4 Burst results for "Berkley Hello Bay"

"berkley hello bay" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"berkley hello bay" Discussed on Asian Enough

"I wanted to turn to a back to sort of talking about you know Biracial -ality and especially as a presidential candidate. You know it felt like people encourage you, or there's pressure to choose a side you know black or Indian, American, and at one point you're asked directly in an interview at one point to say, indian-american are African American. which you know doesn't really jive with my understanding of my biracial friends identity, and what you said it was I'm a proud American in response to this question you know. How do you feel about the way? Our political environment handles biracial identity, and do you feel pressured to pick a side and does that reflect your life experience? Well I mean I have to tell you rancor honestly I. I don't even think we're that sophisticated yet I think that you just have to ask. How does America handle race? Much less what it means to be biracial. Like literally when you're talking about running for office, and you can ask any one of us who was one of the first of our kind to run based on gender or race, and you will know that it can be a challenge because. People. They're more comfortable on I guess. It's easier to place a candidate in a box that you already have defined. And based on your exposure and your your knowledge, right and your experiences. And so the challenge becomes then when you don't fit in someone's preconceived notion of who is president of the United States because they're only reference, point is who has been president of the United States, and not one of those people looks like you. It presents a challenge <hes> which is that. You are probably more required more than others that are familiar. You're required to explain things about yourself that otherwise you may not be required to explain. And that that can be challenging for a number of reasons including because. At that moment, you might prefer that. The interview was about your plan for the economy. But you're trying to help. People figure out who you are, even though you're really comfortable in your own skin. Well I think to that point conversations like these I think, do help people figure out you know as they relate to their own experiences in ways that are not widely talked about so I'm curious along along those lines. How have you dealt whether they're coping tools or learned skills or or sources of strength in your life? Have you dealt with this? External interrogation of your identity and how people use it to judge things like electability. Yeah so wonderful question <hes> you know I was raised with a deep sense of pride. In my cultural background. Like I've never really had. Mean this not as indictment of anyone, but just speaking about myself. As much as I don't like to do, but. I've never had an identity crisis. And it, just I haven't I haven't. I'm really comfortable in who I am I grew up in a family and extended family. Who was you? We like literally. I didn't go through some evolution. About who am I. What is my identity? I guess the frustration I have is if people think that I should have gone through such a crisis and need to explain it, but I didn't I you know. I grew up. In a community where <hes> and maybe it's because also being from the bay area and growing up in the bay area, and there was such a cultural mix of people on in the community in which I was raised, there was an understanding and appreciation. For that that it it just wasn't an issue for me, and but you're right, then being a candidate and going out in the world and being a candidate for public office does mean explaining who you are, then it requires a little bit more exploration to to help people figure it out, but it's not as though it was kind of an evolving consciousness for me. Thank you so much for sharing that and and I think like from what I understand about biracial added entity you know it involves a lot of tackling back and forth, and choosing between them is like choosing between your mom and dad, which you know, no sonner daughters really able to do.

US India America Berkeley California Twenty Twenty Senator Berkley Hello Bay Jamaica Mike Grandfather Kamla Harris California San Francisco Tom I Attorney Howard scientist Zambia ENA
"berkley hello bay" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"berkley hello bay" Discussed on Asian Enough

