18 Burst results for "Berliner Npr"

"berliner npr" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

03:43 min | 3 months ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"And polished copper. Organs isn't complaining about that. He thinks it's fine when people get rich, but the way things are going there, he's got no chance of owning a home. We build all these fancy fancy homes and blowing them apartments. There's absolutely nothing Nothing in between home values in Reno have gone up 27% in the past year. Perkins and his wife are renters. She stopped working as a pastry chef in the pandemic. They have a six year old daughter and another child on the way. I asked him what he aspires to. And he says nothing extravagant. I would like to have a space with a yard like 900 Square feet. Simple cabinets. Simple countertops. We shag carpeting. I don't care. I just want four walls and a roof that I can afford. That home Perkins is describing is just about vanishing in America. In 2020, the number of starter homes built was less than 1/5 of the yearly average of the early eighties. It's a huge problem if you think about the fact that home equity accounts for the bulk of wealth The overwhelming majority of Americans that Sam Cater, chief economist at Freddie Mac, the government backed mortgage company. Traditionally, Americans started building that wealth by purchasing a no frills first home. Freddie Mac defines a starter home as 1400 square feet or less Others define it differently. But on the matter of why they're so scarce, there's a good deal of agreement. The high price of building materials, labor costs are up zoning regulations, restrict construction and a big one, Cater says It's really the value of the land that matters the most when it comes to home prices. Now America is a huge country with lots of open space. So why should land be so expensive? Well, it's not so plentiful in the places where the jobs are and where people want to live. You know, many people are trying to crowd in the same cities that are the most productive in the most affluent and offer the most opportunities. But high on affordable home prices prevent many Americans from doing so When land is expensive, it becomes harder for builders to turn a profit on entry level homes. Greg you Gal D does build them in suburban Connecticut. But, he says it's increasingly tough and more and more builders can no longer do it. You can often squeezed by, he says, by saying, no to extras like upgraded cabinets and countertops. And carpet pads. Place like that sounds fine to Matt Perkins back in Reno when he looks around, though he sees no sign of economizing Homebuyers seemed to be Obsessed with this idea of luxury amenities and home builders are completely willing to give them that the numbers back him up less than 6% of the houses built in Nevada last year, where entry level homes Bergen says he'd gladly pass on the bay windows and stainless steel appliances for small house the bit of green in the backyard place where he could build his daughter. Treehouse. Marie Berliner NPR news You're listening to here and now Two brothers identical twins were working in the north Tower of the World Trade Center on the morning of 9. 11 doesn't feel like 20 years to me. It's yesterday to me, one made it out. One did not. I often try to imagine what the hell those people went through. Guaranteeing my brother went out like a hero. We probably tried to help people out September 11th Survivor tells his story on the next morning edition from NPR News. Tomorrow morning at five o'clock. I'm Sharon.

