded a big rig truck and AC transit bus near forty second avenue, and international boulevard. Remove the truck driver at gunpoint and set both vehicles on fire. A spokesman for the Alameda County sheriff's department says deputy suffered a significant injury to her knee during the incident. Bay area writers and journalists made a strong showing on this years Pulitzer prize finalists cake, Peter Jon Shuler has more in breaking news, Chico enterprise, record and the bay area news group made the finalist list for their coverage of the wildfire that destroyed the town of paradise reporters Aaron glance and Emanuel Martinez at the center for investigative reportings reveal were finalists in the explanatory. Reporting category for their series on redlining in the home mortgage market, which is also in the running for a Peabody award, Bernice young won recognition in general nonfiction for book in a day's work, which expands on reporting. I heard on the California reports rape on the night shift project. Tommy, orange of Oakland was named a finalist in fiction for his bestselling novel. They're they're about twelve native Americans heading to the big Oakland Powell on Peter Jon Shuler cake. News. And in sports, the clippers beat the warriors one thirty five to one thirty one time the first round playoff series and the sharks continue their playoff series against the Golden Knights tonight. I'm Tiffany Cam high K Q E news support comes from Oakland international airport with up to eleven.

Oakland Peter Jon Shuler Oakland international airport Tiffany Cam Oakland Powell Pulitzer prize Alameda County clippers Peabody award Tommy Bernice young Chico enterprise Golden Knights Aaron glance rape California Emanuel Martinez forty second
"bernice young" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

