17 Burst results for "Bernard Hermann"

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

04:22 min | 9 months ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"You mentioned palme. Was he an influence on you. Brian depalma to me was one of the most important actors in my childhood. And i remember watching scarface in the theater. And it blew my mind even the scarface now really feels like an oliver stone film. As well with that incredible screenplay he wrote and most people don't realize that oliver stone wrote scarface but it's the combination of the two and pacino's performance that make it so iconic but i love dapa very influenced by italian jello films. That's why he's using. Pino nausea in kerry to palm taking music from the italian horror movies of the early seventies. And he's putting it into american movie. George lucas is using john. Williams other directors that are doing are using american composers but depalma's using pino dodgy a- denies gio had done a lot of work in italy and spaghetti westerns jealous but he's a very specific composer. It feels like a mix of bernard hermann from psycho and the more coney scores from the agenda jealous. So you have these influences coming in. It's like diploma comes. And he's taking polanski. Hitchcock bernard. Hermann are gento italian cinema. And he's putting it all into american movies and people hadn't seen anything like it dressed to kill. I remember seeing that the split-screen scene where he's watching donahue and getting dressed and michael caine and angie dickinson. I remember as a kid watching that movie and it it does have this dreamlike quality where she meets this man in there having sex and then she finds this file this little bottle with the pills. And you're like oh gosh like what it's just you know. Nothing good is going to happen. And the the shower scenes i mean. He's got this incredible. Mix of alfred. Hitchcock and dr gento but his use of long takes really the scene. I remember the most television. Where donahue is interviewing someone and michael caine is watching it and watching it and just just the the lighting the weights photographed and a as a kid split screens. Drive me crazy when we're supposed to watch supposed to watch but you just sort of give over to it and you're just watching. This thing happened absorbs in your brain. It's really it's got a very very interesting effect on the audience. I tried to do a montage. I've really tried to do a montage like that. In death. wish of bruce willis taking bullets out of people and then putting bullets into target so it was all influenced by diploma. Then of course body double with voyeurism..

bernard hermann scarface Brian depalma michael caine donahue Hitchcock bernard pacino gio oliver stone bruce willis Pino kerry George lucas coney angie dickinson Williams italy dr gento
"bernard hermann" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"The way at one point. I was dying because D- And Charlie reference dolls talking about a split murders personality murder and Charlie doesn't listen. There's nothing more hackneyed than that serial coz split personalities. But he tries to be nice to Aphrodisiac dressed to kill and Donald conferences. I love dress to kill which I just watch for the first time. When Liz Blake by Nancy Allen Prostitutes? He's a mysterious woman brutally slay Kate Miller Angie Dickinson. She finds herself trapped in a dangerous situation. While the police think Liz the murderer of the real killer wants to silence a crimes. Only witness only. Kate's inventor's son. Peter played by Keith. Gordon believes Liz Liz team up to find the real culprit. Who has an unexpected means hiding identity and even more surprising motivation to kill? I enjoyed it. It's a movie that I think has been awfully dated because the main characters transgender and they've got a sequence at the end I mean is I rolling and little nausea inducing at the way. They tried to explain that the character when his penis gets hard. The female side takes over and then fields murder the male side because he's transitioning from male to female you know females body and just hates himself so much that he feels like he has two murders somebody when he becomes sexually aroused clearly is not going to play well and twenty twenty. Lgbt community and this was made forty years ago so the fortieth anniversary of it. I don't think that transgender character kills an attractive woman because their penis gets aroused and they're mad at the male side of themselves having said that in terms of tension implied invention is certainly enjoyable. It's what I would call a genre movie and it continues Brian. Depalma's obsession love with Alfred. Hitchcock it's a fascinating. Debate is diploma a great director because he takes hitchcock movies and then forms Zoll with DNA of Hitchcock. Or is it outright thief and a guy that makes hitchcock? He's all over again and just remakes them and doesn't have the originality of the first movie and then just earns the spoils of them. I don't know what the answer is. It really is each person's view because clearly watching drastically. Go Yeah this is psycho. This is psycho in one thousand nine hundred. There's a brutal slash and seen rather than in a shower. He puts an elevator. But it doesn't have Bernard Hermann score but you know right away like yeah man wearing a wig psycho again okay so Michael Caines going to be the Anthony Perkins character interesting but still it works because it's got enough moments that are certainly juicy and say this for diploma. I'm telling you as far as any director when you throw dialogue out the window. He's having a blast when the cameras just takes over like he's got a twelve minute sequence here fabulous no dialogue just one character track and the other think of Carlito's way what's the best part of the last ten minutes not as war to dialogue. It's just Pacino get raced to grand central station. You got that incredible shot in the escalator. I mean that whole sequences amazing the subway cars chasing the cars amazing. Then just to kill as well think of untouchables. What's the best thing of untouchables when the baby carriages going down the steps to slow motion? Which of course nod to the Odessa steps sequence in Sergei Eisenstein battleship Potemkin loves taking famous sequences famous movies and putting his own spin on them. That's reviews Roy so kind to him. Generally speaking I think in his later years it became a little bit too predictable. Fem fatale. Rebecca Romaine snake eyes with Nick Cage. Those just didn't work although raising Cain to me still has some moments with John. Lithgow Michael Blow at a Boston Globe dressed to kill as a nail biting seat squirming stylish murder mystery with a brain. Dave Care Chicago reader. Originality has never been a high value in the genre bound aesthetic of filmmaking but diploma cheapens. What he steals. There's my point there but in being a thief Roger Ebert Depalma's an artist of hitchcock stature. But he does earned the right to a comparison other go dressed to kill. Don't have you ever seen it Joe. A forty year anniversary of that movie. You know this is the the Palme blind spot that I have. I've never seen dressed to kill The cast it's looks great on it and you know me. I'm a big fan so I definitely will have to watch this. But did you catch the dressed to kill reference in adaptation? What he's talking about the twin brothers and he goes. Oh it's cybil meets dressed to kill. Donald SAYS I love dress to kill. It was great. Yeah he he goes. I love to kill until the Third Act dement and then that's not how it's pronounced. That's right dated great great one more by the way. I'm going to give dressed to kill. I'll give it three maple leafs like I said I was a little squirming at the end there but I did think it was enjoyable in various suspenseful all right one week before iron. We'd in depression era Albany. New York Erstwhile Baseball Star Francis. Phelan play by. Jack Nicholson has become an alcoholic vagabond. After guilt over accidentally killing his infant son led him to desert his family over the course of several days. The animals ready job to dirty bar to makeshift sleeping quarters. By Fellow Itinerant Drinkers Sometime Lover. Helen Archer played by Meryl Streep Together. They waxed nostalgic about their haunted. Pasts the review here from Ed Pot and is notable the Times if you enjoy Richard E Grant Melissa McCarthy as on the skids New Yorkers in Kenya ever forgive me here's an star your example of Hollywood poverty porn. It's adapted from a play which means that it feels little stilted at times but but I enjoyed it. I thought it had excellent performances. Jack Nicholson Meryl Streep both nominated for Kademi awards. Best actor best actress respectively a good supporting cast as well including Diane Venire member. Her and hate playing Pacino's wife Fred. Gwynne played the judge in my cousin. Vinny Tom Waits as rudy the famous singer he's Nat Nicholson's main accomplice. There's not a lot of meat on the bone but I thought the performances were very much lived in and felt authentic..