Matt Perkins Sam Cater Sharon Freddie Mac 2020 Nevada America 27% 1400 square feet Greg 20 years 900 Square feet last year Perkins Connecticut Reno September 11th Cater less than 6% less than 1/5
"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:42 min | 6 months ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Farmers have long had a clear favor when it comes to tractors. John Deere is King in rural America, but farmers loyalty to the John Deere brand is fraying. NPR's Uri Berliner explains. Walter Schweitzer is a third generation Montana farmer. He never expected to get political in the middle of haying season. But there he was last summer on his John Deere tractor, hustling to cut and bail his head while the weather was still good, and then at the worst possible time, he says his tractor kept shutting down. Randomly kind of did all the things that a farmer rancher does to try to troubleshoot the problems, But he couldn't do much because he didn't have access to the software that would help him die. Diagnose. What was wrong on Leah John Deere dealer could do that. Not an independent mechanic or Schweitzer himself. The guy who owns the tractor. It's not like I didn't know that this was an issue. It just became personal. You know when you're staring at a hay crop that needs to be in a bail. And your tractors not working. You get real nervous. Sweitzer wound up sending his tractor to the dealer. He says it took about a month for the repair to get done His bill to replace the fuel sensor nearly $5000. Says a local independent mechanic would have charged only a small fraction of that. White, who was fortunate he had no backup tractor, so his crop didn't get ruined. But the experience made Schweitzer eager to fight for change. Equipment manufacturers are not supposed to hold you hostage. And that's what's happening here. These equipment manufacturers are holding me hostage to them, forcing me to use their dealerships to repair my equipment. On their schedule on their time and at their rates that's wrong. Today's generation of tractors have fancy touch screens and are packed with software and sensors that can help the farmer plant spray and harvest with great precision. That's one reason a new one can cost several $100,000 and his tech has become more important in farming. The standoff between tractor makers and farmers has intensified. Farmers say even simple repairs are off limits in 2018, the industry offered a compromise and made a promise. By this year, 2021 companies would sell farmers diagnostic tools that would let them fix their own equipment. But that's not happening, says Kevin O'Reilly of U. S. Pirg, a nonprofit research group. I myself called 12 different John Deere dealers in six different states asking to try to buy the software tools and diagnostics that you need to fix your tractor. And at 11 of the 12. I was told that I couldn't buy them. Sometimes I was told they didn't even exist. And then the 12th gave me an email address to reach out to which I never heard back from. John Deere declined to comment to other tractor makers, CNH industrial and add comb didn't respond to requests for interviews. Industry as a whole has fought against political efforts to force changes on manufacturers through what are called right to repair bills. Tom Brandt is a farmer and state senator who introduced Nebraska's right to repair bill full. Let's say You've got a couple $100,000 and you buy a bright, shiny new tractor. You only owned the hardware today that software is still controlled by the original equipment manufacturer. The rest is bill would change that it would unlock software and allow farmers and independent shops to make the same repairs as dealers. And industry group, the Association of Equipment Manufacturers tells NPR. He's kind of right to repair bills. They permit illegal tampering and create safety and environmental wrist. That's why states have rejected such bills in the past, but those right to repair bills they keep coming, Riley of U. S. PIRG says right to repair bills for Agriculture Have been introduced in 12 States. Farmers continue to speak out. We see more and more states introducing this legislation, and the movement continues forward as they realized that they just want to be able to fix their stuff. And that's not too much ask. But some farmers aren't waiting for bills to get past their hacking their own equipment to get around repair restrictions. Others they're going back in time. They're buying vintage tractors from the seventies and eighties that don't run on software or a Berliner NPR nous. This afternoon on all things considered. Musicians are eager to play in person again for their fans. But scheduling venues for bigger.

Tom Brandt Kevin O'Reilly 2018 Uri Berliner Walter Schweitzer Riley John Deere Sweitzer America Association of Equipment Manuf Montana third generation 12 different 2021 Schweitzer six different states $100,000 last summer 12 States NPR
"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:27 min | 11 months ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Tanya mostly and I'm Rachel Martin. We know there are some Americans who are hesitant to get vaccinated. So there's this idea out there to give them money to encourage him minutes supported by a number of economists and politicians. Essentially a government cash for shots program. But there are those who do say it could backfire. NPR's Uri Berliner has more Robert lighten worries that appeals from politicians and celebrities that implore people to get vaccinated. They won't be enough so cash payout should be a plan B. Lighten, an economist affiliated with the Brookings Institution, says that could be what it takes to reach herd immunity, because if we don't get to that we're not going to get our lives back. He's proposing that the federal government compensate everyone who gets vaccinated $1000. $200 for getting both shots and 800 after the country reaches herd immunity. We just have a lot of people in this country. We don't trust the government or they don't trust vaccines or whatever I view the payment. For a vaccine as the price we pay for having a divided country. Lytton and his wife are both 70. And they were brainstorming about how they'd ever get out of the house again. Their idea. It's straight out of economics, 101. People respond to incentives and incentives could be used not just for the sake of individuals but for the benefit of society as a whole, like insurance discounts for safe driving. Cash payouts for employees who quit smoking. This one would be pricey. So it $1000 a person round numbers. We're talking somewhere between 253 $100 million. That's billions with a B but Lytton says it would be a drop in the bucket compared to the economic harm if the pandemic persists. After Light wrote about paying people to get vaccinated. The idea got backing from former Democratic presidential candidates John Delaney and Andrew Yang and from the prominent economist Greg. Thank you, but that's about it. There's no groundswell. No bill in Congress, it may not be ready for prime time until we actually see the take up right. Take up rate for vaccinations. Now, if government pay up, speed up to take up right and help us overcome the pandemic, it would be money well spent. But some say the idea overlooks a basic factor. Fear payment may indeed encouraged some people to get the vaccine. Cynthia Crider teaches marketing at Washington University, these old and business school, But it may also deter some people from getting the vaccine because payments signals that the vaccine is risky. The worry is that some people will think the government wouldn't pay me to take these shots. Unless there's something dodgy about the vaccine, even though there's no evidence of that. There's a lot at stake in overcoming suspicions about the vaccines. Dr Anthony Fauci says vaccination levels should reach between 70 and 90%. Fully protect the population, But more than 30% of people say they want or probably won't take the shots right now. The math doesn't work. Maybe confidence will grow as more shots are given. But if not a month from them, we could be hearing a lot more about lightens plan be paying people to get vaccinated. Marie Berliner NPR news.

