35 Burst results for "Bernadette"

Carol Burnett Went Into a Closet Chinless and Emerged 'Determined'

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Carol Burnett Went Into a Closet Chinless and Emerged 'Determined'

"You and Jodi had dental surgery at the same time. Not the same time. I had my jaw done. Yeah. Okay. It was broken in two places. Yeah. I still have wires back here. They took out part of my bone here and lifted. Because wait, your mom had an overbite, and you had an underbite. No, I had a, yeah, my teeth met. And then mom had a slight weaker chin. Yeah, I had a weaker chin. Jodi got that, and so I went to the oral surgeon and I asked him about I said, but I don't want to go through what? He said, don't have to. Just kind of cut in here and pulled it out three millimeters. Wow. Is all. You know, so I just wanted to feel The Rain. You know, on my chin without having to look up. The awning. So now, we had done the easy street number. Before, and we'd wrap Annie and I got the operation. Procedure done. And now the easy street number when we first did it was overkill. It was 400 dancers in it. And in the street with a monkey grinder and it was just too much. And Bernadette Peters and Tim Curry and I said, this is very good, but you know, it should be just the three villains in the orphanage doing the number. So now I had the procedure, and I get a call from the producer, like a month later, saying, we're going to reshoot. The easy street number, and so bernadette is coming in from New York and Tim from England, and I was in white at the time. So we all went and I said to I said to the producer over the phone, I said, I have a chin now. And he said, what? And I explained it to him. And he said, oh, with all that miss hannigan drag, nobody's gonna know, you know, right. So okay, I just thought I'd tell you. So I flew in. Now we're in the easy street. We're in the office of miss hannigan. Right. John Huston says all right. And he said, I think what I'll do, oh, because ray stark said, you know, it won't be pictured a picture. It'll just be that scene. And nobody's going to notice with all that miss hannigan drag, so. Okay. So now we're in the hurt office. Bernadette Tim and I and mister Houston says, I think what our water do. Is take it from when Carol went into the closet to find Annie's locket. We'll pick it up from when she comes out of the closet. Pictured a picture at all. Yeah. I said, mister Hughes. Call me John, dear. John. Two months ago, when I ran into the closet, I didn't have a chin. Now I'm out of the closet. Right. Right. Thought for a minute and he said, well, dear. Just come out looking determined.

Jodi Bernadette Peters Tim Curry Annie Hannigan Miss Hannigan Ray Stark Bernadette Bernadette Tim John Huston TIM England New York Mister Hughes Houston Carol John
Motown songwriter-producer Lamont Dozier dead at 81

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Motown songwriter-producer Lamont Dozier dead at 81

"Motown songwriter Lamont ozier of the team Holland Dozier Holland has died at the age of 81 I'm marchesa a letter with the latest So many classic Motown hits were written by Lamont ozier and Eddie and Brian Holland Here's Dozier in the 2009 AP interview listing the hits he wrote just for the supremes Where did I love go baby love stop in the name of love reflections you can't hurry love love is here now you're gone I hear symphony Whenever I'm with you there are other hits include heat wave reach out I'll be there and how sweet it is to be loved by you Does your sugar pie honey bunch because his grandfather called women that bernadette was inspired because Holland Dozier and Holland each had trouble with women with that name

Lamont Ozier Holland Dozier Holland Brian Holland Marchesa Dozier Eddie AP Holland Dozier Bernadette Holland
Arizona AG Mark Brnovich: What We Can Do About Signature Verification

The Dan Bongino Show

01:48 min | 6 months ago

Arizona AG Mark Brnovich: What We Can Do About Signature Verification

"What can we do about that I mean I know in Florida I just requested my mail in ballot today You have to put your driver's license number or the last four digits of your social It's not perfect but it's another obstacle to fraud Well that do you hit the nail that had to end There are really good I love the pawn stars analogy And it's true It's true But there are things that we can do And you mentioned having the drivers like the number on there You could end up having to have your ballot notarized You could end up having to have a witness like you have to do for a will likely to have to have someone like cosign it So there are additional and if people have even suggested maybe having like a thumbprint on it doing your fingerprints I mean and I'm not saying any one of those necessarily are perfect but the key is there are different ways that different states can enact measures to ensure to provide that extra layer of security to make sure that we know that whoever is filling out that ballot where we're signing that ballot it's that person And let me just add one thing When I was just talking about that bernadette DLC case I already get Supreme Court One of my great moments is that it was a gang prosecutor the federal prosecutor but as they litigator was during the argument we had this in our briefs and it came during the argument that in 2004 there was a bipartisan presidential commission The co author of that report said the greatest threat to election integrity in the United States was ballot harvesting in third parties handling ballots Yes I always ask people do you know who said that And it was the worst president in U.S. history until Joe Biden came along Yes James Earl Carter said that So even the Democrats recognize 15 20 years ago how important it was to have election integrity measures especially when it came to mail in ballots

Bernadette Dlc Florida Supreme Court James Earl Carter United States Joe Biden
David Simon and Nina Noble Are an HBO Production Powerhouse

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:30 min | 6 months ago

David Simon and Nina Noble Are an HBO Production Powerhouse

"In 1998, HBO aired its first big scale miniseries from the earth to the moon. It was originally budgeted and roughly $40 million, but the network followed Tom Hanks passion and wound up spending more than 60 million. Band of brothers, the Pacific, The Sopranos, and many other HBO projects would be beyond costly as well. But David Simon's HBO shows have proceeded down a different financial path. In large part, due to the acumen of his right hand, executive producer, Nina noble. Saunter down the halls of HBO, talk with their production experts, and you're bound to hear the word trust a lot. Trust is a vital ingredient for any network, but particularly so in HBO, where creators and producers are made to feel largely empowered to bring their visions to the screen without being micromanaged. While there is obvious financial supervision, the network wants to be in business with partners who are financially responsible and not spending their days desperately trying to exact more funds. Nina noble doesn't play such games. She has been working at HBO alongside David Simon for more than 20 years, and is part of an MVP triumphant of female powerhouse executive producers at the network, which includes Eileen landress of Sopranos fame and bernadette caulfield, who operated his field marshal on Game of Thrones. Think of all three women as CEOs of these shows, not in the writer's room, but often everywhere else. Noble is known for being a woman of her word and a complex problem solver. You can say she's in the solutions business, and that makes television life infinitely more agreeable for David Simon.

HBO Nina Noble David Simon Tom Hanks Eileen Landress Sopranos Fame Bernadette Caulfield Noble
"bernadette" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:56 min | 8 months ago

"bernadette" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"As bernadette begging Stein's documentary reminds us her desire to be a conductor was met by discouragement from prominent people in music and her 2007 appointment to head the Baltimore symphony orchestra was controversial as well as ceiling shattering Marina also who we are proud to say is also a regular on this program joins us Now my ASTRO thanks so much for being back with us Oh it's great to be here Scott I've missed you Well we've missed you too So good to be with you First what's it like to see your life up there as a documentary My takeaway is that it really is my story so it feels very authentic and I love the way the music is woven into the documentary and becomes a character Tell us about your parents We're often absent They were performing musicians I believe you say here in this documentary they often had to do four shows a day Do you think that made you grow up faster I do think that it led me to immerse myself more in the world of music because it was a world that was very rich It was a world where I could play and rehearse with other people connect Well forgive me did you have the time or circumstance to be a kid I think I'm still looking for that in life Those moments to be a kid and not have a job and not have a responsibility I felt really that I was born with a job I was born to be a musician Well let me ask you about some episodes that come up I'm thinking of a man whose name you do not mention I believe you call him just a tall German guy for whom you auditioned at Juilliard He said.

Baltimore symphony orchestra bernadette Stein Marina Scott
"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"Bulldozing <hes> your way to the world of vineyards and wine. Yeah what would your message back to those of us in western washington. Be about what this world is like out here. I think it's just so different than what i thought it was growing up. You know i was like well. There's nothing over there and then everything. We have not everything. A huge portion of the commodities. We have in western. Washington comes from eastern washington. I don't think i realized that growing up. I don't think i knew about it. You know even as a young adult. I i didn't really realize it so i just. There is so much more to this world to side of the state. Then i what we know about on the west side or what is shown when i say ceo now when i say i'm from washington state people always like oh seattle and i'm like okay. Three <hes> east Yeah there's just so much more out here than i think anybody could ever realize unless they really came out here and really took a look at all the different commodity crops out here. I mean we have the world's largest Like plantings of hops. So i mean the world's i think we're i'm pretty sure predator or even bigger than Germany now so it's just you know the we have we produced some impressive crops out here and just to not really know about that. Growing up on the west side is is kind of mind-blowing amaze me a little sad But really grateful that i-. I landed here and i kind of figured my way out to be here and to actually appreciate it. So and what about like how farming works to for people in western washington like there's a lot of misunderstandings and there's you know talked about a lot from both sides like there's this big disconnect between farmers and eaters and people who live in cities and eat the food that farmers produce and you know people in the city wants to know more but how do they. How do they actually get on a farm and see all that stuff. What's your message to them. Like wh- coming from that world to this learned I think you know. I think social media is really Can be a really useful to all so if you find of farmer you find a crop or grow where somebody that interest you on social media like now you have this opportunity. You could reach out to them. And it's very rarely. Will there'd be a farmer who is like add on a talk to you. I don't i don't want to tell you about my story or what. It is because farmers and the majority of the the farmers out here our families are people some of the big farmers out here still. You know they'll still be family owned and operated for generations. But they're now they're huge but they're still a family at the core of that you know where people are. i mean. some of us are city people that made it out here and stayed so. I think if you reach out if you explore a little if you get out of your own comfort zone just a little you know. It's there's really not going to be anybody that shuts the door in your face if if somebody does then just turn around and try again. There's gonna be somebody who wants to talk to you so badly and just to show this side of the state and this this little bit of the world so so how soon do we get to come out and visit you. I think we need. We need to have a follow up once your vineyard manager and on okay well as i said i'm a grad student going for am not yet appeased candidate hopefully in november. I'll be a candidate and then that will give me like two and a half years left of school which seems like a really long time but when you've been in school this long it seems like a really short amount. It's so yeah.

