35 Burst results for "Berlin Wall"

"berlin wall" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

06:51 min | 3 weeks ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"I've been saying this from the very beginning. You know I. I I agree with what trump did. Yeah. I said from the start that Donald Trump is not the American President America deserves in my in my opinion, but he definitely is the American president. China deserve. that we needed to have a president who is going to call the game with China and trump's done it. With I would say more grit and toughness than any of his predecessors I give him credit for that. But he thought he could do it alone. He thought he could do it with a coalition Thomas. So interesting your point about the importance of of winning the EU over on this This question in this debate, there was a report six months ago and the according to reports. That Angler Merckel had said I'm more worried about the influence of social media companies from the US on our children than say hallway on our nation clearly clearly, the US has influenced the UK on the topic of Wow. Away a lot of it is still up for grabs as you're suggesting, are you suggesting that there's not legitimacy around some of the US? Questions Chinese tech may be always example maybe tiktok as example, and this is just a baffle. To win the hearts and minds of Germany and or there is the and it's just a case of convincing The likes of the Germans are of the ills of say hallway like they managed to convince the Brits. Two issues here. One is a long term structural issue for. For decades. sold us a shallow goods, goods we want her back shoes, warranted feet, socks we warner ankles, solar panels we were we we put on our roots while we still China deep goods stuff that went deep inside their systems and economies software chips, etc. What is new today is that China can sell steep goods five jeep that can go inside your house inside your chat. Bot inside your bedroom, and we don't have the trust relationship with generally for us to buy their deep goods. That's the real while way story. That's what we're fighting about here now over and above that you have to understand and I think this is what the administration where I have problems with them just because China can in theory on call on a Tiktok in demand that it. Data doesn't mean it's doing it anymore. That means that America's doing it or a European countries doing it with their technologies and I'm uncomfortable when I read these tick tock stories I think we should always ask ourselves is this Saddam Hussein. Has Nuclear Weapons. What is the actual proof of what Tiktok has done? Yes. Theoretically given Chinese law they could turn over data. Have they done that I'd like to know that? I'm uncomfortable. I'm not knowing enough of that as we dive into this that's it do I. Think. China just on the base of my own reporting. has been meddling in our elections and has the ability to. Influence you know social networks in this country it does and we need to we need to be alive to that. You remember that massive group of Hacks last your Anson Marriott Equifax, a lot of people think that was actually China. Building a huge database on Americans that could run I on and influence campaigns in the future. Tom. The end of your of your comments, they're kind of make me go back to the beginning of those comments. If we think this is China and we know of other attacks that China has launched on us through the through cyber attacks that they've launched on us. We may not have proof of them using while away or any of these other. Sort of ways in spying on us, but as the relationship has grown more afraid as we know about a lot of these cyber attacks that have taken place that have been sponsored by the the People's Liberation Army in China. How. Comfortable should we feel about that? Knowing that that's out there I hear your point about not seeing the actual proof of this being done but you know the history of some of the issues with wow away with corporate intellectual property being stolen and ripped off on some of these issues and you know about the cyber attacks, you put those two together and that does raise a lot of concern about what we might be setting ourselves up for if this is embedded into everything about our lives. So I'm torn between two things back. One is I. Agree with you. You know I'm not whistling this issue at all I. Take it very seriously, but you know I was in. Shenzhen last year interviewed Mr Rehn, the founder way, and so before I went to the interview I, I prepared for the interviews took looked up. In cyber and whatnot, you know what's the first thing that comes up on on Google and you do it at one of the first things It was how America, Hack always networks you know a decade ago in order to tap into Pakistani intelligence. So the idea that. They're the only ones doing this. You know. And we're not I. Think we have to be you know have an adult conversation about that, and that leads to my second point. You know we're in a world where everything is dual use. Now, a hammer is dual use a radio's dual use. The Chat Bot in your bedroom is do what you said. It could have military intelligence and civilian purposes and we have to sort out in our own minds I live my life I assume everyone's hacking everything you know what I mean. because. If we start looking at every single Chinese company and what it does everything is dual use including your kids next bathtub duckie you would probably a chip in you know. So we have to set down. That's why I say that. There needs to be kind of global conversation between the E. U American China. Over how we're going to do this? Otherwise, we're heading for a silicon, a digital Berlin Wall and the world will be less stable and it'll be less prosperous if that's where we go. Tom Thank you. It's always good to see you and I think we probably fifty more questions for you, but we'll have to have back against any time vic. Thank you. Coming up on Squawk pod from Formula One to family Chabad zoom has made itself indispensable to pandemic life. CFO Kelly STUCCO Burgon. What's next for the platform? We look forward to the day that the pandemic damage is over we can resume normal activities and yet I don't think that even itself is a threat to zoom we'll be right back. It takes conviction to see on the turmoil in today's markets. That's pigeon the Investment Management Business Prudential with a legacy of risk management discipline and investment experience through thirty market cycles. PG is prepared for today's challenges. PG BRINGS LONG-TERM PERSPECTIVE and.

China America Donald Trump president Tom trump PG EU Saddam Hussein Anson Marriott Equifax Tiktok Berlin Wall Investment Management Business Kelly STUCCO Burgon Angler Merckel
Tesla stock rally accelerates

Squawk Pod

02:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Tesla stock rally accelerates

"Tessa says on the move this morning at pairing gains up to the company Equity Distribution Agreement to sell up to five billion dollars of sheds. Joins us with more on that Phil Not enough to put it into negative territory though this morning pre market. No. Because I think when you look at this Agreem- in, what did Tesla has essentially done is it has formed an agreement with a series of bank and I haven't counted how many exactly I think there are seven or eight where from time to time at Tesla's direction, they will sell test shares to raise up to potentially overtime five billion dollars. Now, we don't know exactly what the schedule is going to be how frequently these sexless stock sales will take place the money is going to. Be, used according to the eight K. that they announced this with to sure up the balance sheet and provide a liquidity for the company which raises the question. HOW IS TESLA'S LIQUIDITY? It ended the second quarter with about five billion dollars in liquidity. But remember they've got some strong capital commitments that are coming. They're still building the gigafactory outside of Berlin they've made the commitment to build a gigafactory outside of Austin Texas they're constantly investing in the GIGAFACTORY which is expanding and adding more battery production outside of Reno Nevada. So I think when you look at this TESCO investors will look at this and they'll say look. We don't know exactly what they're going to be using this money for in the future but we do realize that they're going to have these big capital commitments and so now they have said with this series of banks look from time to time we will ask you to take advantage of the market and sell our shares at our direction and Phil we was saying. It's a sign of. The progress of this company that they can re raise five billion. So easily, it's a percent or so just just over a percentage of the market cap today the shares on even flinching and eighteen months ago, two years ago. This would have been nylon impossible correct and remember the reaction that we've seen over the last couple of years whenever Tesla has raised capital, it's been more muted with each capital raise there was. A big reaction. I remember to a capital rate what are they? Two or three years ago and the big question is oh. My goodness what are they doing? Is this an indication that these guys will never be able to make money for just always going to be spending money we have seen less and less of a reaction from the market with each subsequent capital raise or an indication that they will be selling shares. And the share price gains again, not just to mention the eighteen percent since August eleventh announcement of the stocks yesterday up double digit percents off the first of the stock split Phillips thanks much

Tesla Phil Tessa Tesco Reno Nevada Phillips Texas Austin Berlin
Beethoven's Symphonies

Classics for Kids

05:32 min | Last month

Beethoven's Symphonies

"Welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin Fransius of Haydn is known as the father of the symphony because he took that form of orchestra music and perfected it. But no one changed the symphony more than Ludvig Fund Beethoven. The First Symphony Beethoven wrote definitely sounds like it was influenced by Haydn's music. By the time Beethoven wrote his second symphony tragedy had struck, but you'd never know it from the music. The Summer Beethoven wrote his Second Symphony was the summer he realized he was going death. Instead of letting his misery out in his music Beethoven put it all into a letter at the end of which he said he wasn't going to let deafness stop him from being a musician. When Napoleon Bonaparte started conquering Europe Van was a huge fan because he thought Napoleon was going to help ordinary people. Beethoven planned to dedicate his third symphony to Napoleon. But then Napoleon. Crowned himself emperor proving that he was more interested in power than people. Beethoven was furious and changed the name of his symphony number three to ero- Ika the heroic symphony. Beethoven's Fourth Symphony has some very dancing music. Sometimes. The fourth kind of gets lost in the shuffle between the Aurora and the even more famous symphony that came next Beethoven's fifth. Avenue. The man who wrote the first biography of Beethoven claimed that the composer meant the opening at the to be knocking at the door. But a student of Beethoven's thought his teacher had nothing more faithfully mind than a bird call from a kind of sparrow a yellowhammer. Whether or not Beethoven included a bird in his fifth. He certainly put birds and a lot more nature into his six, which even has a nature nickname, the pastoral or pastorale symphony. No birds at all in Beethoven's symphony number seven just rousing music. In Beethoven's Eighth Symphony something is clearly ticking. More about that next week, which brings us to Beethoven's ninth a piece that completely changed how people thought of symphonies. No one had ever used singers in a symphony before, but Beethoven put plenty of them into the last movement of the peace in his famous. Ode to Joy, with words by German playwright. Friedrich Schiller. I one person seems it. And eventually a whole chorus joins in. People all over the world know and love Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. When the Berlin Wall came down, they celebrated with a huge concert featuring Beethoven's ninth. I've been sung it in China where audiences went crazy next week the mechanical object in Beethoven's symphony number eight and a lot more pieces of music describe inanimate objects

Beethoven Ludvig Fund Beethoven Napoleon Bonaparte Haydn Naomi Lewin Fransius Ero- Ika Friedrich Schiller Berlin Wall Pastorale China Aurora Europe Van
Beethoven's Symphonies

Classics for Kids

05:23 min | Last month

Beethoven's Symphonies

"Welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin Fransius of Haydn is known as the father of the symphony because he took that form of orchestra music and perfected it. But no one changed the symphony more than Ludvig Fund Beethoven. The First Symphony Beethoven wrote definitely sounds like it was influenced by Haydn's music. By the time Beethoven wrote his second symphony tragedy had struck, but you'd never know it from the music. The Summer Beethoven wrote his Second Symphony was the summer he realized he was going death. Instead of letting his misery out in his music Beethoven put it all into a letter at the end of which he said he wasn't going to let deafness stop him from being a musician. When Napoleon Bonaparte started conquering Europe Van was a huge fan because he thought Napoleon was going to help ordinary people. Beethoven planned to dedicate his third symphony to Napoleon. But then Napoleon. Crowned himself emperor proving that he was more interested in power than people. Beethoven was furious and changed the name of his symphony number three to ero- Ika the heroic symphony. Beethoven's Fourth Symphony has some very dancing music. Sometimes. The fourth kind of gets lost in the shuffle between the Aurora and the even more famous symphony that came next Beethoven's fifth. Avenue. The man who wrote the first biography of Beethoven claimed that the composer meant the opening at the to be knocking at the door. But a student of Beethoven's thought his teacher had nothing more faithfully mind than a bird call from a kind of sparrow a yellowhammer. Whether or not Beethoven included a bird in his fifth. He certainly put birds and a lot more nature into his six, which even has a nature nickname, the pastoral or pastorale symphony. No birds at all in Beethoven's symphony number seven just rousing music. In Beethoven's Eighth Symphony something is clearly ticking. More about that next week, which brings us to Beethoven's ninth a piece that completely changed how people thought of symphonies. No one had ever used singers in a symphony before, but Beethoven put plenty of them into the last movement of the peace in his famous. Ode to Joy, with words by German playwright. Friedrich Schiller. I one person seems it. And eventually a whole chorus joins in. People all over the world know and love Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. When the Berlin Wall came down, they celebrated with a huge concert featuring Beethoven's ninth. I've been sung it in China where audiences went crazy

Beethoven Ludvig Fund Beethoven Napoleon Bonaparte Haydn Naomi Lewin Fransius Ero- Ika Friedrich Schiller Berlin Wall Pastorale China Aurora Europe Van
Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