Lytton Cynthia Crider Rachel Martin Brookings Institution Marie Berliner Uri Berliner Tanya NPR Dr Anthony Fauci Congress Light John Delaney Greg Andrew Yang Robert Washington University
"berliner npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's AM is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. Ben Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago, the program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months. Increase up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to WalMart, the University of Arkansas. And it's surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark, the Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle. Bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, has proclaimed itself the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started. When Cho Vid took place. We really saw people reevaluating their lifestyle and what they saw is important and we felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of Financial supporter of NPR. For those pondering a move to Northwest Arkansas, Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture atop Museum of American Art. And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco to northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old home town of Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the day area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Garland is a Democrat. And she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city, it will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things, and so I think it's actually very exciting when we Berliner NPR news. One of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act, but they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott report explains what the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your dentist saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that while they service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other, they're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in central California has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake Leak who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting a listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short.

Arkansas Tulsa Lisa Garland Serena Jepson San Francisco Northwest Arkansas NPR Nelson Peacock Fish and Wildlife Service Oklahoma University of Arkansas Ben Stewart U. S Fish and Wildlife Service WalMart Cho Vid president and CEO interim director Berkeley North America
"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation. It's aimed is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. Ben Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago. Program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months increase Up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to Walmart, the University of Arkansas and the surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark The Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, as proclaimed itself, the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started when Cho vid took place. We really saw people re evaluating their lifestyle and what they saw was important and we felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of Financial supporter of NPR. For those pondering a move to Northwest Arkansas, Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture atop Museum of American Art. And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco to northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old hometown, Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the Bay Area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Garland is a Democrat. And she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city, it will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things. And so I think it's actually very exciting where we Berliner NPR News, one of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act. But they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott explains what the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your dentist saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that while they service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other, they're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in Central California. Has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake League who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting a listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short supply. Nathan Rott NPR news for college bound high school seniors. The pandemic has taken campus tours and even some admissions exams off the.

Arkansas Lisa Garland San Francisco Tulsa Nathan Rott NPR Northwest Arkansas Nelson Peacock Oklahoma Fish and Wildlife Service Serena Jepson Berkeley George Kaiser Family Foundatio Ben Stewart University of Arkansas U. S Fish and Wildlife Service Berliner NPR News Walmart interim director president and CEO
"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

"It's aimed is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. And Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago, the program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months. Increase up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to WalMart, the University of Arkansas. And it's surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark, the Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle. Bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, has proclaimed itself the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started when Cove it took place. We really saw people re evaluating their lifestyle and what they saw was important and we felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of Financial supporter of NPR. For those pondering a move to Northwest Arkansas, Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture Top Museum of American Art And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco Toe northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old hometown, Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the Bay Area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Growing is a Democrat, and she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things. And so I think it's actually very exciting where we Berliner NPR News, One of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal Wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act, but they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott explains. What the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your dentist saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that while they service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other, they're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in Central California. Has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake Leak who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting a listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short supply. Nathan Rott NPR news For college bound high school seniors. The pandemic has taken campus tours and even some admissions exams.