Hitchcock murder Kate Miller Liz Liz Roger Ebert Depalma Donald director Pacino Charlie Liz Blake Jack Nicholson Meryl Streep Jack Nicholson Angie Dickinson Sergei Eisenstein twenty twenty Bernard Hermann Michael Caines grand central station Vinny Tom Waits nausea
"bernard hermann" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Twenty third nineteen forty-three Orson Welles starring in and you heard the announcer talk about the fact that Orson Welles was going to be on the next four episodes. So this particular episode three more episodes, and they talked about the law special being next week and I believe the next two weeks off the top of my head was the Lhasa Rhys affect. And then also the hitchhiker, which was a very famous story by by lucielle Fletcher. And she also wrote sorry wrong number and Orson Welles appeared on suspense, many, many times with this was a four week in a row engagements he must have had, you know, some time on his hands. Maybe he was not doing a play because he was doing a lot of plays at this time. And also. Movies. He had already produced citizen Kane he, so he's very busy making movies. He was doing his Broadway and of course, appearing on radio, and he enjoyed being on suspense, and Bernard Hermann did the music on this program, and Bernard Hermann was married to Lucille Fletcher. They were they were husband and wife also Keenan Wynn on this particular broadcast in the announcer. The man in black Joseph Curran's. He was Mr. Wilson on Dennis the menace, there was to Mr. Wilson's. Gale, Gordon, of course, was, you know, seal balls foil for years, and Joseph currents, the man in black on this particular episode quick break, then it's more on the WGN radio theater..

Orson Welles Bernard Hermann lucielle Fletcher Joseph Curran Keenan Wynn Joseph currents WGN Gale Dennis Gordon four week two weeks
"bernard hermann" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

We'll See You In Hell

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

"Well, the man's never been funny in anything. I can't speak to. I don't think I've ever even seen an episode of that show. Jamie Gertz was also like the woman that he shouldn't wind up within twister. You know? She was kind of the uptight one in Toyland talk about a bad movie. I at the time I loved it. I'm sure it doesn't hold up. Believe me. I knew it was shit the minute. I saw I didn't I didn't wear which is why we don't see eye to eye anymore. I was a kid fourteen movie about tornadoes. You know, I'm going to say that I was sixteen. I thought it sucked ass. All right now. We were all that man. I was like eighteen you were like ninety seven. I would have been sixteen. Yeah. Yeah. The dying. We just saw Doral God, she seems sweet shores running me and my aunt Sammy God restaurant. So I love we liked about weeks. Big fan parenthood is also from this era and she's dynamite in that movie had inter sisters. Of course, she's. Her sister. She's she's she I rarely use. This term a force is the force Ed Scissorhands, she's incredibly ash. She's she's wonderful. If I'm being real, I think her performance ED's Scissorhands is my favorite of hers. I, you know, I get it. Dude. People love that movie. I'm not a big ED's is fan. But I get the appeal. I understand why people love it. And I don't think that's crazy that that would be your favorite. We performance handed her sisters because it's my favorite movie of all time, you know, can't compete with that hayme in hayme here at the breakfast table in the class. I always by the way, the grandfather, I always thought this guy was art Carney. Wasn't Bernard Hughes. Name isn't that the name of the guy that died? The boyfriend Bernard Hermann Barnard Hughes and Bernard Hermann Bernard Hughes. Interesting fact for you horror fans out there stars in arguably the best.