The Economist: The Intelligence

17:45 min | Last month

Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

"The squeeze on political freedoms in Hong Kong is ramping up and fast. On Friday, the territory's Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced September's planned elections would be postponed for a year and poss- sediments. I've always had to make difficult decisions but then the announcement I have to make today is the most difficult decision that I have to make in the. Insisted, the delay was only to avoid the spread of COPA, nineteen. The decision to postpone them the training train t electrical election has nothing to do with politics has nothing to do with a likely outcome of this round of. PRO-DEMOCRACY PARTIES, AD HOC for success in the poll riding a wave of discontent at Beijing's recent imposition of sweeping national security law. The legislation broadly defines and harshly punishes subversion sedition collusion with foreigners. Nathan law one of Hong Kong's most prominent pro-democracy activists recently spoke with our sister podcast economists asks why? Phones. Movement is still really strong though there have been protests against the new law. The millions of people who wants surged onto the streets have largely stayed home is police have cracked down harder just try to imagine if you live. In a country place that that is no freedom of expression freedom of them fraiche ethan freedom of thoughts. Then definitely, like protests does not exist or will be lushly quashed earlier last week, twelve pro-democracy candidates were banned from running whenever the elections happened. On Saturday, on Kong's police issued arrest warrants for six political activists living in exile in the West. Since the promulgation of the national security nor on July the first of the scope for political expression has been very much. Dominic Ziegler writes Banyan, our call him on Asian affairs. And because of that, there haven't been any street protests. of any size since July the first because of the consequences. For those taking part. But nevertheless, there has been widespread concern about postponing the election by a year, the Bar Association, representing senior barristers and other lawyers in the territory has expressed what it called grave concern and it said that a decision to postpone September's elections for the Legislative Council, which is known as Mexico was undermining a vital constitutional rights and so what does that mean in practice? What happens with the sitting lawmakers? There are all sorts of implications about what it. Means in practice because hitherto Hong Nor has been very clear you have to hold elections for this quasi-democratic legislature every four years. So the government of Kerry lamb, the chief executive is in a bit of a pickle about how it justifies this. Although she said, it was for reasons of the pandemic several other jurisdictions have been able to carry out elections, and that includes recently elections. In Singapore, there are certainly suspicions that the decision was taken not because of. The pandemic, but because Democrats had a good chance in fact. Gaining for the first time a majority in this rather gerrymandered council and indeed even obstructing a government policy or criticizing the government has it has been suggested by the authorities the risk of falling foul of the new. National Security Law. So this decision is absolutely shot through with politics, but nevertheless to take some finessing by the government. To show that the move is legitimate, the chances are that how it will manage that is to get a ruling from on high from Beijing saying that this is the appropriate course and it's worth bearing in mind that Beijing has always since Hong Kong's return to China. Has Always had the authority to intervene in Hong Kong's has the understanding would be that this would happen only rarely. But in the last few weeks, we've seen it happening time and time again, I think this is going to be the practice for the future. But what about the the the candidates who were banned from running here is, is there a risk that that Beijing will start to essentially stack the LegCo with with loyalists there in this interim year? This certainly is a risk Jason the bear in mind that all the moves around legend. have been made in order to ensure that the pro democratic camp does not secure a majority in the legislature. Now early last week, the authorities did this by disqualifying a dozen also candidates caming that even for criticizing the National Security Law that gave the government grounds for not allowing them to run. Now, a few dozen candidates actually sit in the current Legislative Council. So one big question that the authorities have to find an answer to is whether those four legislators continue to sit in a council session is is now being extended by a year. The chances are that the government will find means to disqualify. Those four and Beijing's moves go further than that. Recently, they're speaking of arresting pro-democracy activists outside of the territory, which is also unusual. That's right has happened in the past week on July the twenty ninth four students were detained for supposedly inciting secession. This seems to have had something to do with facebook page and shortly after became clear that the police had put on a wanted list, a number of activists who are currently in exile. So, there is an example for instance of how China intends for this new national security in order have jurisdiction beyond the borders of the country itself. These people were in the United States, the UK and elsewhere. One of them was not even a Hong Kong citizen better taken up US citizenship and so as as Beijing's hands gets heavier in Hong Kong Antoine Indeed all over the world. How are people coping normal life goes on so far as both the virus and the new political restrictions allow what is certainly happened is that the street protests that so colored and royal the territory last year are now very much a thing of the past. So the act the concerned the worry that. Has. Taken hold in the territory is one that is not always voiced publicly but in private conversations and the concerns really are about Hong Kong's long-term future. One of the possibility is certainly that many people discussing is immigration and a number of countries have. Roots towards long term permanent residency or even citizenship. Those countries include the United Kingdom Australia Canada, the United States. But many people are not in a position to leave immediately. But what happens now with all of the momentum that was behind the protesters but this whole movement now that protests themselves have died down to the protesters are moving abroad. What happens now it looks like well, over half of Hong Kong's population is in favor of democratic change but the possibilities for that through politics and through the ballot box have been very sharply restricted in in recent weeks. So there's a conversation emerging. About what form opposition should take? So people are starting to draw parallels with the Eastern European bloc during the Soviet era too many people here the national security nor is starting to look like the Ray quick building of the Berlin Wall in the early nineteen sixties and people are drawing comparisons with opposition in the decades following that in eastern Europe and that opposition took perform of underground dissident, it took the form of dissident writers and The church played a big role in eastern. Europe. Some hope that it may do here in Hong Kong one positive sign has been taken from last year's protests is an extraordinary. Creativity in in the form of protest art in the form of. Video making. So the hope is that maybe these avenues might at least allow a civil society not only to to hang on by its fingertips but also to grow. Don Thank you very much for your time fact Jason. For. Inciteful pair of interviews about Hong Kong's politics. Look for our sister show the economy asks my colleague and mckelway spoke to activist Nathan Law and to Regina Yip a Pro Beijing member of Hong. Kong's cabinet who said it's the activists themselves who bear responsibility for the mainland's latest moves. It's their choice they had. A goal on the provost part to self-destruction you. Choice. To want to commodes a separatism. From China I. Feel sorry for that. All the problems that they face now are of their own way. No. In fact, they are true young they are too young to commit judgments on these fundamental issues. Why should they be involved in promoting separation from China? Why should be that look for the Economist asks wherever you find your podcasts. Today more than ever. It's essential that we do all the right things to keep our bodies healthy inside tracker is the ultra personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood GNA and lifestyle to help you optimize your body from the inside out transform your body's data into meaningful insights and a customized action plan. Back recommendations you need to reach your goals. Are you ready to take control of your health and wellness journey unlock the power of your potential with inside tracker get twenty five percents off today at inside track or dot com slash listen. America's recent protests against racism and police brutality have drawn much interest in the Middle East. Some people have reacted with shock some with Schadenfreude. For others though America's unrest was an opportunity to discuss the problems with race in their own countries. Most Arab states have a black minority, each of which faces its own discrimination. The worst treatment though is reserved for migrants. There is a scene that played out almost every day for weeks for months outside of the Ethiopian embassy here in Beirut he would see cars pull up and drop off their passengers if the OB and women who were carrying their possessions and suitcases are in bags. Great girls from is our Middle East correspondent based in Lebanon these weren't women catching plane or catching a train. They had nowhere to go actually word maids, domestic workers whose employers. Could no longer afford to pay them because of the economic crisis here in Lebanon also couldn't send them home because the airport was largely closed because of covid one, thousand, nine, hundred, and so they dump them off outside the embassy they simply left them there to be someone else's problem. You would meet women who said they'd been sitting there on the curb for days on end using their bags as pillows simply left the fend for themselves. And isn't that kind of a general comment on how Lebanon treats migrant domestic workers? It is even before cove in nineteen. Before the economic crisis, there was widespread racism and harsh treatment of migrant workers here there are a number of cases where Lebanese have advertised their maids on facebook as if they were property, there was a post back in April that offered a Nigerian made who was described as being very active and very clean and she. was being sold for one and a half million Lebanese pounds, which is worth about a thousand dollars at the official exchange rates. There was also a clip that was circulated widely here in Lebanon in June it was from a television channel in Ghana that covered the return of two hundred or so Ghanaian citizens from Lebanon most of them. One, hundred, eighty of them were women working as domestic workers here, and they described horrendous conditions and treatments. Fit. After that sexual harassment. They bit s like animals. I have videos of this. I went through in that country and they also warned other people not to follow them to Lebanon not to come here to work. No. Doubt Music and go back to Lebanon is not a country that we should be. How does this situation come about? Where for instance, an people find themselves trapped with arguably abusive employers often starts with unscrupulous recruiters are agents migrants who come here to other countries in the middle. East. Are often promised good salaries, respectful working conditions and they arrive and find out that it's anything. But but then they find themselves trapped for two reasons. One is they often have to take out loans to pay fees to these recruiters and the loans can run thousand dollars two. Thousand dollars which when you're making only a few hundred dollars a month and you're trying to send much of that to your families back home it can take many months if not years to pay off those loans. So they find themselves trapped by debt. They also find themselves trapped by something called the Catholic system, which again exists here in Lebanon and many other countries in the Middle East whereby migrant workers are bound to their field or their sponsor, and so they can't simply. Changed jobs because their residency in their work permit is connected to their sponsor, and if they leave that job, they have to leave the country. So you meet migrants who say despite the awful conditions they're making more money here than they would make back home, and so they're willing to they're forced to continue to put up with US conditions because they're blocked from finding another job, and so all of this is a function of how the Lebanese feel about migrants or is this. Strictly a racial thing. It's hard to separate the two because almost all of the migrants here are either from east and South Asia or from Africa. So it's often connected to race as well as their status being migrant workers but the racism here it cuts across socio-economic lines I spoke with a black diplomat too says been pursued through upscale shopping malls Lebanon by security guards thought she was a housekeeper and they wanted to know why she was shopping without her madame without her employer. So Racist, certainly a problem here and in other countries around the Middle East and not only when it comes to migrants states across the Arab world have black minorities. You have Egypt for example, the Nubians who have been there for thousands of years you have in the Levant and the Gulf states black communities that are often the descendants of slaves taken by Islamic empires or the descendents of African Muslims who made pilgrimages to places like Saudi Arabia and decided to stay again, those communities face various kinds of commission as well. Would you mean by that? Will you hear some of it? Simply in the language that people use darker skinned people referred to with terms like opt, which means slave Anwar Sadat was president of Egypt darker skin than his predecessor was sometimes referred to as his predecessors black poodle you turn on the television in the Middle East and black face is fairly common sight on Arabic language television and no doubt that kind of racism manifests in in everyday life in lots of ways, it does you see it in areas of life. March choice of partner you have families that will see skin color as a marker for Associate Comic Status Lighter skinned people seen as being wealthier and more educated. You see it in the workplace as well in Iraq, for example, where there's a black community that has been there for at least a thousand years they to this day struggle to obtain government jobs and they're often relegated to doing menial work and living on the outskirts of society. You see it as well in the Gulf states where there's almost a racial hierarchy to employment. If you walk into a Nice Hotel and the Gulf you might see black migrants from Africa working as security guards or as porters. You will see them far less often in jobs that require interaction with customers. Waiters hairdressers, things like that those jobs which are better paid than less taxing often go to lighter skinned workers from Asia or from Arab countries I mean racism has been very much on the agenda over the past few months because of the the killing of George Floyd protests that erupted across the world did that wave of protests hit the Arab world as well? The protests themselves. Didn't reach the Arab world. This is a region fortunately protest often a criminal offence of we didn't see much in the way in street demonstrations either in solidarity or around the region's own issues with racism but it has certainly escalated the conversation that's taking place both online and offline. There was a video that circulated quite widely earlier this summer was shot by a Palestinian actress condit's. Who recounted some of the just casual bigotry that she's heard and day-today Life Semis Ben Aston Headache. Mariam. People often argue that it's harmless. It's just words. And allow. Them. One of the points that she was trying to make in this video is that it does hurt people and that it does have an influence not only on the targets of it but on societies broader attitude towards Black Arabs, and do you think having these kinds of discussions on social media and the like will make much of a difference? Is it enough having a conversation about these? Things is certainly better than nothing. But one thing that we've seen certainly in America through years and years and years of protests against racism and police brutality is that just having a conversation doesn't actually bring political change or social change. That's something that takes a long time and it also takes concerted effort in politics and education, and unfortunately one of the problems in countries across this region. Is that there are few avenues to do that, and so it's good to have a conversation about these things but. The ways that you actually go about making concrete change. Unfortunately, those ways are often blocked in the middle. East. Thanks very much for joining US greg.

Hong Kong Lebanon Beijing Middle East United States China America Kong National Security Law Legislative Council Chief Executive Facebook Jason Nathan Law Carrie Lam Africa Hong Nor Copa Hong Kong Antoine
Hong Kong security law: What is it and is it worrying?

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:15 min | 3 months ago

Hong Kong security law: What is it and is it worrying?

"24 hours after Beijing had passed its controversial security legislation. Authorities the Hong Kong had already charged 10 people with violating the sweeping new law. A new measure put severe restrictions on free expression. Beijing says the law is crucial to safeguarding Hong Kong's economic development and political stability and allows China to investigate and punish those accused of dissent. Penalties include life sentences. Los effect was immediate Twitter accounts were deleted. Pro democracy activists resigned their posts and several left the country. Li Chun Cheon is a former legislator and prominent opposition leader. He joins me now from Hong Kong, Mr Lee, Thanks for speaking with us. Hello. So, as I mentioned, several activists have disappeared from social media have ceased their pro democracy activities, and they certainly aren't talking to the press with Beijing threatening life sentences. For those that so called collude with foreign powers. I feel like I should begin this interview asking why you're taking the time to speak with us. I think it's very important to tell you well, what is happening to Hong Kong and the wording off the law is so vague that don't really know what it means. One employs collusion with a foreign power. And causing hatred to the central government. I'm not going to preach hate. I'm going to preach love only for the people of Hong Kong. How have you seen this law go into effect in terms of the way authorities are cracking down or in terms of the way that people just conduct themselves differently. They are trying to cleanse all free speech, putting fear among the people and and after you put fear, then the people began to start self censorship. So there's lots of people who tried to Cleanse or their faithful off any mentioning off the stroking that we have. During the past protest movement were now not under the Hong Kong government will have directly confronting The Chinese Communist Party because one off the provisional law is that the police has sweeping power. That is not what they used to have a new power to be operation like the secret Police. Britain has offered some Hong Kong residents safe haven. Many people have gone to Taiwan. You recently urged Congress here in the U. S to Ah pass. A bill making it easier for people in Hong Kong to seek asylum in the United States. How many people do you think we'll be looking for avenues like that over the next few months? And is that something you're thinking about? No, of course I would continue to stay in Hong Kong and continue speaking out for two people. But with the refugee proposal from any country, off course is useful that you know, people who worry about the future can go toe off other country to seek a safe harbour. But I have to remind the woe that actually They're already 9000 people arrested and 1600 already prosecuted and this is very difficult for those who are prosecuted to find a safe harbor. I think the important thing is for people to stay on in Hong Kong to continue demon and one country, two systems that are promised. We are only 23 year we still should have 27 years off, no change and also democracy. So you think there's still some hope then that the protests Khun B successful and that they can push back this this tide that has really picked up steam in recent months from China, seizing more control of Hong Kong, cracking down on on expression in Hong Kong. Of course, the situation is very difficult, you know, But when you look at is the European experience they have suffered for many years. But finally there's the Berlin Wall fell down. And so the hope is that also people in China one also democracy and freedom and joy hand together to seek for that, But off course, this regime ists now. Very powerful in terms of surveillance in terms ofthe, you know, suppression, and they're using law against people, but with the world's standing to get a Hong Kong I think we will continue our fight. We do not know when we can be. Ah, Victoria's but still I think the spirit had to be there. And we want Hong Kong to make it through the difficult time in the in the future.

Hong Kong Beijing Taiwan Li Chun Cheon Twitter China Berlin Wall Chinese Communist Party Congress Victoria United States Mr Lee Britain Khun B
"berlin wall" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

07:54 min | 7 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Welcome to bed time history before we get started a shout out to one of our listeners. Zola and her family. Zola listens to bedtime history every night and is a big Fan. Thanks for supporting our PODCAST. Go TO PATRIOTS DOT COM. That's PAT heart. Yohan Dot Com forward slash bedtime history feud like to become a donor and help keep the podcast going strong in one thousand nine hundred forty five. When Germany Lost World War Two and the allies invaded the country? The Russians came in from the east and kept the eastern part of Germany for themselves. The other allies like the United States and England wanted to keep the other part of Germany. Free so for many years. Germany was divided into two countries east and West Germany. At the time the Russians country also called the Soviet Union was communist and very aggressive. They wanted the German people to be under their control so they did. Many things. Take not let them be free but they started to notice that the East German people didn't like this so they started leaving their part of the country. The Soviet Union didn't like this either because many of their hard workers and smart workers were leaving the next thing they did change Germany. For many years the Russians started to build a wall at first they just told people they couldn't leave Germany then pretty soon. The wall grew taller and taller with more fences. More guards to keep the German people in before long. They were not able to leave. In some cases they had family members or friends on the other side of the wall but no matter what they tried they could not move across Germany to see them. The Wall is made up of barbed wire and thick cinderblocks. It became known as the Berlin Wall along the Berlin Wall. Were watchtowers guns and bombs in the ground to keep people from crossing. This was a very sad time for the people in East Germany and those in West Germany. Who had friends and family on the other side of the wall? The main part of this wall was in Berlin the capital of Germany and was twenty eight miles and extended through Berlin. Seventy five miles up into the rest of Germany during this time the United States and its allies were in what was called the Cold War with countries such as Russia also known as the Soviet Union. The Cold War meant that usually there were no battles going on. That would be a heated or hot war but this war was cold because the two countries were enemies but usually just did things like spy on each other and try to be more powerful or have more weapons than the other during this time the United States and Soviet Union made more and more nuclear weapons which were large bombs which could be very harmful to large groups of people. Both countries had many many spies in each other's countries. Trying to figure out what the other country would do next. The United States and the Soviet Union or Russia were very different mostly because of their governments. The United States was a democracy where people were free voted for their leaders who represented the people. They all sat choices over things like what they could do for work and what they could buy. While Russia was communist Communism means the government decides how much everyone makes and what most people do for job and they also don't let the people vote or say what they believe in what they want. The Cold War went on for many years and during this time Germany was still split in two one side free and one side controlled by the Soviet Union. During this time some people were able to escape East Germany and cross the Berlin Wall without being caught. They think around five thousand people were able to do this which seems like a big number but it was over thirty years and there were a lot of people in. East Germany so really not that many were able to make it across but Germans were very creative in the ways they found to get across the wall for example in one thousand nine hundred sixty three and acrobat named Horst Klein salk cable going from one side of the wall to the other and decided to climb across it. The cable was sixty feet in the air and he climbed across it hand over. Hand it over the heads of the guards far below. When he got to the other side he fell to the ground and was okay but he was free and made a very daring escape. Indeed in one thousand nine hundred. Three two friends decided to do something similar as Horst Klein but instead created a zip line from one side of the wall to the other they did this by climbing to the top of a tall building and firing an Arrow over the wall to someone waiting on the other side the other person real the line across an cable which they attached to a chimney on the other side then Michael and Hoeger. The two friends zipped across and over the wall using police pretty amazing right to other friends. Hans and gutter came up with the idea to make their own hot air balloon. They built it in secret out of old bed sheets and canvas which their wives sewed then at night the two couples and their four children floated the hot air balloon. Eight thousand feet in the air and sailed over the Berlin Wall to freedom in one thousand nine hundred sixty to eighty one year old man and a group of senior citizens or older people spent sixteen days building a one hundred and sixty foot long tunnel under the wall. Many of the people who escaped regards because even the German guards didn't want to be forced to stay in East Germany. There were many guards who are able to easily escape because they were wearing uniforms. Many people around the world including the United States against the wall and challenge the East German leaders to take it down. President John F. Kennedy made a famous speech in West Germany. Telling them to take down. The wall later President Ronald Reagan did the same popular. Rock Stars often held concerts near the wall to entertain the East German people. In Nineteen eighty-nine many countries across Europe. Who were communist wanted to become democracies where the people had more freedoms at this time people in Germany also wanted to be done with communism and become free November ninth nine thousand nine hundred nine in East Berlin. Huge crowds of people began gathering at the wall. The guards were worried but no one told them to hurt the crowds. Eventually the crowd just started breaking down the wall chopping holes in it until finally the guards started letting people through crowds on the free side also gathered welcome their fellow. Germans there was celebration and hugging. Is the German people reunited friends and families were able to see each other again. People all around the world were happy for the German people who are no longer divided today. All of Germany is now a free country in a democracy. You can still visit a portion of the Berlin Wall that is still standing but now it's just a place that tourists can visit to be reminded that once Germany was divided tonight. Spend a few minutes thinking about what it would be like to live in a place with less freedoms and then think about how fortunate you are to live in a free country where you can think what you want to think. Believe what you want to believe and more freedoms to do what you want to do in life. Not all people have these same privileges. Freedom is something that has to be fought for an appreciated or it can go away like anything else. It's important to understand history so you can know what you need to do to keep your own country a free place and learn from the mistakes of the past so we don't repeat them..

East Germany Berlin Wall Soviet Union West Germany United States Germany Russia Berlin Horst Klein Zola East Berlin President Ronald Reagan President John F. Kennedy Europe Hans
Iran protests: Who are the opposition in the country?

The World and Everything In It

02:51 min | 9 months ago

Iran protests: Who are the opposition in the country?