18:03 min | 2 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Hello, welcome to a public affair. I am SDR topic. Today's sexual assault of women will ever they are whatever class the most vulnerable to the most privilege, and we have three guests do discuss it on the phone with us is Bernice young she's in an investigative reporter with publica who covers labor and employment topic. She's the author of in a day's work the fight to end sexual violence against America's most vulnerable workers. And Hello Bill niece. Thank you for joining us today. I thank you for having me. And in the studio with us. We have Naomi Vanessa and Anna both u UW Madison students members of no more and the the way to think of normal is K parentheses. No. W. And they are both sexual assault survivors, and advocate members of Tri delta sorority and Hello to you. Thank you for joining me today in the studio, and I should say we discussed the three of us dealing the studio whether to use the term most privileged, and we agreed that it is okay. In this case since they all members of sorority, and and everything that that means coming from a family, would means and connections. And yet that hasn't helped you when it comes to bean subject to sexual assault has it. Let's I know that you are willing to talk about your experiences. So let's let's start with you nail me what what has been your experience. So I was a sophomore in college. I don't think you on. Okay. Go ahead. So I was a sophomore in college. I was almost two years ago now, and I the night it happens. I was going to a party and basically to summit up. My doesn't need a driver was the one who assaulted me, and it was really devastating because that was supposed to be someone. I thought who is supposed to present prevent that from happening to me. And it was just really hard going forward because we had all the same friends we are in the same club together. And so it didn't hit me for a while. Because I didn't want to think that I was a rape victim. That wasn't something that I really, you know, thought of myself when I thought of my identity, and so I pushed it off. And I will never forget the day that it finally hit me. It was just like this completely dirty devastating feeling, and I like realize like this happened to me and so I- confided in some close friends who were also his friends, and they basically told me that I was lying. This didn't happen. It couldn't have happened because I knew him and they threatened me if I had chosen to report it, and so I stayed quiet for a while afterwards. And I remember I want abroad, and that trip really made me realize like no like I need to speak up. Like, I can't be quiet about this anymore. And so I came out on social media about it. And I mean, a lot of people saw that post, and I just kinda talked about how that like my soul. Alz shaped me informed me, and that kind of led me to be in a part of no more because during that time that I was struggling alone. I did try to reach out to support groups. I actually tried to reach out to five hours denied from all them or I was not even like responded to. So that was kinda surprising for me. And so after I joined trade outta when I transferred here. I remember grace McMurray shoe. She's now alumni on. She made an announcement. And our chapter and said, we're starting a support group called no more. We're going to be doing a video project about it. And for the first time like after go into that first meeting like I heard stories that just resonated and really like reflected nine, and I don't know that no more really helped me kind of come to terms with it and also be so open, and that's what led me to be an advocate for sexual assault. How do you feel nowadays? I mean like overall just about what happened or just a you feeling Neil Back to your softball, you recovering recovered. You have nightmares. I feel. It's been a while. Right. Yeah. It's it's been almost two years. Things have definitely gotten better. But I feel like this is something that I'm going to have to live with for the rest of my life. And I can either look at it as a negative thing. And let it ruin my life where I can take it and change it into something positive, which is what I'm trying to do. Yeah. Yeah. Anna, what is your? Experience. So it happened last year just this past October. It was in marked a year since the assault happened. And because I was a freshman. It was pretty hard to deal with it. It was in my first two months of being at school by myself. But that night, I did not know who what happened with what I remember is him telling me to keep quiet. He kept checking the door on to make sure that nobody came in. And then immediately after he just laughed, and I just kind of sat there kind of not wanting to accept what had happened. And I ran down the stairs found my roommate. Was immediately crying saying take me home. I don't I don't know. What happened? I just need to get out of here. So I think having someone who I got close with so quickly with really helped me out a lot because she encouraged me to go into the University Health center the following morning. I got us TD screening. Unfortunately, one had come back positive, but I'm thankful that she was there to like kind of encouraged me to take care of myself. And then that following day. I made an appointment with a counselor in the rape crisis center at UW, Madison. So I had gone to a couple counseling meetings that really like helped me realize that it's okay to let yourself like feel bad about it. Like, it's okay to show feelings, I'm not one to really like expert like let myself feel vulnerable. I don't like that feeling but. Being able to like let myself cry and deal with it takes time to grieve. But also try to like build myself back up like that's what I needed and now like in October when it hit the one year, Mark. I definitely I definitely found myself falling back into like those like depressive ways where I was not in a good state. But I think having a good support system at the school being part of no more has really helped me kind of think of it as something that I can do more with and lake make a positive impact to like help advocate for other survivors. The project has really helped me and Bernice hearing, these experiences you of course, have written about the most vulnerable of people really in this country. And and we'll get to who. Exactly they'll but how. Familiar that sounds to you all not. Oh my goodness. Well, first of all Naomi, and and you know at both of you. I just I'm just so moved an NFL your your stories. I think it's so incredible and brave to speak about it. And to really then turn that into something where you're helping others. I mean, so much of it resonates with reporting that I've been doing over the years where these, you know, it's when we think about sexual assault and rape, it's primarily with people that we know or whether there's issues related to memory. And all of these things kind of conflict to make it very difficult pursue recourse. You know? And it's great that he's been able to create this organization to support each other side just wanted to reflect that, but you know, the folks that I've been looking at and I think what it speaks to really is just how often we have these ideas about, you know, who is committing or who is engaging in this type of the hazier, and whether you're called student or a low wage worker, unfortunately, everybody is subject to this kind of violation potentially. The folks that I've been looking at through the reporting I started in two thousand twelve with a team of reporters that then became a book project. You know, we really focused in on a very specific subset, which is a low wage an immigrant workers infield like farmwork Jan? To'real domestic work hotel work. But, you know, the dynamics are the same there in terms of what I just heard from Naomi, Indiana, which is that you know, it's people taking advantage of situation. Whether it's at work, whether it's at a party, whether it's at the university, you know, and so for the workers that I was interviewing and and speaking with their experience was they were, you know, going to their jobs, and unfortunately unscrupulous supervisors or sometimes co workers who are maybe a notch above on the totem pole really taking advantage of their position. And so they would do things like try to late the women worker say on the farm field or try to get them into their trucks to drive them to a part of the orchard or a farm field where they said that they needed them to work or in the case of say nightshift, janitors. You know, the supervisor might be the only person. That. Comes into contact with all night during their shift, and that supervisor might be aware of where the cameras are not. And so, you know, we heard a lot of stories about women being isolated and then purposely removed from other coworkers or take into locations where they knew they would be isolated. And that's where you know, the violence sexual violence would begin. And I think it is important to to spell it out. The will talking about men assaulting women of goes, it's not exclusively men assaulting women the men assaulting men, and in very rare cases, they women assaulting men, but we are talking about that aren't we will ever whatever person's class and circumstances one uniting thing. Thing is that the ease sexual violence by men against women, Bernice, right? And and you're absolutely right. This is not an issue isolated at all to men violating women. This happens men against men. This is an LGBT issue transgender issue. You know, really runs the gamut of you know, the entire population. But what we know statistically is that the majority of sexual violence. It is women being victimized by men. I think something in the ninety percentile range. So that's why in in in the book project, and then the reporting that I have been doing acknowledged that. But you know, decided to focus on women because they are the largest percentage of victims another important thing. Bernice you just dropped a budget yesterday. You wrote an article, and it's going to be on reveal on the radio, and it's going to be on TV too. I believe will you talk about the response of police apparently also all around the country. Anyway, would would you would you explain what you talked about in in this article? Absolutely. As a as you say, it's just something that's really literally kind of hot off the presses. And essentially we were driven. I worked with an amazing team of reporters from newsy the TV organization and then from reveal from the center for investigative reporting which produces radio, and we looked at we were very curious about how rape cases moved through the criminal Justice system. That's what kind of drove me into this project was why is it that? Typically there are to begin with. There are very few report of rate to law enforcement to begin with. I think federal government estimate something like twenty to thirty percent. Of people who experienced rape actually, come forward for so many reasons, you know, concerns around just having to revisit such a traumatic event fear of not being believed other logistical issues. For instance, for a lot of the women that I covered in in low wage work. There were language barriers concerns around deportation so many factors that go come into play. When somebody who's trying to decide whether to report officially what's happened. But of that subset of people who actually do come forward very few then kind of make it through the entire system. And we wanted to know why in one when piece that we really kind of took apart through our reporting was looking at kind of the role of police, and then also the role of prosecutors and the most recent part of the investigation. We we essentially found that there's this category called exceptional clearance that allows law enforcement to essentially close cases without making an arrest there. There are very specific criteria under which they can use exceptional clearance. They have to know who. And where the suspect is and they even have to have probable cause. Meaning they have some type of evidence that this crime could have occurred. And so they have all of the conditions for making an arrest, but they don't because of something outside of their control. And that could be anything from you know, the suspect has died or the suspect is already in prison. But what we're finding with rape cases. Is that two of the most common reasons are that the victim isn't interested in in moving forward with the case and the process or the prosecutor declines to take up the case. And I think what's interesting and important to note about those two reasons is that those are two reasons that can be addressed, and and potentially improved because there are lots of questions around whether the way in which law enforcement interacts with people reporting rape could be improved. What what is their bedside manner? In other words, you know, are they interrogating him? Or are they actually trying to Lissette information that will be helpful to an investigation? And that is cognizant of the fact that there are issues like memory loss. Disjointed memory, all of these things that make it difficult to report those things can be addressed through improved law enforcement interaction with victims on the on the prosecutor side, you could argue that, you know, there are strategies that you know, leading organizations are are exploring to make it. Not easier, but kind of seeking out strategies to address the inherent challenges of prosecuting rape cases. And they're doing trainings all over the country with prosecutors. And so there are more sophisticated techniques to really trying to get underneath the challenges of taking on these cases for prosecutors. So we essentially found that some law enforcement agencies across the country were clearing more cases by exceptional means than actually by arrest, and presenting it to the public to make it appear that they were better at solving rape cases. And they actually are. Yeah. And you well for one thing you have graphs the that show that in in these police forces that you looked at including Austin, Texas..