Bernard Hermann Barnard Hughes Ed Scissorhands Jamie Gertz hayme Toyland Carney
"bernard hermann" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

We'll See You In Hell

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

"His fifty year old science teacher boy to get money for pills and the science teacher like breaking bad style. Made the drugs for him. Not. No. So that's what they that's the first stop any takes his mom to it. He could've gone any friends house could've gone to the fucking drug a guy he saw at the mall. Why would he go to the science as it's probably this guy's house? So they go over there. He basically confesses to his mom that he used to fuck as science teacher for bills. But why did he go to the science teachers house? No clue why would this science teacher steal his dog? That's what I'm saying. They had an arrangement where he would fuck him for pills that why would he steal his dog and the second. They did it. I was just like. You're a good writer like why would you do this? It enrage me. I I couldn't get on miss something. I didn't miss I discussed it with everyone. They're all right being headed the whole night. Where like unless it was some sort of like, I want to tell my mom, what happened to me thing. But that wasn't in the store then after they do this reveal. He just goes on to the next house. He's looking for this dog never mentioned the science teacher again strangely enough. This is we're at the big dog seen in law where the dog bites Jason Patric. That's weird. It's a little weird. Sure. Anyway. Ben is back winds up being an even more depressing version of beautiful boy, which was the not great depressing. Steve Carell one I can't recommend it. But, you know, the two of them, I guess, we're pretty decent. Let's talk about the lost boys. Well, perfect time to drop into the film. 'cause which just transpired was Corey hayme going up, the stairs going your vampire, God damn shit sucking vampire, you wait till mom finds out at I remember, you wait till mind. Mom finds out was the big line in the trailer. Okay. He was like, you know, the the voice over would be like. Mikey's. Gotta problem his brother's vampire, and there's which okay have, you know, mom, finds that's how they let you know. Like, it's kind of comedy, I guess kind of comedy. It's certainly not funny now, it's funny. The part where they invite. What's the guy's naming in the died? Bernard Hermann with invite him over for dinner. And they do the whole thing where they turn the lights out. That's very funny when they turn the lights out, and they turn the lights back on his his there's the mirror right front of his face. Right. And he goes. That stuff and then. You don't realize younger is the frog. Brothers are supposed to be funny like Feldman and his brother. They know what they're doing to kill the vampire, but they are supposed to be funny. Right. How'd you like towns thousand bloodsuckers, you know, like it's like they clearly told Feldman like do. Asto loan thing. Got a pin Dan around that. Right. It'll be fun to watch thirteen year old act like stolen. Yeah. I mean, it didn't really make me laugh, and I found that the attempts like when he's like is brothers flying outside his window. So he's seeing his brother like as a vampire flying for the first time, and he's a what are you the flying done? It's like really that be your reaction. It just thought it was pretty stupid. And usually hate that sort of thing, by the way, you're your hypocrite. I don't even think I remember that joke. Oh, it's in their it's in like, my soul. Yeah. I mean, look I didn't say that every joke in the thing was a fucking home run do right? It also has you know, and we're we're we're far from there yet. But the last line of the movie is is pretty is a bit flippant. I really liked the last night of the movie, that's the kind of thing. I do enjoy. If I like a little the poltergeist when they you think it ends. And they kick the TV out in the hallway. That's fine. Love a little joke. Like, that's fine. I'm not like this is a similar job. I'm not crazy about the grandfather coming. That's always been the problem with this down to a minute God damn vampires..

Bernard Hermann Feldman Jason Patric Steve Carell writer Corey hayme Dan Mikey Ben thirteen year fifty year
"bernard hermann" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

Tony the Movie Guy

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

"No, it's. Yeah. He goes. Yeah. Allen vestry. He's a great composer. Right. All right. What do you got my friend? I have vertigo on their edge. Cock bernard. Hermann? Did he do a lot of his schools? He did. Yeah. Okay. From other. That's fantastic. I mean, I love Bernard Hermann scores and I had to pick one. So I went to go. Did he do about the movies mostly catch? I think he did mostly Hitchcock as far as I went on. I don't know why I like Hitchcock last year. I went on this like Hitchcock binge, and I watched everything he had done a really like a span of like a week and a half. I don't know why do that scene. His film, of course. Yeah. I don't know if I've seen all of his like. Rope bird Birgit of. I forgot like vertigo north by northwest further. Go north by northwest and. Rear window. I didn't of course psycho. I it dumbfounded me how great those films. In the music. Incredible. I was gonna put psycho on the on the list, but the music is almost two. Exactly. This is. The whole whole nor is great. And everyone thinks is that. That's why that white input on a. Oh. And that one note. Funny. It's so true mode, of course. Yeah. Same thing. With like jaws. It's like oh. Yeah. That's the theme which is great. And it's amazing that he did that you know, that's the one I was telling you about right? Played the whole thing because there's actually a whole theme for Jew was. Right. You know, and she was like this is Jews. And then finally the okay, right 'cause I played like the whole thing. And it was like two or three minutes in. It was a whole other operatic section threat. It you know, like Jurassic Park that happened as well. Like, everyone just doesn't knows? None. When's it coming? You know that comes like two and a half minutes into the actual tune on the soundtrack, John Williams. Again, they go through Jurassic punks probably on my list. His themes are super anyway, actually, that's a great choice. Yes. A vertigo is. Bit of an eerie soundtrack from other. Remember just last year? But what instruments that's like, it's also orchestral strings. Rask. It's strings. I'm sounding like a could, sir. I've no idea. But it's true. Yeah. No. It's a great score. Okay. Man. Cool. That was you'll one. Do you got? All right. Oh, okay. I have to do father. It's a collar seven a- Novi. It did a bunch of others Godfather's that I connect and again, the whole scores. Incredible. Whenever I listen to that music and kind of the tone of. All you think about is. You know, gangster movies them. Those music is very talion whole told about talion heritage. And it's I loved that the music is super that is Carlo Savina. I don't actually know from the sixties on time ago. And he did I think all three of them hated. Okay. Yeah. I think that's interesting. I've actually been wanting to sit down and watch the godfathers again because I haven't seen them since a long longtime. It's one of those one of those things where it's like I have to watch them as an adult. So I'm a crazy person. I watch a movie every day sometimes two with two or three movies every day, and.

