35 Burst results for "Berkeley"

Jonathan Tsay on early-phase spinal cord injury clinical research

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

02:23 min | Last week

Jonathan Tsay on early-phase spinal cord injury clinical research

"Today. I'll be speaking with dr jonathan cy about his recent paper in the journal neuro rehabilitation enrolled repair titled five features to look for in early phase clinical intervention studies. Dr tsai who goes by. Jt has a doctor of physical therapy degree from northwestern university. And he's currently working on his phd with dr rich ivory at the condition and action lab at uc berkeley and so in the interest of full disclosure jt. And i know each other already from his days. At northwestern where i'm on faculty i can you to discuss listeners. We're in for treats i know. Jt to be smart and an analytical thinker and so whether you are interested in spinal cord injury rehabilitation or neurologic rehabilitation or frankly any rehabilitation where motor learning is at play. I think you're gonna find something that you can use in today's discussion and so jt. Welcome to discuss. Thanks rachel and i do want to say a big part of analytical was attributed to my education and northwestern university they did not sponsor this show but i i do i do think a big part of my training and north western really helped me think through difficult problems especially in the credit. Well mine too. So i guess there we are So let's let's talk about your paper in this paper. Put forward a set of recommendations for how clinicians can identify early. Phase intervention studies that will bring immediate value to their clinical practice which is really important topic and so can you talk about what led you to put these recommendations forward In the first place why. Why do we need them. Yeah so when. I was reading the clinical literature and pt school Had a pain point and the pain point was that i wanted to quickly and efficiently and effectively evaluate papers that might not necessarily fall. as a clinical practice guideline a systematic review or a large scale randomized controlled trial. How do i evaluate quickly evaluate Papers that are more early phase had a lower and offer some novel insights that i can translate quickly To the clinic

Dr Jonathan Cy Dr Tsai Dr Rich Uc Berkeley Northwestern University Spinal Cord Injury Rachel
New Study Shows Ancient Primates May Have Lived Alongside Dinosaurs

Kottke Ride Home

01:45 min | 2 weeks ago

New Study Shows Ancient Primates May Have Lived Alongside Dinosaurs

"Did a primates the precursor to all modern primates including humans live alongside dinosaurs. The theory has been batted around over the years but a new study published this year and the journal royal society opens science provides further evidence that that may have been the case. The study is based on new analysis of fossil teeth from the collection of the university of california museum of paleontology in berkeley. Those teeth were just laying undisturbed and uncategorized in her drawer. Ziam until then grad student. Gregory wilson mental. A happened upon them in two thousand three. The teeth are credited with originally having been found by the late. William clemens prolific fossil hunter an expert on the mammals of the mesozoic era who spent most of his time working in the hell creek formation in montana and who unfortunately passed away from cancer in november and the badlands of montana. As you may know from duress park is one of the best places to find evidence about the last dinosaurs and their extinction. Hell creek formation specifically quoting national geographic is critical to understanding what killed off non. Avian dinosaurs and how life evolved afterwards. It's rocks preserve a timeline of life on earth stretching from two million years before the mass extinction to about a million years after one of the few places in the world where fossils can be found on both sides of that boundary and quotes a skeptical that it was the asteroid alone and not other at the time ongoing factors that led to the dinosaurs extinction. Clemens focused on studying other animals that lived alongside the dinosaurs and potentially lived through the extinction. Events other animals potentially including ancient primates.

Journal Royal Society University Of California Museu Gregory Wilson William Clemens Hell Creek Montana Berkeley Cancer Clemens
Hundreds gather in San Francisco to mourn Atlanta shooting victims

The Splendid Table

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hundreds gather in San Francisco to mourn Atlanta shooting victims

"More youth led demonstrations in solidarity with the Asian community are expected today in the San Francisco Bay area from member station KQED. Julie Chang reports Young people in Berkeley gathered Friday to mourn the deaths of those killed by anti Asian violence, including the six Asian women shot to death in Atlanta, Georgia. Move to the struggle. That's university students. Kiara Konishi, who advocated for ethnic studies requirement for all students in grades K through 12. We are students have been yelling for decades. U S HISTORY CURRICULA SEEKS to race S Konishi says Ethnic studies education will be critical and building cross racial unity and dismantling white supremacy for NPR news. I'm Julie Chang in San

Julie Chang Kqed Kiara Konishi San Francisco Bay Berkeley Konishi Atlanta Georgia Npr News SAN
Can Language Models Be Too Big  With Emily Bender And Margaret Mitchell

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Can Language Models Be Too Big With Emily Bender And Margaret Mitchell

"Are at everyone. I am here with meg. Mitchell and a researcher and emily bender professor at the university of washington. And we are here to talk about their recent paper on the dangers of casting. Parents can language models. Be too big meghan emily. Welcome to this podcast. Thank you welcome. Thank super excited to jump into this conversation. Let's start out like we always do with. Having you share a little bit about your background meg. We'll have you go first. yeah. I basically studied as a computational linguists like emily i got my phd in computer science. And then i've worked at johns hopkins microsoft research And most recently. Google research worked on computer vision as well. As natural language processing computational linguistics and more recently issues of bias unfairness Awesome and emily. You are on the show too long ago when we talked about is linguistics missing from alpine research. Give us a little bit of your background. And maybe a catch up on what you've been doing for the past year so like you said. I'm a linguist. Studying linguistics at uc berkeley and then stanford and then. I got to come to washington and start the professional. Master's program in computational linguistics. Where meg was a student many years ago. Now i got over then. So i work in a largely in linguistics and competition linguistics but since about twenty sixteen have also been working in the space of. I've tried to avoid the phrase. Actually ethics sends people down these paths into philosophy that i find somewhat less helpful but societal impact of nlp and in that context a lot of the same discussions are relevant that relevant to other things that fall under the umbrella. What it's called a. And yet in the past year. I have continued that work and had this great opportunity to work with megan other members of her team and in particular dr timmy brew and a phd student of mine. engine mcmillan major on a paper looking at the impact of large language models. And we started this in september and submitted in october. And it's the first paper i've ever written. That has been far more work after it was finished than writing it in the first