Arkansas San Francisco Tulsa Nathan Rott NPR Fish and Wildlife Service Northwest Arkansas Nelson Peacock Oklahoma U. S Fish and Wildlife Service Serena Jepson Berkeley University of Arkansas Berliner NPR News WalMart president and CEO Federal Wildlife Stewart interim director Top Museum of American Art
"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's aimed is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. And Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago, the program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months. Increase up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to WalMart, the University of Arkansas. And it's surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark The Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, as proclaimed itself, the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started. When Cho vid took place We really saw people reevaluating their lifestyle and what they saw is important and We felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of financial supporter of NPR for those pondering a move to northwest Arkansas. Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture atop Museum of American Art. And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco Toe northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old hometown, Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the Bay Area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Garland is a Democrat. And she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things. And so I think it's actually very exciting where we Berliner NPR News, One of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal Wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act, but they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott explains. What the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your Dennis saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that the wildlife Service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other. They're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in Central California. Has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake Leak who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting the listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short supply. Nathan Rott NPR news For.

Arkansas Lisa Garland San Francisco Tulsa Serena Jepson Nathan Rott NPR Nelson Peacock U. S Fish and Wildlife Service Northwest Arkansas Oklahoma wildlife Service Berkeley University of Arkansas president and CEO Federal Wildlife Berliner NPR News WalMart Stewart interim director
"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Gotta crash in the left lane. That's got you backed up to Valley Circle Boulevard and attend Easter Grant in L, A a stall cleared from the right lane. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. 35. Years ago, a police helicopter dropped a bomb on a Philadelphia row house in a mostly black neighborhood 11 people were killed. Five of them were Children. The bomb lived an inferno that burned down more than 60 other houses, leaving hundreds of people homeless. This is now referred to as the move. Bombing move for the Black Liberation Group by the same name was targeted will. Last Thursday, the Philadelphia City Council passed a resolution that finally issues a formal apology. Philadelphia City Council member Jamie Gotta who represents the third district where the bombing occurred, helped draft the resolution and joins us now. Hey there. Welcome. Hi. So for those who maybe don't know, don't remember much about the bombing. Which you just briefly explain what what was move, and why was the city of Philadelphia so hostile to it? Yes. Move Woz, a black liberation group of back to nature group. And, um, I think they were. They were different, right? Like many people in our society, and they were a group of black people who were different and who were very unapologetic about it. And I think over time, um, there developed Ah, Lot of friction between move. Andhra police in the city of Philadelphia. So You've got this apology through. Why is this important now? 35 years later, I think it's important because one no one was ever held accountable in a real way for what happens with the move. Bombing, which was an atrocity is one of the only times in our country that A government bombed its home city, its own citizens. Um, there was no there was never a formal apology. That's something that was all also very striking to me. And so I was honored. Tonto work with the activists who really brought this the council to bring this about, And not only is this Not only that, I think this was important from a symbolic perspective. I also think it's important because we see echoes of what happened in the move Bombing in what we're seeing now between police and community and and with the police violence that we've seen in the very same neighborhood. This is also the neighborhood where Walter Well, it's junior was gunned down by police. Just that was just last month that police shooting Walter Wallace Yeah, yes. Yeah. And I've seen you talk about how divisions between police and the community are, you know, not new, obviously. And until we actually reckon with them, their divisions and the problems we're going to keep on coming. Absolutely. I think that we can connect what happened to move with what we saw happen with well to Rawlins Jr. And I think what underlines both of these events and a lot of the police violence we see is racism and a lack of recognition of the humanity of black people in our in our neighborhoods on behalf of police, and until we confront what's at the core, I don't believe we'll be able to move forward. We just have a few seconds left. But along with the apology does this resolution also make some concrete amends to the generations of people impacted by the by the bombing? Well, along with this apology. The resolution establishes May 13th as an annual day of observation, reflection and re commitment in Philadelphia to honor those that we lost on that day in 1985. And though that, um, can be seen as largely symbolic. I hope it will be the start of the listening and the conversations that we need to bring about to change. Is Philadelphia City Council member Jamie Got ta Pleasure to speak with you. Thank you. Thank you so much for focusing on this. Now let's dig into some new research about something many of us are guilty of using buzzwords and corporate gobbledygook. NPR's Uri Berliner has a look at why it just won't go away. You've heard these phrases before, maybe more than you ever wanted to. There's definitely some synergy here. That is a win. That's a win win. Let's get our ducks in a row. Here, guys. All right, Here's the 30,000 ft view. It's true that down, I'll be fit up. Can you put it back together? Look, And then there's the more grandiose language so common in Silicon Valley. We're making the world a better place to pack cells, algorithms for consensus protocols, and we're making the world a better place for software defined data centers. In better place to make the world a better place. What does that even mean? All this word salad everywhere. It got Eric Anna such thinking. Why do people use jargon? Anuses teaches that us sees Marshall School of business. Working with two colleagues from Columbia University. He set out to answer that question, along with another one. We also were interested in kind of are there certain types of people who may use jargon more than others. They looked at published studies and ransom experiments that tested when and why people use jargon. And what they concluded. Is that where you stand in the social hierarchy matters a lot. Using jargon is is one thing that people think will impress others. Their research found that people with less prestige in an organization are more likely to use those buzzwords like interns. New hires First year students What we show is that the lower says people are much more concerned about how they'll be evaluated by their audience. Molly Young has a lot of sympathy for people in that situation. She's the literary critic at New York magazine and wrote an essay about corporate speak earlier this year, she says, when interns use words like deep dive, they're just trying to fit in there. Using it Innocently. Young worked at startups for nearly 10 years and says she knows the dialect only too well. But I could only describe his fake words scam me words like bs. Words So words like orientate or guest, imminent or Omni Channel or core competency, she says. When that kind of language comes from the mouths of people with authority, like corporate executives It's not exactly innocent. She recalls One boss who gave long power point presentations in a windowless meeting room with no air vents. She would be sort of going on and on about delivery. Abel's that we needed to operationalize certain processes in order to optimize share ability, as those words blended together into what young cause a soup of meaninglessness. Fellow employees gamely pretended to listen. But none of our brains were actually in the room. And, she says the result was numbing and disorienting. For me. The experience of having an executive speak to a group of lower employees with those words really got at what is disturbing about it, which is that it can also be used to sort of intentionally confuse people. Young hasn't worked. It started for a while now, but that doesn't mean she's escaped business, John Going altogether. It spreads like kudzu. A phrase will kind of float into my head like a little rain cloud Look, level setting or criminal. Just have a little shutter. We're almost done here, and I can't let this one thing go. There's one piece of corporate speak that really gets on my nerves. Learnings with an S. Mentioned it at the end of my conversation with Molly Young. Her response literally a phrase from Borac. It's right there in the title of the first movie, Cultural Learnings of America. Ford Make benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan Worry Berliner NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Many lower income Angelenos were already struggling to pay rent. The coronavirus made it that much worse way. Want.