Bernard Hermann vertigo Hitchcock Carlo Savina talion heritage Allen vestry Jurassic Park John Williams Novi three minutes
"bernard hermann" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

Tony the Movie Guy

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

"Apparently Tarantino to fight for that. Did you know that I did not wait tarintino? Apparently did a lot of behind the scenes fanatic Ling, and we're him to win the Oscar for him to come from Italy guy. So all he was seventy eight didn't wanna fly and for him to get recognized crazy stories about the I remember reading articles inhering Tarantino talk about it like he had to really vie for it. Marconi was. And then when he got it. He obviously loved the knowledge like finally guys catch up. Yeah. But yeah, I found interesting Marconi's done all kinds of John roses. Well. But the good the bad and the ugly. That's for all the whole film him again. Yes, you're right. It's gonna stand the test of time the reality movie. That's a lot more than didn't do them renewed. Totally wrong. The whole scores is really really good. Yeah. What kind of instruments is that? Now, I'm really interested in thinking. What is the didn't? I mean, you'll that. I guess. Yeah. That's right. Yeah. But he also uses a lot of strings. Bombomg that's Qatar right guitars strings progressive snuff. The choir rightness, so much more than just the flute. Exactly. But also, I love just how they're recorded because part of what what I love about older film scores like that and Bernard Hermann and things, you know, older scores in general is the performance, and the editing and the whole process was different. You know, like modern film scoring processes. I think people get so used to hearing sample library, especially composers and producers and so on that they kind of mock these things up for them to hear an approved. And then once they have the live orchestra. I feel like they often tend to try and make the live orchestra sound as a samples whereas all those are Coney scores. There's so many imperfections. There's so many little hearts where the rhythms. Awesome man comes back in intonation is a little bit wobbly here, and this and that, you know, but it makes it great because people are actually performing a phrase in one take in. They're actually there's a human quality to it. There's an emotion behind the performance of it. I always find that with that thing and stuff when when something is like, polished diamond. Yeah, you can appreciate it. But when there's like acting just a good example of performance can be so roar, and brilliant. But when their imperfections definitely like they skip over the lines. They mess up like boogie nights. Great famous line from William H Macy because his wife's like a porn star. And she's always having sex with people and the guys like doing okay today. And he's like, no, my wife got her dick and my ass. Wrong and the direct to the neck. You're upset. You're annoying gonna dick hand he's at the line wrong. And they kept and it's so affective because. Yeah, it's kind of it's imperfect. Life is imperfect. That's funny. I feel like acting in scores. The trend is almost kind of opposite. Right. Maybe not. I feel like was maybe more polish. Yeah. You know, back in the day a little bit more more formal of different now, it's a little bit. That it just made me think of that. It doesn't even have to be acting and just that example may be kind of think of when you listen to music. That's just you know, you can have like a perfect she of music, but the sounds I love affections. Yeah. Yeah. I think elevates also even just the process of recording. I think part of the reason back then you didn't have that as much because you didn't or you couldn't technology wise recording to tape. You can't just go back and punch one bar because you want to get that Choon. Whereas nowadays with pro.

John roses Marconi Tarantino William H Macy Bernard Hermann Ling Oscar Italy Qatar Coney one bar
"bernard hermann" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"So that was his impressing that and saying, hey, let's give it with the string arrangement. Works out. Great. Thank you played the song in the style of Bach to show, Paul McCartney. The voice things that were available. Another example. How about the song penny lane? Featured a Piccolo trumpet solo that was requested by McCartney after hearing the instrument on a BBC broadcast. Mccartney hummed, the melody that he wanted and Martin noted it and excuse me notating it for for day. Mason great day. Mason. But not that Dave Mason, by the way. It's a different day. Mason. Not. We just disagree. They mason. He was the classically trained trumpeter. So when you listen to that song, of course, we know. Course, that's how you know the song. Now, what would it be without that? I mean, Martin's work as an arranger us from any Beatles recordings Eleanor Rigby. He scored and conducted a strings only accompaniment inspired by Bernard Hermann. I mean, just the list goes on and on so happy birthday to the great George Martin again. Born in this day nine hundred twenty six and we lost him in twenty sixteen Casey's and elk grove joining the show. Hi, casey. Hi and happy new year. Glad to have your back. Happy new year. Casey. It's great to be back. Thank you. While you were talking about British music. It it reminded me of Katrina and the waves. And you're the person to ask the question. This question is not designed to trip you up. Okay. All right. Katrina and the waves as website. How do you pronounce her last name? Oh, it starts with an L. It's like Elian something. And you would be the person to ask because 'cause you're usually a very very good. You're always a good trip. This is not a trivial thing. But it's like how do you pronounce her last name? Well, I'll tell you this much, and I'll be completely honest with you. It's it's less.