Emily Bender Meghan Emily MEG Uc Berkeley University Of Washington Mitchell Johns Hopkins Emily Microsoft Stanford Google Washington Dr Timmy Brew Engine Mcmillan Megan
Doctor of Infectious Diseases speaks on the safety of Coronavirus Vaccines

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Doctor of Infectious Diseases speaks on the safety of Coronavirus Vaccines

"About a month or so when the supply of covert vaccine in this country exceeds the demand for vaccinations. Surveys show that about 25% of the people who have not yet been vaccinated or still hesitant to get the shot. Many are skeptical because they believe the vaccine was rushed. The vaccine is safe. The vaccine is incredibly effective. Doctor John Schwartzberg is an expert on infectious diseases at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health Vaccine went through Phase one, Phase two and phase three trials exactly like every other vaccine. It wasn't rushed in terms of its production. A lot of the basic science that needed to be done received a tremendous amount of funding for getting this done very quickly.

John Schwartzberg Uc Berkeley School Of Public H
Fed’s Corporate Bond Buying Foresaw a Year of Covid Pain

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:33 min | 2 weeks ago

Fed’s Corporate Bond Buying Foresaw a Year of Covid Pain

"A year ago. The twenty third of march twenty twenty early. On as you're know in the days of this pandemic when maybe not all of us understood how much trouble we were gonna be in public health wise mental health wise certainly and economic health wise as well and we begin today of last year because we marked two milestones on this tuesday first of all the stock market low of the pandemic. It's been basically straight up since then. I know not the economy. Thank you we offer that. Just as a marker also a year ago today the federal reserve said it was going to step in and start buying up corporate bonds. That was and is a big deal. The fed getting into corporate dead didn't because the market for that debt just frozen and the fed was helping those companies borrow at lower rates which can be conducive to business and borrow they did. Corporate debt had records in twenty twenty but with rising interest news of late. As we've been telling you corporate debts been getting a little bit more expensive. Marketplace's justin ho gets us gone. Investors think about corporate bonds. Kind of like how they think about government bonds. If you're going to lock up my money for years you better pay me enough interest to make it worth my while. They want to be earning a rate of return that is higher than expected inflation. That's winnie caesar. at wellsfargo. She says many investors expect inflation to pick up this year. People are likely to spend more and that spending good drive up prices not just for regular consumers but for companies to it could be that accompanies cost of labor is increasing. It could be that. A company's cost of just raw materials and commodities is increasing. Those expectations are causing. Corporate bond yields to rise. But they're also signs of an improving economy says kathy jones chief fixed income strategist at charles schwab. Which underwrites this program. Jones says corporate borrowing costs are historically low and even though they're currently rising that shouldn't be an impediment to them investing and continuing to grow the business. The concern says stephen davidov salomon uc. Berkeley is if rates continue to grow into next year or the following if rates get too high. He says companies won't be able to borrow as much to a fun. Projects investment will slow because investment becomes more costly fed chair. J. paul said today although he expects prices to creep up this year he doesn't think that will have a big or lasting impact on overall inflation.

FED Justin Ho Winnie Caesar Kathy Jones Stephen Davidov Salomon Charles Schwab Jones Berkeley J. Paul
Applying RL to Real-World Robotics with Abhishek Gupta

The TWIML AI Podcast

04:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Applying RL to Real-World Robotics with Abhishek Gupta

"Gupta aspect is a phd student at uc berkeley. Where he works with folks. Like peter l. and sergei levin who've had on the show before abstract. Welcome to the terminal podcasts. Thanks forward to digging in and learning more about your work and your background. What got you interested in. Studying our al and robotics. Yes so so. I think my first experience with robotics was actually This first lego league that bump additions where we would like make these lego robots than they would like do these challenges and when we first did it we made the robots just by heart goading all the different primitives and programs to do everything and that works to some extent but i think when i came to berkeley it was really exciting to see that people had more sophisticated techniques to control. Robots was also the only thing that had ever done before then in terms of project experience and so i reached out to a number of professors I called the projects cool and beater specifically had a lot of research at that time on folding laundry and flying helicopters and i was like wow this is this is really amazing so at least to him as a freshman and and then he you know. He hired me as an assistant in his lab to kind of help out with some software engineering projects in some research projects. And kinda got started on research from there and so then like the first set of experiences that i had there. Were kind of like helping grad students and post docs on their research projects which were largely related to folding laundry in dying noughts and folding thousand things that peter was excited about at the dime and from there i think click grad school my research and interest under a lot more towards enforcement learning and learning based ideas. Oh cool so within that of of our and our alpha robotics. And i guess maybe that's broad from a tomato perspectives. Since we've had a bunch of conversations on your where do you focus like what are what are your research interest within those fields. Yeah so i guess. Since i am a person who was really excited about robotics and i wanna get robots to work because i think they have a lot of impact and i see. Rls a great dual to enable robotics more so than exploring rl for the sake of water. And so what i specifically think about a lot is like what are the things that prevent us from applying reinforcement learning robotics problems in the real word. So for instance if we want a robot the like operating kitchen and being up your kitchen or make a meal what is it. That's preventing the algorithms at work on. I'll go out for star. Whatever for being applied to these types of systems. And so i specifically think about like. There's a mismatch assumptions between what these algorithms typically assume and what's actually available in the real world. It's like i think about. How do we bridge these mismatched assumptions. So specifically what i mean by that is for instance in a game or in a in a video game or a board game. You'd assume that the score is provided so that award function it's daily easily available but in the vale where there's no score. Which tells you what you're doing. That are for instance in video game. You can collect millions of samples but in a physical robot if you do that with random expiration. You're gone either. Break yourself for the environment and then also just like. There's a lot of assumptions that we make where we can hide are gertie laundry in simulation. So we can like reset the wherever we want or we can like magically set the state of the world in some ways and a lot of our algorithms are critically reliant on these assumptions but in the real world. You just can't do that and so kind of been thinking about. How do we bitch mismatched assumptions. In that way and the problems. That are most interesting to the one that you mentioned earlier that you can cut your teeth on with peter in saturday like folding laundry and not tying and that kind of thing or you have some other When you think about your work. Do you have some set of canonical problems. That come to mind. Yeah that's a great question. So i think it'd be great if we could fold our laundry at byron ought to do the things that we used to do but i don't think we're quite there yet so i think we're still getting objects to be pushed at on and picked out and more basic skills before we can get to the more complex ones that so there's like more averages paradox which would which indicates that like learning low level skills can often be harder than learning the higher level ones and. I think we're kind of stuck in battery him but we're making a lot of progress. I think