Philadelphia Andhra police Philadelphia City Council Black Liberation Group NPR Molly Young Jamie Got Ari Shapiro Valley Circle Boulevard City Council Walter Well New York magazine Walter Wallace Silicon Valley America Mary Louise Kelly. Uri Berliner Borac
"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In better place to make the world a better place. What is the hot even mean? Well, this word salad everywhere. It got Eric Anna. Such thinking Why do people use jargon and assist teaches that USC is Marshall School of business. Working with two colleagues from Columbia University? He set out to answer that question. Along with another one. We also were interested in kind of are there certain types of people who may use jargon more than others. They looked at published studies and ransom experiments that tested when and why people use jargon. And what they concluded. Is that where you stand in the social hierarchy matters a lot. Using jargon is is one thing that people think will impress others. Their research found that people with less prestige in an organization are more likely to use those buzzwords like interns. New hires First year students What we show is that the lower says people are much more concerned about how they'll be evaluated by their audience. Molly Young has a lot of sympathy for people in that situation. She's the literary critic at New York magazine and wrote an essay about corporate speak earlier this year, she says, when interns use words like deep dive, they're just trying to fit in there. Using it Innocently. Young worked at startups for nearly 10 years and says she knows the dialect only too well. But I could only describe his fake words scam me words like bs. Words so words like orientate or guesstimate or Omni Channel or core competency, she says. When that kind of language comes from the mouths of people with authority, like corporate executives It's not exactly innocent. She recalls One boss who gave long power point presentations in a windowless meeting room with no air vents. She would be sort of going on and on about delivery. Abel's that we needed to operationalize certain processes in order to optimize share ability, as those words blended together into what young cause a soup of meaninglessness. Fellow employees gamely pretended to listen. But none of our brains were actually in the room. And, she says the result was numbing and disorienting. For me. The experience of having an executive speak to a group of lower employees with those words really got at what is disturbing about it, which is that it can also be used to sort of intentionally confuse people. Young hasn't worked has started for a while now, but that doesn't mean she's escaped business jargon altogether. It spreads like kudzu. A phrase will kind of float into my head like a little rain cloud look, level setting or mental just have a little shudder. We're almost done here, and I can't let this one thing go. There's one piece of corporate speak that really gets on my nerves. Learnings with an S. Mentioned it at the end of my conversation with Molly Young. Her response literally a phrase from Borac. It's right there in the title of the first movie, Cultural Learnings of America. Ford make benefit glorious nation of Kazakhstan. Marie Berliner NPR news Stay tuned. You're listening to all things considered. News Headlines are coming your way in just a moment and then in a few minutes on W when my sea researchers who modeled disease spread are extremely worried about the holiday season. I'm asking people for the sake of their loved ones for the sake of their neighbors for the sake of their country before go getting together in person more on the current trajectory of the pandemic and how it could change with mitigation measures that and much more right after news headlines on all things considered, it's gonna be mostly clear and cold Tonight Love about 32 windchills between 25 30. It's 7 30, a W N Y C listener, you have.