Dave Mason Paul McCartney George Martin Casey Katrina Bernard Hermann Eleanor Rigby Elian elk grove BBC
"bernard hermann" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"The most of the other one that I could think of and I was just thinking of it as we were talking and you'd brought up to Cameron. Is in this is obviously a more modern take on aspects of that is the little hours they came out about a year ago. Some of the I can't remember their sort of like some of the modern Cornyn quotes comedy people. Like what's his name? Fred Arniston in its I think John C Reilly. And then there's like three nuns one one played by. Yeah. Once played by one of the gals who I know really well from the Garfunkel and Oates. Knees. Comedy music group, basically, these nuns, and they're in a cloister, and they're dealing with. You know, it's it it's basically they took these stories from from the camera, and then kind of played them out and said, right, okay. If we were just gonna ad-lib these, you know, like we're not going to register script or just going to add live like here's a story. Here's the character. I think what's his name's in a day Franko. So it's it's quite funny. And it has some of these different aspects of to where it's of a particular era, and their certain sort of religious context of the cloister and and things like that. And and just sort of like lusty knowns. So it's funny. Yeah. The the other thing I brought it up the beginning. And you have it here. Strange voted joy in the opening soundtrack is christoph- Penderecki who did the score for this who most people who have no idea who he is as a composer both for film in classical music, probably. We know his sort of haunting almost grading sounding music. That's on the soundtrack for the shining. So it's it's very discordant stuff. I had a friend of mine who used to work at a lung RIP gone record stores here in Detroit called harmony house. He used to use Pederick keys threanened for the victims of Harare. To drive yet to drive people out of the store at the end of the night. Because. And so he told me that he goes I used to play this to get people out of the out of the store. And when I heard it the first time, I was like, wow. If you haven't heard it is amazing to listen to it is something that he orchestrated for. I think it's fifty something strings, and the concept is basically the elite up to and then the bombing of and aftermath of Hiroshima. And it is it is hard to listen to it will make your skin crawl. I mean, he is a master of of eight tonality in sort of playing with these concepts. And I think that part of the score ahead. The I didn't listen to it as closely as if I was just going to listen to, you know, just for the scored self there seems to be electron elements in this film. It's either that or something that sounds like some sort of electron or early kind of Sint or something in there. I think there is. I mean, I know he was pretty experimental or not afraid to experiment. I also I love Penderecki. And if anyone is a fan of Ken Russell's film, the devil's Penderecki did an opera called the devils of Lou done, which is based on the same story and also involves softy nuns since this. We were just talking about them. But it's it's not gonna be for everyone. But it's a really incredible piece of music that is definitely longer than threatening to the victims of Hiroshima. But is well worth listen. That's hung is come up on this podcast. This is the third time now because obviously when we talked about twin peak season three episode eight of that uses that song wonderfully. So if people remember. The music from that. I mean that episode was one of the best thing on TV may be in the century. And then it is also it's used in children of men. So that was for while there that song could only be mentioned on episodes that Christine Makepeace was on. But now we've broken that cycle. So I'm sure that she's going to be happy about that last week. We got to talk about Bernard Bernard Hermann and the psycho score. So she's all about the the discordant strings, I suppose Aric is we're going to take a break, and we're gonna play preview for next week show..

Aric Hiroshima Franko Christine Makepeace christoph- Penderecki Bernard Bernard Hermann Fred Arniston Cornyn John C Reilly Cameron Harare harmony house devils Detroit Ken Russell Garfunkel Oates Lou
"bernard hermann" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"You know of of of interviewees, and he was extrordinary was beyond ordinary. But also I wanted to have the perspective of different generations of filmmakers from Peter benefit to give touro to younger filmmakers like Rawson. You know, Elijah wood in his partners at spectra vision. Donyell just Waller to to really make the argument that the shower scene remains very much alive in our consciousness today in his still something that we talked about instill relevant to discuss today. Not least it was very important for me to have number. Of of women obviously into film. I don't see how you can make a film about Hitchcock much less about psycho in the shower scene without having a number of women in their perspective on it as well. It's a great mix of people just so many different perspectives and pretty much every single person that came on screen. I was like. Oh, wow. Yeah. That no. That makes sense. I mean, the one that always except for me is Danielle Ben and that he did the the re score for the remake and just how important Bernard Hermann probably was the his life, and how important music is to that scene at all ties together. Yeah. No. It was great to get to get Danny in a perspective. Also on you know, the goes Vincent psycho, which we also have with Amy donelson who was the editor that project, and you know, unfortunately, we didn't get Gus himself. But you know, it's it's a really fascinating. It's a fascinating to me to to consider. Because this idea of cinema magic, you know, that you can't really recreate even in the hands of of a master like Guzman said he just can't replicate it in a way it's refreshing in. No, I think if you could just take any masterpiece in remake it just a successfully I think it would take away some of the magic. So what were some of the things that you found out while you're making this movie without giving it away. I think to me to two particular areas that I really wanted to explore that in fact, never been explored and one is the baning that Norman Bates removes from the wall to watch Marion crane through his people, which you know, it's actually painting that Hitchcock talks about in the trailer. The extended six minutes trailer to psycho, and there's a mystery behind paintings. So that's something that was wonderful journey of discovery. This. Has great significance. Also, the infamous cassava melon, which is Mellon of very particular kind of Mellon Hitchcock used to create the sound of the stabbing in, you know, everybody while every every hitch dot fan will will know that. He chose that particular melon for the sound bytes. You know, we actually went really deepen and trying to figure out why the Qasaba as opposed to any other kind of melanin ended up ordering twenty seven different varieties of Melon's in season. Instead the mall in recording them and sending the sound files to Gary to him who won't seventy Kennedy awards for for sound in Shannon meals at Skywalker sound than than interviewed them about that. So there are certainly some surprises. I think for even for really hard core film, nerds there are some some discoveries to be made about this hour seed, so obviously so much of this movie speaks about editing, and I'm curious as far as how the edit for the project actually went when it came to putting it together I worked very closely with Chad hers worker, my editor who did people deduct the bed. He did this..