Gupta Aspect Uc Berkeley Peter L Sergei Levin Berkeley Peter Byron
Author Walter Jon Williams Discuses Making the Switch From Historical Fiction To SciFi

The Worldshapers

03:25 min | Last month

Author Walter Jon Williams Discuses Making the Switch From Historical Fiction To SciFi

"How did you make the switch from historical to science fiction Oh that was easy by the historical The market for historical fiction in the united states completely collapsed About may of nineteen eighty two. And so what i plan is attend book series became a five book series And so i spent a desperate six months writing proposals for things that didn't sell And it was across the spectrum. I've read proposals for mysteries for historical Spent not for science victory A and everything but category romance. I think and And none of them sold. And then science fiction proposal that i had written some years before so and so i became a science fiction writer and the science fiction proposal had been bouncing around a publisher to publisher without being read I it's kind of a fascinating saga. But i was probably too long for this interview But certainly explains how publishers can screw up repeatedly and landed at tour books and the editor at that point jim bain and there are only three people in the office there was time dougherty who was the publisher jim in the editor and then those misses dorothy who ran the was the accounting department And now tories. The largest science fiction publisher. That doesn't run like that anymore. But jim bane read the proposal i bought it and it and although it had been on the markets or two or three years it actually sold to the first editor who read it. How did it not get rid at the other places that it had been Well there was a lot of mergers going on in publishing as there is now And so you say it. I don't call the exact sequence but you know it was sent to eight and susan. Allison who was the editor at ace left ace to go to berkeley. And until she was replaced they put buying hold so then it came back and then it was sent to berkeley and the decision house at berkeley and and then berkeley acquired as and suddenly they had too many manuscripts sitting in the office. So another buying hold wet. And then it went to david hartwell at times scape and it was lost in the mail room for about six months and by the time that was discovered they had put a buying hold on and and so it just kept bouncing off of these things till it actually went to an editor who still had a publishing schedule to fill up. That must've been satisfying when it finally sold rate really relieved because i was beginning to look in the help wanted section of the paper so that i could make my rent and suddenly although it has to be said that the science fiction sold for a lot less money than the historical fiction here so i was It took me a few years before. I i could reach my former miserable standard of living from from where i was merely tour instead wretched poverty. Yeah i can

Jim Bain Berkeley Jim Bane Dougherty David Hartwell United States Dorothy JIM Allison Susan
How Chris Wilson Went From Life In Prison To A Life Of Meaning And Purpose

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:21 min | Last month

How Chris Wilson Went From Life In Prison To A Life Of Meaning And Purpose

"Chris. Welcome to the unmistakable. Creative thanks so much for taking the time to join us. Thanks for having me. It is my pleasure to have you here. So i actually came across your story up because of an article that you wrote on medium about the books that change your life in prison and i remember reading through that and my first reaction was jesus this guy Learn to speak multiple languages. Read all these books for hey. I went to berkeley. And i didn't do anywhere near that in four years of college So we'll get into that. But i think i want to start with what i think is a fitting question that i tend to ask a lot of people and that is what did your parents do for work. And how did that end up. Impacting the choices that you ended up making throughout your life in your so gr growing up. My mom started her career as a nurse. How after she graduated from college and then she went back to school and she got a couple of certifications became a paramedic and pretty much work in the medical field. Emergency response feel for For like the rest for life and so. My dad was Electrician so he worked for electric company. So that's what they did. What what impacted they end up having you in terms of the direction you end up going well. My mom Had raised me by ourselves because my dad and my mom got divorced when i was eight months. No my father wasn't really a part of my life growing up but the impact of my mom had me is like my mom because she was a paramedic. She worked twelve hour shifts. So i was still with my grandmother Monday through finding a civil my mom on the weekends and so i would. Just kind of like a hybrid. So my grandmother's neighborhood was like a really tough neighborhood. washington dc. This was late eighties early nineties and my mom lived outside of dc maryland. And a pretty like you know. Middle class neighborhood was nice. It was mixed white people black people in everything was like really cool around a but My mom when i had time to spend. What does she instilled in me. A good work ethic entrepreneurship in and being nice and respectful. Mom for the most part at least initially when i was younger mike. Thanks changes certain point. So i wonder what that point changes because i remember you. There's something that you said in the book. And this is one of those things like i. I look at basically took everything that a highlight and underline and put it into a document. But you said you know when you start from a place like division avenue. Life's fragile you don't get to make mistakes because you don't have a safety net but and you know when i when i read that and i was going through the book I remember going to school an probably. What was the worst neighborhood in a place called bryant texas and it was in seventh grade and it was by far the most dangerous area of town and i used to have to stay there late at night because i worked at the university. So it'd be terrified as this seventh grader after basketball practice but i also think that to some degree probably i have certain biases about that neighborhood. Ob just baked into how. I was raised by And so i wonder what about what about those kind of environments. Do you think that we have misperceptions about from you. Know media like my immediate thought was. Oh this is probably just like boys in the hood rob so like how accurate is stuff like that. Well i would look at it differently right a little bit. I would say. I mean you're right in the sense that folks have their biases about Neighborhoods like that. But i think what people don't think about is what would have conditions in policies that will put in place to make these neighborhoods. The waiting. Were you know so like police Name was policed in. You know people just being harassed by the police. That's what happened with. Like when i was growing up. Only come through his jump out. Pakistan folks didn't own a home folks Couldn't get jobs so there was a lot of stuff but these were like based off for policies put in place that kinda like creed atmosphere what he's neighborhoods dangerous so always important for people to remember that So that's something that you know. I don't think people think about no well. I mean you. And i were talking about this before we hit record here I remember dave chapelle talking about you know with your an african american men. Your relationship to law enforcement is fundamentally different than that of other people like you actually have a relationship of fear of the very people who are basically put in society to protect you absolutely absolutely Better than us especially at my neighborhood on weight it was just all black people and so only interaction while white people were police and when they would it would pat down. It wasn't like nice. It wasn't like it would ask. Holiday was so we grew up this way and then when stuck what happened in our neighborhood. I'd say shoot something like that and like folks like neighbors or call the police. It'd take a mike thirty five minutes. Get it twenty. Minutes or maybe. Sometimes they didn't even show up so this was a relationship with them growing up in. So is this like naturally like and then we see people on. Tv shot by police like all the time. So it's something like it's a survival mechanism to just be you know worried police.