"US Senator. Kamla Harris is an open born Howard educated lawyer legislator former district attorney of San Francisco and Attorney General of California in Twenty Twenty Democratic presidential candidate. She is the daughter of immigrants who met during the civil rights era Berkley Hello Bay area shout out Bay area and her mother's from Indian. Her father's from Jamaica so welcome to Asian enough senator. It's great to be with you so I'm going to take. Take the first question, and we're just GONNA. Jump right into it so in your memoir. You talked about how your mother made. Conscious choices about raising you and your sister is black woman, though with strong and unquestionable connections to Indian culture. How did she do that? Tell us more about that. Well, so I mean it's complicated, and and probably a lot deeper more complex than we have time for, but I'll try You know she arrived in the US. When she was nineteen years old. She was the eldest of my grandparents. Children and you know an Asian cultures that. She wanted to become a scientist. She wanted to cure cancer, so she went to her father as the eldest child, and it set up by WANNA. Go and I study in what is considered to be one of the best schools for science. I WANNA go to UC Berkeley, and Mike Grandfather it now. This is his eldest daughter, and this is in the late nineteen fifties. Said okay. Follow your dreams. He was very progressive. So my mother flew this. When transient ENA national flights were really very rare, and she arrived in Berkeley California alone. And began her studies, and because my grandfather was really an advocate for India's independence, he was really a extraordinary person, and really always fighting for democracy. And Justice and so immediately. Then of course, my mother was naturally attracted to the civil rights movement that was blossoming or occurring in the bay area and Met My father, and so instead of going back to India had been the plan to have you know what would have been an arranged marriage? She met my father and had a love marriage, and that through my sister and me and my mother understood you know she was just conscious of race. She understood what these things meant. And she knew that in America that her daughters would be treated as for better and for worse as black women and black. Black children and she raised us with a sense of pride about who we were who we are, but never with a false choice, right? It was never to the exclusion of of always also being very proud and very active in terms of our Indian culture as well, but she and she understood what America was at the time, and who America is, and and the struggles that people face in America, and so that's that's it in a nutshell. But there were never any false choices you know. We grew up in the black community and learned that you can cook Okra with mustard seeds, or with dry shrimp in and spicy sausages. Did you learn any of those recipes you. Did you keep any of those? You know my will, so I mean? My mother was an extraordinary cook, and as was my grandmother, my aunt, my. Is the. It's the name for your. Your mother's younger sister basically means younger mother, and she thankfully still with us. She and she's a great cook. Indian cooking is very complicated. It's like a lot of Asian cooking. There are a lot of different spices and she was such a good cook, and my aunt is such a good cook so I never really had to learn how to make Indian food, but I have been slowly teaching myself how to do that. But my mother was also. She loved good foods, so she would make. Incredible Italian meals. She would make you know I. Remember US making bows and. Tons I. Remember s making you know. She loved to make barbecue. It was just it was a ECLECTIC, but I think it was just was a very universal I in many ways she loved cultures, and and and she loves to cook. She sounds really fascinating and I want to also ask about your grandma India. I'm told that she was somewhat of a an advocate for access to birth control and an activist. Well Nigh Grandmother was so my grandmother had an arranged marriage. She was married at a very young age. To my grandfather, but then I started living with him when he was, she was older and. I don't think she graduated High School I. Don't know, but my grandmother was one of the smartest people you have ever met. And she knew everything about politics. She Nuba Policy and she was. That, she was a force a force in the context of our family in the context of her community, and she was the person who would take in everything from. She would feed the stray dogs to to take it to fight for women's rights to fight for you know whatever fight against whatever she thought was unfair and. and. This is just who she was. She was a protector. My Grandmother, really when it comes down to what was it just a protector, she? She always protected people that she felt needed to be protected. I'm so curious also in terms of language. You know you'd go to visit your family or extended family in India as a child and elsewhere like your grandfather was stationed in Zambia but In terms of the language. Did you take any of that with with you? Does your family speak Tom I think? Who Baby I mean sadly I didn't learn. I did not ever become fluent in the language..

US India America Berkeley California Twenty Twenty Senator Berkley Hello Bay Jamaica Mike Grandfather Kamla Harris California San Francisco Tom I Attorney Howard scientist Zambia ENA
"berkley hello bay" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"berkley hello bay" Discussed on Asian Enough

"US Senator. Kamla Harris is an open born Howard educated lawyer legislator former district attorney of San Francisco and Attorney General of California in Twenty Twenty Democratic presidential candidate. She is the daughter of immigrants who met during the civil rights era Berkley Hello Bay area shout out Bay area and her mother's from Indian. Her father's from Jamaica so welcome to Asian enough senator. It's great to be with you so I'm going to take. Take the first question, and we're just GONNA. Jump right into it so in your memoir. You talked about how your mother made. Conscious choices about raising you and your sister is black woman, though with strong and unquestionable connections to Indian culture. How did she do that? Tell us more about that. Well, so I mean it's complicated, and and probably a lot deeper more complex than we have time for, but I'll try <HES>. You know she arrived in the US. When she was nineteen years old. She was the eldest of my grandparents. Children and you know an Asian cultures that. She wanted to become a scientist. She wanted to cure cancer, so she went to her father as the eldest child, and it set up by WANNA. Go and I study in what is considered to be one of the best schools for science. I WANNA go to UC Berkeley, and Mike Grandfather it now. This is his eldest daughter, and this is in the late nineteen fifties. Said okay. Follow your dreams. He was very progressive. So my mother flew this. When transient ENA national flights were really very rare, and she arrived in Berkeley California alone. And began her studies, and because my grandfather was really an advocate for India's independence, he was really a extraordinary person, and really always fighting for democracy. And Justice and so immediately. Then of course, my mother was naturally attracted to the civil rights movement that was blossoming or occurring in the bay area and Met My father, and so instead of going back to India had been the plan to have you know what would have been an arranged marriage? She met my father and had a love marriage, and that through my sister and me and my mother understood you know she was just conscious of race. She understood what these things meant. And she knew that in America that her daughters would be treated as for better and for worse as black women and black. Black children and she raised us with a sense of pride about who we were who we are, but never with a false choice, right? It was never to the exclusion of of always also being very proud and very <hes> active in terms of our Indian culture as well, but she and she understood what America was at the time, and who America is, and and the struggles that people face in America, and so that's that's it in a nutshell. But there were never any false choices you know. We grew up in the black community and learned that you can cook Okra with mustard seeds, or with dry shrimp in and spicy sausages. Did you learn any of those recipes you. Did you keep any of those? You know my will, so I mean? My mother was an extraordinary cook, and as was my grandmother, my aunt, my. Is the. It's the name for your. Your mother's younger sister basically means younger mother, and she thankfully still with us. She and she's a great cook. Indian cooking is very complicated. It's like a lot of Asian cooking. There are a lot of different spices and she was such a good cook, and my aunt is such a good cook so I never really had to learn how to make Indian food, but I have been slowly teaching myself how to do that. But my mother was also. She loved good foods, so she would make. Incredible Italian meals. She would make you know I. Remember US making bows and. Tons I. Remember s making you know. She loved to make barbecue. It was just it was a ECLECTIC, but I think it was just was a very universal I in many ways she loved cultures, and and and she loves to cook.