"The latest protests in Iran over the Iranian military's unintentional downing of Ukrainian jetliner are different from past ask protests over rigged elections rising gas prices and what Americans liked to call voter suppression this time. The protests cover a much wider area of the country this this time protesters did not chant death to America or death to Israel. This anger was directed at the theocratic regimes handling of the missile strike. This time a president president of the United States tweeted his support for the protesters at English and Farsi and warned the world is watching Democrats. Were nearly silent about the protests even though Oh they once boldly voiced opposition to totalitarian regimes interviewed Sunday on. ABC's This Week House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi appeared to minimize the significance insult demonstrations host George Stephanopoulos asked her if she supported the demonstrations and whether it would be good for the regime to collapse. The protesters are are. I pro testing as I understand this brand of protesters about the fact that plane went down and many students were on that plane and these are largely students in the street. Come again the far left which increasingly dominates the Democratic Party predictably took a rand side against their own country. Actress rose McGowan tweeted. Dear Iran the USA has disrespected your country or flag. People fifty two percent of US humbly apologize is we want peace with your nation. We are being held hostage by a terrorist regime. We do not know how to escape. Please do not kill us. And then she ended with a Hashtag Solo Money Aig. SHUTT- responded to McGowan and many others on the far left in National Review magazine. He wrote quote while it may be tempting to dismiss McGowan's attempts attempts at whit her line of reasoning however faulty is echoed by nearly all the Democrats on the campaign trail and by virtually every Middle East specialist in the media and in academia unquote. Now why aren't the Democratic presidential candidates asked if they share such views. Perhaps it's because those asking the questions don't want to do anything thing that would harm the chances of one of the Democrat presidential candidates beating president trump in the November election. Does that sound too harsh. We'll consider that ninety. Two percent set of media coverage of the president has been negative. According to a study by the media research center could the protests in Iran. Follow the pattern of other freedom movements like solidarity in in Poland or demonstrations that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union or could they end a stalemate with increasingly brutal repression as as in Venezuela. It's too early to say but we should at least expect people who enjoy the blessings of liberty including the right to say very foolish things to support the efforts of others who want to free themselves from totalitarian oppression

Rose Mcgowan Iran President Trump United States Nancy Pelosi America Democratic Party ABC George Stephanopoulos Berlin Wall Israel Soviet Union Middle East Rand Poland Shutt
The left Is Imploding Over Events With Iran

Rush Limbaugh

15:31 min | 9 months ago

The left Is Imploding Over Events With Iran

"So what happened the president kills a well known terrorist who was responsible for the dance hundreds of Americans including uniform military personnel left no stone the left has a break down if everybody is puzzled by this all you have to do is go back to when trump came down the escalator on June fifteenth two thousand sixteen and announces slogan make America great again member how controversial that once you make America great again what's controversial about that what in the world is controversial about America first but it is to the American left and they're really why is the explanation for all of this of course I'm gonna break it down into many many details for your great to be back folks happy to have you with us the telephone number eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two if you want to be on the on the program Twitter in my mind has become useful I was never going in the gang on the other side of the glass are looking perplexed didn't puzzled because it is well known that I think I'm sure and Twitter is inseparable what Twitter is highly useful right now on Twitter is allowing the laugh and today's Democrats and the media to show normal people how freaking insane they are Twitter has become words while it is incredible I wonder how many as I watch this this this why as I watch the left melt down over the death of a genuine one enemy of the people of this country and signed with an enemy nation over their own country in present I wonder how many Americans independence what have you for I am the fantasy this and are shocked and surprised by and I do because you know you never know the the depth that the mainstream media succeeds in achieving in terms of persuading people and I have found over the course you might find it hard to believe folks but I have found over the course of my stellar big broadcast career yeah I've said things about just take your pick I've said something and I've pounded it for ten fifteen years and people have heard it ten fifteen years when they hear it from somebody else what god did you see rush must be right the words everybody needs verification or a lot of people need verification what we've been one of the missions of this program since its inception has been the attempt and the objective to inform everybody ideologically who the left is who liberals are what liberalism here's how it becomes indistinguishable from socialism yeah yeah yeah yeah and now I mean it's unmistakable who these people are and they are the ones making it well known nobody has to tell anybody what the American left is or what the modern day Democrat party is because they are out there informing everybody you see where Iran has announced it will no longer abide by the terms of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement with a mama the guy like Bill Clinton announcing is no longer going to abide by his marriage vows I mean big deal everybody's shocked whether you're right they never about what in fact they may have a buy because the terms of the deal free them to go ahead and develop nuclear weapons nuclear power and all of this look let me take a stab I'm late to this this issue and stories been around since late last week let me take a stab at explaining this and by the way fox I need to tell you I am so I have some kind of a it's a weird thing I never have this little respiratory called and it has I don't have stuffed nose or throat or any of that I was calling Azam I had as well when I was a kid shortness of breath so if I if I speak a little slower that's why don't be distracted by the trying not to make it distracting why is the left being so blatant in their support for an enemy nation why is the left why is the Democrat party going out of its way to tell everybody that they actually preferred the models in Iran and this dead terrorist awesome so much by the way this guy and I have the inside track on how they did it which I will share with you is the program unfolds I mean the military operation I have the inside track how this was done it is amazing and yet as ironic as it is it's how we may have to really really praise the intelligence community for pulling this off I mean the deep state I you see but this this guy in the revolutionary guard general Qassams stole the money his body is being flown back to Tehran in a cardboard box with his picture on it across three coach seats on a rainy in Ireland the New York Post has the picture he's in a cardboard box course there's not much of a left just his finger with the ring on that that's how he was identified soul but still and they've got his picture on the cardboard box but it was a bad dude folks now why why is the left beside themselves I think and their many reasons for this by the way I am all of them I've discussed before but in in terms of what may be guiding this in a specific sense I think as much is the case with the modern day Democrats it's about protecting the legacy of the Obama administration and Obama himself and the Obama foreign policy to many conservatives and many Republicans Reagan is the president of all time the president president said no matter what kind of assaults are attacks on and they're going to be answered and defend and I think to the left there used to be Clinton I actually now think it's Obama that must be protected above all things must be shielded against all the terms it was the mom administration that ran the crew on trump and it went all the way to the oval office there's no doubt in anybody's mind posted by the way still hasn't sent the articles of impeachment over Josh Paul a senator from Missouri so he's gonna offer a resolution to just dismiss the charges because she won't sandy the articles over and nobody knows when she's going to send them over she's trying to again persuading people to re open the case in the Senate for more witnesses but I think she may be waiting for Durham she may be waiting for the dorm report even if that six months from now and you was the articles being sent to the Senate to blunt whatever bad news might be coming down the pike for the Democrats during could be one thing protectable could be something we don't know about but let me explain this Obama business as as a way of explaining how the left is is imploding on this it is very fashionable actually it's not it's not been fashionable to call them anti American but the reason I asked the question what the world is so controversial about make America great again you realize that phrase sent them into apoplexy make America great again or America first sends them into a nose dive into a tizzy what in the world to do normal decent common citizen Americans what in the world is controversial about that make America great again the answer is very simple there are a lot of people in the Democratic Party don't think America ever has been great do not think America can be great because of our founding don't believe America deserves to be great and in fact thanks America's guilty and they have now become the mainstream of the Democrat party Madeleine Albright Madeleine Albright teaching at Georgetown University one of the things that she teaches students is that the United States is nothing but an accident of timing and events that there's nothing special about the United States that there certainly is nothing exceptional about the United States that it was just an accident they were just happened the confluence of events people fleeing the dictatorship of the king in Great Britain it up any number of other things for forces beyond anybody's control brought these events together in a nation was created by it's just an accident and therefore there's nothing really you think about it there's nothing special about it there's nothing noteworthy about it now Madeleine Albright might you might also remember that when the Berlin Wall fell and the Soviet Union imploded that Madeleine Albright was very alarmed that that left the United States is the only superpower in the world and that was not good because you see the concept of America as the good guys does not exist in today's Democrat party in the world wide left do not doubt me on this there is no concept of America as the good guys and that's why make America great again is so offensive to the Americas not the good guys America needs to be cut down in size American needs to be limited America needs to be guarded against so Madeleine Albright's out there teaching young sculls full of March there's nothing special about America it's just a coincidence just an accident and that the United States as a singular super power is a destabilizing element in the world okay that brings us farmers she was secretary state among other things for Bill Clinton she has videos which are common in the modern day laughed and they are common in the American government their common in the American assembly flint that view that America alone as a super powers destabilizing is a view widely held in the civil service throughout the state department it's not an obscure review it's not it's not a minority view took me a long time to learn this long time to believe it long time to understand long time to accept tough thing to accept can't give me you grew up in your own country it takes seven to go to school when you're a young kid you're talking about the founding of the country your aware of how unique and exceptional America's then you then you discovered that people in your own government non biased don't believe it don't think it fact I think just the exact opposite tough thing to believe lot of people don't want to believe it lot of people don't want to accept that our own government there are people who do not believe in the goodness of the United States the concept of America as the good guys but you're looking at it in every bit of this opposition to what trump is non you're seeing it don't if you don't want to believe me do not then I what you're saying did not deny what you're reading they hate the trump did this for a host of reasons they hate the trump succeeded at it in a political sense thank you that trump has done damage to the Obama foreign policy the reason I mention mall mantled right is because Obama was of the same view you know what Obama's policy in Iran was aside from giving them notes but what was the motivation for all bomb I had the same view of the Middle East that he and Madeline Albright and all the rest of them have of the United States the Middle East was destabilized when only Israel was an economic and military power one of the reasons the and there are many it one of the reasons the Obama administration entered into the Iran deal one of the reasons that they engaged Iran one of the reasons that Obama dropped off a hundred and fifty billion dollars in cash on the tarmac in Tehran and don't think that some of it didn't get the Qassams only money a lot of it did by they know who the guy what is the Obama people know who the guy was they were making deals with this guy they know exactly who he was Obama believe that empowering Iran would stabilize the Middle East provide a counterbalance to Israel because once again the Israelis are not seen as the good guys even though they are United States ally and by the way there are many reasons why people like Obama's Susan rice madam Albright all the rest would not see Israel as the good guys there are religious reasons there are geo political reasons strategic reasons racial resent is all kinds of reasons for it but regardless Israel is the problem in the Middle East the United States is the problem in the world at large SO policies must be developed and implemented to blunt the bad guy nature of the United States and the bad guy nature of Israel and so there's Obama

President Trump America
Paul Theroux's Mexico Journey

Travel with Rick Steves

06:47 min | 9 months ago

Paul Theroux's Mexico Journey

"More than fifty years of writing about his epic journeys in Travel Books and novels. Paul through has recently finished a series of road trips on the back roads of Mexico. He wanted to see for himself who lives there how they live and what's really behind the headlines about a migration crisis from south of the US border and by the way you'll have to pardon my weak voice at the time we recorded our interview. It's better now. Paul theroux welcome Doc Ricketts a pleasure to be with you. You know this is such an exciting adventure you went on and right at the beginning of the book you write the Mexican border in the edge of the known world only shadows and danger beyond it and working figures. Hungry criminal predatory fanged fanatical enemies an ungovernable rabble eager to pounce on the unwary traveller so you decided to travel. Tell us where you went on this trip. And why by the rest of that senators and a Tutti fruity of grizzled gringos accident. So why why. Because I noticed that people were stereotyping Korea Typing Mexicans Mexicans who come across the border why they come that illegal looking for welfare making trouble and I thought one of the reasons as we traveled your a great traveller. Rick is to destroy the stereotype to find out what people are really like. What's this story and we find the come from? All sorts of places is in Mexico they might be billion as they might be millionaires. That might have no money at all. Some people in Mexico have less than the average person in Kenya or Bangladesh Rush. So it's not a simple situation but to see it at its best or to see it most clearly. I thought I WANNA go alone. I want to go on my own car. I WANNA the drive up and down. The border. The border that everybody talks about but no one knows that firsthand as written about much and I want to see it drive along the aboard and then drive deep into Mexico and I thought I bought a car for this purpose secondhand car. That wasn't very notable and off. I went not very noticeable but it had Massachusetts license plates on it. That was a little unfortunate. The police said you know they. They looked at my plates. And then they pull you off the road and they say Whether or Saturday do you know what I can do to you and you say what exactly do you want. And then they say pay me some more Didi. Is that the open. This happens but people say how awful and I think. Yeah how awful but on the plane of snakes is travel book and travelers travel writers. Rav Paul Writers have the last word so I have the last word and that's a side of Mexico. The police are excited. Mexico that exists and as travelers were not looking in for la La land in Orlando. We're looking for the reality. Go south of the border. We're looking to see things as they are the good the bad the ugly the the fun that whatever it is the sunshine the rain you know I was the Peace Corps joined the Peace Corps nineteen sixty three and I went to Central Africa. I didn't know what I was GonNa find was into the wild blue yonder and what I found was not at all what I was expecting. Not at all our guest right now and travel with. Rick Steves is author Paul. He just published an account of his road. Trips from the back roads of Mexico his new book introduces us to the people he met and explains what he learned about life in Mexico far from the comforts of resorts in the safety. Excuse tollways the books called on the plane of snakes. Your book is about the wall and I'm fascinated by walls in my travels. The Berlin Wall the walls between the Protestant and Catholic neighborhoods in Belfast. The wall of between Palestine and Israel and in this wall I remember when I was in the Holy Land on one side. The Wall looked a certain way. And then the other from the other side that looked a lot different tell us about the actual wall standing there especially on the Mexican side looking at it. What's it like where the wall is a big piece of iron mongering That looks like it looks like a prison wall. I mean it looks ah fence it has slats in it. The first one that I saw was in Nogales may be eight years ago or possibly more and it wasn't a wall that you could see through. It was sexually big iron plates steel plates. I guess and there were there. Were Rusty thirty feet high. You couldn't see through. It looked like it didn't look like offense at all actually looked like a wall That's now slats. What is it looked like it? It looks like something that is surmountable. Looks like you could climb over and people do it. Looks like could tunnel under it and people do it also looks very beautiful. It looks like a piece of sculpture by the artist Christo it looks like Krista went to the border and said I'm going to show the world. What a border looks like in metal and so the the fence to steal border fence goes up and down through hill and Dale undulating up? As far as the I can see and you think how amazing but how primitive too because house obviously keep any vote. No when I go as a traveler to these walls the odd thing is I can pass them easily. I can go from Israel to Palestine I in the cold where I could go between East and West. You were south of the wall and you wrote about the women in the diners there that kind of saw you you as a maybe a ticket to the north. It must have been interesting for you to be in these hardscrabble. Little spots in the wall was so close and you could just waltz right back and forth. They couldn't not only that it's only yeah waltzing bank in Nogales Arizona. You visit door in the wall. The first time I saw it there was a turnstile where you're in a street in Arizona. You know with parked in the sunshine. POKKA walk down the end of the street. Go through the door in your in Mexico is your show you I mean I showed by. Id and just by walking through a door. That for travel is such an amazing experience to me. It was an experience of the kind that I'd I'd never had before I've cross borders. You've been through many borders but most borders that are memorable you walk across Kenya Ethiopia China China and Russia Kazakhstan Benetton wherever you know Canada and say but Mexico is it's the wall and also there's another language behind the wall is cuisine beyond the wall and the women that you mentioned some of whom want to go over the wall around it to work in a motel or a hotel in the states Have left children behind husband's behind and the going what I found. Is that coming to make a living

Mexico Wall Rav Paul Writers Kenya Ethiopia China China And Rick Steves Paul Theroux United States Doc Ricketts Peace Corps Korea Israel Arizona Massachusetts Kenya Nogales Nogales Arizona Berlin Dale Canada
"berlin wall" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:09 min | 9 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on The Current