DC Berkeley Chris Maryland Washington Dave Chapelle Mike Basketball Texas Pakistan
The gold rush of digital media shaking everything up

The 3:59

03:28 min | Last month

The gold rush of digital media shaking everything up

"Broader chang and this is your daily charge. What does shed light on. This mysterious world is our crackle reporter rich. Never welcome rich anything's so let's get right into it. What the heck are nf. Teas that is a good question. And it's a complicated answer but nfc stands for non jewel token in their bisley. They work like a bar code and they're meant to authenticate pieces of digital Like a file or a or a or a video or a or a movie At what it does is basically it designates one version as the authentic version and everything else is just copy right. He gives you the examples of some high profile. Tease of some of the wilder. Ones have gone for lots of money. Sure so right now. There's this auction at the british auction. House christie's is doing ended today and the bidding last time i looked at thirteen million. And it's for a piece of art by by rs named people So that's kind of one at the crazy extreme end of it There were those one clip of lebron james of walking shot that went for like a hundred thousand dollars jack dorsey of twitter is auctioning off the first tweet And i think that one is at at more than two million right now home what. Let's let me kind of break. It down because i think this is where i'm having difficulty wrapping my head around. You mentioned the lebron james to drill clip. Which can easily be shared the tweet by elon. Musk that can be screened. Shot at or can be shared the the the christie's auction that that piece of our it's not physical. It's a digital piece of art. Which again can be copied and shared. Why would someone pay this much money for. I guess what is what is technically though authentic version of this digital asset but ultimately is still a digital asset that you can copy and share right right. So that's that's where it gets really really complicated because the people the people are work. You know that's me. That's in our story like the pictures in our story right and i didn't hate thirteen million dollars but it you know it basically comes down to perception and that's really why this is kind of a fascinating topic because at the heart of it it it. It's we're talking about ownership online and what that means And and so you. I was talking to one one. Berkeley professor for For the story. That i did and his his take was. You know. it's it's about bragging rights but it's also about more than that know like like you. You've got these these pieces of art. That are are prolific online right. Everybody seen i'm like like a meme And if one person owns that you can take credit for for owning this That people love but also you know it. it could also be kind of something deeper than that I liken it to a painting right if you it. It makes sense that you'd want to buy like an original basquiat versus printed and the reason might be because you you might feel closer to the artist if you were to own the quote unquote authentic version of the same go for for an

House Christie Lebron James NFC Jack Dorsey Elon Christie Twitter Berkeley
Dr. Amol Navathe Discusses Medicare Fee for Service Policy Reforms