Hitchcock Gus editor Mellon Hitchcock Elijah wood Waller Skywalker sound Donyell Rawson Guzman Bernard Hermann Peter Danielle Ben Gary Danny Amy donelson Norman Bates Chad Marion crane Vincent
"bernard hermann" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

"Can hear the whole thing and help now playing continue to meet its operational costs. This is a war of the worlds rip off. Right. They call it out. It's like war the world. Yeah. Because the alliens have a stupid fucking weakness. Well, also, the newscasters they feel very Orson Welles. This just feels like m night decided he wanted to do were the world's a couple years before Spielberg. Yeah. Being just to put it in context. Believe Spielberg resurrected were of the world's to comment on nine eleven this movie started shooting on September twelfth two thousand one it is not intended in its design to be that commentary. I think it's completely happenstance. The two movies happen to be made so close together. Maybe. But I also wonder if m night might have tried to get the rights to war of the worlds and Spielberg Hatem locked up and am night decided, okay. I'll do crop circles and signs. I don't think I'm thinking about doing other people's works intentionally that way with few exceptions. He usually doesn't adapt others. He's the genius that comes up with the ideas. But yes, I do believe that it makes sense that if you've already covered ghosts and superheroes. The next logical step and talking about urban myth and the realm of the supernatural and how it intervenes with reality and faith and belief. It makes sense that he would come here. Yeah. I'm just saying that so much of the story, including the aliens weakness does feel like a war of the worlds rip off. So that's why I think water is the weak point is the same way that just the germs in our air killed those alias spoiler alert for worthy worlds than the original version. Well, water was also the kryptonite too. Bruce, Willis and unbreakable. That's why said the that's what he came up with this next idea for a movie was at that moment and unbreakable. It's theme he it will be what went into his own personal identity more on that next week. But there's more water stuff. So the lady in waters completely safe from these aliens? What am night has claimed his number one influence was Hitchcock's the birds the scope of it would be similar that while this thing was happening. All over the world is strange phenomenon. No, one could explain it would be set on a single farm, and it would take the vantage point of just a few characters that was the novelty of it. But he also talked about nine living dead and the original body snatchers. And again, he wants to be Hitchcock. And he refused to bring up Spielberg, but we're all thinking close encounters to that's what I expected with this movie. After unbreakable expected this entire movie to be aliens give signs and at the very end. Mel Gibson much like Richard Dreyfuss stands at the base of an alien ship as the door opens and credits roll. That's what I came in just expecting to have happen. Now. I saw the trailers I remembered the tin foil hats, I remember watching the news. But I still just thought it would all be. She heralding the aliens of rival how are you not thinking X-Files? That's what I was thinking. Because I think there may be a lawsuit here if someone wanted to pursue it. The score at times is just straight up that X files. Opening the no, I think the score was very much Bernard Hermann who is Hitchcock's Goto composer for many of his greatest. It reminds me of psycho north by northwest all of those being X-Files ends up sounding like it in notes. I didn't hear that Jacob. But I do think the attempt is being made is to tell us from the get-go you're in a Hitchcock thriller, and I don't have a problem with doing that thing like from the birds where it's this worldwide epidemic, but we're going to focus on one little family and a house kind of like living dead 'cause I think from the first two films. What's impressed me the most coming back to these is seeing how well he's done even when he's using sleeping's like a Bumblebee how well he's done with these little family dynamics. And that's what's really won me over with those last two rewatching. Yeah. The throw a little family in here. They got a crisis of faith. And all that. Let's see if that works. We're dumped right into it. I mean when the movie starts it just begins with Joakim, Phoenix. And Mel Gibson running towards screaming children. They're running through the rows and trying to find the two kids..