washington seattle Washington Germany
"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"Yeah and working with one crop. That's more of a fumigation replacements. so it's a salon asia's crop. It's called lee tomato tomato. He is kind of tomato. If us spiky tomio and a tomato and weirdly pie cherry had a baby. Yeah eat them you can. They're not really good but people like make pies out of them which 'cause they kinda taste like a pie cherry so but you grow you grow those in the ground because of what they do to the bugs in the dirt. So that's like my fumigation replacement crop. So i'm working with that To see if it can replace the fumigation chemicals that are currently the standard for reducing codes in replant pre plant vineyards scenarios. So yeah so. They have like a certain route exit. That calls it causes flash lash hatching and root nematodes and then they're a non for them so they can't actually feed on those routes so we've seen after you know a season of observing data collection. We've seen some really Encouraging results that and that wasn't using chemicals. I was using a plant. You know and they've done research on this In potato for pale system. Golden cyst nematode. So yeah. it's just like okay. So i using new technology. We're not creating anything. New is just kind of expanding that scene does it work on another pest it's similar you know it's another soil boat soil borne plant parasitic nematode. Now can we take this research. That's been done in potato and apply it to grapes and so now after grapes. Maybe it can be used in another crop after that. So yeah stuff like that is really cool and it's really encouraging to get good results. So yeah that's a fun project to work on and really cool to see the potential at has. What does your family think. Oh this yeah well. I like i said i'm first generation students so Education was never like a priority for my family so at first it was kind of ood. Is anything going to come from this. Now there's a lot more support and intrigue and interest because it is wanted so applied. I think my family thought of education as more traditional. Like you're in school for four years and then you sit at a desk for the rest of your life. This is the opposite of man. I'm in school for like eight years now and hopefully won't be at the rest of my life But yeah there. I mean it's so crazy you my family is..

lee tomato asia
"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"And i really care about the research i'm doing and you know these the systems and everything. I'm working with the apply to agriculture. As a whole not just viticulture specifically like my research is medical viticulture specifically but the the stuff i'm working with you know it could go into other systems too so i stayed for a phd. And i'm planning to be a vineyard manager with hd and so yeah dr gonyea someday but Yeah i just wanna farm. Great wine grapes in washington state. Sound yeah what are you gonna find a vineyard. That's in need of a manager. You have visions of starting your own. I don't. I've never really wanted to start my own I don't know why that's just never been something. I've aspired to I i want to manage the. I want to be the vineyard manager for someone else. I think the business aspect of things kind of scary for me a little team so i would rather just focus solely on the growing instead of all the other things that go along with it Well not that go along with it but the other side of things So yeah i have worked in. I've kind of like bull dozed. My way into the industry like just like forced my way into some internships and then you know i still spend a few hours here and there working with vineyard i worked at a few years ago because i just don't leave and i just kind of like. Hey i'm here So find something for me to do so yeah. I've worked several places in a short amount of time and i have really good relationships with a lot of growers because i am curious i work hard and i care about this industry a lot. So yeah what what is it like. What is it like working with grape growers. Whoa what kind of people are they. I mean very salt of the you know people in general. There's just this community. I really love the industry love. Because i feel like everybody. Is there with a helping hand. You know it's farming. Even you know something with a glamorous product like wine farming is still hard. Farming is still a struggle. And it's very few and far between refined somebody who isn't willing to help out so i really love the community of people that just support each other and kind of lift each other up so by is something i loved. Nasa reminiscent of camaraderie and the marine corps. So yeah that's a huge attraction for me is. I just loved the community here and i. I think it's so cool to see somebody grohl the same grapes totally different from somebody else and then it comes out as a as a amazing product that is can be different vintage to vintage and site to site and i just think it's really cool to see if you care about it if you're passionate about it the product that can come from it so yeah what do they think of what you're doing though. Are they like New ways of doing things. I don't know or they you know our growers wine grape growers here in washington state open to that kind of like think outside the box stuff so far gotten really good reception from the research. I'm doing or to research. I'm new You know people are interested. In because minus. Oh apply you know. It's not like a super expensive equipment man or crazy Technologies we're gonna bring in retrofit of in your and all these things like minus like okay. Well you're assist. This is something that is meant to help the system. You have in place So i've had really good feedback and response from growers I've had people ask me a lot of questions about it And like some of this isn't new is just using technology techniques that we already have and kind of fine-tune them you know like okay. We know that there is some potential with bio fuming against green manure. But do we know like how it works..

dr gonyea washington marine corps Nasa
"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"Now i can look them through like ten times twenty times when i'm like okay. Wait i got a check this out a little bit more. I can crank it up to forty x. But i'm not looking at anything crazy here. You know it's if i break it. I will probably get in trouble. But i'm not. It's not going to be the end of my grad school career. If i praise this electron working. Yeah so yeah so. I look through microscope. Say like get a soil sample through a process down to About ten mils ten milliliters. And then i take one mil from that. And then i look at that under a microscope. And then we just use the multiplication factor. And if you're okay. This is how many plant parasitic nematodes. You have in two hundred and fifty grams of soil. I'm and we can multiply that out to entire vineyard or yeah area. That's under pressure that we think is negative pressure. We can kind of evaluate it and see. Okay what are the actual population levels. They're sort of these folks. Look like what they look like little worms. I mean they yeah. They're microscopic my spiel. When i go into presentations is okay. Never toda's microscopic roundworm and soil wa. So they look like little worms and the roots. Or i guess some of them do the plant parasitic months. They are the root not tells the one i'm working with they. Those specific ones. I'm working with bacon. Move through the soil when they're juveniles and they're kinda like poking and prodding around the roots until they find one that they like and then they establish a feeding sites and they established reproduction site actually in the cells of the root themselves. So i mean you think of how tiny root hairs and fine root tips are and then something actually has to get into the cells of those so they are microscopic. But they're not almost invisible to tell. Yeah so then again. They're messing with my wine. So yeah so gear about them. Yeah so talk about what these are. Wine grapes yep right behind us tells about what these are chardonnay. So this is our for my the lab. I'm part of the lab. I work in here w Prosser iraq I work for dr michele. Moyer see the washington state. Viticulture extension specialist. She's like one of one person's in the whole state..

vineyard bacon dr michele Moyer iraq washington
"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"Because i am i'm getting a degree in horticulture not soil science so i stayed dirt more than i probably should The ice days people all the time. Yeah i'm in the dirt more than actually in the.

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"And this is documenting. My journey's all over washington state to get to know the real people behind our food here in washington. You aren't a farmer like you're a student and researcher right correct but you're still kind of armor. Yeah absolutely that about nails it. So what do you do well. I am a graduate student at washington state university. I am currently on the prosser campus. They irradiated agriculture research extension center And i'll spend my duration of my grad school life out here So i am kind of the behind the scenes for Improving or coming up with different ideas that farmers can use hopefully in the very near future. So i sometimes we drive tractors. Still sometimes i. We'd walk way more than i should. I work with a machine that was built in like the forties that used to be an potato research. And now i'm working on in grapevines So yeah all of my research is. My studies is all geared towards kind of creating new or different or Just different techniques for farmers to use in the near future and my focus is all in white grape systems so like what kind of things are you researching. Yeah wine grapes So i am in alternative strategies for emma towed management and wine grape systems. That's like my professional title of whatever working out bugs..

prosser campus washington washington state university
"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"Make sure that you are taking care of again. Mana insurance group dot com. Check them out and thank them for sponsoring this. Podcast also dairy farmers of washington. Generously supporting this podcast. The real food real people podcast And they are all about what we're all about sharing the real stories of the food and the people behind the food here in washington state particularly of course dairy farms dairy dot org is their website. You should check it out and if you haven't yet i've been talking about this for a long time. Check their virtual farm tour. I know a lot of work win in that to capture the real essence of what life is like on a washington state dairy farm. What the farmers think do how they manage their animal's how they produce milk. How they're sustainable. And you see it up close and personal in their virtual farm tour again at wa dairy dot org and then finally don't forget that we live here in washington in the pacific northwest. We live in earthquake country. And we hear about you know some day. When could it be could be Today tomorrow next week next year we don't know the big one though could be coming in there. Lots of smaller earthquakes all the time here. Are you prepared. Do know what you would do in. The event of an earthquake will coming up. This week is the great washington. Shakeout shakeout dot org slash washington. Is the website. Go check it out and find out what you're supposed to do. There's a lot to it. The first thing the most important thing you need to remember is drop cover and hold on used to be dropping cover but that hold on part is important to if you're under something to protect yourself because in the event of an earthquake scary stuff but things will be moving around things we've falling and you need to hang on as you drop and cover under under something to protect you from any falling debris there's so much more though to be prepared for an earthquake here in washington again go to the great washington shakeout page at shakeout dot org slash washington and be prepared for the big drill. That's coming up again this week on.

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Real Food Real People

"The farmers out here are families people some of the big farmers out here still. You know they'll still be family owned and operated for generations. But they're now they're huge but they're still a family at the core of that you know where people are. i mean. some of us are city people that made it out here and state. This is the real food real people podcasts. Do you know if your family has any farming roots in your background. Bernadette gonyea didn't until she was in prosser learning all about wine grapes and farming and research and science at w. s. u. research station there when she found out she had farming roots in that very community she shares her story. How important it is to her even though she grew up in a totally different life not connected with farming at all and how. She's embraced the farming community. What she's learned about family farms here in washington state and the importance of all of the science and the research that goes into growing wine grapes and continually growing them better and better with better techniques. More and more sustainably all the time. That's what she's focused on. Great conversation again at the w. research station where we talk with bernadette gun yeay in prosser our sponsors here on the podcast are man insurance group. Men insurance group dotcom their website and they are focused on protecting your financial future in a way..

Bernadette gonyea washington bernadette
CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

One Life Radio Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

"Mary holland. One of my favorite people. How you doing today mary. I'm grace could yeah. It's great. We're going to call him a mondays mondays with mary. It's gonna be regular well and there's so much to talk about my goodness let me introduce you for people that maybe are listening for the first time mary holland serves as president and general counsel of children's health defense. She left the faculty of new york university school of law where she surfers seventeen years most recently directing. Its graduate lawyering program. Mary received her master of arts and juris doctorate degrees from columbia university and her undergraduate degree from harvard. She has worked in international public and private law and mary is the co author a vaccine epidemic and the hp vaccine on trial seeking justice for a generation betrayed. You can find mary at children's health. Defense dot org. That's children's health. Defense dot org. We have a lot to cover today with our children's health defense. Update okay so there were an additional twenty seven thousand reported injuries from the covert vaccine in just one week so from last week to this week. So what kinds of what. Kind of injuries. Mary are being reported. And what about deaths bernadette all kinds of injuries are being reported and death the total deaths so far that have been reported and we know that's really a small faction of what the real number probably is over thirteen thousand and the number of total injuries. That have been reported or over six hundred thousand. I don't think this would be possible. Except for the fact that the government and the industry and the healthcare profession all have liability protection under emergency use authorization status It's really distressing thirty. Two percent of those deaths were within forty eight hours of having developed symptoms after the shot. So i it's it's extremely troubling bernadette It's just there. Were over five hundred fifty deaths last