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:36 min | Last month

Dr. Amol Navathe Discusses Medicare Fee for Service Policy Reforms

"Doctrine of author. Let's start with My asking a general question that is a. What medicare later policy conclusions. Do you draw from the pandemic's effects on the medicare Beneficiary population well the the pandemic the public health emergency here with kurna virus. Kobe has obviously had devastating impacts on elderly americans in particular. The data's pretty clear that age is a major risk factor in the and older americans have disproportionately or the burden Alongside the inequities that we see along racial socioeconomic lines as well and so. I think there's a few things that we see here. I think one just from a A basic humanity perspective. Of course we have. A large population are laudable. Folks who Who unfortunately died in and others who are at risk particularly heard a lot about those who live in the nursing homes so the medicare program. I think one has obviously to support vaccination efforts public health efforts as strongly as possible as well as trying to get more support guidance. You know p. p. e. sort of the full nine yards if you will i in particular to nursing homes in this living facilities and other institutions. They're carrying for particularly vulnerable medicare beneficiaries. The other point i'll note. Is that the other impact it's had on. The medicare program is of course financial given the amount of cost associated with the type of care. The pe- that's been required along the way that will be continued to be required over the next year. At least and we've seen for example medicare trust fund or the hospital insurance fund the estimates of its insolvency have accelerated. Now i think the congressional budget office is estimating as soon as twenty twenty four correct. So so i you know we obviously have a lot of people who've been harmed by this and the medicare programs first duty is to try to to help them as best as possible. Get the care that they need to set up. The appropriate health measures the like and the second is. We need to now addressed the financial implications of the kobe public health. Emergency on the program at larch. Okay thank you for that. And we'll get back to the Solvency a questioner issue but before we go into specific program policies Let me ask you. what's your take on. Expanding the medicare program or medicare by and policy as you very well aware. This has been discussed for several decades actually And there was not surprisingly this past congress. A bill introduced to allow seniors And it varies beginning at fifty or older to buy into the medicare program. What's what's your what's your policy perspective on a buy-in it's it's a great question My policy perspective here is the the medicare program on one hand for for current medicare beneficiaries. Obviously has been very successful in general and within it you know we've had a successful medicare advantage program that has also engaged the private insurance industry in the private sector within the medicare program as well so so i think from that perspective Starting from that as a foundation looking forward and saying okay is there a way to expand the medicare program to allow more people to buy in. She will Makes a lot of sense that being said unfortunately with all things healthcare the devil's in the details. And if you look at the concept of public option the concept of being able to buy into medicare one. We know that medicare beneficiaries from an age perspective and an end of life perspective. Berkeley for those who eventually will pass on a bear a or cost if you will expend a lot of dollars and and so if if we think about this at least in some sense as a traditional insurance concept of spreading risk having younger individuals buy into medicare is likely at least to start out to be rather expensive compared to accurately fair insurance product that the goodbye on the commercial market and and so to make that pragmatically feasible would means that we would have to mobilize very substantial subsidies and And so. I think that's where the devil in the details becomes particularly important is that is. Is this the mechanism that we really want to pursue as a society from a legislative perspective from an executive perspective to try to expand insurance or are there other ways to do it kind of like the way the affordable care act had tried to do so i think i think in principle put it this way. I guess i would say my my policy opinion as principal. It sounds like a good idea but to make it feasible and actually to make it affordable such that you get considerable uptake as a way to solve some of the under insurance or uninsured once problem in this country i think actually. It's not as trivial wars as simple as it may seem otherwise.

Medicare Kobe Congressional Budget Office Congress Berkeley
Michael Friend Advocates For Diversity In CRISPR

CRISPR Cuts

04:34 min | Last month

Michael Friend Advocates For Diversity In CRISPR

"Can you talk about what that role endangered so as a minority being part of minority coalition. How does that actually would say you're planning. Events are one out of the types of responsibilities. you're kind of involved in shore. What for chris. Carr my role on is on of the committee and really is to help develop strong. And broad foot trenton. Targeted monastic communities by by really joe trying to facilitate interactions with community based organizations to include aftermarket universities. Darkly restore cabrera colleges. Hvac us that had a very long standing history of mistrust to some extent. And so i kind of summit up just to really increase bernardi representation in these conversations around christopher and engagement with a very strong focus on making sure we have diverse forces some of our listeners. Who may not know exactly. What could a split on this. Can you just in a few lines. Dealers about guzman on absolutely or christopher is is an organization that really focused on the compensation crispin and they do it from the perspective where they're not be. The four or guest technology did not pro con but to really have conversations as it relates to this technology in house being utilized many ways and the benefits and risks down a bowl and started out by uc berkeley in conversations. There which later a year after moved to boston and she'll hope these. These conversations are kind of women around the country at really sparing Lotta interests around. Christopher and i can say that they've been very diverse voices after just faded indiscretions discussions. That's a very interesting role in vegas to learn more about your experiences by doing this. Just one question before that. How did you get into you. Know the crisper fields specifically was your background and christopher. How did that come to be that. You are involved in organized crisper con is. It's all started. President obama launch of the precision medicine issue which was pm. I in two thousand fifteen. I was invited to be a part of that much and that pm. I initiative is a multi year multi million on effort that was developed to keach around creating a diverse cohort to trutv by disease treatment for all but that program is currently known as all of us program and so from that launch. I started the minority coalition for position mets. So you're speaking under the bit of audio experiences. As an event organizer being part of that rising committee on crisper con- you had mentioned that when pulling together some event it was really impossible for you to find black researchers in the area. So could you elaborate more on the garden. Status stakes are the neck of diversity that you are seeing in the field. Well just to be honest. You know this is that i think at this point is kinda shameful in subsets. Your article article that you've written highlighting some of top companies in fear. Know as you look at even these compromises need couples this leading the work around crisper. You can see most senior today. Shes clearly the lack of diversity that so evident in these companies. And i think what is sometimes hurtful. Is that in this crisper in some ways to successive crisper. Really an johnny outcome A black disease sickle cell disease which is driving an has driven a lot of interest at of course financial investments. And so i would say at this point. It's not looking very good chance of diversity

Christopher Uc Berkeley Bernardi Trenton Cabrera Carr Guzman Crispin Keach Minority Coalition For Positio Chris JOE Boston President Obama Vegas Sickle Cell Disease Johnny
Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission, Israeli studies show

Pacifica Evening News

03:19 min | Last month

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission, Israeli studies show