Spielberg Hatem Hitchcock Mel Gibson Jacob Orson Welles Willis Phoenix Joakim Bernard Hermann Richard Dreyfuss Bruce
"bernard hermann" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"Now, it's time for our bus when the back lot segment and this week we have Hitchcock going to great lengths to conceal psychos dark secret. Alfred Hitchcock bought the rights to the novel anonymously from Robert Bloch for only nine thousand dollars. He then bought as many copies of the novel as he could to try and keep the ending secret. When the cast and crew began work on the first day they had to raise their right hands and promise not today voltage, one word of the story, Hitchcock also withheld the ending part of the script from his cast until he needed to shoot it. Every theater that showed the film had a cardboard cutout installed in the lobby of Alfred Hitchcock pointing to his wristwatch with a note from the director saying the manager of this theater has been instructed at the risk of his life. Not to admit to the theatre any persons after the picture starts any spurious attempts. To enter by side, doors, fire escapes or ventilating shafts will be met by force the entire objective of this extraordinary policy. Of course is to help you enjoy psycho. Moore signed by Alfred Hitchcock, one of the reasons Hitchcock shot the movie in black and white was he thought it would be too gory in color. But the main reason was that he wanted to make the film as inexpensively as possible for potentially under one million dollars, which he ultimately was able to do Hitchcock was so pleased with the score written by Bernard Hermann that he doubled the composer salary to thirty four thousand five hundred and one dollars Hitchcock later said thirty three percent of the effect of psycho was due to the music paramount gave Hitchcock a very small budget to work with because of their distaste with the source material Hitchcock wanted to make this movie so much that he deferred his standard two hundred and fifty thousand. Dollars salary in lieu of sixty percent of the film's gross paramount believing that the film would do poorly at the box office. Agreed his personal earnings from the film exceeded fifteen million dollars adjusted for inflation that amount would be just nearly a hundred and thirty million dollars today for the shot looking up into the water stream of the shower. Head Hitchcock had six foot diameter shower head made up and blocked the central jets. So that the water sprayed in a cone past the camera lens without any water, spraying directly, add it. And speaking of that bathroom scene. Psycho is the first American film ever to show a toilet flushing on screen Hitchcock himself. Hated the infamous psychiatrist explanation seen done by Dr Fred Richmond. Played by Simon Oakland at the end of the movie, he felt the scene was boring, and that the movie came to a grinding halt at this point the scene has also been ripped to shreds by critics over the years as the worst thing. In the movie and one of Hitchcock's were scenes, ever, both Hitchcock and viewers felt that the scene was unnecessary overly obvious and to talk slowing down the action. It's spent the rest of the movie, but there was strong pressure from the studios and powers that be that funded and distributed the movie to relieve the pressure from earlier scenes and also to explain the action to less inciteful audience members who might be confused by the big reveal at the end. So the scene was kept in the movies famous line. A boy's best friend is his mother was voted as the number fifty six movie quote of all time by AFI and the strings only music by Bernard Hermann is ranked as number four on AFI's one hundred years of film scores psycho is currently number fourteen on one hundred greatest movies of all time. That concludes our episode on psycho and our month of Alfred Hitchcock movies. I would love to hear what you think of this. Classic movie must and Hitchcock's work in general feel free to tweet at movie musts pod or E mail. Classic movie.

Alfred Hitchcock Robert Bloch Bernard Hermann AFI Dr Fred Richmond Simon Oakland director Moore fifteen million dollars thirty million dollars nine thousand dollars thirty three percent one million dollars one hundred years sixty percent one dollars six foot
"bernard hermann" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on WGN Radio

"To see this ESO perform this along. With the movie at? Ravenna tonight how cool. Is that I'll let you. Know so I love that music. I and I love Bernard Hermann he's one of. The great. Composers of all time totally agree I you guys know what. The hell you're really. Talking about, I'd done he does I. Mean 'cause, that? Sounds like, fine pardon me Griffin I mean no disrespect Fine generic old time movie music but it is. Lovely was pleasant yeah maybe maybe you'll feel it tonight but I can't believe. That use zoned, in on that having. Seen it on TV or computer. All these years, later I don't know it's it's really dramatic when you see the. Whole movie I mean that was just a minute but when you see the whole movie but Bernard. Hermann his. First movie that he ever. Composed for was citizen. Kane. And, his last movie. That he did the score for was. Taxi driver and then he did a million in. One of the greatest. Careers, about time he did psycho that's probably the. Miles. He did a lotta Hitchcock movies so this one psycho north by northwest and? The birds and a bunch of others. But one of the best I tonight at Ravenna and they've got a beautiful big screen instead up I'm. Jealous I think it'd? Be great maybe I'll. Pop over yeah well feel. Free to I'm going to be. There with Brendan some friends will probably be raining. Like all. Hell so it'll be good yeah you really need to work. On this today okay. I don't, know what did it start. Griffin with? McDonald's? Or where, did this This, whole thing start I think that's my my. Sour. Mood today started with our visit to the apple store that sells hamburgers now Pretty sober for that. Actually, I, was, in, a bad mood before then right and. I think I know what. Was it because I. Was a little late oh no no no didn't have anything to do with you don't do that to. Yourself Yes there's two minutes late Happening. In those two minutes Thirty seconds pass the time we're supposed to, me and John calls me I'm like a graph, looks, at me and goes hey. She's only, two minutes late I mean come, on, relax and I'm like no. I'm not upset at all I just thought I'd let. Her know where we were so I didn't answer.

Bernard Hermann Griffin Ravenna Kane Hermann his John Brendan McDonald two minutes Thirty seconds
"bernard hermann" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"You're going to find the some that don't even glorified in that what's the american psycho affect you know it's a legitimately dangerous film john hinckley famously credited it was did what he did for jodie foster and i think it's thorny issue in terms of like how much responsibility filmmakers have for the impact that has on society i tend to favor the artist in cases like this but they're like almost trump's chris from filmmaking for awhile right like the feeling responsible yeah well i mean that's the thing that's been word seductive the words adoptive applies of the sense that like you've got that bernard hermann scores as a kind of a romantic quality to at times dark but present but i do think the film is much as maybe we don't know who travis's travis scary or obviously dangerous and unhinged the film really captures profound way a certain mode of alienating of urban alienate of male ilya nation you get palpable sense of how much he's hurting and i think that people menace 'specially young men especially me when i was when i was younger responded to that aspect of the film i've never i've never even gotten into fistfights by life i i'm not i'm anon violent person but the feeling of being apart from the rest of society of not understanding women being rejected all of these feelings are captured an such pablo away in the film that you feel it you know and so so the film does maintain that kind of sense of danger in that it remains so yeah i mean sometimes i can see how one would look a little bit of scans at people who like taxi driver too much it's not about liking taxi driver i think it's about like idolizing or celebrating elevating travis pickles or specifically as a character you know it's like the american psycho effect it's not about liking the movie it's about the extent to which she identify with that character and identifying with.