"In the early eighties linksfield started a group called the peace circle the state had granted citizens some freedom to organize impart to appease international calls for reform. It was a time when the threat of nuclear war was top of mind. I was a mother of three women with small children and at the beginning of the NATO deployed atomic weapons along the metro border and then the Soviet Union started to deploy Soviet atomic weapons along the inner German border and it was not a very good feeling to live in an area which was regarded as a future atomic better field the group distributed pamphlets and inspired dozens of other so called peace groups to form throughout the DDR and we kept telling the authorities that we are no opposition of course because opposition was forbidden by law. We told the authorities set. We are people who we're concerned about the fate of socialism and who wanted to improve socialist the Stasi was ubiquitous in the DDR. There were ninety thousand workers on the payroll plus thousands more official and occasional informants estimates vary widely but anywhere from two to ten percent of the population was involved in surveillance. Of course we were well. Aware that We had spies are group's I was a trained philosopher. I was working at the Academy of Science and they threw me out. wrote due to my activities are peace circle and this was a very dangerous situation because also law in East Germany me saying if a person had no trump for longer than six weeks person could be thrown into prison. And if you lost your job for political medical reasons it was very difficult to find new work. But Vera. Ling's failed had prepared for that possibility. I will wear that such a thing could tappin. She had acquired one hundred and twenty beehives. And so I had to drop my new life as a beekeeper. ooh My father wasn't allowed to publish in East Germany. Six years earlier Susannah Shit. Lakes father was on the verge of losing his own academic job in East Berlin. He decided that he would publish his book. In West Germany the manuscript had been smuggled smuggled across the border by a West German journalist. It was a book of short stories about life in east. Germany called approximation. He lost all his his work and then shade lakes mother received a visit from the Stasi and they asked her to distance herself from her husband or father and also have children in mind. That's when her parents realize that it was no longer safe to stay. Of course leaving was forbidden. The Berlin Lynn Wall has been erected to keep people from doing just that but her father's case became political won his exiled writer friends including the famous guenter. Goss advocated on his behalf. So did a key west German diplomat. They'd been denied twice before. But this time Susannah Shit. It looks parents were told that they had permission to leave. It was a Monday that they told me that we would leave. East Germany five days later so I had like five days to leave my whole life behind. It was tough but it was also adventurous. Everybody wanted to see the West. The details of that winter enter day in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven when they left the. DDR are still etched in her mind. I remember that was a cold December day and we were driving driving driving driving. It was endless. Then we came to the crossing the border my father had to step out and leave and and we actually thought it would never come back. There was still that scare at the last minute and then they finally let us go and suddenly the whole border point lit liked. Football Stadium was like flashing white and soon after they would be driving into West Germany and everybody in the car was just quite dead silence because I think we only realized that the door or just closed behind us their life would have to begin anew but for now there was just the black road in front of of them. It was nineteen seventy seven when the shitless family settled in Hamburg and West Germany and yet the East German state was still part of their lives chiefs. They had their informants all over the place. They left science like a key on the kitchen table. They entered departments actually just to scare people to let them know. We're there we watch you. Life in exile was difficult for Shea lease parents especially her dad who who suffered from a nervous breakdown after they left the GDR after a couple years in Hamburg they moved back to Berlin but this time on the other side the west side of the wall. It was closer to her old home. But even so Susannah Shit Leaf never felt settled in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven. When she was in her early twenties twenties she moved to Los Angeles? When was far far away? I quit forget it. All even eight thousand nine like okay. The Wolf he'll you know I saw it on. TV Vera Ling spouse experience of the wall coming down was very different. Shade Leash had left West Berlin. Two years before the wall fell links felt had remained on the frontlines of the divide. Her Peace Movement kept working away in church basements mints but in the late eighties. They decided to be bolder in their activism. We couldn't call for demonstration. This was forbidden by law so we decided to join Roy Innis state rally with our own banners on my Banesto first sentence of article twenty seven of the East German constitution. Every citizen of East Germany has a right to utter opinion freely. I thought they might arrest me. All the will rest me short time forty eight hours. This time I was wrong. They did arrest her. And one hundred and four others in the span of two hours. Linksfield filled was put on trial and accused of hooliganism. which could have meant eight years in prison? By this time her father had been retired from the study for a couple of years when she was on trial he publicly took her side because he no longer believed in the system he said if the system called also my daughter criminal I call the system criminal system. Eventually the charges against Lengsfeld were downgraded. Did but she was still sentenced to six months in jail. Meanwhile political pressure was growing instead of keeping all the activists in prison. The government expelled them and so she went to the United Kingdom but as soon as it was possible she made plans to return to the DDR. She had no idea Eh. She was returning on the eve of history. By coincidence. I returned to Germany in the morning of nine. Th of November when the wall stood stood November ninth nine thousand nine hundred eighty nine. Nobody expected that it will come down in the evening. The way events unfolded. That night was as dramatic as it was unusual. There'd been large protest in East Berlin for weeks. The government was under pressure Asher to give citizens greater freedom of movement and at the evening of the ninth of November. A poet Buhlmann by Goodish of scheme called for an international press conference here in Berlin to introduce seven amendment of the new travel law is also an owner for and then there was a question. Question is Italian journalist. When will this law come into effect chop of Ski? He was not accustomed to answer spontaneous questions. I think immediately you. And as soon as he said immediately sounds of people who rose from their cultures and went to the nearest border checkpoint till belief berliners began gathering on both sides. Ah at the famous checkpoint Charlie and other I came to the bone on the bridge already. Thousands of people stood before the barrier to west from. ABC This is world. News tonight with Peter Jennings and all the border guards dude. Lisa baked into the walls of the barracks. Save it covered spos- flowers at the button. Here in the tens of thousands head battles in the a hens wine schnapps champagne softening as you can see almost a party. I heard a huge shout because people have raised barrier and the crowd spilled over the bridge into West Berlin and I try and them short while ago. Astonishing us from East Germany where the East German authorities have said in. Essence of the Berlin Wall doesn't mean anything anymore. Links fell describes the moment the crowd out happened upon what normally would have been quiet bus station a coach. It just pulled in ends up. Dr was very surprised he. He stepped out of his past. And said where do you guys coming from. And we told him from East Berlin Wall came down own and he said is the so. It's the so. Please come into my house. Come into my bus and started to get to give us a spontaneous sightseeing tour through West Berlin. An you might imagine that this was one of the happiest moments of my life. The three years after the fall of the wall Susannah shapely. Who's still living in Los Angeles? She'd gone to America to escape the pain of her divided childhood but when the Stasi files were opened a couple years after Germany's reunification her family's past came crashing into the present. We found that our uncle my father's brother was starchy informant. which for for us was a total.

East Germany East Berlin Susannah Shit West Germany Vera Ling West Berlin East Berlin Wall Berlin Lynn Wall Berlin Wall Los Angeles Hamburg Soviet Union Academy of Science Peace Movement NATO official Roy Innis Asher Goss
"berlin wall" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:53 min | 9 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on The Current

"From the December. Twenty seven th edition of the current November marked thirty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall. After the East German government accidentally announced the borders would be opened people gathered by the thousands thousands of the barrier that had come to symbolize the separation of the two Germanies for decades. They sang they cheered. They attacked the wall with pickaxes hammers. If it was a stunning moment in the West it was seismic for the people who grew up in East Germany and those reverberations continued today especially in the eastern part of the country tree where an election earlier this year. An extreme far-right anti-immigrant party with Neo Nazi ties. Increased its popular vote. This is the story. Corey of two women both raised in East Berlin and how decades after the fall of that infamous wall. They believe there is still an invisible barrier. Here's there's the CBC's Kristin Nelson with her documentary. The Wall in the head. It was first broadcast in November. Just before the thirtieth anniversary they parts of the city where you actually still feel East East German and it's like you cross the border and there are different people. They look different. They have different different clothing. Shankly is a writer who was born in the former east. Germany were standing together at sad friedrichstrasse station in central central Berlin. These days the Public Square in front of the train station is surrounded by shoes stores and cafes but like so many places in Berlin Lynn. History runs deep here. The people still say east and West Shade. Lisa spend her teens and twenties in West Germany. I'll get to that story soon. So we are in the West in front of the so-called Ten palest- which was the Border crossing location. Shen for people who wanted to cross from west to the East for visit. Of course the by Espen. The building looks fairly innocuous with a bit of a nineteen nineteen sixties madman aesthetic. It's two stories high and painted baby blue and the entrance is embedded in a wall of curved windows during the Cold War. The building was a tiny hole in the Iron Curtain. I came through this building When we lived in the West because because all of the rest of the family grandma everybody was of course in East Berlin and the way she describes it? It was an unnerving experience. There were two doors forced into one door. The door would close behind you. Then there's a guy who controlled you and the other door wouldn't open until they were finished with the youth. Sometimes they would pick up the phone own and you never knew whether you would be able to go visit your family and friends or whether they would send you back over the would pick you up and put you into a cell born in one thousand nine hundred sixty five just four years. After the Berlin Wall was erected the wall cast a shadow shadow over much of her early life in East Berlin. Even though it was mostly invisible actually east berliners never really got really close. You couldn't touch. There was also still the area where they hit the towers to watch. There was no man's land the only time I saw the wall when we went up the tool once as family in East Berlin there is this big tower with the restaurant. You go all the way up and then and I saw the wall shades. Perception of the city changed that day before then. Her mental map of Berlin reflected the official maps of of East Germany the German Democratic Republic or GDR. My father had a map of Berlin and the West German pot was the white and when I was little I was always well in Novi living in East Berlin and rounded as only snow. It's all right so when we went up to the tower I saw. It doesn't snow. There's actually also houses city but the east. Germs did map it nor did they map the Stasi prisons Susannah Shaft League knew from an early age that her family wasn't typical. Her father was a writer writer. Who wrote critically about the state and her mother worked in publishing? Both of them were political and so were their friends. Schaedlich recalls being gene visited by the East German police the Stasi on nights that her parents were out just to scare us me and my sister and they would would ring the bell and I would go to the to the window. Look down there were two men classic also ridiculous if you think about about it now and in the trench coat like an Abed James Bond movie but that's a scary feeling. They didn't do much more than just ring. The bell in the night and then go way While Susannah Shakily was growing up another woman in a different neighborhood of East Berlin was also living in the shadow cast by the Berlin Wall my name is filings for two. I was born in nine hundred. Fifty two in east. Germany needs a so called German Democratic Republic and to a family of supporters of socialism. My parents parents have been both Party members very active party members. Her mother was a schoolmaster her father. An officer in the army and so so I was brought up and educated like a real socialist but it was a love story that changed the way she perceived East Germany. When I was seventeen I met the most nicest and beautiful boy in East Berlin? The boy was from Yugoslavia via his father. A diplomat in east Germany who had fought against the Nazi regime but East German officers didn't approve of the way. Communism was practiced in Yugoslavia Slavia. And so my goose left lover was regarded a western enemy and one day we were stopped by a police. They took me to the police station. Eventually they realized that links fell's father was a Stasi officer. The the police drove me home at was past midnight. They through my father out of his bed and they. I told my father that they would not inform my father. Superiors about this this time but if say a ever saw me again this western element they would inform the superiors of my father and so of course I was forbidden to meet my love. Of course I met him secretly but this was the end of my love if to the East German regime and slowly. I became an adversary of these communist state. Today links failed still lives in the neighborhood. Were her activism began tourists. Come here to see where the Berlin Wall once once stood and where I began to crumble.

East Berlin East Germany Berlin Wall Berlin West German Democratic Republic Berlin Lynn West Germany writer officer West Shade Kristin Nelson Germany Public Square Susannah Shaft League Yugoslavia sad friedrichstrasse station Shankly Corey
Tear Down This Wall: The resistance

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:53 min | 11 months ago

Tear Down This Wall: The resistance

"The I on curtain was not the creation of a mindset or a system which had any time for dissent. The curtain was at its height. Seven thousand in Columbus of wires watchtowers walls fences minefields and sentry posts stretching from the Arctic Tundra Finland to the Black Sea coast of Greece. This old dedicated to preventing captive people's from fleeing somewhere they might speak think and vote freely. Nevertheless there was resistance courageous inventive and surprisingly rarely violent it took foams as different as the imprison nations of Eastern Europe would different in this third episode of the foreign discs series reflecting on the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. We look at Poland where the regime Asia was confronted by a trade union and joined by Pope the country then known as Czechoslovakia where revolution was led by poets playwrights and rockstars and Romania the only one of eastern Europe's liberation struggles of nineteen thousand nine to descend into bloodshed. This is the foreign desk. My impression of the strike in the Lenin shipyard was that this was going to happen as they were going to get way because there was nothing credible calm about the way people are going about the strike. There there was no panic. There was no drinking no rushing around people were just waiting for the government to give in and the government did get enough to series of public negotiation. I mean we knew something something was going on but we still wear not sat in that be able to live to see the end all the system. We knew Tom Unsustainable in the long run but most of our perspective close sustainable for longer than our lives about the thing about people on television television or a heads of the secret believes in the army and they were giving contradictory instructions to people in the field but there was fighting on on the streets. Nobody knew who was on whose side and the sea turns out of course neither there or no sides there was a single side and the churches were along and they had no loyal troops in August. One thousand nine hundred eighty a group of workers at the Lenin shipyards in Gdansk went Own Strike they called their fledgling trade union solidarity and hoisted a Groovy flag based on Poland's national banner with the Solidarity Name emblazoned in red on the White Stripe in cheerful friendly font within a year of its foundation solidarity had ten million members within within a decade. It had the country a few weeks after the Berlin Wall fell solidarity leader Falesa an electrician by trade was elected. President President of Poland Kristof Bobbin. Ski Is the President of Union and Polska a pro European think tank in Wausau. He's also the former Warsaw correspondent Brandin of the Financial Times. He picks up the story in Gdansk. In the summer of nineteen eighteen to strike in the shipyard had two phases one was a phase which which went from about this Thursday to the Saturday afternoon when the shipyard authorities the management gave into the demands and tell people go home that he said we've we've got the money or go home and at that point it was. The younger workers also led by young dissidents. I suppose who went round the ship out saying don't go home. The strike is not over people out there in the restive discuss still on strike. They were driving around in this small electric electric trucks telling the people not to go home and a lot of people go home but enough state from the Saturday afternoon and I arrived on the Saturday Saturday afternoon and I saw young people saving shy making it continue into the Sunday. On the Sunday people started coming back on the Monday morning people came back and strike got underway big strike on underway. So actually I had the impression that it was actually a young people's movement at that moment it was saved by the young people by the shipyard workers wasn't quite solidarity then because it was formed as it were off the strikes extended but my impression of the strike in the Lenin shipyard was that this was gonna happen this they were going to get their way because it was incredible calmness about the way people we're going about the strike. That was no panic. There was no drinking. There was no rushing around people. Were just waiting for the government to give it and the government did give enough to series the public negotiations and is the reason for those public negotiations were a certain number of Social demands pay demands but also the the main demand with for this supplements of independent unions

Lenin Shipyard President Trump Berlin Wall Gdansk Poland Eastern Europe Black Sea Columbus Finland Poland Kristof Bobbin Czechoslovakia Warsaw Greece Tom Unsustainable Romania Financial Times Union SKI Army Falesa
The East German punks who helped bring down the Berlin Wall

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:18 min | 11 months ago

The East German punks who helped bring down the Berlin Wall

"Berlin Wall. Couldn't keep all Western culture out. And it couldn't keep old East berliners down inspired by the music born over the wall by radio radio stations in West Berlin. A spirited and resourceful punk rock scene flourished in the city's east to more author of burning down the House that's H. Cia. US punk rock revolution and the fall of the Berlin Wall joins me to countdown his East German punk rock top five tim first of all before we stopped. Stop playing the songs. How did punk rock find? Its Way to East Germany. You could pick up western radio almost the entire country of Germany and so everybody talks about the first time they heard the pistols usually on KNBR forces radio or BBC and that was just a moment that changed people's lives. It was so different from anything that ever heard. NFL Ika switches me sore inside them. How soon did it take root the first hearings that people had of the sex pistols? So I'm guessing this is seventy six seventy seven. How quickly did jump the fence? The first punk in East Berlin was a fifteen year old. A girl who went by the name major and that was September nineteen seventy seven and within less than a year. She already had thirty five opened on her and she was labeled enemy of the state and in her case case. That led to constant attainments interrogation and despite that a senior rounder. They wait until she turned eighteen and they arrested or tried her put in jail offer year and Stacey prison and that she slept with what's called the Berlin fabled meaning that when she got out of prison they took her mmediately to a textile facility in the middle of nowhere and she was expected to work there for the next next five years. And be sort of politically rehabilitated. And would not see your family or friends. She ran away almost immediately. Back to East Berlin was rearrested put back and Stacey prison for eighteen months and then at the end of that term ex patriot. Meaning they to ship off the West Germany to Take care of problem. This first strike is called. MFS which is the determine initials for the Ministry for State Security which is the study by benkhaled nominal since from nineteen eighty to about four or five years after ground zero of companies Germany. You can kind of see how the Stasi on GonNa go for conquer. Well they also make a direct comparison between the dossier and Hitler's S S which did not overrule on an explicitly. Anti Fascist in the music was their tool that is just how they fought dictatorships of the music. Wasn't they weren't trying to be tickly. Artful I don't think it was all about the message. And whereas other activists groups had a more reformist approach let's change Environmental regulations are some of the legal system. The punks just said screw. The system was bringing down and that was a really powerful message especially for bringing you to their costs. One of the interesting things about normalises day ended ended up going to prison for almost two years for their lyrics in nineteen ninety-three and I think what happened to them. During that process shows why the scene became so important as far as being a significant it can force in the revolution. They constantly were offered to go to the West. When they're in jail the wooden really rather just go to the west and the member the kept saying no? We're GONNA stay here and fight because that was quite coleman wave dispensing with troublemakers. Wasn't yeah exactly but two punks mostly rejected that and they insisted that they can stay and fight. And I think that basically the big Goan in in a place like East Germany was what happens when you run afoul of the secret police. The Sasi and the punks did that experiment. And what they proved was in going through the jail terms going through the payments going through interogations the blacklisting from jobs in schools the conscription into army units specialising political reeducation and the fact that they came back and kept fighting. That was a game changing revelation. Because it showed that you could resist and survive and that's deal the resolve of a lot of the opposition minded people within the country in that in turn allowed the protest move out into the streets worker then snowball into the big mass protests that we know from eighty nine. Let's move along out to sean climate. At what point to divide join the revolution. They're very early. Bantu and there are unique because they come from a little farm town in the south of East Germany and end and yet they became if anything. It's not really a star type culture but there was closest star system. We're in the eastern or Pengzi. How big was it possible to get? I'm guessing terrifically it couldn't record you couldn't play except in churches and get on the radio so yeah it was very limited seen it first and everything had to be done very personally. So you couldn't do mail wasn't security consent flyers for shows. The phones weren't security. Couldn't call friends say you're doing a Gig so it all had to be done through what they call the whisper network person to person. We're doing a GIG. And he told that friend Ephron told another friend but by eighty three they were getting concerts in the thousands. And that's when the stuff you really crackdown but Shaun calm created in nineteen eighty-four after they had some the trouble with this dossier has resulted crackdown. They created the song called clue which means sort of like the tomboys the people that get beaten by the police and it has a line in there. We are the people. We are power and punks from Leipzig claim that that is the source of the chant. That became the sort of signature chant during the marches of eighty nine lexus. which was the people? The