Mary Holland Mary Children's Health Defense New York University School Of Columbia University Harvard HP Bernadette Government
"bernadette" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Now right it's everywhere. Yes even in the air. There was a study out of brazil. That founded in nanoparticles in the air over the cultural fields. Where it's us but even in the city where there wasn't any agriculture they found life is in the nanoparticle in the air which is very disturbing because you have to breathe. You can't breathe. You can buy certified organic food and really greatly reduce your exposure. And i very much recommend people do that. I have gotten so much email from people. Who've said you know i i saw your stuff. I change to an organic diet. And i healed you. Know all these leases that people are coping with that are going away once they adopt a certified mechanic diet and it's remarkable. How many diseases are going up dramatically. We know that we have a healthcare crisis in this country. Healthcare costs out of sight. So many people are sick with various autoimmune diseases. And in my book. I explained liver disease autoimmune disease reproductive issues all these problems immune system disruption. I haven't on each of those things it's it's remarkable. And i explain exactly how i think this is happening with glyphosate. It is an amazing chemical. Very subtle and extremely. Talkative accumulates senior tissues and it causes additional damage over time as you accumulated very very difficult to get it out once it's in Yeah and i Read something yesterday out of cambridge university. That said that organic food is up to sixty nine percent higher in antioxidants than conventional food. And at the root of that as you as we're talking about is this You know the weed killer glyphosate and it's it is it's destroying our health and the environment and our food I was gonna say. I'm going to go to break. Is there anything you want to say about what i said. I know you you basically did. But it was just say that the that these foods that are being exposed to life is going to have an impact on their ability to produce molecules that they use to protect themselves and those those one when she was also protect us. These are polyphenyls and five annoys interpret. Noise these are very important. Nutrients that are found in plants that are that the past seat disrupts actually is needed to make those nutrients. Well you were talking about beasts. I i read something not recently so i'm having trouble recalling it but it was something just astounding like if the b.'s are destroyed. I think it's something like sixty percent of our food that we that we love will no longer be is too and i was shocked. I had no idea it was that big an impact. I know almonds. But i really didn't realize so. Many foods depend upon the bees. It's going to be really awful if we just lose all of these food choices because of the bees going away well talking about is the first step right and making people aware giving them the knowledge so that they can make good choices and stand up to this. I might add. We're going to go for a quick break. More coming up with dr stephanie son. If she is the author of the book toxic legacy we will be right back. You're listening to one life. Radio want to advertise on one life. Radio send us an email info at one life. Radio dot com. It's back to school time. And that means that you need to boost your immune defences with organic by the immune support. Bundle is a double pack of protection for your hardworking immune system. It's a holistic approach to wellness combining daily support with extra defenses. When you need them. Most often ganic vitamin cs zinc and adapted genyk superfoods. Give a nate immunity a helping hand for a limited time. Your immune support bundled will include an extra box of immunity a forty dollar value at no charge. That way you and your family can feel safer get yours by going to our gamified dot com. That's organic dot com ten years of positively on your radio this is one life radio Right everyone welcome back to one life. Radio this is bernadette with junior in the mix broadcasting live from dallas texas on iheart media as well as in southern california on. Abc news talk. We are continuing with dr stephanie. Saaf she is a senior research scientist at. Mit's computer science and artificial intelligence laboratory. She has five degrees from mit. I can't even believe that. Dr sun up. You have to be like the most intelligent human on the planet serious with all that education. Were you always that way when you work kid. Did you know when you were little that you were just like. I just can't even imagine having that brain. What what you would must have been like as a child and do it correct to you. There's only four degrees. So i thought that was fun. If you count the minor in nutrition. I guess we can call that the fifth one. So that's yes brain brainiac. Oh my life. I loved to read and i read. You know i read Rachel carson's book. When i when it first came out it was something like twelve years old and i just love to read and i really was kind of a nerdy brainiac type kid wonderful well and i really feel it's a A a special thing. That i have that i love to read and it's still true to this day and i read many articles and i love. Biology is so fascinating. And i hope that that comes through in my book because it does you can get bitten by the bug of biology. It can be a very gratifying experience to make it almost be a hobby for you to learn about biology about metabolism about immune system. These things are so fascinating. And we're really. The the research is very exciting right now. Because i think we're at the cusp of of a breakthrough at the highest level in the ideas of how how metabolism works and how chemicals disrupted. I think it's a very exciting time in biology right now absolutely and you know you you up. The book by rachel carson's silent spring. Y was that book so important just like yours. why was it so important. It was really very similar. I think there's quite a bit parallels there because ddat was pervasive in the environment. They thought it was great. It was controlling the mosquitoes. The mosquitoes were causing me. Malaria you know disease and so it was. It was felt that it was a great boon to help us stay well and it took a long long time to notice that it was actually causing a lot of damage and she worked. Mostly about the The environment you know 'cause it was violence. Spring was the name of the book. And that was the point was birger dying and and and she went from there and It was a wakeup call. Just like with glyphosate. Because we've become so comfortable with this chemical this is roundup. I'm sure people know roundup and many people don't know the word life is but that's the active ingredient in round up and you know they use it now. Not only on The gmo crops but also non gmo crops. If people think if i buy non gmo that safe but that's not true at all there's actually at highest levels are showing up in non gmo crops. That are sprayed right before harvest. They use it as a desperate purposely. Kill the crop. Make it go to see increase the yield because you synchronizes. He'll see across all the different parts of the crops. 'cause they can go go to see it at different times. If there's a there's a they go right you know at different times if it's not synchronized by a chemical like life is eight. So they really think it's great and since they think it's perfectly safe for humans they don't care but showing up at very high concentrations and we and oats and barley and garbanzo beans and chickpeas are all non gmo crops. That are being sprayed. Right before sugarcane and i'm sure you're familiar with the book a genetic roulette and the he's been on the show actually in his name escapes me right now. He's been on the show. Yes jeffrey smith and it was interesting in that book. It said that It it it. It did a study or talked about this research that was done on on fields of genetically modified corn and just a regular corn. However you want this healthy cornyn unhealthy corn and how the cows would not eat the gmo. Corn it's like. They knew they knew that it wasn't it wasn't good. That's something about it was toxic. I heard that beer bears would go all the way across. Gmo corn crop. Go all the way through the field to get to the non. Gmo going right right. You know and it's because animals. I think they're just more in tune with.

dr stephanie liver disease autoimmune disea ganic vitamin Saaf autoimmune diseases Dr sun rachel carson Mit cambridge university brazil bernadette Abc news birger southern california dallas
AI Search Personalization - Bernadette Nixon CEO of Algolia the Unicorn Search and AI Company - Voicebot Podcast Ep 221 - burst 06

The Voicebot Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

AI Search Personalization - Bernadette Nixon CEO of Algolia the Unicorn Search and AI Company - Voicebot Podcast Ep 221 - burst 06

"Personalization obviously is one of the big macro trends that we've seen over the last two decades really but predominantly over the last decade. Maybe the biggest driver of some of the largest businesses. We have out there. So what you're talking about is a little bit different than what i think. A lotta people initially come to a search conversation thinking about they start thinking about. Oh it's there's a search and there's an optimal answer right so it's it's a it's a binary or it's deterministic type of solution but it might be true on a one to one basis but it's not a true on a one to many basis because the right answer for one shopper might be different from another shopper and so maybe you could break that down a little bit in terms of personalization. So how does your search enable this dynamic response that provides a better personalized response to result for the user. Sure and i'll start at the highest level with with the vision that we have A lot of that vision is in place today but we will continue to release products later this year on that journey to to fully realize the vision so our vision is really about Being able to predict what somebody is looking for real time for example in the in the web browsing session that they're in as opposed to based upon the last three months of metrics that you gather on somebody because it's very easy to present you with something if you've collected a lot of data on somebody but if you're coming at it from a cold stott perspective and i'm a first time visitor or i'm an infrequent visitor then how do you know how to to personalize the results for me. It's really hot. And so we do believe that that is the next big bastion that that needs to be cracked in the search arena and sort of the future of said is being able to real time understand them predict what somebody is looking for and then as a result be able to save up at search results better recommendations or a better a better offer to somebody took economist type of situation. So that's one of the main premises that we believe in that. It's it's not just good enough to be able to gather three months of data on me and then be able to present me with something that's nicely tailored and personalized. We have to be much more nimble. We have to be able to do that as i'm walking down the street not. I'm looking for something today because that could be vastly different than what i was looking for three months ago. So that's a big part of our vision strategy And it's it's webby official. Intelligence will come in and it will be very unique in the marketplace when we're able to fully deliver on that vision so if you come back to right now today what a people doing in in the product today. It's also more than just your standard so the personalization. Which is you know what city you you coming from and you know what what. What season is it. I mean that's been the oldest you know level of personalization that's really been consistently done whereas we provide an open transparent Tool that allows you to exactly see. Why did that red dress come up in the fourth position on the search results when you wanted it to be in the first position and we provide you with the insight into exactly what is causing that result to be returned amend as a result you can tweak the results and you can get that readdress in in the number one position as opposed to in the fourth.

Positioning Search AI Retail Personalization Custom
Algolia's API First Model - Bernadette Nixon CEO of Algolia the Unicorn Search and AI Company - Voicebot Podcast Ep 221 - burst 02

The Voicebot Podcast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Algolia's API First Model - Bernadette Nixon CEO of Algolia the Unicorn Search and AI Company - Voicebot Podcast Ep 221 - burst 02

"Lot of different people in the software world that has done things around databases or things like that but it seems to me that like around discovery and surfacing information within within the enterprise. This is an area that you spent a good deal of time in your curb even before i'll go you. Yes that's right. If you in fact if you look at the competitive set in the market in which i'll go competes. They're really sort of two bookends to that competitive set one end of it. You have purpose built sass. Apps typically for one specific use case quite often ecommerce site surge and then at the other end of the spectrum. you've got the open source. Players like elastic solar and they can solve many different types of such Problems indeed as we as al goalie can win neither one of those. But i have experience of both both of those bookends. If you like of competitive set But the way to think about us is sort of in between both of those ads because we have. We give all the flexibility that you get with the open source but yet we are an api. I model which we can get into what that means really means a lotta people bandied that about. I'm actually hosted so fully the sas business model if you like. And that's one of the reasons why i came to. I'll go earlier in. May of last year. Because i truly believed in the positioning of the company having had experience in the such market before we are hearing a lot more about api first businesses. These days it would be useful for you to talk about what what that means in. Why that's a model that we're seeing a lot more of your absolutely. I mean it festival if you think about you know the the old ways of Satisfying problems you either went out. And you bought a big monolith or you built your you built the application from. Scratch yourself on what we're finding. Is that both of those paradigm 's are cracking a little bit right now under the strain the strain created by the need to constantly. Hr eight because the market is moving so fast. I mean take a look at the last twelve months. Kobe didn't start any new trends. It simply spend the ones that were there up if you think about it and so what we're finding is that people are wanting to find a abed away to build and use some building blocks so api's have been described as the picks and shovels of the information age because you can compose your applications using multiple api's but the difference between an api company and a platform that has some api You can interface with it is an api fest. Company really means three things at least while going. I think too many of the other folks out that in the api first economy as well one. It means at flexibility as in you're able to handle a broad set of use cases so in our case that's not just ecommerce such it's Internal search behind the firewall using us as the The search service when you're composing your own internal applications and many other different cases in between so being able to handle a broad set of use cases. That flexibility is one of the tenants of api. I approach the second Is speed so we build speed into our api so that our customers don't have to do that. Performance tuning As they would have to if they were building from scratch. Let's say using open source. And the third which i personally think is probably the most important is the backward compatibility developers want to solve big meaty business problems for the companies. They work for and they wanna move onto the next one. They want to minimize the amount of maintenance that they have to keep up with and so we take that burden on. And we guarantee the backward compatibility of our