john hinckley travis pickles jodie foster bernard hermann
"bernard hermann" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Suggestions that came through anything about a heavy mood as an actor guy who has played some of the toughest and darkest roles where a lot of the action going on you know is up in their head right taxi driver with like robert de niro and this is one of those e it's kind of like what we talked a little bit about the star wars the characters that are in it you know there's a there's a before that moment in time and then there's an after and there there never really thought of the same after that and for robert deniro he's been so pigeonholed into wonderful way right for his work in godfather godfather to and all that kind of stuff so but for for taxi driver it is one of those movies that is as far as quotes and all those kind of things it's it's as famous as it gets very quotable as ever when it comes to denise talking to me blade talking i am talking directly to you the other thing is it's one of scorsese's finest works but i think we go back to little bit of baby driver our discussion about abraham music is so important you know bernard hermann his score for that movie is haunting and it's gripping and it really puts you in every scene when you're watching taxi drivers so now a lot of people have seen taxi driver and we're talking about a movie that you know i can probably six yeah you bring ten people in here and eight out of ten of them have seen it what i would tell all eight of those people is go back and watch it and pay extra attention to the music in the film and much like when we discussed baby driver i think a lot of people don't pay enough attention to all of these elements that sometimes make a movie special when they want to watch it so i i'm assigning a little bit of homework i do this on occasion when i'm with your audience they say go back and watch something you've seen before but this time here's something to pay extra special attention to and bernard hermann score is what i want people to pay you look at it everything from the actors that we've mentioned that is.

robert deniro scorsese denise abraham bernard hermann
"bernard hermann" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Filmspotting

"And it makes a noise and deniro here's it and he's onto them that's all you needed was to hear that one little sounds just like a quiet place in deniro's of the extra torrential and they managed to get out of there so heat i think man probably paying a little bit of omayad they're alluding to reveal and part of that interview michael we've talked about composers a little bit here and that instinct whether to use music or not but in that interview director mentions that his composer said i'm going to score this i'm gonna give you a score and he says i don't want any sound i don't need to music for and he goes no i'm going to do it to save you just just to give you a backup because i don't think it's probably going to work and then they screened it with the music and without and the composer said no music bad music don't use the music go with the version with and the opposite thing happened when bernard hermann and hitchcock we're working on psycho because hitchcock said this is needs to be quite and it was a different kind of of stark ineffective but then they play that music and yeah hitchcock was like couldn't have been more wrong our our top five quiet scenes we'd love to hear your picks you can email us feedback film spotting dot net michael any honorable mentions and the others that haven't come up well the first one that comes to mind because i'd or the film and i love i love this is just a scene voice churches in the blackstone carol beller snicking seventy nine film when kelly reno as the young stranded boys on the deserted island with the with the arabian horse from walter farley's book and it's it's a long sequence where they simply have to get to know each other in this difficult circumstances and the boys trying to figure out a way to communicate and befriend the horse and eventually comes on him trying to feed them and then successfully feeding them and then writing them and that film is just two or three minutes like i've never seen and it it was the work of a truly free filmmaker whose came out of documentaries and they were shooting on the island.

deniro michael bernard hermann hitchcock kelly reno walter farley director three minutes
"bernard hermann" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"bernard hermann" Discussed on Filmspotting

"No i love these films i love almost all these bergman films but i just decided there's not a single test to turn sweden traumatized you know in your make up one final bit of setup here a great scene the gets at something you talked about when we were reviewing a quiet place that's a film that you said yes relative to a lot of other films it's a quiet movie but to say it's quiet is a little bit misleading because there are a lot of jump scares there are a lot of loud noises in the score is pretty prominent something like the miller's crossing danny boy seen that we talked about during our real dialogue road dialogue the danny boy music obviously machine our cities you got so much noise there but it is a scene that's dialogue free so probably eligible for lists like this and i certainly did consider it but didn't actually include it so with all that said we're going to jump in your number five quiet scene okay north by northwest i'm starting very famous okay the crop duster scene this is the scene we're cary grant has been told to meet his you know this mysterious operative george kaplan who he's been mistaken for out somewhere two and a half hours outside chicago in a cornfield in the middle of nowhere in indiana of course it's actually near fresno california but so be it so this scene which is really epic in length because it's like seven eight minutes has very little dialogue and has no music by bernard hermann whose music you tend to notice when it's there it doesn't have any music from him until the very end of the scene when the plane actually crashes into the oil truck but for most of that picture it's a fascinating contrast to the entire rest of the story in the swirl of improbable craziness that hitchcock and hers lehman the screenwriter of cooking force and i just love the way it does things visually that really bring out the lack of conventional sound and music and that have my favorite shot and that whole crop duster scene before the plane actually osa is cary grant on one side of highway forty one and malcolm attleboro playing you know this this farmer with five lines.

miller george kaplan chicago indiana california bernard hermann hitchcock lehman bergman sweden fresno malcolm attleboro seven eight minutes