East Germany Berlin Wall West Germany East Berlin West Berlin Berlin Stacey United States Ministry For State Security Nfl Ika H. Cia Leipzig BBC Ephron Shaun Hitler Coleman Sean
Tear Down This Wall: Life behind the Iron Curtain

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:07 min | 11 months ago

Tear Down This Wall: Life behind the Iron Curtain

"The fall of the Berlin Wall in November nine thousand nine hundred nine was reported almost universally as a good news story. This was fair enough. If the the ending of the imprisonment of half of Europe wasn't good news it's hard to imagine won't ease however for Eastern Europeans it marked the end of life As they knew it and all of the world as they understood it. This was doubtless a relief in many respects the iron curtain had after all been built to stop eastern Europeans from fleeing the system of dismal incompetent and oppressive police states which had been imposed upon them in this episode of the Foreign Oren disc series looking at Eastern Europe. Thirty years on we recall life behind the Iron Curtain. The personality cults of the leaders the snooping of the secret police and the rebellious subculture which deafened the neighbors and baffled. The style see this is the foreign desk. Schoolteacher would say did the the news reader have a red jacket on or blue decorate on last night in our house and that was the way of checking whether the parents in that household had been watching Western television which was illegally. Everybody was being turned by fear. Inform on other people. Many many people were very scared of saying anything in public. Were doing anything public. This is why when my father protested on ten March one thousand nine hundred eighty three most of the people in the village that he was absolutely saying that he had the courage but they thought it must have been something wrong with his head to do that because it was so dangerous they couldn't record do couldn't play live except in churches. The male wasn't secure. She couldn't send the fliers. The phones want security. Couldn't call say do the GIG so all had to be done through what they call the whisper network person to person we're doing a GIG and he told deferent- and Ephron told another friend but by eighty-three they were getting concerts in the thousands and that's really crackdown Even by the standards of Eastern Europe behind the Iron Curtain Romania under the long dictatorship of Nicolae Ceausescu was was a remarkably paranoid police. State our first guest. Common beauge grew up in Romania in the nineteen seventies in one thousand nine hundred eighty s a period she recalls Kohl's in her memoir burying the typewriter the title refers to the nightly ritual performed by her dissident father trying to keep his writing secret. Kurt from the security. I grew up in a very small village which was quite it is located from Eucharist. In general was actually quite isolated from the political situation. Most people lived in small houses. They were raising animals. They were growing their own gardens. So things were quiet self sufficient for the memo what people were self sufficient Shen in the small towns. We saw that there were big lines. Four bread for sugar or flour and things got worse worse. I think at the end that seventies and in the early eighties when I was very young. Of course I didn't notice much of the hardship because I was very young child. Doc who grew up on a farm with the grandparents life was very idyllic and very beautiful but by the time I started going to school and we started noticing the lines signs and started hearing people talk about the lack of food and then we also started experiencing longer electricity cuts. You need the The electricity would just go off so we would have to do. Homework by candlelight in the kitchen and the whole family will sort of heavily in one place where we had the candles and then candles were becoming harder to get so people would go to church on Sundays and come back with their candles rather than leaving them there. For The for the data dad the altar but nineteen eighty S. Things began to be very tough. I mean they're even for us

Iron Curtain Romania Eastern Europe Iron Curtain Shen Europe Berlin Wall Nicolae Ceausescu Kurt Kohl Deferent Ephron Thirty Years
"berlin wall" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

03:52 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"As the costs and chaos imposed by brexit became more and more onerous the reduced England salt as its former fellow constituents of the UK boomed and was mired in incessant rancor that necessitated for more general elections in the early years of the two thousand twenty S. The two thousand and twenty four vote was the final Straw for Londoners. It was won by the new English conservative movement. A hard right sect now led by former. Oh Madala and bucks fizz singer David Van Day who had become a Tory councillor inferring in two thousand and nine thousand nine hundred and ascended stealthily since the Sem Am defeated. A Labor party still led by Jeremy Corbyn despite five previous election losses under the slogan. The real fight starts now a referendum on London becoming a sovereign entity in two thousand and twenty six was carried by an even greater margin than the e U referendum. A decade previously elections were swiftly cold after which prime minister study con formerly declared independence and applied also successfully to join the e U do. It became swiftly clear that while London possessed many of the accoutrements of a nation state a hefty economy a big population than many members of you a coherent regional identity. It would need to make one key and ironic compromise with itself. One of the world's great open cities was compelled in the interest of maintaining what was now one of the EU's external borders to build a wall. The M twenty five. The ring road laid around London between nineteen seventy five and nineteen. ninety-six proved an obvious foundation for what became known as the new London. John Wall indifference to the smaller fortification erected by the Romans somewhile earlier. The New London Wall was of course controversial. There was some lobbying for a corridor to Brighton and a great deal of enthusiasm for deviating the new London sufficiently from the M twenty five to exclude Croydon. Roydon however England agreed to drop all its other claims for compensation if London agreed to keep it in London behind the wall built. What a great deal change? Both Londoners are non. Londoners would have willingly confirmed if for vastly different reasons that London had long since detached itself spiritually from the rest of England. A city far more in touch with the rest of the world than with the country it served as a capital Heathrow and city airports stayed stayed. Open the banks of the city of London resumed their pre brexit roaring trade welcoming a few grateful exiles back from Frankfurt and Paris London's culture thrived in. It's all new circumstances much as West Berlin once had when isolated from a hostile East Germany the only major adjustment. It was the relocation of England's parliament from the Palace of Westminster on the banks of the Thames to Birmingham then Manchester then leads all of which it was obliged to flee is the Midlands Lancashire and Yorkshire. serially seceded it's beleaguered. Members eventually sought asylum on the isle of White whose only noteworthy resident Mark King Out of big in the eighty s slap bass weirdos level forty two had seized power in two thousand twenty five on the new London Wall checkpoints. Were actually actually notably quiet as previously few London's took much interest in England and vice versa. The Wall ended up representing a division. More than creating one.

London New London Wall London Wall England Paris London John Wall Jeremy Corbyn brexit EU prime minister UK David Van Brighton Mark King Berlin Croydon Frankfurt East Germany
"berlin wall" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

09:20 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Closer to home The UK has its own version of religious and nationalist based Division Northern Ireland rooted in political and sectarian disputes between Catholics six. And Protestants things. Turn violent in the nineteen sixties and in response to rioting in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine peace lines were constructed between the communities. His the Good Friday Agreement of Nineteen ninety-eight sorts bring peace to such segregated communities but fifty years off the barriers. went up up. The divides have our new grown wider in many cases and violence is still present to this very day with brexit. Now further complicating issue. What's next for the peace lines? Peter Osborne is a director at the Integrated Education Fund in Northern Ireland and joins me on the line from Belfast. Alpha's along with Dennis. Murray the former BBC island correspondent Dennis. If I could start with you. How's the BREXIT process affected? The divisions were ready play in Northern Ireland. Brexit has been a complete disaster for Northern Ireland. Nobody talked about the united. I'm departure. Shin Fain fine until brexit next domino to fall the DP espoused brexit with open arms when other unionist said. This is very dangerous. which has made breakfast? Something that is meant to be a protestant stroke unionistic now. It might have crossed. Those limes accepted. The trouble is things here. Always inclined to to those lines but look at the way and President Self. The people who by the end of the process were saying no dale the same people that were saying before the referendum well a second referendum might be necessary and of course we want to stay in the single market we wanted to wonderful was the European Union. Doing it's just in the way it was fish politics. It has become an enormously divisive issue. Now this place was divided enough already. But here's the difficulty. The Good Friday Agreement in fact any future for Northern Ireland was predicated on the fact that both UK England would be in the European Union. Because that means there's no the visible sign that the two parts of Ireland different. The fear is that it's going to bring those hard borders back on those barriers back. Bring you hit. Those hard awed borders as far as they are existing. Do feel a sense of being in some way in a city that is fortified divided. Because they don't get talked about in the way. The Berlin Berlin Wall would or the barrier in Israel. Would somehow they have been in the background after. But they are in the background but they're very much in the forefront of people's minds ends. I suspect in Belfast. And especially those people who live close to the interface barriers the peace walls. And don't forget that when the troubles were occurring through the seventies and eighties very high percentage. Nearly fifty percent of people who got killed during the troubles were killed within a few hundred yards interferes community so these working class communities have suffered during during the conflict is suffering as well because of what is nigh for them probably a new normal of having these walls in their facility I'd go back to when they were built Kebir Dalton seventy seventy one seventy two. A committee led by the Dan Home Secretary and North Naarden. John Taylor considered whether the the peace walls up on there were basic considerations erases abide. It's better that either side of the community fight the British army. Then they fight each other and as part of the reason why they went up and they took it a station to construct them but there was one person. I'm not in the room. There was an English adviser and the English adviser wrote a minority reported. That said if you put these peace walls up Ni- you will not be able to take dine. I'm for at least a hundred years and fifty years on. It's hard to disagree without English adviser because the twenty twenty three target is not going to be mad and part the reason why. It's not going to be mad as you can't set a target and then not genuinely politically in government with resource to take the interface barriers or the apiece Walstein and. I think that goes to the heart of a key. Issue for Belfast. In Northern Ireland as a whole is twenty one years after the Good Friday Green Room. The Good Friday Agreement was concluded on the sort of hope and aspiration. We had at that time. Hasn't been fulfilled. But you cut do not you can't and the segregation and the divisions evasions tick dine interferes barriers with proper sourcing on proper commitment from government. Night when you look at high divided. Belfast stays in one thousand nine hundred when agreement. It was signed ninety. Three percent of Social Housing and Belfast was segregated ninety percent plus of those areas being one side of the community or another twenty one years on guess what. The percentage is ninety three percent of social housing faster still segregated when you look at education. These are the two critical issues housing and education currently ninety three percent of children and northern go to schools that are segregated so you got to break down these divisions to actually get underneath an end end the segregation night until we do that. We are going to continue to perpetuate the segregation in this society. Which means that whenever we get into some difficult as we are I I that society could go backwards? Not just go forward. There is no inevitable forward flow to this peace process. It can go backwards so at some point we you have to take those critical decisions arising and education do share the same concern over what brexit will do. They will just entrench attitudes. Stephen Moore I do if you look at it. Seems to me is happening. In England it seems to have entrenched opinion and divisions in the Times that I've been across the the it's almost like politics religion north and art and in Polite Company to talk about Brexit because it is entrenched opinion over there. Well if that's what's out in England what on Earth this is happening in Northern Ireland where I suspect there is even greater currency to what Brexit might be on the consequence for the border onto the concentration of future of north was an art and so as does say has become an issue that is synonymous with political religious division here. I think that's extremely unfortunate but Dan again. I think is very unfortunate that the UK chasm whole has decided on this course of action. Because I really can't see the benefit of brexit anyway. What Dennis we could finally return to you? We've seen some some of the ideas that you could potentially begin to bring communities gather education walking with younger generations. What do you think action could be taken to try and keep the discussion open and to get me activists across the borders between these two communities? The one thing I think is crucial on the one thing I think. No British central government will attempt is integrating education. I went on the air twenty twenty or thirty years ago as a young reporter. I covered the start of lagging college in Belfast. which was the first attempt and integrated school? And it's still there and it's thriving even now where there are integrated schools. They do very well. But I used to quote the old Gilbert and Sullivan thing. Every little child that's born alive will be liberal or Conservative before you go to. School isn't going to change your opinions. You're going back behind the world's again. I have not changed opinion. I I have come to take the opposite view of that if you don't have integrated education you are never going to resolve this place. Never then as Mary and Peter Osborne own there. Thank you very much for joining me. Speaking of Brexit. Have you ever wondered what might happen if London declared independence events from the UK and remained in the European Union without potentially begin the capital's own story as a fortified city. WELL WE CONVINCED CONVINCE Monaco's contributing editor and Ramada to look into his crystal ball to find out the conservative live and Unionist Party. It's full official. Name used to be the train of events set in motion with David Cameron's ill-advised European Union referendum. In Two Thousand Sixteen twenty years ago now led to the and unionist part being quietly dropped opt just after Scotland's second independence referendum in two thousand and twenty one after which the newly sovereign state north of Hadrian's wall applied successfully Saly for readmission to the EU Northern Ireland which never quite left the EU even when the United Kingdom finally finally did in December two thousand twenty resumed full membership in two thousand and twenty three as six counties of a reunified Republic of Ireland. Shortly after that Wales which had voted leave in two thousand sixteen changed its mind about Brexit and about Britain and declared independence itself itself in two thousand sixteen. London had voted resoundingly. Remain once Scotland Northern Ireland and Wales had decided they were better off without England. London's own independence movement. Rapidly acquired an irresistible critical mass especially.

Northern Ireland Brexit Belfast European Union Ireland Division Northern Ireland Dennis UK England United Kingdom Peter Osborne London Integrated Education Fund Republic of Ireland Unionist Party Murray Alpha British army John Taylor
How Reno, Nevada, turned its economy into a small powerhouse

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:12 min | 11 months ago

How Reno, Nevada, turned its economy into a small powerhouse

"Berlin Wall came down thirty years ago tomorrow. As we've been reporting this week Germany opted to spend a fortune uniting the lagging lagging east with the more dynamic west. What if the United States opted to spend this kind of money nearly ten trillion dollars over thirty years adjusted for population size to unite the strongest strongest and weakest parts of the American economy McKinsey Global Institute this year analyzed which US counties towns and cities will thrive with more technology hitting the the economy and which areas will fall further behind without rethinking or new investment? Today let's get a snapshot from place that's turned itself into a bonafide technology hub in the space of ten years. It's the Reno sparks area in northwestern Nevada once known for a fading Casino Vibe. The region gained nearly fifteen thousand thousand jobs in just the last year. Hillary she is the mayor of Renault. Welcome thank you for having me now. You have land compared to the San Francisco Bay area. You got low rent. You've got three hundred twenty days of sunshine a year. I'd like to say that Reno just got lucky but give us a sense of the ways that you got the boom to come come to you. Well you have to remember. We were the highest in for closures and unemployment during the recession. So kind of hate to say it but really there was only one other way to go. And that's up but I think we really looked at our city really sort of played upon the things that were already here but were sort of not really being highlighted and some of that was arts and culture we have one of the biggest and best events called burning man which brings in seventy million dollars of economic impact so I reached out to them. We did a lot of soul searching with entrepreneurs small businesses businesses. Those things that we really feel that make a difference in Reno and could diversify our culture. So it's been pretty amazing. You know we really can provide a lot of qualities that you know other cities can't and also it's a great environment for companies to be able to grow and and expand here. Let's talk a little rough because not just about like the big Kahuna that they got about fifteen miles west of you. The Tesla Panasonic Battery Factory. That's going to open and next year. There's the Big Apple Facility. There's that giant data facility the biggest one in the world but me you got fourteen thousand eight eight hundred more jobs year over year in that region. I mean that is dramatic you must have done something about fostering and entrepreneurial what we call it ecosystem absolutely and. I think that that's critical. You really want to have that mentality of yes and a culture of yes and how do we get out there. And I think that that's really made a difference by opening up the doors to city hall and also bringing in residence and saying what do you WanNa see in your city. We surely there must be some local tensions though because although your rents are cheap compared to northern California southern California. They're going up. Because of the new businesses moving in law supply and demand and some people are going to find the rising rents a hardship. Sure I think you make make a great point you know. Every city is struggling with affordable housing and mental health issues and addiction issues. And those are all things. Is that cities that are certainly on the rise. have to deal with Because as you know you know housing doesn't pop up overnight and we've reached out to developers and said hey this is the time to build build now because we need housing now and remember in the recession. Many of those developers Were wiped out. Many of them went bankrupt. And we hope that initiative where we put some of those fees those development and building fees on the back end that. They don't have to go allow embargo as much money. So we're constantly working on different ways. that we can solve those issues that you know. They're very complex issues and that's just one little tool Hillary Chevy mayor of Reno Nevada. Thank you so much.