Amazon Api First Backward Compatibility Economy Flexibility Performance Tuning Enterprise Search Al Goalie Kobe
"bernadette" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

"Radio. This is Bernadette, with Amanda and Mary Holland. We are broadcasting live from Dallas, Texas on I heard media as well as KM et. In Southern California on ABC News talk for those of you Just now joining us, I'll give a quick introduction. Mary Holland serves as president and general counsel of Children's health defense. She left the faculty of New York University School of Law where she, sir for 17 years, most recently directing its graduate loitering program on Mary received her master's of arts and jurors, doctorate, degrees from Columbia University and her undergraduate degree. From Harvard. It's always a pleasure to have around the show. We are discussing this week from the Children's health defense, and, um, the defender. We're talking about what's happening this week. So you know, last week I know that you all talked about and reported the side effects of vaccines, Mary. So what are we seeing now that the vaccines have been given to millions of Americans Well as we were just saying, burning that we have this adverse event reporting system that is a government the main government place and so we're seeing a very wide range. We're seeing death. We're seeing a lot of auto immune conditions, but some of the things we're seeing. Um, low platelet counts were seeing what they're calling inflammatory thrombosis Ida Penick events So people get inflammation, and they also their blood. They get blood clots, and then they have very low platelets because they're going toe sort of stop a clock someplace so people and those clots can lead to strokes. They can lead the heart cardiac events. So we're seeing a really wide range. But one of the things that's recently got attention is that women are complaining after they get the vaccine that it's affecting their menstrual cycles and also women who have not been vaccinated but who are coming in contact with people who've been vaccinated are also reporting that they're having problems with their menstrual cycle. Women who Our past, you know in menopause are reporting that they're getting bleeding. Children are reporting that they're getting nosebleeds. If they're near people who've been vaccinated so real things that suggests that it's affecting the immune system. We know the whole point of the vaccines is to affect the immune system. So there's mainstream media has even come in to say Yes, it's quite possible that the vaccines are affecting menstrual cycles. And so they're saying, you know, we need to do more research on this. But you know it is causing inflammation and it's causing blood clots. And, um you know, we're sadly last week we saw deaths in three teenagers 2 15 Year olds and 1 16 year old to died of Heart. Cardiac arrest in one died of a blood clot related things. We've seen women 170 reports so far of miscarriages and premature birth. So you know, these are very, very serious medical interventions. Half the U. S population allegedly has received at least one dose of one of these Over vaccines. I don't know if that's accurate or not, but that's what we're being told that over 110 million doses have already been sorry over 222 million doses have been administered. That's what we're being told. I have a friend who vaccinated herself got two doses, But yet she will not vaccinate her daughter. I feel the same way. I haven't gotten the vaccine and nor will I, But I have a 16 year old daughter who says Mom, I want to get the vaccine. I feel like she's being heavily influenced by social media and bully and I told her over my dead body is the only way you're gonna get it on D. I just think that it's ah It's so important that we talk about these things need to talk about it, and I think we have to show people the evidence right When we have to explain to people there's never been a vaccine that's been put on the market with his little testing. Is this ever the messenger RNA technology is brand new. It was on Lee used for people with cancer. That's a very different calculus than healthy teenager. We know that there's zero liability, no people if God forbid, they developed some bad health. Listen, There's no way they're going to be able to prove that it's related to the vaccine right now, and the compensation program is. It's a very tragic joke. It's awful, You know, reproduction. We have no idea who said they never tested it for that. So you know, and we do have very credible scientists like Michael. You didn't who worked for 17 years as a chief scientist advisor. Advising people that it would be unwise to give this to women of reproductive age because there is a protein that in these vaccines that it's similar to a protein and human placenta, so we just it's I just Nobody would sign up for an experiment right or very few people unless they were getting paid. A lot of money would take that risk to go on, be a subject in a clinical trial on something that it really never been tested adequately, even on animals, And yet people are being bullied. And people imagine that these vaccines must be safe and effective and well tested, and it's understandable why they would think that because it is so shocking. What's actually happening? It's been completely experimental Injection is being pushed on the global population. Yeah, and by our own president. I mean, we have to question that. Oh, I agree with that. I mean, this is being pushed, but it's not just our president. It's being pushed by virtually every government leader in the world. And the few that have spoken out against this candidly. A lot of them have come under pretty severe attack and the living have died. So I mean, it's It's a very strange situation world. We've never seen anything like this. Where every country in the world virtually is on the same page. I mean, it's bizarre anted to be really pushing people to take an experimental medical intervention, which is what this is. Yeah, well, the people that I do that I know that do want to speak up about it are too afraid to. And so you know, there's like this underground. This undercurrent. Ah, fear that people are even afraid to question it. You know, because they don't want to be called out like Oh, What do you a conspiracy theorist? I mean, how could you not So many people.

Amanda Mary Holland Mary Michael Bernadette 17 years Southern California 2 170 reports Columbia University two doses New York University School of last week Ida Penick ABC News Dallas, Texas over 110 million doses this week over 222 million doses Lee
"bernadette" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on WGN Radio

"T shirt. Tell me how mild that is. Bernadette. Right, Bernadette. And what did you say? Your middle name is Theresa? That's a lot of syllables. Yep. Well, you know, good Catholic girl. Thanks for the phone call. You have a good day. My little Bernadette Rose is our granddaughter. I haven't seen her in about a week, even though they don't live that far away. And one of the reasons is you just kind of afraid to go out. Certainly they're not coming over. You know, it just feels perilous. 30 degrees find 20 degrees fine. 15 10. You get to zero and you think that what if I get a flat tire on the way over, We won't die. But it's just a hassle I don't need And so at some point you shut down your travels. Listen, if you are outside today, shovel is spot for your mail, man or woman. The letter carriers think about all the people that are delivering packages. Anyway. If you've got a spot out front that isn't easy for them to access, do them a solid and Go ahead and chip away at that. There are some cars downtown Chicago and I know that while we're getting snow in some of you are not. We've all got a foot of snow on and around us, and there's some cars parked on the street where I live. That aren't getting anywhere any time. Soon. They are complete igloos with blocks of ice on front and back. And now, since the plows and cars have gone through their walled in I don't know what's going to happen to those cars when they try and turn the key on, but Wow, I was in your neighborhood yesterday. I saw a very great Yeah, it's Yeah, it's going to be tough. I have my car was plowed in. For two months in the winter, 1979. We had all that snow. Well, I mean, I didn't see it for two months, right? Honda Civic. I couldn't find it. Well, I'm wondering what it is going to be like when you try and start your cars. We have some jump starting tips. Some should you idle the car for a while. If your battery dies, What should you do? It doesn't help to turn on the lights. What about your tire pressure for every 10 degrees that the temperature drops. How much air pressure do you lose your tires? All of those questions answered this morning when we talked to Steve Phillips, the owner of the Chevrolet dealership of Homewood. He's going to join us.

Steve Phillips Chevrolet Bernadette 30 degrees Theresa 20 degrees two months Bernadette Rose today yesterday Homewood one zero Honda this morning Civic 1979 about a week 15 10 degrees
"bernadette" Discussed on Podcast – Women in Leadership

Podcast – Women in Leadership

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Podcast – Women in Leadership

"<Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It didn't <Speech_Female> make sense to you at the time <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> i arranged <SpeakerChange> for you <Speech_Female> i was. <Speech_Female> I think it was twenty five <Speech_Female> when he got <Speech_Female> my first pension <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> against <Speech_Female> ryback to just <Speech_Female> thinking along <Speech_Female> the long term peace <Speech_Female> so <Silence> pension <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> is a very <Speech_Female> important one and <Speech_Female> the other piece. <Speech_Female> And i had <Speech_Female> to do when i got. <Speech_Female> My first <Speech_Female> mortgage was <Speech_Female> a notebook <Speech_Female> and writing down everything <Speech_Female> that you spend <Speech_Female> money on. <Speech_Female> If you don't know <Speech_Female> what you're spending <Speech_Female> your money on. I <Speech_Female> think that can be quite an eye <Speech_Female> opener to re-live <Speech_Female> have <Speech_Female> much <Speech_Female> you spend on <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> the coffees <Speech_Female> if <Speech_Male> that an awful lot of <Speech_Female> work. I don't think i could <Speech_Female> be disciplined. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But i think <Speech_Female> time every <Speech_Female> so often <Speech_Female> know exactly <Speech_Female> like <Speech_Female> the pension <Speech_Female> and important north <Speech_Female> enrolled going to be <Speech_Male> hopefully have long <Speech_Female> someday <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> long. Good live <Speech_Male> though. He's god yeah <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> finally music. <Speech_Female> I can tell that <Speech_Male> you're into music. I don't know <Speech_Male> why could be something to <Speech_Female> do with that. Musical instrument <Speech_Female> behind you listeners <Speech_Female> can see. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Are you a musical person. <Speech_Female> Yes <Speech_Female> what's <Speech_Female> your go piece <Speech_Female> of music or <Speech_Female> selection <SpeakerChange> of music <Speech_Female> that you like. <Speech_Female> Get broad <Speech_Female> tastes <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> If i need <Speech_Female> a pack probably <Speech_Female> put on <Speech_Female> like the stardust <Speech_Female> something like this <Speech_Female> or <Speech_Female> a teenager <Speech_Female> in the nineteen <Speech_Female> th somewhere or <Speech_Female> pixies <Speech_Female> something with <Speech_Female> big big <Speech_Female> guitars <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> brain <Speech_Female> and brennan. That keeps <Speech_Female> it. Going <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> branch has been a pleasure <Speech_Female> talking to you. Thank <Speech_Male> you so much for doing. The women <Speech_Male> in leadership podcast. <Speech_Male> It's been a pleasure talking <Speech_Male> to you and the <Speech_Male> best of luck with your <Speech_Female> own work <SpeakerChange> in business in <Speech_Female> the community. Ireland's <Speech_Music_Female> thank you very <Speech_Music_Female> much. <Speech_Female> Thanks to bernadette <Speech_Female> feeling there <Speech_Female> of bi tci <Speech_Female> business <Speech_Female> in the community ardent. <Speech_Female> Who is my guest this <Speech_Female> week on this episode <Speech_Female> of the women in leadership. <Speech_Female> Podcast <Speech_Female> plough on <Speech_Female> the best. Bit of advice <Speech_Female> of her this week. <Speech_Female> It does take <Speech_Female> and determination <Speech_Female> to get through. <Speech_Female> And don't we know the <Speech_Music_Female> ask the moments. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Well thanks to you our <Speech_Female> listeners. For your support <Speech_Female> much appreciated <Speech_Female> make sure to follow <Speech_Female> us on apple podcasts. <Speech_Female> Spotify <Speech_Female> or wherever <Speech_Female> you get your podcasts. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You can get in touch with us <Speech_Female> on the website. Women <Speech_Female> in leadership dot <Speech_Female> e or follow <Speech_Female> us on twitter <Speech_Female> ashley leading women <Speech_Female> part <Speech_Female> and we're also on facebook <Speech_Female> and lincoln <Speech_Female> until the <Speech_Female> next time from me <Speech_Female> and jim zeti <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and all of the team here <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on the women in leadership podcast. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Goodbye <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and take care. <Music>

facebook twitter jim zeti nineteen twenty five Spotify apple Ireland bernadette first pension this week first lincoln
"bernadette" Discussed on Podcast – Women in Leadership