rape assault Bernice Naomi Vanessa prosecutor America Tri delta sorority Neil Back investigative reporter supervisor Alz Austin University Health center McMurray Anna Madison
"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"O'clock. Good morning. From the center for investigative reporting in PR X this is revealed amount lesson. When we left off we were on the trail of an alleged child predator. A man now in his thirties named Brian kind. It's currently facing trial in Wisconsin for allegedly raping a teenage girl there, but we also found out the police hundreds of miles away in Maryland spent more than a year investigating him in a very similar case police, they're never arrested him a press charges and he went free Bernice young of propublica. Mark green blend of newsy have been investigating. What happened warning before we pick up? The story contains disturbing allegations of sexual abuse. We got our hands on a report put together by police in Howard county, Maryland, it says Brian kind met a girl online a local girl who was just twelve years old twelve years old, take a minute and think about that. A girl not even a teenager a middle schooler just starting to figure out who she is in the world. From the police report, we know a few things about her that she has shoulder length hair and shows her teeth when she smiles when she writes, she colors in her ex clinician points, and we know that she and Brian kind sign many of their messages by spelling out, the sound of a kiss police say she was thirteen by the time Brian meets her in person.

Brian kind Maryland Mark green Bernice young Wisconsin Howard county twelve years
"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A look at the California wildfires stay with us. We can all things considered starts at five. From the center for investigative reporting in PR X. This is reveal amount leads in. When we left off we were on the trail of an alleged child predator. A man now in his thirties named Brian kind. Squarely facing trial in Wisconsin for allegedly raping a teenage girl there, but we also found out the police hundreds of miles away in Maryland spent more than a year investigating him in a very similar case police, they're never arrested him a press charges and he went free Bernice young of propublica. Mark green blend of newsy have been investigating. What happened warning before we pick up? The story contains disturbing allegations of sexual abuse. We got our hands on a report put together by police in Howard county, Maryland, it says Brian kind a girl online a local girl who was just twelve years old twelve years old, take a minute and think about that. A girl not even a teenager a middle schooler just starting to figure out who she is in the world. From the police report, we know a few things about her that she has shoulder length hair and shows her teeth when she smiles when she writes, she colors in her points. And we know that she and Brian kind sign many of their messages by spelling out, the sound of a kiss police say she was thirteen by the time Brian meets her in person in Howard county..

Brian kind Howard county Maryland Mark green Bernice young California Wisconsin twelve years
"bernice young" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on Reveal

"What's the takeaway? You know to me out. It's that some cities are are really honest and transparent. And when they tell you that they cleared a bunch of rape cases. They really did. They really took a lot of people off the street. But then what you don't know is that there are other cities that don't do that that are telling you that that they're clearing a lot of cases. But that in fact, it's it's almost like a smokescreen. It's not really giving you a an accurate representation of how well the police are doing and for me, Al it's really that. You know, all of these numbers they mask what's really actually happening in the real world. We're presented with this picture that law enforcement is making our community safer by taking you know, alleged rapists off the street when really what's happening is. They're just gaming the numbers. And in the end, it's really the public that loses. People do not know how rape is really handled in their community. Mark bernice. Thank you. Thank you out. You bet. Oh. Coming up, Mark. And Bernice take us to Austin with police officials have repeatedly bragged city council about their high clearance rates for rape will introduce you to a whistleblower who says she was pushed to change the numbers. That's coming up on reveal from the center for investigative reporting and P R X. From the center for investigative reporting in p r x this is reveal I'm outlets. Today. We're looking at how police handle sexual assault. Cases are reporting partners are pro Bernice young and newsies Mark green blend.