Molly Young Eric Anna Marshall School of business Kazakhstan USC Marie Berliner New York magazine Columbia University Omni Abel executive Ford Borac America
"berliner npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The pandemic has turned millions of people into virtual workers. But there's another trend that's been less obvious. Permanent full time jobs are going freelance, and that's severing ties between some companies and employees. NPR's er Berliner has more Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then? Of course I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep our occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer for 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, glancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip a quota tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR on advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky, and in the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers. And now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are trying to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Orry Berliner NPR news students going back to school are adapting to change and uncertainty. But for students with disabilities adjusting to constant change could be more complicated. Theresa for Stack spoke with two students in Maine about how they're navigating school in the time of covert 19 in the spring, when the pandemic for schools to use online learning the transition was tougher students. My name is cool. I am Mui I live in. One of the main Quiet is 1/12 grader who attends a public charter school with a hands on focus and tight knit community. She especially loved being on stage at her school's Open mic nights. Quiet also has down syndrome and it was hard to concentrate while learning at home was really have to focus on the work. I do because you're talking, talking talking now stay and you can't Do you look down there? She learned to be flexible and find a quiet space to work and one of quiet teachers emailed her every day, which was a huge help. The same was true for a middle schooler in Portland, Maine. Mining is after a big grey are very on would be his own grain. I really games I ah and places Asher has autism and 88. The unpredictability and lack of structure at the start of the pandemic. Where a challenge so his mom worked with the school to make sure he got the support that he'd had at school in person. I actually work with Pharrell Zoom. She also basically helps me almost every day. But Asher said some of the changes weren't so bad, like not having to choose a new outfit each day and adjusting school hours to be more manageable in their home. Learning was pretty cool. I Actually had lost under the day around. 12, both quiet and Asher schools have adopted hybrid models of online and in person learning. At first, Ashley wanted to be completely remote. But then he realized some things were better at school like eating pizza in the cafeteria in gym class. There is not sure about playing tag, no contact Andre shirt that you're not supposed to do that during cornering with people that don't even live with you so probably highly unlikely. Why has been back for a couple weeks, and she's thrilled her teachers are like family. But some things like wearing a mask and social distancing are certainly different. We can't give them hugs all high fives. Yet in a way, she also said, these changes are worth it to be in person again. Asher agrees. He started school September 14th and the changes are important to getting back his primary concern. Halloween I'm worried about is like how we and inevitably, your mask. Maybe they're based off a distance and couldn't salary in whether or not Halloween or hugging can happen this year. Quiet in Asher Think for turning to school in person, at least part of the time is a step in the right direction. When more changes come, they'll adapt again for NPR news. This's trusted her steak at a moment when over 700 people are dying every day in the United States of covert 19. And infections continue to spread. A new poll shows that trust in public health officials is dropping precipitously here. The Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that public confidence in the Centers for Disease Control has dipped 16 points. Dr..