"To Israeli studies have found that Fizer Cove in 19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission. Shedding light on one of the biggest questions of the global effort to quash the pandemic. Data analysis and a study by the Israeli Health Ministry and Visor found the Fizer vaccine developed with Germany's beyond Tech. Reduces infection, including an asymptomatic cases by 89% and in symptomatic cases by 94%. The findings air from a pre published study not yet peer reviewed but based on a national database that is one of the world's most advanced a separate study. By Israel's Sheba Medical Center, published Friday in The Lancet medical journal found that among 7200 hospital staff who received their first dose in January There was an 85% reduction in symptomatic covert 19 within 15 to 28 days with an overall reduction of infections, including asymptomatic cases detected by testing of 75%. More research is needed to draw a definitive conclusion. But the studies are among the first to suggest a vaccine may stop the spread of the novel coronavirus and not just prevent the people vaccinated from getting ill. Dr Jon Swartz and Burn cold clinical professor emeritus of infectious diseases at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. The implications of this are enormous Republicans standpoints in vermin individual standpoint. If if the If these numbers are even numbers significantly less than this hold true, that is that once fully vaccinated. Well, first of all we know once fully vaccinated. It's Very, very, very, very unlikely. We're going to get seriously all and there's no evidence that you'll die after you being fully vaccinated. So we know that. But what if after you're fully vaccine, you get reinfected. We know you're not gonna get sick, but you could spread it. But what if you can't spread it? Or what? If it's very unlikely for you to spread it? It's gonna really mean that our masks they're going to come off sooner that we're gonna be hugging her loved ones a lot sooner right now. I'm fully vaccinated have been fully vaccinated now for this Just actually, three weeks today, um If I knew that I couldn't transmit this virus to my loved ones, I would My strategy would be very different. If I may ask you really come off. I could be hugging. Uh huh. But I don't know that yet, And so I have to still remain vigilant. And that is where a mask and social distance to be absolutely certain that I can't do that and think about all the health care workers. If the health care workers knew that they didn't it once they're fully vaccinated, they wouldn't transmit that would make an enormous difference in the hospitals. And think about just Transportation. It's just goes all the way down the line. So the implications are

Fizer Cove Israeli Health Ministry Sheba Medical Center The Lancet Medical Journal Dr Jon Swartz Uc Berkeley School Of Public H Germany Israel
What COVID-19 lockdowns show about a future with electric vehicles

Climate Connections

01:12 min | Last month

What COVID-19 lockdowns show about a future with electric vehicles

"Many people expect the future of transportation to be electric and that drivers will charge their cars with solar and wind power. Recently scientists got a window into that future and saw what it could mean for the climate and people's health. Ronald cohen is a professor of chemistry at the university of california. Berkeley for years. His team has been using low cost sensors to monitor and map carbon emissions and air pollution in the bay area when the covid nineteen pandemic hit. He saw unique opportunity shelter in place. Orders effectively stimulated a future with fewer gas powered cars. We had a brief moment two or three weeks in every city that shutdown where passenger vehicles drop to almost half of their normal driving miles. Coen's team found that during the first six weeks of the shelter in place order in the san francisco bay area carbon dioxide emissions fell by about thirty percent other air pollution improved to and that was almost entirely due to a decrease in passenger vehicles. So he says the data demonstrates the benefits of moving away from gas powered cars. We can reduce co two emissions and reduce health impacts at the same

Ronald Cohen University Of California Berkeley Coen San Francisco Bay
Serverless Properties with Johann Schleier-Smith

Software Engineering Daily

03:41 min | 2 months ago

Serverless Properties with Johann Schleier-Smith

"Welcome to the show. Jeff super excited to be here. You've been looking at service computing from the vantage point of berkeley and talked to a number of other people from berkeley about service. Talk to john. Stoica and vikram. She conti from your point of view. Why has berkeley taken an interest. In service computing. Berkeley has a long history of prominent Research in computer science and systems in particular. Lots of really cutting edge work was done here and think the faculty are always looking for that next thing. That's coming down the pipe and can we be on top of an and ideally ahead of that trend and in the context of service computing. This is something that we latched onto people at berkeley. I wasn't actually the first one myself. Yaas okay eric. Jonas published pirate work back in so john's dog. Eric jonas. They published a pirate work back in two thousand sixteen. Two thousand seventeen were were really saying. Wow service allows us this access to supercomputer scale resources for basically anyone. So i think that people kind of latched onto. Hey there's something new. There's something really different that's happening in the cloud and we should really pay attention that we should try to understand what the implications of this new technology are what to service make easier. What does it make more complicated. What are the trade offs in using services from our perspective services computing is really about making life easier for programmers. That's the big change. Now it makes a number of changes so it certainly makes life easier for operators as well in some cases even completely removing the need for certain system administration responsibilities so everything that's complicated about servers and by that we mean things like setting them up making sure that they are patched for security Making sure that when they fail application is responding in the correct way so that continue to deliver service all of these concerns. Go away the handed to the cloud provider. Cloud provider has ways of automating them away. So that for them. It's also much much easier to manage. So they can imagine for many many companies at scale so the program are also has this ability to basically write code and their favorite programming language upload loaded to the cloud and then it just runs not have to worry about it anymore. And that is i. Think in many ways fulfilling kind of this promise of the cloud to give you that effortless access to scale so the downside of that is that you do have to change how you program a little bit so i think that lambda was successful because it allowed you to bring along your existing libraries logic bring along your existing languages so there's a fair degree of continuity on the other hand if you really are going to make programming simpler you're going to be writing simple programs and that means that you're probably going to be rewriting your programs at the same time so you do have to learn to think a little bit

Berkeley Jeff Super Stoica Eric Jonas Conti Vikram John Jonas Eric Lambda
Collegiate Esports with UCI's Mark Deppe