Mark bernice rape Bernice young assault Austin
"bernice young" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on Reveal

"Takes on one of Canada's biggest cold cases, the murder of Kerry Brown in October nineteen Eighty-six fifteen year old Carrie Brown disappeared from a house party for body was found two days later in the wooded area outside of town. A suspect was arrested and charged. But the case never made it to trial David helps track down witnesses and suspects and uncovers new evidence that may have been overlooked the time subscribe to someone knows something wherever you listen to podcasts. From the center for investigative reporting in PR X, this is reveal amount lesson when we left off you're on the trail of an alleged child predator. A man now in his thirties named Brian kind scarlet facing trial in Wisconsin for allegedly raping a teenage girl there, but we also found out that police hundreds of miles away in Maryland spent more than a year investigating him in a very similar case police, they're never arrested him or press charges. And he went free Bernice young of propublica. Mark green blood of newsy have been investigating. What happened warning before we pick up the story? It contains disturbing allegations of sexual abuse. We got our hands on a report put together by police in Howard county, Maryland, it says Brian kind met a girl online a local girl who was just twelve years old twelve years old take a minute and think about that a girl not even a teenager a middle schooler just starting to figure out who she is in the world. From the police report, we know a few things about her that she has shoulder length hair and shows her teeth when she smiles when she writes, she colors in her exclamation points. And we know that she and Brian kind signed many of their messages by spelling out, the sound of a kiss police say she was thirteen by the time Brian meets her in person in Howard county. That's where we head to the suburbs outside. Baltimore. There's the Wendy's. On the corner. Yeah, there it is. Tonight. This is our first stop in reconstructing the case that Howard county police built against Brian kind. The police report says Brian met the young girl for the first time in person right here here, it is that the the victim stated that she got herself over to Wendy's in order to meet Brian kind, and they had lunch July. Twenty fifteen hint driven from Michigan to Maryland to come to this very Wendy's to have lunch with a thirteen year old. Here. Taking a child out to someplace special someplace fun buying them. Treats child, therapists, tell us it's one of the ways that predators. Groom potential victims in the evidence file we find to video interviews the lead Howard county detective did with the girl on her parents in one video the girl wears Jean shorts and shoes with bright pink laces. She fidgets as she talks while the detective leans in listens closely and the other video the girl tells the detective that being with Brian felt protective the compared themselves, so Romeo and Juliet the girl stepdad tells her if he's doing it to you. He's doing it to someone else. The same detective interviewed the girl. Four times over six months learning. New details with each conversation..

Brian kind Howard county Wendy Maryland Carrie Brown Kerry Brown Canada Bernice young David murder Baltimore Wisconsin Romeo Michigan Juliet twelve years nineteen Eighty-six fifteen ye thirteen year six months
"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Vernal tonight, partly cloudy, some fog out they're coming in with temperatures in the fifties. And tomorrow, partly sunny, then gradually becoming sunny all around the bay. It should be seventy seven tomorrow and Livermore same for walnut creek, San Carlos Tamara seventy two along with San Rafael and in San Francisco tomorrow, expect a high of sixty three degrees. From the center for investigative reporting in PR eggs. This is reveal by Mel, let's. Today. We're revisiting a story about in vitro fertilization, even though IVF has been around for about forty years. It's still confusing territory for the growing number of people who consider it and even for some who've already done it at the start of this hour, we introduced you to Melissa Pineda. She tried to have a child through IBS with the help of Dr Rafat Salem, months later. She couldn't shake the experience from her mind. I didn't know the truth yet. It was still all my I couldn't figure out that type of whether I was going crazy. I just didn't know what was the truth or not reveals Bernice young reporter Jonathan Jones kept trying to talk with Dr Salem, high rosy. It's Jonathan Jones calling from. Just Dr Salema one thing they wanted to ask. Why had Dr Salem put three embryos into Melissa? Transferring more than one at a time is a common practice, even though as Bernice Jonathan discovered that can lead to all kinds of health risks for moms and kids, doctors know, this yet most continue to do it while waiting for Salem to get back to them, but Niessen Jonathan visited two other southern California for clinics to learn why doctors risk transferring more than one embryo in a woman at a time..