Asher Diana Gil Berliner NPR New York Maine NPR executive editor president Post Cove United States Julia Pollock Kaiser Family Foundation Cogan editor Julia Polish Stephanie Coddle Tio Centers for Disease Control
"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's gone up dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR on advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Orry Berliner NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. And this is double u N Y. You are listening to all things considered. Stay with us just after the break on WN my sea we'll hear from Navajo Nation President Jonathan Mess about the latest report of no new Corona virus cases at the reservation. That's a landmark for a region devastated by the pandemic. I'll have that story and more just after the break on W and my C statement..

Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock NPR Cogan Post Cove Julia Polish Tio Jonathan Mess Connell Black Girl Group President Pollack founder
Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:21 min | 1 year ago

Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

"Just. A few months ago college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now, because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst generations when members of the class of twenty twenty half landed jobs, the experience is odd NPR's Berlin reports. Twenty twenty was shaping up to be a great year for Golden. DACA, he be the first member of his family to graduate from college not only that he was the Valedictorian of his school. Morehouse College. ATLANTA. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online and then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement it was postponed I wanted to give that huge speech onstage with my family friends and loved ones who made it very possible for me to go to it came to an abrupt end been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead he landed in the pandemic, it's been a really difficult transition you know and it's been one that's a mocking allies with. A lot of uncertainty. A lot of self doubt. Worst of all, his grandmother who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native. Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot dako landed a paid fellowship with the governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews. So I'm more on the fortunate side and a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate through pollock is a Labor economist with the job sites Ziprecruiter. So compared with fee labor market in February before covert hit, we have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by seventy three percent. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring eighteen million jobs have been posted. On ziprecruiter since covert struck, what has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired interviews or evolving from those zoom skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person that all the lack of face to face human interaction that's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan she graduated this spring from the University of Iowa, and moved in with her mom it's been fine. But with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I, feel like my interviewer singing a different background, every single time with them. You know this is a very difficult, but as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work at a startup in. So I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation because so much of the last few months felt unreal even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo and it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people. Virtually getting an apartment. So nothing feels like tangible to me all that is about to change this weekend. Kaplan will load up a rental truck and moved to a new hometown. Kansas. City. There won't be anything virtual about it. Berliner NPR news.

Danielle Kaplan Morehouse College Kansas City Twenty Twenty NPR Zambia Berlin Berliner Npr Atlanta Labor Economist Illinois Kansas Pollock University Of Iowa
"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. Pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other bids. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. You think that would have cost even more if they waited, And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything changed the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate. Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber inthe e month of April where we typically would get Navy. 75 enquiries. In a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the National Realestate brokerage Redfin, he says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom. Covert has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills near a lake that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, But the picture has shifted once again. Over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs, more movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw you knew everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of strange Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson. Thanks so much for being with us during my pleasure. I've read that. This is the song that kind of got this album started. Is that right? Yeah. Nobody.

New York Willie Nelson William Fry Miriam Manhattan Navy. Connecticut Montclair front porch Brookings Institution Glenn Kalman Hearst Postal Service NPR Monica Schwarber National Realestate America Steve
"berliner npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog. Louis as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. The pandemic clinched it be in the epicenter, the washing of the hands. Just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other bids. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. She thinks it would have cost even more if they waited. And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything came to the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area. Since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media And in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber in the month of April, where we typically would get Navy 75 enquiries. In a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money on Ly the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the National Realestate brokerage Redfin, he says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom covered has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills near a lake that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, But the picture has shifted once again. Over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs, more movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Hurry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of strange Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson. Thanks so much for being with us about I've read that this is the song that kind of got this album started. Yeah,.

New York Miriam Willie Nelson William Fry Manhattan Louis Connecticut Montclair front porch Brookings Institution Glenn Kalman Postal Service NPR Hearst National Realestate Steve America Monica Schwarber CEO
"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. Pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other bids. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. She thinks it would have cost even more if they waited. And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything came to the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service. And moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate. Here's real estate agent Monica Schwartzberg inthe e month of April where we typically would get Navy 75 enquiries. In a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the national real estate brokerage Redfin. He says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills near a lake that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, But the picture has shifted once again. Over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs, more movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw everything had changed over love started. First rule of Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson. Thanks so much for being with us. Sure about pleasure. I've read that. This is the song that kind of got this album started. Yeah, but.