Podcast – Women in Leadership

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Podcast – Women in Leadership

"It business in the community ardent bernadette with all over ireland on their sustainability initiatives and believes that conversations in workplaces are being led by consumers. I'm by employees. People very increasingly sensitive to my coffee from my jumper from buying this from..

ireland
Indigenous people fight oil development

Native America Calling

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Indigenous people fight oil development

"This is national native news on tonio. Gonzales which people are seeking to stop development in the coastal plain of the arctic national wildlife refuge in alaska a sacred place foundation of their culture and way of life though seeking to protect the area are concerned about caribou other wildlife and the environment bernadette dementia with which is steering committee. This week in a statement said they'll never stop fighting equal you know. We don't allow anybody to tell us how to live to do this week. In federal court tribal plaintiffs represented by the native american rights fund sought a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to prohibit the trump administration from approving seismic exploration and issuing leases in the coastal plain proposed to begin in january supporters of the sale including politicians seek jobs revenue and energy independence in minnesota indigenous and environmental groups are continuing to demonstrate near the mississippi river in aken county opposing construction of the end bridge line. Three pipeline this week. Nearly two dozen people were arrested. The star tribune reports indigenous and environmental groups have been giving daily updates on social media showing people standing in the way of construction including tree-sitters saying they're protecting the water and the environment they're calling on the state's governor and president elect joe biden to stop line three. The company says replacement of the oil pipeline is in dire need supporters. seek jobs and economic boost. Regulators approve the final permit on december first indigenous and environmental groups and some minnesota tribes are seeking court action as construction is expected to ramp up tribes across the country are continuing to receive cova. Nineteen vaccines this week. Five red lake tribal council members of minnesota volunteered to be the first to get the vaccine on wednesday red lake hospital. Healthcare workers will begin to receive vaccines along with staff and elders at the nursing home. Tribal leaders are working with the hospital. On vaccine plans for tribal citizens as they become available other tribal leaders are also volunteering to be among the first in their communities to receive a covid nineteen vaccine when dina league would chair of the white mountain apache tribe in arizona was vaccinated this week on wednesday. She said she feels fine. Other than a sore arm academic pueblo in new mexico began covid nineteen vaccine shots for healthcare workers. Wednesday the mescalero apache tribe in new mexico. Receive vaccines in the afternoon to vaccinate doctors nurses and other hospital staff president gave aguilar encouraged the community in a video message urging people to stay vigilant in taking precautions as they anticipate to get vaccines for the community in early. Twenty twenty one of the community. We came together. you know. we're not. We're not done yet. But i'm very proud because our numbers show for it. We're we're all doing our part to stay home. Our numbers dropping. You know for a for a few days in october numbers were like twenty a day. I think for this out to summit two a day maybe five you know. I'll be more thankful when he home. Zero tribal health programs. Urban indian organizations are getting the vaccine through the indian health service or states more than three hundred programs are on the ihs cove nineteen distribution list according to the indian health service tribes in alaska are working with the state. The tannen not chiefs conference in fairbanks alerted the community wednesday. The pfizer vaccine arrived and was being put in a freezer to store until ready for distribution.

Bernadette Dementia American Rights Fund Aken County The Star Tribune Minnesota Tonio President Elect Joe Biden Arctic National Wildlife Refug Red Lake Tribal Council Gonzales Red Lake Hospital Dina League Alaska Mississippi River Cova New Mexico White Mountain Aguilar Arizona Fairbanks
The History Of Exorcism

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:58 min | 2 years ago

The History Of Exorcism

"Tony us and carry the show where we don't just report on fringe science spirituality and claims of the paranormal. We take part ourselves. Yup when they make the claims we show up so you don't have to carry poppy and i'm becoming an exorcist me to a and so can you at the international school system bernadette dad too. That's my for everything now. Oh are you willing to give it to bob larsen. I'm willing to rent it to bob larson. Yeah you're welcome bob. Yeah bobo what is it that. Let's see your outing a little bit of a syncopation bad about up. But i'm different. Now you repeat all right. We'll know is asking myself if that was different from what you did. I don't know i anyway. it's beautiful. Thank you and we have taken. The course work to become exercises. We've told you a little bit about it in our previous episodes but now we're in deep dive mode. Yeah man. let's get into the history of exercises so put on your exorcism hat. Your student hat last time we left off at the end of level. One course one. I know big cliffhanger yes so. Let's talk about tanger absolutely. Let's talk about christian and pre christian exorcism. Okay well this is module two of level one apprentice level. Oh okay you're making the sound like a very long journey of the exorcist. They have all these like sort of sub descriptions. When you get in there it's not very easily delineated. Your but yes so. You're talking about macho to within level one to be fair level. One is synonymous with the apprentice level. Correct so there's going to be ten modules. And as i was telling you earlier today all ten modules basically amount to exercise been around a long time. It's not a new thing. I'm bob larsen. Just summed it all up for our show for show. Thank you so much. So they're christian and pre christian extra schism part is about how there were indeed exorcisms before jesus even right before. There were such things as christians. So don't be thinking that exorcism is just this new up start phenomenon or that. Bob invented So he let us know that egypt. Persians canaanites all had x.'s rituals. Yes mostly they were incantations or enchantment. There's always going to be kind of a rough line around exorcism as posession versus exorcism as occurs. That's influencing you or maybe laid upon an object so there's kind of squishy lines around all of this. I wonder if he would acknowledge that. Sometimes people did them for health ailments that we would now just acknowledge our health elements. Yes yes. yeah. I think bob's pretty weird that little bit of god of the gaps where god when used to explain things that we just don't understand yet like lightning for example like when a lot of churches and the late seventeen hundred started installing lightning rods. A lot of people were upset. Like oh well this is going to subvert. The will of god share so then when science steps in and explains that oh actually charged particles in quick energy transfer. And hey look you know you can actually take control of that aspect of weather. Then god stops being used as an explanation right. That's what i mean. When i say god of the gaps oh god gets increasingly small and one's world view if one defines god based on what we don't know the more we know the less god is invoked to explain. They should make that at the. Bottom of the nbc. The more you know you need to invokes to explain what are bypass about about so. While bob didn't used that terminology. I think he realizes yeah. Ok some things now. We do explain with medical science or just an understanding of the natural world and very late in this game hill. Really get into mental health issues. That definitely although i think he'd draw a hardline around anything that happened. During the jesus years everything jesus healed. It was whatever she said it was the bible. Says you're walking on water. You turned water into wine or something else involving water then. Yeah that was legit because the bible is absolutely correct about everything i was gonna say. Is there any area where. Bob is not a scriptural literalist. Oh good question you know. I feel like that is always hard to define. Because some people say they are and then as he listened to them describe their beliefs. But if you look through a certain lens you'll see that at the time they were encoding. They're under yeah virgin actually There's gonna be all kinds of ringing. But i feel for the most part bob pretty literal. Yeah he doesn't have to do a lot of back flipping to defend his literal biblical azam. So one thing. He said that i thought was interesting. Is basically everybody alive. During that time was an exorcist like it was kind of taken for granted. Something anybody could do if there are spirits in this world you talk to the spirits right being and when you live in that world where everything around you is kind of controlled by the whims of the gods and the demons. You have to deal with them and placate them. So you mentioned in ancient babylon you had priests like creating a clay figure of a demon and then smashing it. In hinduism you had demons and demigods. Who were understood to attack living beings in greece. You had the oracle of delphi and they were supposedly possessed to tell the future Andy pointed to other which and shamans and various cultures that have had the equivalent of these beliefs

Bob Larsen Bob Larson BOB Bobo Bernadette Tony Egypt NBC Azam Bible Delphi Greece Andy
Yahweh is the Danger with Ed Burdette

The Bible Says What!?

06:28 min | 2 years ago

Yahweh is the Danger with Ed Burdette

"Today. Special guest is the host of the one year bible. Podcast ed bernadette. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Thanks for coming on things for accepted the invite appreciate you being here man You tell us a little bit about your show. The one year bible podcast. It came out of an idea a few years ago Two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen where. I decided that. I wanted to read through the whole bible and it was something that never done before and so i got one of those one year you read the bible in one year bible's divided up that way and i thought he good way to kind of keep myself going. If my energy and motivation was flagging would be to to try to make streak of it and record these Daily readings and just post them for anyone else might be interested and you know. I'm very thankful. I made it through the whole year and then just realized that. Hey this could be continue to be useful. And so that was Was late two thousand and sixteen when it started Into into two thousand seventeen in the last couple of years. I've added a friday. Devotional know a once a week type thing where we take a little bit of a deeper look into a part of that day's passage that winds up with reading through the bible in a year so So that's you know. That's the backstory to wear that that came from and it's really been a labor of love Ever since that first year you know. I haven't followed on posted the episodes but i haven't followed on with reading through in a year but have been Just really encouraged. I think to to keep going with it. And i've gotten just just Used every so often the a wonderful email from someone saying how it helps them encourage damage. Shine some light on something. That was helpful So yeah that's That's where that podcast came from. That's also i listen to one I think it was one more. Ma more recent ones and the way you read through is it's so fluid and and wonderful honestly. I can't even get through my intro without screw up ten times. I don't know how you're doing. And do do i do i do edit So world or gag or or something That doesn't make the final cut. Well you know. I mean i i understand that i i. There's another guy who does a youtube stuff. Bible says what guy. He doesn't same kind of thing he does a little videos and whatnot with it Did you start off on genesis. Because i know you do three separate different verses Read from three time. that's it yeah so So the the beginning of each year does start out a reading from genesis so delayed the way this particular one year. Bible's divided up. You do a reading from the old testament reading from the new testament a bit of a bit of a song. Maybe a wholesome and some proverbs and you that every day so in In in january you find yourself in genesis working through and then by the end of the year you know in the new testament revelation and Yeah that's how it works through. And they were lots of different plans that were through lots of different ways. And you know pros and cons to I think all of them and so this is just one that worked out well and Yeah but that's that's how it's all set up interesting definitely interesting way of doing it Backing the longtime ago. When when i was a believe i never actually sat down to read the bible and that was definitely one of the things that opened. My eyes was sitting down and reading it. It was it was like going through. Genesis was difficult for me I had a hard time connecting the dots and whatnot. Is there anything that you've read so far with your journey through since you hadn't done before or anything so far that you've had an issue with food there are lots of things that you know i'll be reading. I'll think i don't. I don't understand something that i'm reading And i think. I mean that must come up for. I have imagined for anyone reading the bible. I mean reading it from this distance in time away and and the end of the great cultural distance away. There must be things i would. I would have seen him Anyone in any culture today reading it would just say this is something that is strange or i don't understand and so at that at that moment i think that's just like a very Kind of a decisive. A decisive moment. There where it's what. What am i responsible leads. You know to that to that. Like i don't get it And you know off the top of my head. I'm not thinking of anything where it's like man you know. This is something where i really. I really struggled with this. I really Just don't connect with it or don't see how it is that way What what i've learned to do you know. I think i think honestly like part of this journey of wanting to read through the bible was really Is really about trying to get to know. God better and so this this sense of okay. God is someone who i can talk to I can you know. That's that's prayer. And so if. I'm if i'm reading something that that is in the bible that you know i believe is god's word and it's something that i don't get i mean there are there are people who are older and wiser than me say things run just like i don't know about that and and and yet and yet at some point it comes to like you know you've got more Years on the trail and You know there's there's i i've seen you i've seen you be trustworthy in the past and so even though i don't get necessarily what you're saying now i can kinda go along with this. Okay i trust you as a person

Ed Bernadette Youtube Bible
Coronavirus is far more widespread in Orange County than reported, study shows, Los Angeles

Tim Conway Jr.