Dr Rafat Salem Melissa Pineda Bernice Jonathan Jonathan Jones Dr Salema San Carlos Tamara Bernice young San Rafael Mel Livermore San Francisco IBS California reporter sixty three degrees forty years
"bernice young" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on Reveal

"From the center for investigative reporting in PR x. vis is reveal. I'm let's. Today we're revisiting story about in vitro fertilization. Even though I v f has been around for about forty years. It still confusing territory for the growing number of people consider it and even for some forty done it at the start of this hour, we introduced you to Melissa Pineda. She tried to have a child through IVF with the help of doctor referred Salem months later. She couldn't shake experience from her mind. I didn't know the truth yet. It was still all my mind. I couldn't figure out that time whether I was going crazy. I just didn't know what was the truth or not reveals Bernice, young reporter, Jonathan Jones kept trying to talk with Dr Salem high. Rosie, Jonathan Jones calling from Vail just the doctor, Salem. One thing they wanted to ask. Why had Dr Salem put three embryos into Melissa, transferring more than one of the times a common practice, even though as Bernice, Jonathan discovered that can lead. To all kinds of health risks for moms and kids. Patilally doctors know this yet most continued to do it while waiting for Dr Salem, to give back to them for Niessen. Jonathan visited two other southern California for Tilleke clinics to learn why doctors risk transferring more than one embryo in a woman at a time. I went to reproductive partners Tilleke center, San Diego, Lisa, yo manages the lab here. So this is our embryo legiti lab. She opens a heavy door and leads me inside the miracle. We call it that happen to prevent contamination of the embryos. I've put on a face mask a hat, a blue paper gown and booties over my street clothes and shoes inside the sterile zone machines from refrigerator. Shoebox-size we're and beep. Interesting machine back here. That's making all this interesting sound. What what is it? Oh, it's a, it's machine, the tests, the hormones. So we do run progesterone has been an embryologist for almost thirty years. She seen major advances in reproductive technology. For example, she can now pick the most viable sperm and inject one directly into a tiny Egge the technology for freezing embryos so.