president United States India Knicks Bombay Toshiba point America Delhi
Interview With Kamala Harris

Asian Enough

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Kamala Harris

"US Senator. Kamla Harris is an open born Howard educated lawyer legislator former district attorney of San Francisco and Attorney General of California in Twenty Twenty Democratic presidential candidate. She is the daughter of immigrants who met during the civil rights era Berkley Hello Bay area shout out Bay area and her mother's from Indian. Her father's from Jamaica so welcome to Asian enough senator. It's great to be with you so I'm going to take. Take the first question, and we're just GONNA. Jump right into it so in your memoir. You talked about how your mother made. Conscious choices about raising you and your sister is black woman, though with strong and unquestionable connections to Indian culture. How did she do that? Tell us more about that. Well, so I mean it's complicated, and and probably a lot deeper more complex than we have time for, but I'll try You know she arrived in the US. When she was nineteen years old. She was the eldest of my grandparents. Children and you know an Asian cultures that. She wanted to become a scientist. She wanted to cure cancer, so she went to her father as the eldest child, and it set up by WANNA. Go and I study in what is considered to be one of the best schools for science. I WANNA go to UC Berkeley, and Mike Grandfather it now. This is his eldest daughter, and this is in the late nineteen fifties. Said okay. Follow your dreams. He was very progressive. So my mother flew this. When transient ENA national flights were really very rare, and she arrived in Berkeley California alone. And began her studies, and because my grandfather was really an advocate for India's independence, he was really a extraordinary person, and really always fighting for democracy. And Justice and so immediately. Then of course, my mother was naturally attracted to the civil rights movement that was blossoming or occurring in the bay area and Met My father, and so instead of going back to India had been the plan to have you know what would have been an arranged marriage? She met my father and had a love marriage, and that through my sister and me and my mother understood you know she was just conscious of race. She understood what these things meant. And she knew that in America that her daughters would be treated as for better and for worse as black women and black. Black children and she raised us with a sense of pride about who we were who we are, but never with a false choice, right? It was never to the exclusion of of always also being very proud and very active in terms of our Indian culture as well, but she and she understood what America was at the time, and who America is, and and the struggles that people face in America, and so that's that's it in a nutshell. But there were never any false choices you know. We grew up in the black community and learned that you can cook Okra with mustard seeds, or with dry shrimp in and spicy sausages. Did you learn any of those recipes you. Did you keep any of those? You know my will, so I mean? My mother was an extraordinary cook, and as was my grandmother, my aunt, my. Is the. It's the name for your. Your mother's younger sister basically means younger mother, and she thankfully still with us. She and she's a great cook. Indian cooking is very complicated. It's like a lot of Asian cooking. There are a lot of different spices and she was such a good cook, and my aunt is such a good cook so I never really had to learn how to make Indian food, but I have been slowly teaching myself how to do that. But my mother was also. She loved good foods, so she would make. Incredible Italian meals. She would make you know I. Remember US making bows and. Tons I. Remember s making you know. She loved to make barbecue. It was just it was a ECLECTIC, but I think it was just was a very universal I in many ways she loved cultures, and and and she loves to cook.

Kamla Harris Berkley Hello Bay America Uc Berkeley Mike Grandfather California Jamaica Bay Area Howard San Francisco India Berkeley Cancer