Reno Hillary Chevy California Berlin Wall United States Nevada Reno Nevada Mckinsey San Francisco Bay Germany Global Institute Apple Panasonic Hillary Renault Thirty Years Three Hundred Twenty Days Seventy Million Dollars Ten Trillion Dollars Ten Years
Over 100,000 celebrate 30 years since fall of Berlin Wall

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:12 min | 11 months ago

Over 100,000 celebrate 30 years since fall of Berlin Wall

"Walls weather meant to keep people out or keep the men's separated and apart have a way of falling with the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall at hand Holly Hubbard pressen has this perspective on the evening of November ninth nineteen eighty nine I was seated at a bar in San Francisco celebrating my birthday with friends when I looked up at the television and my jaw dropped pictured on the screen where east and west Berliners hacking away at the cement wall that had divided them for twenty eight years the jubilant scene so unexpected in my lifetime moved me to tears the eight hundred and sixty six mile long barrier system that divided east and West Germany including Berlin was supposed to stand for another fifty even one hundred years that's what Eric Honecker east Germany's last president told the nation ten months before the communist regime collapsed and he was forced to resign the prior year right a company to German friend on a visit to our family in West Berlin in her car we traveled from the very across the border into East Germany where we were confined to the heavily armed transport corridor that led to the democratic island city that was West Berlin though I traveled through the Soviet block before this was my first trip to West Berlin and the experience rattled me I had west German friends with relatives in the east who hadn't seen one another in decades not because they didn't want to but because the communist regime would not allow it fearing that such familial exchanges would undermine its ideology reflecting back on those long ago images I'm reminded of the impermanence of walls today Germany as a unified country the U. S. less so one no physical while separates Americans from one another the country is clearly divided what separates us is not cement or barbed wire but race religion class and politics if I've learned anything from the German unification thirty years ago it's that differences need not divide and that the will of the people makes for a mighty pick ax when held in a defiant collective

Berlin Wall San Francisco West Germany Berlin Eric Honecker President Trump West Berlin Holly Hubbard Twenty Eight Years One Hundred Years Thirty Years Ten Months
Germany marks 30 years since fall of Berlin Wall

Joe Pags

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

Germany marks 30 years since fall of Berlin Wall

"Germany marking thirty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall chancellor Angela Merkel grew up in East Germany he said today quote no wall that keeps people out and restricts freedom is so high so why it can't be broken down thanks as Amy Kellogg in Berlin America is listening to foster W. O. A. I. local news didn't police say two people died this afternoon after an eighteen Wheeler blew up near mile marker eighty four after hitting two other vehicles three people are hospitalized and should

Germany Angela Merkel East Germany Amy Kellogg Wheeler Berlin Wall Chancellor Berlin W. O. A. Thirty Years
Germany marks 30 years since fall of Berlin Wall

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 11 months ago

Germany marks 30 years since fall of Berlin Wall

"It was thirty years ago today that the influence Berlin Wall was opened in many places it was actually knocked down CBS news correspondent rocks at a severity as world leaders and ordinary Germans are marking the historic anniversary over the years thousands tried to breach the twenty seven mile wall dozens died making the attempt the fall of the Berlin Wall in nineteen eighty nine pointed to the end of the Cold War and the promise of a more unified democratic

Berlin Wall CBS Thirty Years
Tear Down This Wall: Tipping Points

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:48 min | 11 months ago

Tear Down This Wall: Tipping Points

"This first episode of a four part series marking the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. We examine the conventional wisdom that the I cracks in it appeared a long way away in a ruinous war in Afghanistan malfunctioning nuclear plant in Ukraine. This is the foreign desk. It's partially about the Aghanistan. But it's partially more about the kind of discussions people are having about institutions inside which you weren't supposed to look so the military leterrier was one of those. The military was sacred military defeated the Nazis. The military was the defender of the Soviet order. And suddenly you have very public discussions about that was a little risque at the extensive research. Shaw it was a bizarre situation where Cold War was still going on and foreign governments the governments of the NATO countries that were warning me and people around me on how I should behave and protect ourselves in our own Goldman and I saw somebody. Reading is best German newspaper bid side and I said to my at my partner into Cau- aw look somebody reading side and it was really something extraordinary and immediately drove to British and really really it has become commonplace to compare the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan John in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine to the United States long misadventure in Vietnam which had only ended for years beforehand. Both was exacted. A terrible ribble cost in lives and money abroad both undermined faith in government at home and both ended in humiliation but was the confrontation between the Red Army and Afghan Mujahideen armed with American weapons really as is often suggested the climactic battle of the Cold War. This was Leonard. Leonard Brezhnev's Soviet leader at the time when invading Afghanistan still seemed like a good idea. Would the party today strongly tastes the following principle fully words. I'm evaluates the unfolding situation and in consultation with the government of the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Ghanistan the Soviet leadership taken the following decision which I am officially announcing today. Kalinowski is a professor first of Eastern European studies at the University of Amsterdam and the author of along good by the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan. Tamie picks up the story story in March nineteen seventy-nine there's an uprising in the city of Herat and the Afghanistan's socialist who are in power. Ask them to intervene. Intervene and the and the Soviets think about it and basically say no and if you look at why they say no. It's quite interesting. Because they are quite aware that it's GonNa make relations with the West more difficult it's GonNa make relations with the Soviet Union's allies in the developing world problematic. They're worried about as they put having to fight the Afghan population and so on so they actually reject the idea march. I think what happens. By December is that they lose hope of the the government in Kabul actually being able to control the situation without Soviet help the fact that the communists are sort of killing each other but I think what really worries them is that a CIA can take advantage of the broad background to that of course is they're looking at deteriorating relations relations with the US already they're looking at the revolution in Iran. They're thinking okay you know. The Americans are getting beaten in Iran. They're going to try to look for a way to compensate. They're they're going to do that in Afghanistan so basically I think what happens by December nineteen seventy-nine as they think they have no other choice unlike the US in Vietnam the USA in Afghanistan was not troubled by a free press asking questions but not even the USSR could hide everything forever. We've had this justification for the the last six seven years about why we're in there. We can't just pull out right. We have to explain to people buyer pulling out now. Was it doing damage to the Soviets. Sure they were losing people will and they were spending money on it. But proportional to how large the Soviet military is and the kind of resources that it's used to spending. It's actually fairly small. I I think the bigger issue for Gorbachev one is that it's not improving especially by nineteen eighty six eighty seven. He's convinced that it's not going to get better and to is that. He sees that is an obstacle to better relations with other countries with countries in the Middle East and awesome first and foremost of course the United States. And that's as big a

Afghanistan Afghan Mujahideen Soviet Union United States Democratic Republic Of Afghani Berlin Wall Leonard Brezhnev Gorbachev Aghanistan Ukraine Vietnam Iran Middle East Herat Nato Red Army Tamie Shaw University Of Amsterdam
Germany celebrates 30 years since fall of Berlin Wall

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

01:02 min | 11 months ago

Germany celebrates 30 years since fall of Berlin Wall

"Germany is commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall thirty years ago today it was built in nineteen sixty one to cut off the part of Berlin liberated by western allies from communist East Germany and the Soviet bloc Veronica's are Govia reports German chancellor Ongole Americal pay tribute to those who suffered under the east German regime chancellor Merkel spoke at the Berlin Wall memorial she said many people were killed here and thousands imprisoned trying to flee from the west side is now we want to ensure that no one the finishes off separate people again it proves to us that no one is so high and so strong that we cannot play catch her through a live interpreter from German broadcaster Deutsche Avella Merkel also brought up the **** attacks against Jews on this date in nineteen thirty eight a celebration of the fall of the wall takes place at the Brandenburg gate where president Ronald Reagan famously made his tear down this wall

Berlin Wall Berlin East Germany Veronica Berlin Wall Memorial Deutsche Avella Merkel Brandenburg Gate Ronald Reagan President Trump Thirty Years
"berlin wall" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

07:49 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Here & Now

"Between West Berlin and the Soviets came to this decision off to people's policemen from the Soviets ad the pitch on the boundary stepped in to the city and begun to lay above Blah barricade along a one half mile stretch. The graduate. People who gathered on the Soviet sector by people's police using tick comes to from the Voice of Germany. By this point the Cold War was well underway and two years after the wall was built. President John F. Kennedy went to Berlin to express support for its citizens he delivered one of the conflicts most memorable speeches thousand years ago proudest both laws key with Romana so and the world of freedom. The proudest boast is being on. Lena I am a berliner. Still the conflict would simmer for decades and sometimes flare into violence. Took Poonch Allah. Here did happen very much here. For example the crossing book nearing the young boy was eighteen was killed because he tried I to escape. German border got shot in his beck. Alexandra Hildebrandt is director of Berlin checkpoint. Charlie Museum Checkpoint Charlie was one of the few crossing points between East and West where Soviet in US tanks once stood muzzle to muzzle in a showdown that nearly led to war war. I met Hildebrand inside the museum. There's a line of bricks in the floor. which once marked the border of the divided city? This is the museum which was open. Just after the wolves built so museum did grow up with a history and also wrote a history and here we. We are just days away from the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. How are you feeling? Very difficult. Link is great feeling to to be free you would say it would be wonderful if you would remember Chairman Division about Civil Division. Not just on the anniversaries Chris but also every day out the window. We can see a stack of sandbags piled in front of the military checkpoint. Replica I asked Hildebrandt to describe what was happening happening in the east before the wall was built in the Soviet part of Germany and also billion first dictatorship. It was Soviets who didn't didn't laws that people to sink didn't allows people to speak his. They didn't allow people to to move source of people did escape. A lot of people it was engineers. It was doctors. It was very important. People who was important for the East German Associates Gemini Visit of Soviet Union did build civil but they tried to escape right. Did they tried to make these daring. Dashes across the wall using being very inventive. Means I see in your exhibit here in the museum that there was a balloon that someone tried to use to cross the wall. They would hide in the backs of of of cars in the trunks under the seats. That sort of thing. Well Dangerous this is. It's a very tragic also. Can you imagine to put your kids in in such construction. I myself myself seven kids. I don't believe that would be able to put my kids in such construction listen but In billion was also somebody who did build such balloon. And this is this escape was unsuccessful he did felt down and die but also very many Qasim billion Which People Detroit to escape and also successful for example we see here in this room the little? BMW is at a tiny little car. Yes nobody could imagine from nobody from the East Germany. Boorda got could imagine somebody could escape because there's just room for one person at the most there because it's very little but this cape help. Rg three build it. Build it as a place for gasoline made it smaller so somebody could be inside the nine. Okay okay is forced success for the last one was not successful because the woman was too big and the East Germany got could recognize that something wrong because the Kaaba was to know. What kind of sympathy was there from the people in the West to the people in the east who were trapped behind the wall? It was a big many example short. It's as a Christmas tree on the border for example here checkpoint on Charlie just after. The wall was built Every year at Christmas time visit light to show the people in the vet he. Nobody forgets them Also this tradition. We continue now also and in this year also will open will put. The Lights is together this American embassy in Germany to to show the world that we are one vote and vets American. Do not forget. We'll speaking speaking of the Americans in the late nineteen eighties president. Ronald Reagan gave a very famous speech. Not far from here in front of the Brandenburg Gate. Now the Soviets themselves this May in a limited way becoming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released certain foreign news broadcaster no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to cooperate with greater freedom from state control. Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state or are they token gestures intended to raise false hopes in the west or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it and what came next next will forever be remembered president. Reagan challenged the Soviet. Leader Mikhail Gorbachev to prove that he was serious about reform. Mister Gorbachev tear down this wall. How impactful was that speech to that spilled the beginning of the end for the Berlin Wall? Well have you have in. Our museums. Exhibitions gone about the role intriguing but his first first visit in Belene was not not ninety. Nine hundred eighty seven but I ninety nine hundred eighty two when she was here at Checkpoint Charlie and made just one step all was borderlines original border line. We're we're standing right in front of a line in the floor. Essentially yes. It was here down down the street. WHO's bricks? Yes yes and may chest one step over just like we did. Yes and that was symbolic it was symbolic. He told a house of about. I don't want any Moses Division and it became president. Reagan is still adored in the city secretary of state. Mike Pompeo Heo is in Berlin today. Unveiling a statue of the former president at the US embassy. But it wasn't just Ronald Reagan. Political pressure had been building in the east for ears. It reached a peak in October of nineteen eighty nine when thousands of protesters risked their lives in the streets of Leipzig Germany demanding in free elections and free.

"berlin wall" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:51 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"China's President Xi Jinping is a huge fan of football in two thousand eleven. He said out his three goals the national team to qualify for host and eventually win a World Cup so far. The team is only qualified for one tournament. The two thousand two and he didn't didn't score a single goal. Things haven't improved much. Since his national team has consistently underperformed James is China correspondent and it is currently ranked sixty ninth in the world which is one spot below a tiny country of north Macedonia. And so why is it that the national team struggles so much or entire books have been written about this. Football is a very popular sport in China teams. That play in the English. Tremor League are especially popular but the popularity of the sport has not translated into success on the football pitch. I know that the government is trying hard to change that China China recently announced that it would build or renovate twenty nine thousand football pitches on school grounds by the twenty twenty so China's plan to get better on the world. Stage is simply to attack things at the grassroots level while the government has recently resorted to a new strategy which is grind King Chinese any citizenship to foreign players. According to China's Football Association as many as seven or eight players are being naturalized. So how how does that work In illegal sensory rules of the game sense if you're building an international team just by granting citizenship China does not permit dual citizenship naturalized realized players have to give up their original passport in order to take a Chinese one under FIFA rules in order to play for A foreign country you have to fulfil one of several criteria and this usually involves having a relatives from the country. You want to play for alternatively unabashedly if you don't have any connection with a foreign country but if you have lived there yourself for five years continuously since the age of eighteen you may also be eligible the first player without Chinese ancestry to play for team. China is a Brazilian player named L.. Choson and he made his debut in September a he already might be the best player on the team. And so how does this sit with Chinese football fans then that their national team doesn't look like it used to sue. Public opinion is Very divided on this Some fans appreciate that China needs to do. Everything can including granting citizenship to foreigners to try to secure a spot in Qatar in two thousand twenty two. But I would say a sizable minority fans are repulsed by this new tactic of granting citizenship to foreigners. These people cannot accept the idea that someone who doesn't look Chinese can play for came. China look online for example many angry comments from fans one fan in for example said we're not a country of immigrants and this other fan said you don't love China you'll only love Chinese yuan directed at l.. Choson I imagine and and so how do you think this will play out in the longer term though that fight between the hard core older school China fans and the ones who simply have ambitions to succeed on the world stage. China's foot off association is certainly aware of the backlash not only regular football fans by China's all time top goalscorer. How High Don? She is a strongly against the use of naturalized citizens on team China so in response to such criticisms China's Football Federation has recently promised not not to recruit as many foreign born players going forward. And what about in the near term. How do you rate China's chances to get into the World Cup cut? In order to guarantee an appearance in the next next stage of World Cup qualification China needs to finish at the very top.