New York Willie Nelson Miriam William Fry Glenn Kalman Connecticut Manhattan Montclair front porch Monica Schwartzberg Brookings Institution Postal Service Hearst NPR Redfin Steve America
"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. Pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other bids. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. She thinks it would have cost even more if they waited. And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything changed the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate. Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber inthe e month of April where we typically would get Navy. 75 enquiries. In a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the National Realestate brokerage Redfin, he says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom. Covert has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills near a lake that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, But the picture has shifted once again. Over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs, more movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw her he knew everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of strange Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson. Thanks so much for being with us. Sure about. I've read that. This is the song that kind of got this album started. Is that right? Yeah..

New York Willie Nelson Miriam William Fry Manhattan Connecticut Montclair front porch Brookings Institution Glenn Kalman Navy. Hearst Postal Service NPR Monica Schwarber National Realestate America Steve
"berliner npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In New York. Like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may have Haitian that movement, even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent. And she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey, a suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios. Restaurants. You can walk to art galleries, even a film festival, Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different scale, every last bit of it is covert related. New Yorkers used to say maybe one of their one day now they've decided we don't have. Look you lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out. There are which says people are eager to buy like Miriam Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September. Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management, and Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. The pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other biz. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. You think that would have cost even more if they waited, And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything came to the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber in the month of April, where we typically would get Navy 75 increase in a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the national real estate brokerage Redfin. He says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom covered has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills, nearly that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, but the picture has shifted once again over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs. More movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says. New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson, Thanks so much for being with us about I've read that this is the song that kind of got this album started. Yeah, but he can.

New York Montclair New York City Miriam Cantor Susan Horowitz Willie Nelson Steve William Fry NPR New Jersey Uri Berliner BJ Liederman Glenn Kalman front porch Connecticut Gen Z Brookings Institution Manhattan Postal Service
"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"berliner npr" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm no well king in normal times hotels try to attract customers with star chefs or high end design but these are not normal times seven out of ten hotel rooms in the U. S. are empty now and to survive hotels are adapting here's NPR's uri Berliner the news from Hilton lately isn't about craft cocktails response it's a partnership with Lysol that's right Hilton is teaming up with the parent company of Lysol it's all about enhanced cleanliness Phil Cordell was Hilton's global head of brand development we know that through this pandemic the that expectation of cleanliness has probably been elevated to the point now where it's cleanliness almost with a double exclamation point after it at Hilton and other hotels guests can expect disinfectant being applied liberally and visibly for the sake of cleanliness and for reassurance says Jim Coyle who consults with hotels on customer experiences when you get a guest key you'll see the staff members they will conspicuously white the guest key in front of you for that and it's you when you arrive desk you're going see hotels that wiping the desk cleaning forty even though there's nothing on it when you go to your room more efforts of reassurance Marriott international has identified twelve touch points for extra disinfectant ray Bennett is the company's head of global operations doorknobs thermostats door handles drawer handles things of that nature has Hilton rolls out its clean state campaign Cordell says guests will notice some familiar objects missing they will see that some of the items in the ring that could likely be fingerprinted by previous guests magazines notepads pens those items have been removed from the right and there's likely to be more here's industry consultant Jim Coyle again the phone will probably be something that is seeing its last days because of in that most divisive object in the hotel room I think the the death of many bars probably finally here all of these steps have one purpose to assure travelers that hotels are safe released as safe as they possibly can be while corona virus is still with us an early test will be convincing business travelers like Liz Oppenheim who lives outside of Boston she's itching to get back on the road the longer I go without traveling the more I just don't feel like a person I I literally had dreams almost every night about traveling Oppenheimer street drug companies on clinical trials normally spends three or four nights a week in hotels she enjoys it for one thing she racks up a whole lot of loyalty points I have all the statuses for now her travel is on pause and this Oppenheim imagine staying in hotels again there's one word she uses a lot anxious so there's something about slipping between the sheets of the clean white Christiansen hotel that's just credibly relaxing especially works at a really hard you know tense day at work and it's just so wonderful but I think I will be anxious I think I'll be anxious to as hotels spray and disinfect and purge their rooms of pens magazines and note pads they may eliminate germs but will they eliminate anxiety hotels are about to find out Berliner NPR news sh this afternoon on All Things Considered in Alabama high school will hold a graduation ceremony today despite worries from parents about safety tell your smart speaker playing P. R. or just ask for your member station by any you're listening to morning edition on KCRW.