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus is far more widespread in Orange County than reported, study shows, Los Angeles

"Orange County are seven times higher than previously thought. We estimate the 12% of Orange County has already had That exposure to Cove in 19 because of elevated antibody response. You see I public health director Bernadette Boden Al Bhalla says. That's 370,000 people. She says the study shows people throughout Orange County have been infected and had no symptoms. This study also confirmed higher infection rates and Latino and lower income areas. This

Orange County Bernadette Boden Al Bhalla Cove Director
Boston Area Teachers Return to ‘Unsafe' Classrooms in Sharon, MA

WBZ Midday News

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Boston Area Teachers Return to ‘Unsafe' Classrooms in Sharon, MA

"Of days. Schools and Sharon re open tomorrow with Day one of in school learning set for Thursday. The teachers agreed last week to enter their buildings after first saying they'd refuse. Now they're criticizing the school district for not complying with their safety needs. You agreed to go back into the school, and then we've got it cools and saw that a lot of the things that they claim that would be fixed by the 14th. We're not. Bernadette Murphy is the president of the Sharon Teachers Association. They also are saying they've been forced to buy their own pee pee and the clock is ticking with their options. Right now. School is set to start on

Sharon Teachers Association Sharon Bernadette Murphy President Trump
Stephen Fry on Reimagining the Greek Myths

The Book Review

03:14 min | 2 years ago

Stephen Fry on Reimagining the Greek Myths

"You've written memoirs. You've written novels. What made you sit down and think what I really need to do is is rewrite Turi version of the Greek myths. It was amendment two to. Having dinner with some friends and I can't remember how this subject came up, but Someone was talking about you know. It wasn't an over pretentious dinner party discussion, but it was about the way. Different Cultures explained how the world came to be. We were saying is is Genesis a terrible myth? Is it all about guilt and shame and other better ones, and so started to talk about you know the Greek origin myths, and then went back to to the you know out of chaos, and or an Austin guy on I'm started staring at me and said go on. I said well. You know and then I. Get the next generation was talking. Know about Kronos and and then the birth of Zeus. New Game Wow. How'd you oldest I supervised? Creek myths and a lot of them were very far more diligent to nine and probably better read, but they just they knew the names. Everyone knows the names use in Paulo, and and and so on, but they hadn't joined the dots. And, it's a miraculous thing about Greek mythology that there is a timeline in chronology knits probably be reverse engineered by. He's been homer and later poets obviously, but nonetheless it has a shape a beginning in the end, which other mythic structures don't seem to have and the so deepen. To use such a Cliche, but I can't avoid in the DNA of our own culture and art that it's kind of part of who we are so. They encouraged me really and a lot of people said you got. You could retell those stories, and at first I thought I'd do a stage show, and then I started writing it and realize what pleasure it was to to research. Go back to some of the sources the time remember burn and find out and fill in the gaps in my knowledge that I started writing. Did that Mobile Library play a part in your early reading of the Greek myth says well, yes, it did and firmly enough it was American, mythologised, who were the biggest infants so me when I was young apart from Robert Graves who was hugely influential. Who wrote a magnificent two volume edition of agreements, but when I was younger and too young, for Robert Graves, it was Hamilton and Bernadette, Flynn and bull finch copy of Dolphins, which is American I think. Isn't it the both with? And Anthony Hoffman whom I remember well reading those when I was very young, had big illustrated version of Nathaniel. Hawthorne's Tanglewood Tales and these were all wonderful retailing children, and there was a pretty sure Roger Lance Lynn Green. Bread was a boy and at school, because I loved classics at school from a very early age, we were taught latching from age of seven of. School and and I did. It only because I think it did so badly it everything else. That I was put onto ancient Greek quite young, too. I was eight or nine when I started engine. Great which I love. And so the stories, of course, the things you use for translations and So I grew up with a with a lot of them.

Robert Graves Paulo Bread Kronos Roger Lance Lynn Green Austin Anthony Hoffman Mobile Library Hawthorne Nathaniel Flynn Bernadette Hamilton
BLM Minnesota Alliance Meets With Police Chief Ahead Of Weekend Protests

WIOD Programming

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

BLM Minnesota Alliance Meets With Police Chief Ahead Of Weekend Protests

"Protests safe in focus is the goal of the black lives matter Minnesota lions the group has met with Sarasota police chief Bernadette depino to prepare for weekend demonstrations the alliance educates participants on how to protest peacefully coordinator Brianna let's see tells campus news channel eight her job is to amplify black voices and to ensure the safety of future protests the biggest thing to know about the escalation is to not let it escalate in the first place remain calm do not engage chief the piano says the meeting she had with the organizers have all been positive

Bernadette Depino Brianna Minnesota Sarasota Coordinator
Clean energy has shed thousands of U.S. jobs due to pandemic

Morning Edition

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Clean energy has shed thousands of U.S. jobs due to pandemic

"The bay area shelter in place orders have forced clean energy businesses in the region to trim thousands of jobs he committees Marco Seiler Gonzales reports on how the industry is trying to bounce back small time solar businesses close shot during the first round of shelter in place cutting at least six thousand jobs when a customer goes dark because they're dealing with this kind of crisis our business is going to go dark that's Bernadette del chiaro she's the executive director for the California solar and storage association she says it first state and local authorities did not authorize solar as an essential business as a result we had a lot of our building departments and even police departments in the bay area just completely shut us down but del chiaro says what the market is totally reliant on consumer demand and a lot of those skilled workers could turn to larger mainstream contractors for more

Marco Seiler Gonzales Executive Director California
Stephen Sondheim gets starry but tardy 90th birthday concert

Leo Laporte

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Stephen Sondheim gets starry but tardy 90th birthday concert

"A ninetieth birthday tribute is being held on line for a Broadway hit maker take me to the world as a free virtual concert saluting Stephen Sondheim on Broadway dot com's YouTube channel the event is hosted by Raul Esparza who starred in the two thousand six revival of Sondheim's hit musical company also set to perform America St Bernadette Peters and Mandy Patinkin among others Sondheim wrote the lyrics for West Side Story in gypsies also the composer for Sunday in the park with George Sweeney Todd in a little night music bill Stewart KFI

Stephen Sondheim Raul Esparza Bernadette Peters George Sweeney Todd Stewart Kfi Youtube Mandy Patinkin
What to do when you dont like your partner?

One Life Radio Podcast

09:47 min | 2 years ago

What to do when you dont like your partner?