Esports Network Podcast

05:18 min | 2 months ago

Collegiate Esports with UCI's Mark Deppe

"A very solid listener base for you to talk with Blossom. I think most people especially if they're following the ecology Sports feed are pretty familiar with the University of California or New Jersey. It's e sports program but we have a lot of people from the East Sports Network podcasts as well who might not be as familiar even after that introduction. So you see I was really held up as one of the early leaders in Collegiate Sports a lot of attention on the program from really the first days of it how have you felt that the program is a whole have you have you felt that the program is in a bit of a guiding position when it comes to the expansion of college sports cuz it feels like you guys are kind of at the Forefront of a lot of the different areas of Collegiate Esports. Yeah, I do feel that way when we started our program, you know, like like everybody else. We had a lot of questions. We didn't walk or doing. I think we did a few things that have been very notable that other people have looked at and and these are kind of things that I share with people when they they first call was a lot to school as I've talked to hundreds of schools and universities. It's become such a heavy time investment that we now have a Wiki that we share with all our frequently asked questions FAQ. Academic conference where we help teach people we're doing we've done webinars. So we definitely take that role seriously, but I think initially some of the things that really were groundbreaking was one. We we really identify pillars of our program what we were going to do our mission essentially. So we do five things we compete we support academics or research we engage with the community we create entertainment and we launch careers and so everything we do goes into those five things and we We Don't Stray outside of that too often because you can get distracted pretty easily. The other thing I think people really liked was our space that we built we didn't realize how important it was going to be. We needed a space for people to sit and to play it helped fund our program initially are are the arena which is powered by other powers you mentioned and not once we built that a lot of schools thought that was kind of required piece of the program. So a lot of people have come to look at our place toward our space to see what what they can build on their campus. So I would say those are two dead. That Drew people in and the third and final thing would just be UCI is just a really respected University. It's from all I can see the highest-ranked academic institution that offers suggestions for Esports from where a public university part of the most prestigious Public University system, and we're the only School in California. That's really this invest in these Sports. So a lot of jobs make a stand out and unique and because of our our position people have reached out to us and we've been happy and honored to share what we've learned and to be part of the thought leadership of the police force base. Absolutely. I think there's everybody any student who currently has a nice sport Three Dog campus or e-sports loud or place to crash just hang out and play video games. A lot of that is probably fakes to some of the the work done by by UCI and pushing this forward even at the University of Oregon when I was in school after birth. The iBuyPower Esports Arena had been announced there was no e Sports Lounge and I would back right before everything shut down due to covid-19. to adjust to what was going on and for those of you are familiar with Irvine U Irvine we don't have a football team we're one of the younger you see schools so long it's hard for us to distinguish ourselves among our peers like Berkeley and UCLA because we're just so much younger and newer and so I think e sports are viewed by money and a lot of our campus leaders is something that makes us unique makes a school of First Choice so if you're a gamer if you want to compete and you also are really smart student California you see I might be your top choice and there are a lot or cidar few other programs or services or attributes of Campus that can say that that they make you see is school First Choice definitely the leaders don't have any football program that stuff to hear that such a great mascot I would love to see yeah it's been a point of contention for many years but at this point it's a dog too expensive to start up and we probably be good anytime soon if we did well yeah it's showed

University Of California UCI New Jersey Ibuypower Esports Arena Public University Irvine U Irvine California University Of Oregon Football Ucla Berkeley
Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:10 min | 2 months ago

Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

"Welcome to the talking biotech podcast. Weekly podcast about agriculture medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology and the good things we can do for people and the planet names kevin volta. I'm a professor and a podcast host. Who cares about science communication mostly around the area of biotechnology. So today we wanted to talk about something interesting. Radiation and radiation has many places in biology. Of course our resistance to it. The problems that can be caused from it as well as its use as a therapeutic agent used to induce genetic variability when we do plant breeding but has some deleterious downsides and they've represented barriers both for remediation of radioactive. Waste as well as if there's issues with the side effects of radiation therapies for cancer. So i was excited to learn about some work. That's happening. The innovative genomics institute out at the university of california berkeley. There's work that's gone. Underway under darpa funding to attempt to use gene editing to solve some of the problems associated with radiation exposure. Mostly in acute radiation sickness. and so. today we're going to talk to dr feodor urnov. He's a professor in molecular and cell biology department at the university of california berkeley as well as the director for translation technology at the innovative genomics institute associated with berkeley. So welcome to the podcast. Dr urnov thank you for having. This is really a pleasure. I was really excited to read about this. Because it seems like such a cool project that's long overdue and i can certainly understand arpaio's interest in this. I tried to frame a little bit of the problem ahead of time. But could you give me a better explanation of. What is the problem with acute radiation sickness. And where do we see it across. The bay from the berkeley campus is one of the best if not the best teaching hospital in america. Ucsf in the chair of radiation oncology. Dr mary fung has told me how frustrating it is to have. Her patients succumb to cancer of the abdomen and of the pelvis. Oh things like pancreatic liver you. Try a variant. Despite the fact that she has a powerful weapon to pure those cure is a big word and the weapon is radiation as you pointed out as all technologies radiation has had a positive side in the negative side the negative side. Of course we think about weapons. We think about radiation disasters such as mobile in in the ussr. Where i went grow was born and raised three mile island Shema but then on the positive side radiation is used to determine how our teeth are doing or our lungs are doing which is particularly timely given. What's happening right now. In our nation and has also a really really powerful medicine to cure cancer. The reason it's not more widely available is what's technically known as dose limiting city and in english. That means you cannot give enough of the cure before it side effects overpower its benefits. So in dr funk's practice the physician. So i'm regurgitating. What i learned from her and other had the honor to collaborate with. She has a patient with a with a major cancer of the abdomen. Or or the pelvic area she can irradiate the tumor and eradicated. The patients do not recover because tissues that are inevitably also effective so the gut and the bone. Marrow where are aquatic stem cells live are irreversibly damaged by the radiation itself. So the patients Die off either lethal diarrhea which cannot be stopped using anything

University Of California Berke Kevin Volta Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Feodor Urnov Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Urnov Berkeley Campus Dr Mary Fung Pancreatic Liver Cancer Darpa Arpaio Ucsf Cure Cancer Dr Funk America Diarrhea
Interview With Evan Kuo

