3 Burst results for "Berkshire Science"

"berkshire science" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"berkshire science" Discussed on Science for the People

"And you mentioned that people do consider them kind of a source of human food like not just eating our waste. And then feeding them to chickens or something. But people can eat them have have you eaten one? I have eaten one of they are perfectly safe to eat a little bit like a sunflower seed when they're like dried, and processed, but I've been thinking of going with a book of like career, these maggots so something in the future. That'll be a thing. Welcome to science where the people I'm Bethany. Berkshire science writer at science news society for science and the public when I think of the most voracious predators in nature. I usually go to something like the piranha, you know, takes down a fully grown, cow and seconds. That's not actually true. But if you want to be truly inspired by predators for racial feeding habits consider the black soldier fly larvae this tiny worm like thing comes in numbers. And they will take down a fully grown pizza in a few hours. But it's still cool, and it's important to because these little guys could be critical to helping us humans manage our waste problem. And it's not what these bugs eat. But how they eat it that really matters anyway to take us through her fountain of research on this topic. Is Olga Shishkov. She's a mechanical engineer at Georgia Tech. Welcome Moga high. I wanted to start with. Couple of why questions kind of get picture of your background..

Berkshire science Georgia Tech writer
"berkshire science" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"berkshire science" Discussed on Science for the People

"Hi, everyone. Just a quick note about today show. It is a live show and the meeting for the American Association for the advancement of science is loud and proud. So please don't mind. The crowd noise. We promise our guest this week are worth it. We've snagged three amazing experts to talk about micro-plastics rafting barnacles and bird poop because science with people. There's always room for bird coop. Okay. So we're about to get started. And the way this works for all the people who are enjoying science. When people the first time signs of people is an interview only podcast. And so I'm going to give an introduction. And then I'm going to start asking these fabulous scientists questions about classics, and it's going to be depressing. Amazing, and I brought this plastic coffee, and I feel bad or any? I'm just gonna don't don't look. Okay. So welcome to our science who the people live show. Thank you. I'm bethany. Berkshire science writer at science news and society for science and the public today. I am delighted to be here on the podcasting stage at the American Association for the events of science. And we've got the invitation to record a live show here. I just started digging through the program, and it's it's so wonderful to be here. It's like an embarrassment of riches in terms of content. But a couple of the sessions really stood out to me and all of those were on plastics. We are surrounded by plastics right now, they're plastics in my coffee there plastics in our smartphones. They're plastics in the chairs you are sitting on the close. We are wearing it. Plastic wrapped the food you probably ate for lunch. If you ate lunch, please eat lunch, and that classic eventually ends up in the environment. And as scientists have found a truly shocking about of it ends up in the ocean. When a lot of us think of ocean, plastics, we might think of like whole plastic bottles and tennis rackets, and I don't know boats. Big chunks, but a lot of the plastic in the ocean is actually way smaller than that. These plastics are micro-plastics which are smaller than five millimeters in size. That's about how. The size of a LEGO give or take I should've brought my goes, but small plastics can have big effects. So today, we're going to talk about plastics in the water where they're going. How much there is how we track it. What on earth we need to do about it? And I'll just go ahead and tell you guys right now that they found plastic in the beer, so we'll start there. To to cover this incredibly depressing topic. I'm here with Jennifer, Jennifer, Provan, sure, Chelsea Rochman, and Christina Simpkin. Jennifer provider is unit head of the wildlife health group at the Canadian Wildlife Service Chelsea Rochman is an aquatic ecologist at the university of Toronto and Christina. Some cannon is a marine ecologist at the Smithsonian environmental research center. Thank you so much for being here. Even though I know here's another session on plastics right now when I'm sorry. Thank you for having us. So I wanted to start a little bit with the scale of the problem. Chelsea do. We know how much plastic is in the ocean by weight or volume or tanker trucks Wales. So measure, we don't know how much plastic is in the ocean. In terms of in general, we have some estimates of how much is floating on the surface of the ocean. And we have estimates of how much enters the ocean every year. So the number that we're often given is that we estimate and this comes from Jamba. Wchs work that eight million metric tons of plastic enters the ocean each year. And so the elephants are the blue whales is that if we lined people up along all the coastlines around the world shoulder to shoulder, and they all had five plastic bags, and they threw them all in at the same time. That's how much enters every year..

Chelsea Rochman American Association Berkshire science Christina Simpkin Jennifer Jamba Canadian Wildlife Service Smithsonian environmental rese tennis writer university of Toronto Provan eight million metric tons
"berkshire science" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"berkshire science" Discussed on Science for the People

"Jose pretty serious athlete for quite a few years and looking back. Now, I realize that the thing that really limited my athletic career recovery. It was something that I just never managed to master. And really I spent a large part of my career sort of negating it and not giving it the tension that it really deserves looking back Nak and see that had I paid more attention to recovery. I may have performed better that that may have actually been my limiting factor. Welcome to science for the people. I'm bethany. Berkshire science writer at science news and society for science and the public as some of you might know from previous podcasts, I am also a runner but was training for races and trying new distances comes something else. Sore muscles, minor injuries and other irritating kinds of paint. When that happens, it's time for recovery short. I could take a few days off, I guess, but I want to run I want to be stronger wants to be faster and better. So I must my muscles with a foam roller. I protein to my oatmeal. And maybe I should consider a cry tank or compression leggings or like didn't Michael Phelps do that cupping thing do any of those treatments, actually work. What is the science backing the latest fads exercise recovery to test it out for us? We've got Christie ash Wanda, and she is the lead science writer at five thirty eight. She is also the writer of a new book good to go. What the athlete and all of us can learn from the. Range science of recovery. So you tried a lot of different things for this book. And I wanted to start with I guess a basic question, what is recovery? Like, what is that? Exactly. Well, it's great that you start with that. That's actually how I started. When I first began researching this book, I thought. Okay. Well, the first thing I need to do is define recovery. What what is recovery? And I found out that this is like a really hard question to answer at you talk to twenty different researchers and you'll get twenty different answers, and you know, one of the fundamental problems here and trying to study this stuff is you immediately run into stuff finish and problem. Like, what is recovery, and they're therefore how do you measure it? If you can't even say what it is. How are you going to do a study that that tests whether something works like if you are using a particular device or approach how are you going to test whether it works are you talking about like how tired you feel whether you're sore things like that? But I guess it's most basic level recovery is really sort of a return to readiness. So it's like you exercise or you work out or you do a race heart event, you're tired. You're sore. Probably and recovery is the process that happens between then and that time when you sort of feel all refreshed, no longer sore no longer tired. But ready to go back head end recovery. I guess in a way is as old as exercise, you know, people have been feeling or and then feeling better for as long as we've been exercising. But I was especially struck in your book by how recent recovery is as industry what did people used to do for recovery. And how has that changed? Oh, yeah. This is so different now. So I guess it was probably the the, you know, early two thousands to like twenty ten around that that time when I stopped comp- competing seriously. Even back then which wasn't that long ago. And I don't necessarily want to do the math. Back then recovery was really something that you weren't doing. It was you know, you weren't going out and dancing all night. You weren't standing on your feet for long periods of time. It was really just rest resting up sleeping putting your feet up. It was all these things that you weren't doing. But now, a recovery has really become this whole enterprise in and of itself, where it's almost another part of training, where there are all these things that you're doing you have people that are foam ruling that now recovery has really become a thing that people do it's become a verb. It's no longer a noun and so people go out and they use foam rollers they jump in ice baths. And I'll just say is there one thing that are very old and Beckham back in my day..

Christie ash Wanda Berkshire science Nak Michael Phelps Jose writer Beckham