Dr Salem Jonathan Jones Melissa Pineda Bernice progesterone Tilleke center Lisa Tilleke Vail Niessen San Diego reporter California Rosie thirty years forty years
"bernice young" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sexual harassment and abusive behavior recently, a lot of high profile powerful men have fallen because of metoo movement, and that is encouraging more of you women and men to come forward and say enough is enough. But there's still a lot of women and feels that are not high profile who were suffering in silence. They feel left out of the metoo movement. Bernice younger is a propublica. Reporter she interviewed sixteen women who work in dozens of different industries and wrote about them in an article called the unrec, and it was a partnership with reveal from the center for investigative reporting in it. She examines why many women still can't report sexual abuse and harassment. You can read that article in the September third through sixteenth issue of New York magazine. Bernice welcome to midday. Thank you. Are you surprised that CBS fired? Les Moonves says? I think that we have really in the last year or so really seeing a a willingness to address sexual harassment in the workplace in a way, that's quite aggressive and quite more responsive. I think especially in when it comes to high profile individuals in a way that we just haven't seen previously. You know, I've been doing reporting on sexual violence and sexual harassment in the job across industries for the past six seven years, and what I've been hearing over the past many years is that unfortunately, most of the time when women report sexual harassment at work, very little happens. They feel that, you know, employers them blind eye or that they feel their complaints are diminished. And so I'm not exactly surprised given the current context and dialogue and reckoning with this issue, but it is certain. Only a shift often we think about these powerful men being kicked out but not being bankrupt reportedly moon Vaz's was expected to get one hundred million dollar payout. But CBS might be donating twenty million to organizations that support women who have suffered from me to experiences. Now. Do you think this is the approach is is that a bigger corporate issues and not just about, you know, essentially punishing the them, but also changing the environment. I think that's the most critical component of all of this is this kind of, you know, hard to grasp, but I think very critical issue of so called culture change within a workplace. I mean, there's been decades of social science research just sitting right there in front of us. That tells us that when we actually make it very clear that sexual harassment is not tolerated in a particular workplace. There is less of it. You don't get rid of it altogether. But it does send cues to people who might be contemplating that type of behavior that it is not acceptable that there will be consequences and people then is a result are less likely to do it. I think when you have a situation like what we've been seeing in the media and in Hollywood where it's coming straight from the top. I think that, you know, obviously, those messages are getting dispersed and disseminated to every other part of the culture of the organization, and so when when you have leaders could do the opposite. Set and who say, no, this is not acceptable. That message gets hurt. And I think it translates to less sexual harassment is the research has shown that you write many women feel like Hollywood is taking action to support glamorous rich high profile women, but that there are a lot of women who are experiencing sexual harassment and abuse in their everyday lives, and they don't have support. That is true. I think even from the very earliest studies from the nineteen seventies. Looking at sexual harassment in the workplace women, and then have felt that reporting and coming forward about claims of sexual harassment is just not something that they can really do very comfortably. You know? There's concerns around just frankly, sometimes the shame and embarrassment of what's happening happened. Also, deep concerns around the economic repercussions, you know, especially a lot of individuals who are not high profile who don't have high paying jobs, this might be kind of their financial lifeline and the risk of losing a job is is just not something that can really contemplate, you know, you bring in all sorts of other factors for some of the more vulnerable workers such as farm workers domestic workers, janitors who might not even have the language linguistic abilities to make a report and also issues related to immigration status. And their tenuous immigration status. So there are all these kind of confluence of factors that really become part of the calculation for a lot of individuals when they're deciding whether or not to come forward with sexual harassment complaints or not, and it's it's a really delicate. You know calculation. There's so many things that you have to weigh and it's so individual really in the end that it's it's amazing to see so many people come forward. But I think we have to really recognize that there was so much that went into that decision. It wasn't just kind of a knee jerk. You know, I'm coming out today with this with this complaint. It I I imagine it required. A lot of soul searching and a lot of bravery. One of the extraordinary things about the article that you've written is that you go into granular detail, and you found sixteen women across section of America really in many different industries that are not necessarily glamorous. How did you find these women? Right. I luckily had some great help from colleagues over at New York magazine. And we did the very systematic approach of calling. I think over a hundred and fifty organizations individuals organizations that work with workers unions worker groups it was literally kind of cold call after cold call trying to get in touch with individuals who might be willing to share their story us. So did some social media reach out to people who you know, who might be willing to share their story. And it was it was very challenging. I think in the end we spoke to something close to thirty women all of them had incredibly powerful stories to share. I think what is powerful as you mentioned is kind of the granularity, you know, how each concern and complaint. Around sexual harassment that they experienced was. So specific I think sometimes, you know, especially in this may two moment where we're hearing about this flood of people coming forward around sexual harassment. We can kind of put it into a generalized box. But when you really start to talk to a lot of the women individual, and you ask them, you know, what happened. How how did it make you feel? Why were you feeling that way? What else is going on in your life at that time, you realize how impactful sexual harassment, these, you know, these unwanted comments unwanted touching even, you know, something as as horrific as sexual assault and rape in the in the workplace how that is just completely tumultuous to their lives, and how finding a way out of it. You know is not always clearcut. If you're just joining us. You're listening to Bernice young propublica reporter who covers labor and employment about her recent investigation for New York magazine about why women still can't report sexual abuse and harassment, even in this metoo era. Now, Bernie's I know that all the names used in your article are not real names because the women requested anonymity is that because they feared retribution. It's really interesting some it's that's exactly right. Even in this moment, where there is this opening this kind of fascinating an amazing opening to kind of shatter that taboo around sexual harassment in the workplace all of the women that we spoke with still had concerns about what sharing their story publicly would mean. And so we did speak to them using different names names that they chose because they did fear still those financial professional reprecussions personal repercussions, you know, to coming forward and speaking out. So, you know, I think part of what is tremendous about me too is creating of space to really speak out. But then I'm not quite sure that everyone feels that coming out and speaking out won't result in some kind of collateral and unexpected. Consequence. I don't think that we have at all been able to guarantee anybody that kind of protection you spoke with a twenty six year old woman that you call Jessica she works at a at a hospital in Florida. What's her story? So Jessica she worked as basically a hospital tech, and she had two guys in a basically in the in the room that she worked in that. We're constantly making comments towards her. You know, about her legs about the way that she dressed about the fact that she was sexy, and it just was something that put her off. And there were other people in the room. They heard these comments, including some older female colleagues, and no one really said anything or defended her she didn't care for it. And she was just too concerned about losing her job in order to say something the other issue too was that she's an interesting situation where she was a third party contractor. And so were the other guys that were making these these comments to her? So she thought about making a complaint, but it wasn't clear who would take responsibility for it since it wasn't the hospital that she was employed. By and the the men who are making these comments weren't employed by the hospital either. She wasn't even sure who they who they work for. So she kind of found herself in a bit of a bind, and she she says, you know, quite forcefully. She wishes that you know, there was some book out there, you know, called this is sexual harassment that you could just give out to some of these co workers, but the at the core of it is this idea of if you wouldn't say this in front of your wife or your girlfriend, and it's probably not okay for you to say in front of your co worker, and you know, frankly, most most people are people are there to work there not to be there to be hit on. And so if she wished that her co workers would keep that in mind, but isn't there training like that already available? Maybe this is something that in my professional life. I've been to trainings like this where everyone is worn don't do. This don't do that. What's not what message is not getting across? I think there's there's a difference between training and a lot of the training that I think you, and I and so many other people have sat through where maybe some of it is on a computer where you're clicking through your readings through and going through these rote exercises, or maybe you're in a conference room with fifty other people, and there's somebody droning on and on and on at the at the front of the room about laws and liability. And it it I don't think there's a real human element to what all of this actually means. And I don't think that there's always a connection between sexual harassment laws and the actual workplace and workplace culture in which you find yourself. I think we've been seeing some really fascinating efforts to ships that actually coming out of some of the the university of low wage workers so farm workers and janitors. I think have actually really taken the. Lead on this issue by completely transforming the way that they do training..