"berlin wall" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

09:06 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Tomorrow marks thirty years since the Berlin Wall fell with the Iron Curtain Separating East West Young East Germans dash the last one hundred to the wall and will hold into the West by West German food. They don't come on. The wall was built overnight in nineteen sixty one dividing city and a country in symbolizing a divided continent but three decades ago. There was a change in the air. In East Germany. Revolutions had begun to sweep through central and eastern Europe. Communist rule was beginning thing to come to an end. There was a sense having lived in a pressure cooker not just that year but for a number of years preceding it and I think we all I decided to go on like this and macelroy is a senior editor at the economist in nineteen eighty nine. She was working as a correspondent in East Germany. My the experience that the fall of the Berlin Wall was sitting at a press conference with condition of ski head of the Berlin Party. Who accidentally fall by trying to relax travel restrictions and then saying for immediately so a number of us then rushed to checkpoint Charlie and do other crossing points tried to persuade border guards at the wall was they didn't believe us and then a couple of Acer it was on the evening news and that seemed to who people like a suction from across the city tens of thousands of people to go due to the wall and to stop shouting? Let us cross. Let Us Cross and about eleven o'clock in the evening. The gods was no other advice just gave up an I did that. And that's the way it happened. quickey is sue easy enthusiast. People celebrated celebrated on both sides of the wall some took to it with hammers and shovels tearing it down piece by piece not surprising lots of hugging lots tosses of vodka and we take some with the Berlin Wall in historical significance. WHO's a healing of the scar? God that ran throughout Germany it was a country being slotted back together again but it was also a Europe whole and free. It was about pushing. I'm back together something. It'd been destroyed in that Calamitous War in the twentieth century for those living in East Germany the change was profound and I watch television all night and I was in tears and I just couldn't believe what I saw. I have the feeling something's happening in this year. Of course no idea and no thought that the war would come down. Cornelia Guenter manages our Berlin Bureau who was born in East Germany. My knife has changed enormously many aspects first of all I was able to travel. That was always my wish and in my desire for me it was very very happy thing that has had a very positive impact on my life but not everyone in the east called at the same in his speech last month. German Chancellor Angela Markle who is herself east. Germany said in Ulster. Today must all learn to understand why live from many people in East Germany German unity has not been a solely positive experience. Reunification made successes of some victims of others. Today it's being debated like never before one of the interesting things that's happened in the last few years. Is that large parts of West Germany. How many have started to realize that the way that they look at reunification is not the way many people in the east so retort experienced? It's almost half of West German. Say They consider reunification to have been a success story and the same goes for less than a third of East Germans. Tom nuttal Berlin bureau chief. The speed with which change with brought to East Germany was almost unfathomable if Germany was to be folded into what was a modern market economy like West Germany. Then mass layoffs and deindustrialization the industrialization were inevitable. Because voss way to these Germany was simply uncompetitive with mass privatization of East German companies to bring them into onto the market. That was a union of the currencies that ensured that the East German currency could be exchanged at one to one rate for the West German deutschemark. Moth what that meant is that firms in East Germany. All of a sudden having to pay their workers salaries that they could no longer afford and voss way to them with bust overnight essentially and had to lay their workers off by one estimate. Eighty percent of East German workers at some point in the post reunification years found themselves out of a job. And do you see evidence of that trauma still today. Yes you do you see it. In a small but persistent economic gap wages ages in the east are between eighty to eighty five percent the average of what they are in the West as productivity gap the proportion of large German companies companies that are headquartered in the east is absolutely tiny and then you have things like they call it. The transfer of elite of the sort of upper echelon of public jobs in the East only four percent of them occupied by east. Germans will what's your view on how East Germany was impacted by reunification its development since the wall fell. I think you have to start doc by saying that reunification has been a success in the sense that people in East Germany a no longer living under communist dictatorship economically. Actually the convergence budgets has been pretty good. There are those gaps that we mentioned but of course people are free to migrate to the Western ahead of a lot of them have done but the politics of the east. We've had several the state elections in the east this year. In which P alternative for Deutschland the far-right. AFDC done very well. The AFDC started off this conservative euro-sceptic party worried about Eurozone bailouts. And so on. But over the years it's morphed into anti-immigration in particular anti-muslim keen to wage culture wars ause and in the east it has tried to tap into this particular sense of East German grievance about the mixed legacy of reunification I've been at AFDC events in places like twice question where you see because attempt to tap into a sense that East Germany remained pure while West. Germany has been corrupted by by. I Dunno Merckel migrants Muslims. And I think it is important I think is worrying that it is finding an audience amongst younger voters. I think that has this. Shakin some people in the west out of a sense of complacency about the progress that was made about reunification alerted to the fact that a lot of work remains to be done. I wonder if there is still a divide in terms of identity. Do people still think of themselves as East Germans or Westerns. The identity question is absolutely crucial. Crucial to understanding this one. Statistic I think is quite telling in that regard is that forty seven percents. Almost half of these German says that they identify the Germans before Germans and that number is much higher than it was at the point of reunification and the converse is true. Only twenty two percent one fifth of Germans in the West one thing that I found in my travels across parts of East Germany. Talking in particular to young East Germans was that they develop some sort of East East German identity. When they went to the West and often they were surprised to encounter what they had considered archaic stereotypes of these Germans? And there's this idea the so-called Yelm ozzy the complaining easterner. They've never satisfied despite all the money that they've been given from the West and so on or there's an old cold war term Dunkel Deutschland Germany. which set of Noted backwardness ignorance Jupiter tea and I spoke to some people who encountered that. Tom Directed against them when they we went to the West and so they often develop to sit of east. German identity as a sort of protective shield almost spoke to some who had returned to East Germany and found themselves a a lot. More comfortable debt. Why do you think it is that these questions of identity debates around reunification are coming to the fore now? There's almost psychoanalytical account which Angela Merkel Michael has floated. And that's if you compare what's happening in East Germany now to what happened in West Germany in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight. When across across the country you had younger people who turning on their parents and said what did you do in the Nazi era? What did you do to fight for freedom? Some people have suggested that initiative compatible way twenty five years after a traumatic experience. Young people are starting to confront questions that parents were not able to do. Now of course in the East German case it's younger people asking questions not over their parents but on behalf of their parents but the success of the A. F. D. among some segments of the young electorate may be related to that in some centers to bury trauma that odor comes to the surface a generation or generation and half later Thank you very much for joining us now from until thanks.

"berlin wall" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

07:11 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Callers join was. Let's just nuts to think dribbles and I had to stop to say unexplained again and again that's you can spend hundreds of kilos of colors on the Brainwa- it will be never beautiful. It was acts of defiance. Tiaras were started to break down the mental barrier that the wall had imposed the imperial war museum in London is marking the thirtieth anniversary of the full commissioning new pieces from Jerry and fellow street artists stick painted on real fragments of the old war. The works will be on display at the museum from now until the first of December Paris Asia. Aw is one of the Cold War curator's the imperial war museum and joined us to discuss the effect the art had on the barrier it completely transformed it. I'll Wa- section outside. Appeal in London is emblazoned with a message. Change Your Life which was written by the Artis Indiana so he painted two hundred and twenty-three individual sections of the war just after the fall and each of them were sort of motivational slogans for the new era in Berlin. So our says change the life of this day. Fight your misery save our Earth things like that. I mean these sorts of messages of just as poignant now and so the art of the Berlin Wall completely transformed what was also very stark and inaccessible structure on purpose and something very accessible now years later has the removal of the wall. Man and the memories have faded. And how does the city move on. Keeping the lessons learnt close heart. His poor scrutton again. I would say that it's quite interesting in that. The creation of the Berlin Wall trail in the main memorial sites only happened in the early two thousands around about the time I moved to bill and and because for a long time in the nineties. The kind of the impulse was just a remove trace and I think a point there was an understanding that you calm Russia under the carpet. You have to deal with history. What you have to remember is when the building was built it wasn't just a single wall by the end it was to walls with this security strip this no-man's-land in between so a whole strip of land was taken out of the center of the city and serve? Those gaps is slowly being filled in but the remains places. Where for whatever reason there is still a gap is a patch of wasteland? Is the place where kids play football or some of it is being tended to parks playgrounds. And so I don't know how consciously Z.. People think of the wall when they're engaging with their spaces but even the absence of the world has become part of the fabric of this issue and of course she didn't think about every day but sometimes when you do think of it it does seem almost on imaginable City could be divided in that way but of course we have cities still on this planet today undivided in similar ways and communities divided. So unfortunately it can be to real still when you talk about other cities around the world who have to face divisions and divides is whether their physical sectarian when you come together as a city again and you've talked about the value of memorials. What would be your your takeaway away from the successes? That Berlin had in coming together as a city and being a place at both remembers the past but manages to move on as a contemporary places. I think it's a very important topic to think about how we memorialize remember the past because of course the danger is that you turn the sites of remember these places. The officer Resin with the stories of the past you tenement to Tori attractions. All places for people to take off on that checklist of must-see bill earl insights without the people hats reflecting on the stories as deep as you would like them to at the same time and I felt as myself as a younger person and I see this with my daughter two now to have places where you can go to reflect on the history to hear the stories of the past. I think a very important. I'm an country like Germany. The city light Berlin with the specific history of this place not only related to the division of the city but the Nazi history the Holocaust. I think it's almost vital right now for us to be able to tell these stories through memorial sites in these places because where a point where the people who were where around to tell us the story on their longer with us and this will happen with the Berlin Wall to at some point in the future and so therefore I think preserving these sites exhibitions museums memorials lines in the ground. Cobblestones in the ground are all part of making sure. We don't forget these stories of history and I think the negative aspect of it is this kind of commercialization of history three months tourism by actually still believe that the benefits outweigh the negatives as importantly importantly don't forget the damage that this wall did and using autism form of memorial gives us even more ability to ensure that these parts of our history story on forgotten so what value should we place on the artwork of the wool from his powers Oregon the F. Amazed Valley. In my opinion. We now live in a society where barriers and walls are actually going up not coming down if you think about. Say the peace walls in Belfast. And how they're covered with murals else and the blast walls in Kabul Afghanistan. These barriers are meant to part people and demarcate borders. They're sort of like a blank canvas for artists and when that transition happens where art appears on structure like that it does make it sort of devaluate in its actual function makes her valley for people and it so humanizes it. In a way which is extremely important finding ways humanizes barriers has become a very necessary necessarily go because walls clearly still a popular political solution for many of our modern day leaders. That wall build that wall build that wall next week on the nest we will look at some examples of these modern day. Walls bump there's one important lesson that we should learn from Berlin and the great thing about it was that it came down because sometimes asked in talks. Oh you know you said about all these barriers and these divisions but you know they come down and I say well give me an example of a wall. That's come down apart from the Berlin Wall which in a wider sense is the Iron Curtain. Can you I presume the occasional after after rotten through ancient history. Yes but they're they're in a more Going up and I said it's reflective of the time I mean most people don't no no India has completely fenced off Bangladesh as two and a half thousand miles completely fenced off watchtowers etc.. Most people don't know that Turkey has built a seven hundred kilometer concrete longcrete will completely sealing Syria the top. They don't know that. Saudi Arabia is completely fenced off Iraq Malaysia. That's fences India Pakistan Dan Pakistan Iran on and on it goes around the world the huddle grant fashion..

"berlin wall" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

09:23 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"So as years ago this Saturday a wall slicing through the heart of Berlin and separating the Soviet controlled east from the British American American and French secured West Foul after twenty eight years. The Iron Curtain had been breached. Thousands of East Germans came across the border. Today perhaps more than one hundred thousand so many that border police lost count and at every border crossing the thousands of West Germans there to say welcome off the second mode will the Potsdam agreement divided control and reconstruction of Germany between the victorious allies and with the British and Americans not willing to hand full control of the capital over to the Soviets the city was similarly a divided but with Berlin residing in the east the agreement men that a Western en clave was born and the west of the city became a potential escape route for eastern defectors east. Germany was losing its best and brightest and flows in charge. Something had to be. He done so in the early hours of the thirteenth of August nineteen sixty one barrier began to be enforced. This story has all the hallmarks of a political story. Still Alive and kicking today at its heart. The Berlin Wall was an immigration issue orbit one of keeping citizens in rather than out we used to be on together's then about twelve thousand years ago. We began to stopping together. As and at that point when static everything everything you have is precious to. You is also static. If you are feeling concerned that somebody else might covet your goods at that point you will defend them and building. Wolves will be part of that. And that's where the wool building started about twelve thousand years ago. It was no point until them. And before that and it has been throughout history whether it's the walls of troy the walls of Jericho Constantinople etc etc and most walls barriers and fences are physical manifestations stations of something much deeper which is the concept of us and then which was true in the time of the Great Wall of China one side barbarians the other side civilization and it's true now of trump's wall they are all these manifestations of division. That's the author author journalist Him Marshall who quite literally wrote the book on walls divided. Why we're living in an age of walls? Chronicles the thousands of miles of fences senses and barriers in our world and how they affect the political landscape too. So how did this particular wall come about the Berlin Wall and the subsequent fence which then fenced off East Germany from West Germany is actually probably a one off in the this will is actually a prison wall to keep people in so they count escape. What is most wolves That we don't want that law over. They're coming over the will to us so it is different in that respect as you get to the late. Nineteen fifty s Germany was divided into zones as one of the losers of the second world. War The problem was that the American can Marshall Plan was already kicking in and the western areas. We're doing much better economically. And so of course people in the Russian sectors sectors of East Berlin voting with their feet and in the years running up to when it was built a couple of million East Germans thought look the standard of life is much better over there and they started moving now. That is a direct challenge to the Russians to the Soviet Union and to the idea of communism because because if it is a physical manifestation is. That's working better for me I'm going that suggests something about your system. So they could not put up with his hemorrhaging. Both at an economical level. All of the workforce but probably more importantly for the Soviet Union and its populations. They can't put up with that because it's a challenge to their concept that our always life is the better way of life for everybody and people supported and so over night one night when the wall and the flow of people was cutoff immediately. I've been in both when the wall existed. But also he hears later and what struck me in the years. I've been since as I find it quite hard to imagine where wasn't people so this is where the war was. This river was a place where people use to try and swim across this dividing line. How complicated indicate it was it to divide a city when you think of our city London how you ever run a fence across the middle of it that would be effective? Well the Russians and East Germans had the advantage of not being directly answerable to their the peoples living there and there were the sectors as you know there was the French control sector British American and there was the Russian control sector so as they had control over that sector and the Americans. The British couldn't say no you can't put at a brick on top of another brick there. They simply walled off their sector unless said they did he overnight. They brought huge concrete slabs in and other things things fencing and they did it overnight but it wasn't politically difficult insofar as the other occupying power bill and didn't have a say in it so obviously go with the contours of the sector. They occupied and that was East Berlin. I mean if it'd been southbound South Bill would now be that buzzword that we have in politics not East Berlin just geographically. That's how far they got the sector that they took for centuries raise walls have been built to keep out invading armies but this was the first wall in all recorded history to keep an entire country from fleeing fleeing into West Berlin is three and a half million before the war was erected if the gods were there guns unsuccessful in keeping people from fleeing that there's the barbed wire if they crossed that that was the wall they reached the top. There was the broken glass and with that a city was divided. Millions of Berlin citizens were now defined by their street address. Peter Miller what is a journalist in East Berlin and the author of nine thousand nine hundred nine Berlin Wall my part in his downfall. Peter told us how he ended up with quite peculiar assignment. I immediately joined Reuters news agency London after finishing university and they sent me straight away after working as a trainee. They sent me to Brussels when I came back to London later about six months and then they say well how up in so it's my job. It's okay I don't Germany level moral and they said well nothing much happens at least seventy days. I'd say a couple of minutes but anyway they put me in there because they'd has the office since easterly separated in nineteen forty nine and a want to give it up because no other non German news agency had enough us on eastern side. The rule. So I I've lived in Paris and lived in Brussels. I thought it was just too good enough for two minutes and slightly disconcerted. I went there and discovered the billion Elian accents and started to pick it up and at the same time had to world. The when I was about to bury I hugged together would be East Germany. which was shook but I ended up there and I found probably one of the exciting places I'd ever be and so there I found myself going through checkpoint quite chilly and finding of flats it Roy says head for study use it was quite doubting? Tell me what was life. Like for a a journalist working in eastbound at the time did you have a sense that you are being watched by the infamous stars e the secret police. It's there's two sides to that question. was that ever since the Russians have done these German Roy shooting in Nineteen fifty-six and he just really accepted it was nothing we could do. Getting cross the Woolworth always dangerous restatements. Who tried to many had been shots and really very so nothing happening city except funding the old dissident who is willing to speak out yes? He took that for granted. Then only after the wolf find became done. We discovered that they started the headed. Twenty nine microphones in the FLACCO. Black I live in which was expected to be a little bit. Quite that many life for foreign journalists in East Berlin was clearly a well. Mona set one for many many in these Ovo life did go on. They wanted to escape and they took risks with their lives and hopes of making it to the West. I am what was seen as freedom. As the communist barrier between East and West Berlin rose higher and stronger. The more determined grows wheel of those in the east to us. Along the border east Berliners forced to evacuate their homes as the communist police moved to prevent their escape however the wool proved effective Tiv- and despite political efforts to remove it. Mister Gorbachev.