"Bernadette via Shetty that rhymes with Spaghetti with Rinaldo Davis. I never say my last name but I just thought I'd throw it out there. Have you ever heard me say that Rinaldo? Well it really is so. It's got double cheese and Spaghetti. Envious shoddy so. Yeah I used to say that when I was a when I was a kid so Great to have Have everyone listening great to be here and although and I are doing the show against day feels really good though it. Does you know I've not been alone in the studio ever. Yesterday was my first time doing the show by myself with just a board op and I'm actually kind of liking it. Actually you know stretcher myself a little bit and during difficult times you know finding my inner strength and that's always good. It's a good feeling but we have an incredible show coming up today. We've got Joe Lane here in just a minute She is a pro e Pro. Athlete Health Nutrition coach and founder of fuelling champions. Sam Morris is coming. Up is the founder of the unbreakable man project and Dewan Bennett one of our favorites here on one life radio. Along with many others including Jill He is a licensed professional counselor. And we'RE GONNA be talking about all kinds of things like what to do when you don't like your partner. I think that's really funny. Don't that's A. that's a tough spot especially if you're married what would I but I do think that people you know like each other. Sometimes you know I remember someone telling me it was. It was my friend Andrea and her. She asked her grandparents. What was the secret of staying together all the years that they were together and he said well I guess neither one of US fell out of love with one another at the same time And so you know there's something to think about something to contemplate and so keep that in mind you guys. But Sam Morris Another Guy. That is just incredible. You know we're GONNA be talking about the similarities between Rehab and Corentin I can't I'm very anxious to talk to Sam. He's a super great guy he really is. He's had a long journey and sometimes a very painful journey but he's riven risen above it and he is a he is truly a brave heart and a kind heart. I'm looking forward to him. And as I said I've got Jill Lane on the line She is a pro athlete. Health and nutrition coach and founder of fuelling champions which is a three step sports performance and Athletic Nutrition Program Bill to the potential of student athletes in appearance. That support them. How you doing today Jill? Hey great to be with you again. Burn Yeah I always love having you on the show and for those that don't know that maybe are a new listener From California or here in Dallas. We're on in California on K. MIT in southern California and five counties. But maybe if you're a first time listening but Jill has been on the on the show from the very beginning. We met in the studio actually the first time she was on the air. And she's friends with KIP. Watson and Tina Burnett and a lot of other regulars on the show and so I asked her to call in today to talk about This article that I found eleven natural remedies for anxiety. Because I don't know about any of Y'all out there but I have been dealing with a lot of anxiety lately and I know a lot of people have it's just the it's just the sign of the Times right. Yeah it is and I think I think the most important thing for people to know is that experiencing anxiety occasionally is a normal part of life. You know it's a normal part of our bodies response. The thing is to know when it's becoming something that starting to control your life because people that start to having Zainy disorders or even to extreme panic attacks. They're trying to start to get in the way of them doing their normal daily thing thinking about the worrying and the the The depression or the physical symptoms of the anxiety like the racing heart and the tight chest and the worry and even sweating for some people. Can I get in the way of their daily life? So it's important to know where you are on that spectrum absolutely and it snowballs on you and I speak from personal experience I started started to experience anxiety anxiety disorder. I'm a little anxious talking about it. I'm SORTA joking but yeah I mean it's it's a big subject and it can spiral on you or snowball on you. I'm very quickly and I do think it's important to keep in mind that there are a lot of natural remedies That we can use along with some other things as well And we're going to talk about it. So this article really Gets into some of the things that I personally use so you wanNA start at the top of the list. You'll yeah I mean I think The first thing that they mentioned is lavender and the the interesting thing about lavender is that essential oils in journal. I think of become like an explosive thing in the quote Unquote Natural Health and wellness world. In the last few years with the advent of you know some big companies and multi level marketing but but essential oils have been around. And I've been part of I kind of line of medicine along with herbs for you know years and years and years for a very long time and I'm familiar with a pleasant smell of lavender. I mean most people like the smell of lavender and the really cool thing about lavender does so many things but like a couple of the other things that we're going to talk about is that it actually enhances Alpha waves in the brain and the Alpha waves in the brain are the ones that kind of help easier for the effects of anxiety and depression and they actually helped make us more creative. Like when you're meditating or practicing some sort of mindfulness or prayer your Alpha wave levels go up even just smelling lavender or applying it. You know in some oil to your body. Help increase Alpha waves and physically changes the wave lengths that are occurring in the brain. So doesn't really power fall. We yeah any one of the things that I that. I was astounded by actually and I've used lavender for years. I love it. I I used to use it. There's a lavender eucalypt eucalyptus blend that. I used to spray. You can spray it on your pillow. You have to be careful though because cats are sensitive to I believe both but But the in in this article that that amaze me was this a twenty ten study conducted in Germany suggested that a lavender oil capsule show similar effectiveness effectiveness in people with J. D. And I'm not I'm not quite sure what. Ged Is. And I did not look it up before we went live is general anxiety disorder which is kind of a generalized anxiety. We'll Sola Raza Pam which is kind of like Oh there's a couple different ones but it's basically like Isn't that the generic form of Valium? If I'm not mistaken it's in that class of drugs for sure but it says it's just as effective in people Or similar effectiveness. Excuse me and people with ged as Lorazepam. A commonly prescribed anti anxiety medication. That's amazing and I think the thing to know about this list of kind of quote unquote natural remedies. Is that like I tell with anybody as soon as you start like. I think anything in your health that you're starting to notice your little off kilter. It is a good time to start with some of these. You know natural things. And if you're having a hard time controlling anxiety and you're on medication you can talk to your position or your your preferred health practitioner about potentially using some of these things in conjunction with your pharmaceutical. And so if you're feeling a little anxious right now which like you said. A lot of people are. There's a lot of uncertainty and we have a lot of new things that we're learning to cope with. You can start with some of these things that are generally regarded as safe. Generally benign generally. Don't interact with other medications but to your point. A lot of essential worlds are really strong for pets. Have to be really More about that but you can start with some of these basics and it may just help with the you know the day to day processing that you're doing You know with the Munis especially like right now that you're subject to On this list is which I know you've told me to take before I have some at my house but it's basically green tea and so you can get green tea. He pretty much anywhere and and let's talk about that for a minute. I WANNA I WANNA really give people out there listening today. Some take home value of things that they can find in almost any grocery store or you know or market or or something like that. Yeah so L. Cnn is actually an amino acid the L. before a word Is how we differentiated amino acid in science land. So I mean isn't amino acid that's found predominantly in green tea. And the really cool thing about is that it to actually affects. Alpha waves in the brain and the cool thing about it is that you can get the benefit whether you're drinking DECAF or regular green tea. And so even if you're drinking green tea in the morning for the oxidants and the caffeine but named can't can work along with the caffeine for focus creativity a bit of dampening the anxiety as long as caffeine doesn't triggering society which for some people actually does. And so you have to know that about yourself. But Elsie needs in a capsule form is like just extracting that amino acids from tea leaves and you can get the benefits at a very low dose one hundred or two hundred milligrams and it's been shown to help again with the Alpha brainwaves which again help Easing the effect of depression and anxiety and helping with creativity and just kind of helping keep your brain and kind of chill state not like your zone out but preventing it from being stuck in overdrive. Which is what anxiety kind of feels like you know your gear engines running too hard. It's a help. Just pump the brakes just a little bit But not so much that you can't be creative and that's what I love about Al. So that's a really. You know their studies on it and children and in adults and so it's something again it's like you said a first line of defense is something you can get just by drinking green tea and you can get DECAF and make some ice cream teen with your children right now at home. Yeah I'm so great really practical thing to start

Anxiety Sam Morris Founder General Anxiety Disorder California Depression Rinaldo Davis Caffeine Jill Jill He Joe Lane Jill Lane Bernadette Sola Raza Pam Partner Andrea Dewan Bennett GED Shetty
How to Help Children Make Decisions

The Next Right Thing

09:27 min | 2 years ago

How to Help Children Make Decisions

"I had a dream that I printed out a manuscript. I was working on and it fell from the printer like soup so I grabbed a little Japanese bold. Catch it with and it took a sip without thinking and then I worried because I wasn't sure which Chapter Eight. It was a dream of course but still woke up feeling like. I had done something wrong like I was missing something important but I didn't know where to go to find it. A mentor told me wants to pay attention to my dreams. It wasn't because every single element in my dreams had some kind of hidden meaning but the emotion that lingers when we wake up will that can be an important source of information. That's the power of our imagination. A thing may not have happened but that doesn't mean it wasn't real on a cross country flight a few weeks ago. I watched the movie version of a book that I read a few years back it was. Where'd you go? Bernadette if you must know but I enjoyed the movie which is saying something because typically when I watch a movie version of a Book I've read. I'm fairly disappointed this time though. I've found myself watching it and just enjoying it without much judgment now. Many factors were at play here in my experience. In general I like movies better on airplanes due to the watching a movie in the clouds factor. That's just cool and also it's been years since I read the book so the details had faded enough that I knew I liked it but I couldn't tell you exactly what they got wrong or left out in the movie typically with movies that started out his books. Well it's hard to please the readers. The filmmakers have so many limitations with time and money technology not to mention their own interpretation of the author's intent but when we read the book imagination as limitless if the author does it give details. We just fill them in ourselves. Our nation's powerful the only limit to my imagination is that I cannot put myself in your head. I'm stuck inside my own head. I don't know what you're thinking unless you tell me and even then I only hear it through the filter of my own experience. Well that's true between you and me and it's true between us and our children so when my daughter was an elementary school and she told me she was afraid of what her friends would think of her new haircut. I dismissed her imagination too soon. Oh my gosh. They're gonNA love it. I said they probably would. That's true but they may not love it so then. The picture that she was holding onto in her mind wasn't necessarily an unreasonable one. She was lost in her own imaginary world saying her friends laughing and pointing an offering only heavy rejection in her head. They'd hurt even though it hadn't happened yet even though it probably wouldn't happen at all but I'm no help to her when I say that won't happen. Don't worry about it. I'm learning to practice expanding my own imaginary world to include the imagination of my children. I started to learn this back when they were a little bit younger. But I'm finding it still applies. Even as they grow the goal is to enter into that painful place with her to walk alongside her into the dark alley of her mind to confront the fear lurking in pretend corners and not to tell her. There's nothing to fear but to give her the tools to handle what might come next. This is an important practice in all aspects of parenting but especially when it comes to helping our kids make decisions the next time your child comes to you with a particular fear or maybe a potential uncomfortable outcome or maybe needing help and making a decision rather than launching immediately into lecture. Fix or tell mode here are four things you can do instead to help. Your child begin to develop their own habit of soulful decision making number one. Ask At least two questions. I've come to believe more and more. That listening is the opposite of loneliness or at least being listened to imagine if someone was willing to listen to you in your lonely places and really hear you out. You may not feel so lonely anymore. Part of the fear of negative outcomes are kids half is they're afraid of the burden of being alone in their rejection alone in that new adventure or alone in their decision. Making if your child is stuck in fear or doesn't know what to do next pause and ask a question not a leading question or a statement disguised as a question. You don't. I'm talking about but a true curious question that seeks to know and understand episode ninety. Four of the next right thing is all about the importance of asking the second question and with children. It's equally important. I know where the parents and sometimes it seems like. We're supposed to have all the answers and so our first instinct is not to ask but to tell but instead if your child is struggling with fear frustration or a decision before you tell them anything. Try asking them a question and then challenge yourself to ask at least one. More Question. Look for clues to her hesitation. Find out the images. She's holding on to follow the trail to her heart number to kneel to understand their world before asking them to rise to understand yours years ago. I read a book by Wess Stafford. That forever changed how I see children. The book is called too small to ignore and in it. West says this. He writes so far as we see in reading the Gospels. Jesus never admonished children to become more grown up. He did however exhort grownups to become more like children. This begs the question. What does it mean to be like little children? The best way to know is to ask the children themselves. What imaginary outcomes might they be anticipating? What is he afraid will happen? What sounds fun. What sounds scary. What clues will she offer you about the shape of her soul number three offer next right thing solutions if your son needs to decide between taking an art class or taking a music class in third grade keep the third grade perspective what matters in third grade learning yes but also friends predictability safety curiosity fun resist? The urge to insist third grade decision have highschool consequences. Let it be a third grade decision but at the same time when offering an x ray thing solution keep in mind. That third grade is the oldest. Your child has ever been in fact no matter the age of your child the age he or she is now is their oldest one no matter if she's three or ten or sixteen that's why they always feel like they're so grown up is because they are in their own minds to her this is the biggest and potentially most consequential decision. She's yet had to make the resist the urge to downplay it. Just because it's only third grade. After all as the parents we get to share these moments for our kids we could to help shape them anyway both by respecting them for what they are and by not making them something. They're not and if a child has no idea what she wants to do. Maybe take what you've learned and ask her. What is just the next right thing she can do today? It might have nothing to do. With the decision it might go for a bike rider. Eat a snack do her homework or play in her room. Keep her in the moment as much as you can and do your best to stay there with. Her will finally number four. Remember your job. There's a difference between God's job our job in his book families were grace is in place. Jeff Van Vondran says quote. God's job is to fix and change. Our job is to depend serve and equip this is the work of grace and it is more restful than you can imagine speaking for. Myself Now. I wonder what would happen. If in our family we would dare apparent from a place of love rather than from a place of fear I do know a little bit about what it could look like. I want to know even more and so I need God and all of this not just to do the parts that I'm not good at not just a pick me up when I begin to feel weak but I need the kind of God who takes up residence inside me to parent with me in me as me as I trust him. Good thing. That's the kind of God. He is so that haircut conversation might sound to my grownup. Mind Small and unimportant but when you're in third grade that is your whole world and actually now that I think about it. I've had some pretty important haircut conversations in my adult world too. I WANNA be willing to walk into the imagination of my child and face her biggest fears with her and I know our friend. Jesus is willing to walk into my imagination with me in face my fears with me too. He doesn't dismiss me and say that's never going to happen. He says he will be with me even if it does happen.