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"bernice young" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And just moving forward in the little bit of time that we have a what what do we have to be hopeful about is there really demonstrated increased focus on on these lower wage workers in the plate that they face i think that what has kept me very hopeful in the many years of covering this issue are the women themselves and also the the work that they have been doing amongst themselves to really problem solve around all of this on first of all just the level in which they have been resilient and responded and such power powerfully positive ways to some very difficult in horrible things is quite inspirational and i think now many of them like erica and others are you know they're going out and they're trying to help other women they are fighting for legislation local legislation state legislation there you know doing a lot of outreach to help anybody that they can to make sure that sexual harassment and sexual violence isn't part of the job right bernice young is an investigative reporter with the radio show in podcast reveal in author of entities work the fight to end sexual violence against america's most vulnerable workers for news thank you so much for reporting on this thank you so much kim and you can continue the conversation and get the on point pot podcast on our website on point radio dot org and you can follow us on twitter and find us on facebook at on point radio i'm kimberly atkins this is on point.

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"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Did they wanted to use their own experience that terrible experience that had happened to them for some kind of positive altruistic purpose i think that's just amazing and i really wanted people to meet some of these women so that they could see how in the face of really horrific horrific violence they have still you know maintained such humanity bernice young thank you so much for for your work in for speaking with us let the usa thank you so much bernice young is a reporter from reveal from the center for investigative reporting her book in a day's work the fight to end sexual violence against america's most vulnerable workers comes out dismay coming up on that dino usa using virtual reality to connect families separated by immigration status i what all more dollars sheriff me a story that he had showed his uncle of vr film and songkhla had said something along the lines of i will pay anything for somebody to film back home stay with us nothing the my ass and let's use the short break to check traffic with only shamail well there's lots of heavy traffic on i on their way home out there people leaving from their vacation spot santa cruz mountains is heavy northbound seventeen from the lexington reservoir to highway 85 fremont north eighty slow from all the parkway to thornton pleasanton south six eighty slow from burnout ovallis beatles vacaville you'll its experience slow traffic west eighty from.

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"bernice young" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Basically that hollywood celebrities and the accused people who are often you know white melts of power have really been the focus of the conversation if you remember during the golden globes eight actresses took activists as deeds and i was looking out that in the us mainstream media an iphone dot the actress names appeared in new stories about me too far more frequently banned the activists names through dessert dessert suggest that this was about celebrity unless about the cause well i was talking to bernice young who is a reporter for reveal and she covers issues of harassment and assault among low wage workers i asked her about how the media tended to focus on celebrities and she's not really surprised about that we you know as members of the press we do tend to gravitate toward people who are brand names or they'd lend a level of credibility what struck me and my colleagues was that a lot of the workers that we had looked at where they had faced very extreme sexual harassment and i'm talking you know sexual assault and rape they they weren't as president in that conversation initially i think there's been some shifts you know but i think they're just voices that i personally think we need to hear more from it happens to women all ends of the economic spectrum so sophie igf which would it be surprised either but i'm curious through how some pushback also from celebrities either worked against or four the mi2 movement because a couple of weeks back you may recall french actress catherine deneuve signed an open letter with ninety nine other frenchwomen basically saying were against the me to movement um how they see it as a puritanical invasion of american morals in france did that pushback letter grab as much attention or more attention than me to and what did it do to the meat to space on social media well it didn't get more attention that meeting and general fat in the case of catherine denied of in the us actually.

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"bernice young" Discussed on Code Switch

Code Switch

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on Code Switch

"Blue confronts his longstanding nemesis abu from this simpson's condo boluo explores how this character was created and continues to exist 28 years later also featuring whoopi goldberg calpine luke harsh on booed car asif mondovi and aparna non share la watch it on demand or stream it on the true tv app support also comes from gugel home there are things you need to know in the morning like the weather your calendar or the news of personal assistant can just tell you those things like the one built into every gugel hong just say hey google good morning and the google assistant will tell you the latest forecast traffic on your way to work and even the headlines it's a personalized briefing from an assistant that knows you best it's a little help at home like only google can gene sureen coach which i have your cheque but only if you give near underwear or do you want me to take them off of you he tried to touch me tell me have had sex with other women here said he wasn't going to fire them because he was the one a charge i never slept with any of them i'd say if i did but i won't lie i had to satisfy them in other ways those are voice actors reading interview transcripts of three immigrant women from latin america it's from the reporting project reveal one of those women worked at a packing plant the other two were farmworkers all three or sexually assaulted on the job our next guest help find those stories her name is bernice young she's a journals with reveal from the center for investigative reporting npr x bernice has been covering the sexual abuse of farm workers and janitors for the past five years she was a part of a multi team collaboration they did two huge investigative series called rape in the fields and rape on the night shift assuring you actually spoke to bernice about the mi2 hashtag than some of the women historically left out of conversations like this yes she shared her initial reaction to what is now being referred to as the reckoning.