The fall of the Berlin Wall

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

09:00 min | 11 months ago

The fall of the Berlin Wall

"So as years ago this Saturday a wall slicing through the heart of Berlin and separating the Soviet controlled east from the British American American and French secured West Foul after twenty eight years. The Iron Curtain had been breached. Thousands of East Germans came across the border. Today perhaps more than one hundred thousand so many that border police lost count and at every border crossing the thousands of West Germans there to say welcome off the second mode will the Potsdam agreement divided control and reconstruction of Germany between the victorious allies and with the British and Americans not willing to hand full control of the capital over to the Soviets the city was similarly a divided but with Berlin residing in the east the agreement men that a Western en clave was born and the west of the city became a potential escape route for eastern defectors east. Germany was losing its best and brightest and flows in charge. Something had to be. He done so in the early hours of the thirteenth of August nineteen sixty one barrier began to be enforced. This story has all the hallmarks of a political story. Still Alive and kicking today at its heart. The Berlin Wall was an immigration issue orbit one of keeping citizens in rather than out we used to be on together's then about twelve thousand years ago. We began to stopping together. As and at that point when static everything everything you have is precious to. You is also static. If you are feeling concerned that somebody else might covet your goods at that point you will defend them and building. Wolves will be part of that. And that's where the wool building started about twelve thousand years ago. It was no point until them. And before that and it has been throughout history whether it's the walls of troy the walls of Jericho Constantinople etc etc and most walls barriers and fences are physical manifestations stations of something much deeper which is the concept of us and then which was true in the time of the Great Wall of China one side barbarians the other side civilization and it's true now of trump's wall they are all these manifestations of division. That's the author author journalist Him Marshall who quite literally wrote the book on walls divided. Why we're living in an age of walls? Chronicles the thousands of miles of fences senses and barriers in our world and how they affect the political landscape too. So how did this particular wall come about the Berlin Wall and the subsequent fence which then fenced off East Germany from West Germany is actually probably a one off in the this will is actually a prison wall to keep people in so they count escape. What is most wolves That we don't want that law over. They're coming over the will to us so it is different in that respect as you get to the late. Nineteen fifty s Germany was divided into zones as one of the losers of the second world. War The problem was that the American can Marshall Plan was already kicking in and the western areas. We're doing much better economically. And so of course people in the Russian sectors sectors of East Berlin voting with their feet and in the years running up to when it was built a couple of million East Germans thought look the standard of life is much better over there and they started moving now. That is a direct challenge to the Russians to the Soviet Union and to the idea of communism because because if it is a physical manifestation is. That's working better for me I'm going that suggests something about your system. So they could not put up with his hemorrhaging. Both at an economical level. All of the workforce but probably more importantly for the Soviet Union and its populations. They can't put up with that because it's a challenge to their concept that our always life is the better way of life for everybody and people supported and so over night one night when the wall and the flow of people was cutoff immediately. I've been in both when the wall existed. But also he hears later and what struck me in the years. I've been since as I find it quite hard to imagine where wasn't people so this is where the war was. This river was a place where people use to try and swim across this dividing line. How complicated indicate it was it to divide a city when you think of our city London how you ever run a fence across the middle of it that would be effective? Well the Russians and East Germans had the advantage of not being directly answerable to their the peoples living there and there were the sectors as you know there was the French control sector British American and there was the Russian control sector so as they had control over that sector and the Americans. The British couldn't say no you can't put at a brick on top of another brick there. They simply walled off their sector unless said they did he overnight. They brought huge concrete slabs in and other things things fencing and they did it overnight but it wasn't politically difficult insofar as the other occupying power bill and didn't have a say in it so obviously go with the contours of the sector. They occupied and that was East Berlin. I mean if it'd been southbound South Bill would now be that buzzword that we have in politics not East Berlin just geographically. That's how far they got the sector that they took for centuries raise walls have been built to keep out invading armies but this was the first wall in all recorded history to keep an entire country from fleeing fleeing into West Berlin is three and a half million before the war was erected if the gods were there guns unsuccessful in keeping people from fleeing that there's the barbed wire if they crossed that that was the wall they reached the top. There was the broken glass and with that a city was divided. Millions of Berlin citizens were now defined by their street address. Peter Miller what is a journalist in East Berlin and the author of nine thousand nine hundred nine Berlin Wall my part in his downfall. Peter told us how he ended up with quite peculiar assignment. I immediately joined Reuters news agency London after finishing university and they sent me straight away after working as a trainee. They sent me to Brussels when I came back to London later about six months and then they say well how up in so it's my job. It's okay I don't Germany level moral and they said well nothing much happens at least seventy days. I'd say a couple of minutes but anyway they put me in there because they'd has the office since easterly separated in nineteen forty nine and a want to give it up because no other non German news agency had enough us on eastern side. The rule. So I I've lived in Paris and lived in Brussels. I thought it was just too good enough for two minutes and slightly disconcerted. I went there and discovered the billion Elian accents and started to pick it up and at the same time had to world. The when I was about to bury I hugged together would be East Germany. which was shook but I ended up there and I found probably one of the exciting places I'd ever be and so there I found myself going through checkpoint quite chilly and finding of flats it Roy says head for study use it was quite doubting? Tell me what was life. Like for a a journalist working in eastbound at the time did you have a sense that you are being watched by the infamous stars e the secret police. It's there's two sides to that question. was that ever since the Russians have done these German Roy shooting in Nineteen fifty-six and he just really accepted it was nothing we could do. Getting cross the Woolworth always dangerous restatements. Who tried to many had been shots and really very so nothing happening city except funding the old dissident who is willing to speak out yes? He took that for granted. Then only after the wolf find became done. We discovered that they started the headed. Twenty nine microphones in the FLACCO. Black I live in which was expected to be a little bit. Quite that many life for foreign journalists in East Berlin was clearly a well. Mona set one for many many in these Ovo life did go on. They wanted to escape and they took risks with their lives and hopes of making it to the West. I am what was seen as freedom.

Berlin Wall East Germany East Berlin Berlin West Berlin Soviet Union Peter Miller Potsdam East Germany. West Germany China Him Marshall ROY Reuters Brussels London Donald Trump
"berlin wall" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Scorpion the song they wrote about the fall of the Berlin Wall a great weekend everyone we conservative underground meets for right now never spoke to anybody in Ukraine in my life one thing I know is quid pro quo John we got Joe on tape Joe saying do you want the billion dollars.

Berlin Wall Ukraine John Joe billion dollars
"berlin wall" Discussed on This is Why

This is Why

03:04 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on This is Why

"Here we are now thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall when you think back on that period of time are there any other really special memories that stand out. Uh of course is going to checkpoint Charlie because that's how we got in there and I remember you know we had to go into inside. They went through everything you had in your your truck and looked into your cars and you know had mirrors going underneath the cars and so on and so forth that was always something because you they could they could at anytime say no they could at anytime we know so it was. Yes sir. No Sir three bags full Sir from our side. We just had everything they wanted they got and we got in there. The other one was really weird as we decided after after we played the Walsh show that my agent and I would go and try and get our money out of the bank we We had to put her money. We couldn't take our money out eastern marker no good for us to take out of there anyway so we had to put them in a bank in In East Germany so we left them in a big East Germany. We had an account. Then we got called in to do a show when the wall was starting to come down in in In in nineteen eighty nine and we did a show on either side of the wall that night we did one show in East Berlin one show in West Berlin back back on a weekend again. And all the West burners came East Berliners game and they all our money from eastern went back into the same bank so we were getting paid the one day but we we thought we had some money. Either we would come back and get it and then the wall then the next thing happened. Of course the Wall came down so we had to go find a bank again and we found the bank and it was like a three-story restoring. Walk up building to up to the top to get a bank and we had our deposit slips and stuff like that to take it out because you couldn't take before and at that time they then converted it it when when everything got back together. They converted the East marks to the German mark and we got her money and it must have sat there. Probably I guess for two and a half to two to three two years and we didn't get any interest never looked but I mean that was my next question. Did you know I gotta go back in House. Of course I. I don't think so. I think we were just happy to get. Our money changed but it was kind of neat because there was some little little place a little. Why a wooden building walk up the stairs to this place? And the and the small small bank government run at that time government office and Two or three people working there that you could see and gave her slips they got the money and you know I call. Her agent had called ahead of time so we were coming up and to make sure they had some money but It was it was really interesting. I still got a piece the wall because we all got some. We rented sledgehammers we on the day of the show the big wall show and we got a chance to swing at the wall and keep pieces of it. I got a big chunk of it in my. Oh still to this day. As does Brian and most of the guys in the band you know you're paid so much money for such ever rented it for ten minutes to smash away at it and knocked down your piece pick it up and back off you win and it was It was something I'll never forget this. This is why is produced by John. Doubt.

"berlin wall" Discussed on This is Why

This is Why

04:58 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on This is Why

"Is Auburn hair down this wall two years and three months after. US President Ronald Reagan made that now famous speech at the Brandenburg Gates. The East German government stunned the world when they finally decided to allow travel travel between the East and West. Weeks of civil unrest led to that monumental moments for ten thousand three hundred and sixteen eighteen days east and west Germans had been kept apart but on November nine th nineteen eighty nine. The Wall began to come down. stonning us from East Germany for the East German authorities have said the essence of the Berlin Wall doesn't mean anything anymore from the Berlin Wall specifically take a look at them. They'd been there since last night. They are here in the thousands they are here in the tens of thousands occasionally. They shout de Momo's vic the wall must go thousands thousands and thousands of West Germans. Come to make the point that the wall has suddenly become irrelevant. Something as you can see almost a party on. How do you measure such Donovan? Moment in history thousands of east Germans came across the border today. Perhaps more than one hundred thousand so many that border police lost count and at every crossing thousands of west Germans there to say eight. Welcome such an astonishing moment in history. Now what's it feel like standing on top of the wall. It's incredible for me it's I can't Describe really the my feelings it's Something unreal from me if if there is someone who who sleeps for eight weeks and you told told him what happens here. He thinks you're crazy. It's unthinkable walks came down and we got involved in a concert right next to the Berlin Wall between East and West Berlin as we're Roger waters a founder member of Pink Floyd who performed the classic work the wool to raise money for the Memorial Fund for disaster. Relief waters will bring a cast of some of the world's top stars to perform in Berlin's the Democrats in the shadow of the Brandenburg Gates at four hundred and fifty thousand people showed up. That was an amazing show. They did the whole the wall record. That was done by Pink Floyd that we perform the whole thing with different people taking different songs. And there's the band was there. Van Morrison Snake O'Connor conor. Let me think Cindy lauper Scorpions. Rock Band Man Faithful Joni Mitchell Bryan and Brian Remember. He did that. Song comfortably Numb It was a tremendous event and and while they were doing that of course they were building up the wall and then tearing down the wall and by the time the show was over the wall was down. That's the way they did eh. Four hundred and fifty thousand people was quite an amazing thing and we played right in that. No it was the no go zone between the two walls. There's actually two walls between there's a place where the East Germans has had their Towers in that set up like a penitentiary and then on the other side the West West Germany was the same thing and people of course as you know tried to get over the wall and try and get it to the other side so it was a very interesting time and it was really a thrill to be on that wall record and it did very well and that was one of the First Times Roger Waters where he performed on those conditions which made it even more more memorable looking back before that concert and before the Wall came down. When you were with Bryan Adams playing shows is in East Berlin? What were the crowds like there? I am just imagining that. They must have gone crazy just the crowd. Atmosphere must've sipping electric. No it isn't it isn't because they were beaten down Okay so yes. You got up played applause now. I can flash forward. I like earlier this year. Both my accent over there and Michael will feel it tonight. There's a way they react differently as much going to a symphony and people you know clocked up coming Up Stop then as it gets a loggerhead more into the show and they feel that they can feel the whole thing loosen up it's up to the act to loosen them up and Mike and of course it's very good. He works on ramp in the middle of the audience. He starts talking to them and they start. They start to buy in but they're not like the West Germans who were right into it right away and Brian's the same way they notice that the audience is a little a bit different because they've been they've been they've been brought up that way. Okay you to not show that much emotion show. It's it's throw some acts off younger underperformers. I mean I know Michael I went there. Who'll he really had to work to get to him? He got to him and they were really appreciative but they do not so that in the same way as they you do in West Berlin even to this day to a certain extent.

"berlin wall" Discussed on This is Why

This is Why

04:29 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on This is Why

"Silly. My memory concede all I can. I know often. I was so close by twenty centimetres swimming in the summer. In one of those leaks were supposed to bite it. But he's a West because you're the megaphones of the of the border control people from the east. You're now passing the border. Scream bag kurt. Hoop ner is a professor in the Police Department at the University of British Columbia and he's a part of the Institute of of European Studies. I decided to start my conversation with Kurt on the morning of August. Fourteenth nineteen sixty one. What did Berliners wake up to that mornings mundane woke up with a vol? I'm seeing that. The from a government of the Yar was erecting in kind of night action in order to secure their own nation. State Duri Konami. There must've feeling on site that too. Many people are using to kind of open border and the leading this kind of modem terms the brain drain all the kind so you cannot make church aspect and rather than offering the attractive Social model industry are is it. Okay now we shut the whole thing down on the wall bustier. That must have been so confusing for people and frightening as well. Just boss definitely very frightening. Pure you're into Monday before my time I lived later on for twenty years in Villena under times of and the wall was here and even then it was reflecting and you could see him on Uber. You fell trapped in many respects. You couldn't move a in the time. Nineteen sixty one of three people living invest in role in Hecker chops the east. None of that. They couldn't go to work any longer. And the other way round so it was confusion. They're also pretty clear. That's the kind of left at the moment of the corridor at a time. The Soviet Union said they built the wall to keep out. Western spies and fascists seemed seemed more likely though in reality the wall had been built to keep East Germans from flooding into the West with the sides separated different cultures. I began to emerge professor. Hoffner explained those differences can still be seen today if you it's now united city and to let's say you're moving beyond the censure Annoy Mitchell how it's called girls in museum science on your really back in eastern turn trump many sonic from the houses but also the kind of people living there so there is still this kind of separation. This sentiment that We see Gee starting latest is ninety sixty one. We see the the emotion to growth of harms of German identities One man who witnessed those different Germany's in a very unique way. Is Bruce Allin. Bruce is the longtime music manager to so Bryan Adams. Michael Play and a whole bunch of other artists. He told me what it was like back in the eighties. Travelling to East Germany well on tour with Bryan Adams we've played them so as the eastern bloc so we would go to checkpoint Charlie get stuff through go over to leap see or Mannheim take them shows their Berlin when the wall was up was a model city and it drove the East Germans nuts because they would sit there and the other side of the wall in this dark we every every every time we were over there was streets barely work noting their lights on the houses dark dark dark all the time and they would hear all this fun coming from Berlin and they ended up there so it would drive them crazy listening to what's going on in West Berlin while they're sitting there in East Berlin. In this dreary circumstances. Meanwhile you know you could hear the music you could hear. Are you know they had brides going up at affairs. Wheels and stuff like that apply so the people having a great time and they really pushed it and become a real. It became a model city for Germany. And I think that had a lot to do with the reason the wall came down. I mean they. They're Germany services. We're GONNA take it anymore but just like torture. It's like when you were in Alcatraz prison. People always said you could hear San Francisco. Well that's a drag when you're in a cell so I think the Germans East Germans. They just got sick of it and I think they put the pressure on you know. Let's get this down. Which of course Reagan was up there to tear down this wall? All the Hind.

"berlin wall" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:40 min | 11 months ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"The Berlin Wall our correspondent chance Henry put together this reflection on the iconic barriers past and its lasting legacy their ears cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire concrete John runs and guard towers the sight of this poisonous snake winding its way through a lovely city will bring you to your knees the communists are using concrete slabs to block off many of the cross over points along the seventy five mile border never seen so many east German army vehicles in my life when they suddenly began building it in nineteen sixty one Russians in east Germans called it an anti fascist protection ramparts the rest of the world called it the Berlin Wall husbands and wives and brothers in and dividing up people who wish to be joined together he's jumping from the eastern side the rest on site and they were killed in this in this time then in nineteen eighty nine after a series of events is surprising and shocking is when a rose press Vergy behind it rumbled people finding it's not the end of the story all in its fall continue to impact our world today completely change the geography of Europe the east Germans themselves filled with national treated as second class citizens chance joins.

Henry Germany John Vergy Europe Berlin Wall
"berlin wall" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"berlin wall" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Pretty good. We should look into whether or not each of these presidents did in fact, call it a border crisis. I know that they said certain things about the border being problematic. And I'll bet Reagan did declared a crisis because that's what prompted the two million person. Amnesty thing for him. Bush w actually did talk about a crisis at the border. So. Do something like grant ministy to them. Do we should do? Good times. Good. And those times do come back. Oh, they come over and over and over. Meanwhile, Alexandria, causing Cortes. Has said something really very very profile carrying her name makes me ill. No. This is gonna fix it though. Because she's so great in this little speech. Oh, good. Yeah. Here's A O C on the wall. How you feel about about the wall? I think it's a moral bomb nation. I think it's like the Berlin Wall. Okay. That's as dumb thing is. She's probably ever said. You think it's like the Berlin Wall moron. Wow. Do you suck lady? You know, went to Berlin. The Berlin Wall wasn't to stop immigration. It was to keep their own citizens in. The per Lynn wall. What a dumb what a dumb comparison. Although if people like her continue to ascend in the ranks of leadership, it would be like the Berlin Wall because we'd all be trying to escape, but I did make that they would shoot people for leaving the country when we're just trying to control how many people come in. And let's just ensure that we can know who they are what their intent is. And that's that's a moral crisis. That's a moral situation. I don't know if we've elected anybody. Stupider dumber more ridiculous than Alexandria caused Cortes. I know that's not kind. No, no, no. She's just trying to state the fact here. Let me let me let me just say. No, you're right. She's dumb. And meanwhile, the freshman congresswoman from Minnesota Omar would be our most evil with her anti-semitism and is in this freshman class. Who's that the Toledo lady she's nasty shooter to lead? Yeah. There's some real winners in congress right now. There's no doubt about that. Just then here's some of the from Daniel Horowitz erode about five of the worst provision in this amnesty omnibus Bill that we talked about last week. This is really bad. This is how they got the whopping one point three seven five billion because they make concessions on everything else. Number one. Less of a wall than even what the Democrats already agreed to. Trump originally demanded twenty five billion for the wall, then he negotiated himself down to five point six billion Democrats balked and only agreed to one point six billion this Bill, of course, wound up at one point three seven five billion now less than a year ago. They said we will fund your entire wall project with twenty five billion dollars. If you give us the dream act. And of course, everybody said, no. And at the time I wasn't for that either. But yeah plow that looks like oh boy Hoof who've. at looks like a mistake at this point number two, liberal local officials have veto power over the wall. That's that's interesting..

Berlin Wall Lynn wall Bush Cortes Alexandria Berlin Democrats Reagan Daniel Horowitz Trump congress Hoof Minnesota Toledo twenty five billion dollars