Jesus Wess Stafford Bernadette Jeff Van Vondran West
"bernadette" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"bernadette" Discussed on WJR 760

"Bernadette Bernadette came from a very poor family and lords France at the age of fourteen she had a series of eighteen miraculous visions it was believed she was visited by a small lady in white later self to be the Immaculate Conception the virgin Mary Bernadette lived a simple life she joined the sisters of charity and died at the young age of thirty five later she was canonized by pope Pius the eleventh St of the church in December of nineteen thirty three you're listening to an original Christmas to say is this this is this this is two.

Bernadette Bernadette France Mary Bernadette pope Pius
"bernadette" Discussed on Parenting Roundabout

Parenting Roundabout

08:08 min | 3 years ago

"bernadette" Discussed on Parenting Roundabout

"We're taking a break from talking and complaining and obsessing instead shouting out things. Other people are doing that. We think you'll you'll find as useful or enjoyable as we do. We call this our roundabout roundup off. Start Out On thanksgiving actually. I think it was on Thanksgiving Day. I spilled water on my laptop which I feel like I have done many times before and nothing has happened but this time it must have just found right the correct little area flow down into to completely freeze up and kill. My beloved La is very traumatic yes so I have purchased another of. I've got one of the new apple sixteen inch macbook pros and I am enjoying it very much. But that's not what I'm GonNa talk about. Today on talk about the ridiculous ease with which new computers can be. Set up these days you know. I remember with apples used. I used to be that. They made it very easy to flow things from one computer to the other computer and that was really nice but in this case. You don't even have to do that in. It's not just the apple. The cloud it's dropbox. It's a google drive all the places I have stuff and you can just go to your computer and log in and it's all there yeah Everything you want you know you can set up your browser exactly the same way. I'm in Google chrome you log into Google. Chrome got all my bookmarks. It just happened so quickly I mean you you have to click through a bunch of two factor authorization things which is comforting to me to know that that's not actually works but it's really you know he comes up on your phone phone. Is this you and you hit Yesen. You're on your way. It's you know as uncomfortable as I feel about the cloud. Sometimes like who's looking at that stuff offer people minding my data from this stuff that I've put with them for free and is really safe for me to have all these things in boy when you need it and things just are there with no time at all in no time at all on multiple. I mean I.. I had to use my son's laptop and so I did that for my son's laptop and poof. It was replicating replicating my old machine. And then I got my new one and I did the same thing and just hardly any time. It's all there so I am setting aside any reservations I have with the cloud out and just saying wow. This nice is really nice. You know it really makes things so easy in as little trauma trauma as possible to get yourself right back exactly where you are just like you know magical beings came in took care of all that yes yes so who for modern technology. I will cosign. You've done the same thing recently right since I recently finally got rid of my ancient laptop and got anyone anyone and you know. I didn't do it for so long because I was afraid of that process and it's really really quite easy. It's like my old computer was dead so I can't couldn't get anything off but I really had very little that was just on that one You know in the adapts at the APP store downloads. All your same apps that you had and everything is connected in the cloud a few things I didn't have connected and now I do so in the future. It won't be an issue. Golly it's Miracle Very Company Nicole what do you have to share this week. Well I've done a lot of travel recently and have rented a lot of cars because I'm not a big Uber or lift user and I've found that if you're a member of Costco. Oh you also have access to their travel department. So Costco has a travel department. I don't know if you knew that or not now They have limited eh selections of hotels. But what they're really good with is their car rentals So for the past year I've been renting my cars through Costco travel. And there's at least a thirty percent discount on the rates and I find it so affordable and surprisingly inexpensive like I'm constantly surprised at how cheap I my car rentals are and you can do it all online. You don't have to Fuss around and with the you know the going getting directed to another website or can make the booking right then and there and you know it shows you all your options and you can do any add ons you longer than in the airport. I've been consistently unpleasantly surprised at the great rates that I've been getting car rentals and they've all been any usually get because at some uh-huh because you have the membership with Costco. You always get an upgrade to a better car so you get like you know the base car for the price and then they offer you a free upgrade so then you end up getting a really good car for a great price. So yeah so I've been using that and I thought they deserve Did Not Service Costco. Yeah I'd only will will they do cruises and And we even bought our last vehicle through Costco Lasso. Yeah so that's COSCO provides a lot nicer uh-huh yes has can costco provide. Catherine was an idea of what to talk about on around. Yes I have I'm I'm going to talk about the movie. Where'd you go Bernadette. Oh yeah so. Based on a book that you talked about around two I believe yes and I I really enjoy the buck and I think the movie got some flack and I don't know if it like the the person the author it was a screen writer before she was a novelist but yet she didn't write the screenplay in anyway it was just ignore all that and and just watch the movie and it was enjoyable. It was funny. Kate Blanche's great and She got nominated for Golden Globe for that movie. Yeah Okay Oh okay yeah. Those just came out Much to the surprise of all the podcasts people. Listen to me and Allen come from well I mean. She's good in everything she does but she it was good in this Playing this extremely quirky if not just downright strange person Bernadette and the the the House that they live in that she and her family live in is really a character in in both the book and the movie And that that was fun to see and it's just a great mother. Daughter Story Her and her like fourteen year old ish daughter and it's just it was. I enjoyed it quite a bit. So who plays the daughter anybody that we've seen before anything I don't reckon racket I didn't recognize her as somebody but I can look it up real quick but she was great. She was great. The the actress who played the daughter and like Kirsten Wag is in it playing out her not really a funny character actor Like she surprises you in it. Because she's she's not what you were expecting Kirsten Lake she plays like the neighbor her. So and let's see. The daughter is why her name is among Emma Nelson us. So she's been in something called Margaret in the moon other than okay comer newcomer. which is a student film? So yes definitely not something. I have seen so good job. Hamma got herself from Lewis with Kate. Blanchett yes nice going. Yeah chicken chicken do it. You know she can. She can act on the same space. It's so good for her. And that it for another week of parenting roundabout if you miss any of our earlier episodes this week. Look look them up months Or Apple podcasts..

Costco apple Bernadette Google Kate Blanche La COSCO Yesen Kirsten Lake Kirsten Wag Blanchett writer Catherine
"bernadette" Discussed on AMS on the Air

AMS on the Air

06:12 min | 3 years ago

"bernadette" Discussed on AMS on the Air

"When you were younger you had some storming dieting. I share that I still It's not as bad as they used on the basement and dog and you know the fund. The thunder was the worst part. I'm curious how that may be influenced you as a not only meteorologist but as a communicator well I I. It's is something that I it. That's part of a lot of meteorologist. Origin story is some fear of weather for many as driven by inexperienced with specific event. I lived through a hurricane or a blizzard or a tornado were flood impacted them at an early age and we hear lots and lots of stories from urologist about that I think in my case it I was always fascinated with weather her from as far back as I can remember so even when I was terrified of storms and hating the storms I was fascinated by it and at night I I was cowering under the covers trying to block the sand from my ears of the thunder in the win but the next morning I'm at the library trying to find pictures of tornadoes IOS and trying to learn more about it so I think there's a curiosity there. I think that kind of it helped drive up to drive that and as a communicator now I mean I really have a lot of input the sympathy for people that experienced this I mean I work in central Oklahoma on we have bad weather occasionally there and I feel I feel oh for the people that had that suffer from this much worse than I ever did. that live there and have to have to go through this so. I'm you know we're not changing changing the message because of that. I'm not GonNa not tell people that they're bad. Weather is coming but I think it makes me much more sensitive to the fact that there are a lot of people that are hanging hanging on every word and hanging on every graphic in subtle changes in your tone of voice or your language the word you use people are people that suffer from from this pickup on all of that. Oh I noticed you went from thirty percents to forty percent. Does that mean we're more likely to have tornadoes and things like that so I it's. It's certainly something that's in the back of my mind. We're trying to raise awareness of it throughout the weather community in general that you know it's it's important for us to communicate and be honest communicators leaders of the science and give people tell people what we think's going to happen but also being mindful that there's a there's a large segment of the population out there not just in Oklahoma Oklahoma but scattered all across the United States that this is a traumatic event for them whether just the matter of whether happens to them or not a weather forecast passed as a traumatic event for them so I'm I'm mindful of that and try to be sympathetic to that and try to it all comes down to just being a communicating communicating. What you think is going to happen not not overselling at not trying to make it more than it is now trying to make it sound scarier than it needs to be. If we need to scare people will will will scare people in the appropriate ways but we don't need to be doing that every time there's a threat of severe weather and it's probably influence you in ways as you don't even know having gone through that and when the event POPs up in your approach to it and I'm like you. It hasn't gone away. I mean it's still will I mean our home has been impacted by a tornado in multiple hailstorm since we've since we've lived here so the anxiety I have now's house more as I guess you could call it more dread you look at the radar. It's like Oh now here we go again or I hope those storms. Don't come near the hell. I mean it's it's very detached detached from being a scientists looking at colored blobs on the radar. When it's when it's you personally. It's a whole different thing so. There's some of that still there but yeah. I mean it's it's it definitely it definitely is in the back of my mind whether I know it or not all the time when I'm communicating weather information for me. It's lightning because I feel like it's so unpredictable when you're like near a storm. Yeah I don't know why but well. It is as we don't know enough about. I wish more people felt like that because a lot of people will don't realize how dangerous it is and yeah and don't treat it seriously enough yeah kind of origin story. Bernadette about that. That's influenced you. Do you know mine's a different path than most meteorologists. Go figure I feel like that's the whole story but it's I always was fascinated with weather more than anyone around me but most of my background prior to college folkston gymnastics as Jim Nissen that was my whole life so by the time I got to college I had not thought of meteorology is a career path and I think most of my influences in life weren't those outside the box careers such as as a meteorologist and so it just never really dawned on on me and again always been way too fascinated always saying up way too late with certain storms we would spend summers at the Jersey Shore. I'd be down there you know when everyone's once trying to clear the beach and they'd have pulled me off and I remember the blizzard of ninety three. I was at a gymnastics meet in Florida. Even though I lived in Philadelphia and we got the tornado part of the blizzard and my coaches like you have to go to bed your meat. You're competing in the morning and that morning going to the gym. There's just everything wiped out Adam. We still have the meat but trying to get home. We got stranded in New York airport. Somehow they got us to New York but then there's no way from US get to New York from Philly and and I mean there's just so many of these kinds of stories where I was super fascinated by this but never really process that as a career that's not where my mind was so when I got to penn state. Eh My brother was like what do you mean you don't know and Portuguese taken enough science as a background in that and when I spoke with the People Penn State Nisa clouds and storms. It's loud science but I had that background so that had been a strength of mine so I was able to do it and once I committed myself to it. I just loved it more more every day really and it continues to grow the different steps. I take in my career paths. I would love the Funky more Ford experience. That's I've talked to people that have been in the snow side but never someone in the storm side so thank you so much for talking. Thanks Jordan..

Oklahoma People Penn State Nisa United States New York Ford Jim Nissen Bernadette Adam Philadelphia Florida Jersey Shore penn Philly forty percent