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"bernice young" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the most important relationships in our lives this episode of review he'll is about win those relationships come up against us immigration policy will hear from families and children caught in a system with shifting rules and from those in charge of enforcing those rules on the ground we start in los angeles county it's late august just after 5 o'clock in the morning the inky black sky mirrors the dark storefronts of a strip mall in the parking lot more than a half dozen immigration agents and bulletproof vests huddle for a briefing what he thought were important a 33yearold natural clarke of this review are therefore required fruitful reckless driving agents from immigration and customs enforcement or ice have been staking out the homes of convicted felons who were in the us legally the agents planned to arrest them when they meet their homes over fruit on the facts the legal walmart there will be a 21yearold mexican national rift from earlier this year furthermore the people on today's lists have criminal convictions for drunk driving sexual battery and done possession if the agents are able to make arrests ice will start their deportation proceedings right away colin trevorrow operations like this attract media attention and create anxiety for emigrants ice arrests of criminals and noncriminals are up thirty five percent since donald trump became president they've happened at restaurants courthouses and sometimes like these early in the morning outside an immigrants home mm reveals bernice young has been investigating the administration's crackdown on immigration and went along on a recent ice raith i write shotgun next to jorges field who helps run what ice calls its enforcement and removal operations in los angeles they are in the city of the former in aceh fernando vellon it's more of fees city los angeles poor hey is in his fifty's he's got salt and pepper hair and a goatee like the other agents he sports a navy blue bulletproof vest with the words ice and police in big block letters off we park around the corner from the suspect's home i grew up in a neighborhood like this in a predominantly hispanic neighborhood to him these arrests are about protecting public safety and respecting the law offer generational american on my dad came to this country so it's not something we don't understand the reasons behind why they come on their shows the process and.

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"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the most important asian ships in our lives this episode of reveal is about win those relationships come up against us immigration policy we'll hear from families and children cotonou system with shifting rules and from those in charge of enforcing those rules on the ground we start in los angeles county it's laid august just after 5 o'clock in the morning the inky black sky mirrors the dark storefronts of a strip mall in the parking lot more than a half dozen immigration agents and bulletproof vests huddle for a briefing corning birdied the rear old one among now clarke review our and through clark equal reckless driving agents from immigration and customs enforcement were ice have been staking out the homes of convicted felons who were in the us legally the agents planned to arrest them when they meet their homes we number two on the french evil walmart twenty nine year old mexican national for furthermore the people on today's list have criminal convictions for drunk driving sexual battery and gun possession if the agents are able to make arrests ice will start their deportation proceedings right away river road operations like this attract media attention and create anxiety for emigrants ice arrests have criminals and noncriminals are up thirty five percent since donald trump became president they've happened at restaurants courthouses in some times like these early in the morning outside an immigrants home reveals bernice young has been investigating the administration's crackdown on immigration and went along on a recent ice rate i write shotgun next to jorges field who helps run what ice calls it's enforcement and removal operations in los angeles they are in the city of lahore nla emma suffer number well it's more of fees city los alamos poor hey is in his fifteenth he's got saltandpepper hair and a goatee like the other agents he sports a navy blue bulletproof vest with the words ice and police in big block letters aw who park around the corner from the suspect's home i grew up in a neighborhood like this in a predominantly hispanic neighborhood to him these arrests are about protecting public safety and respecting the law offer generational american on my dad came to this country so it's not something we don't understand the reasons behind why they come on their sus the.

clark us walmart media attention donald trump president bernice young los angeles los alamos los angeles county clarke lahore thirty five percent twenty nine year
"bernice young" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"bernice young" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the most important relationships in our lives this episode of reveal is about win knows relationships come up against us immigration policy we'll hear from families and children cotonou system with shifting rules and from those in charge of enforcing those rules on the ground we start in los angeles county we're going to go ahead it's late august just after 5 o'clock in the morning the inky black sky mirrors the dark storefronts of a strip mall in the parking lot more than a half dozen immigration agents in bulletproof vests huddle for a briefing with the sovereign foreign nuclear 33yearold one among now clarke who briefly review i and required truthful reckless driving agents from immigration and customs enforcement or ice have been staking out the homes of convicted felons who her in the us legally the agents planned to arrest them when they meet their house we number two on the facts we are ruled illegal walmart there were twenty nine year old mexican national with year very in order for the people on today's list have criminal convictions for drunk driving sexual battery and gun possession if the agents are able to make arrests ice will start their deportation proceedings right away and river road operations like this attract media attention and create anxiety for emigrants ice arrests have criminals and noncriminals are up thirty five percent since donald trump became president they've happened at restaurants court houses and sometimes like these early in the morning outside an emigrants home reveals bernice young has been investigating the administration's crackdown on immigration and went along on a recent ice rate i ride shotgun next to jorges field who helps run what ice 'cause it's enforcement and removal operations in los angeles they are in the city of hormone in the south fernando velvet it's the city of los alamos poor hey is his fifteenth he's got saltandpepper hair and a goatee like the other agents he sports a navy blue bulletproof vest with the words ice and police in big block letters aw we park around the corner from the suspect's home i grew up in a neighborhood like this in a predominantly hispanic neighborhood to him these arrests are about protecting public safety and respecting the law a first generation american on my that came to this country so it's not something we don't understand the reasons behind why they come on their sister a process and.

los angeles county clarke us media attention donald trump president bernice young los angeles los alamos walmart thirty five percent twenty nine year