Bitcoin Radio

06:04 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Evan Kuo

"Welcome back to imagine twenty twenty. I'm yonaha coutts and today. I'm glad to join by co co founder of ampleforth ebonics of joining. The i'm glad to be here. And i see you're wearing a costume for this halloween themed interview necessary. I i know it's not a very scary costume but this is what had around the house so you'll have to forgive me right. It might be scary if you stand up. Exactly i'm gonna sit. I'm gonna sit camera token upward for those who haven't seen any your past interviews. Who might not know. You wanna give a background kind of who you are and how you got the blockchain. Yeah totally so On my background is in engineering. School at uc berkeley to study kind of mechanical engineering and also computer science got more and more pulled into that direction of robotics but then you know after graduating quickly went into the startup world and eventually kind of Teamed up with my co-founder brandon aisles. He's also kind of a computer scientist. Said he's more of a a google search engineer And the time of a twenty seventeen after therion was really taking off We started to kind of think. About what sorts of applications block chain. Technology might be interesting to explore We had both been introduced to bitcoin years prior. We both kind of didn't fully believe you know it would be as revolutionary as. It wasn't about an interesting and anyways we kind came to this mutual conclusion. That the most salient application of blockchain technology degree the be monies and then began a journey asking what sorts of new monies ought to be created are can be created with this new technology and in particular. We're interested in non. Collateralized currencies like bitcoin as opposed to redeemable collateralized currencies like tether anyways Ampleforth is a cryptocurrency like bitcoin. Except for the number of units in your wallet can increase or decrease does so each day based on price exchange rate so it accepts a price as an input as a proxy for demand. If there's more demand and supply than increase the total supply of ample directly to use our wallets and proportioning there's less A demand and supply than we decrease the quantity of units proportionately from user wallets and the design of this crypto currency was actually meant to address the limitation of fix supply commodity. Money's like gold and bitcoin and along the way We kind of we were. We were funded by a you know. Really kind of reputable leasees were also advised by two members of the hoover institute which is a political and economic thing at stamford in their independent capacities and anyways long story. Short upon further analysis We also realize that this new kind of incentive mechanism or protocol Might introduce a different movement patterns to the space and so that's really interesting because most of these cryptocurrencies very very tightly correlated And it makes it difficult to kind of make them useful. In baskets of collateral assets or to construct you know robust systems on top of it and so two things one we designed it to address the limitations in fix apply money and two we noticed that And hypothesized that it might have novel movement pattern. That could allow to decouple for mass. It's like bitcoin. Which makes it useful for. Diversification at basket of of crypto assets. So that's kind of ampleforth in a nutshell okay. Well it does seem like a like a great idea does addressing those problems. You mentioned You know obviously knipling. The price fight supply and demand. Classic out it's an economic officials. But how do you actually change the amount or the value in actual you can hold it in a in a special wallet. And what a flip on keeping my ample in foot. How does your network right. That's a really great question. Actually that's the kind of the one technical breakthrough here That we take advantage of its The the the ampleforth protocols able to increase or decrease apply across all wallets proportionately without a transaction between pierce and the way that happens is but we adjust this kind of global coefficient of expansion if you will And by adjusting that single variable once every day. It's actually not we do it. But the protocol does so once every day automatically You know the number of units in all wallets whether they're in cold storage or not an increase or decrease now if your wallet your ankles being held on an exchange in the exchange tends to pool these wallet addresses so the jane wallet Quantities will automatically increase in decrease according to the protocol But if somebody's custody in your assets in pulled it then it's the responsibility of the custodian to make sure that the accounting is up to date. Because if you're if you're are in exchange really what's being reflected near-balanced might be just some entry in the database not what's actually directly connected to a wallet because they pull wallet addresses and therefore the certain exchanges that integrated ample have essentially propagated that accounting Into into the wall balances or the balances that are displayed to users. But yeah kind of happens automatically. So that's kind of the novel thing would never in the past people to do that. Like increase or decrease the quantity of units in people's wallets without a transaction between pierce and. That's what allows us to happen in a scalable way with just a single transaction per day And so yeah it's cool. It's elastic and it's also. Non diluted mentioned this earlier like bitcoin.

Yonaha Coutts Uc Berkeley Brandon Aisles Co Co Hoover Institute Bitcoin Knipling Stamford Google Pierce
"berkeley" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"berkeley" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Chinese symbols for Berkeley that's up there and that's a sixteen for lead as the red ribbon with the signage around the arena also right displaying leading the yellow brick Mandarin writing symbols this is in the red gold right to left is Derrick rose takes it across to the court life Markieff Morris in the game now we're number eighty eight eighty eight number from eight to eighty eight the dollar Kobe Bryant Galloway downloaded drumming driving the lane for Detroit five issue how to Morris right wing fifteen footer is no good we got off the floor by carrier B. spousal little front quarter going strong down the lane road to the galley lost the ball scooped up by snail galleries down like this really hurt drove me to turn around both these good Galloway laying down now does a push up to get up he was laying down not moving for a little bit surprise him given follow the check him out Irving puts it left rates for three no good to strong rebounded by Derrick rose the pistons rose and moved to the front court gets around Irving down the lane to the remotely uprooted a phallus call gets prince temple there are grows he he is a different player the last last year and a half and certainly this year is playing it incredibly high level he had Senate Detroit piston record of well game zero twenty points or more and he is is back up and say is back to the MVP leveille once was but it's awful close it's not that exploration game going right now is a twenty or more in this career high twenty twelve consecutive BM it's the longest streak since Jerry Stackhouse back at the two thousand two thousand one season for the pistons down the lane harass wrapped around the defender to elevated strip the pieces go the other way rose to the frontcourt down the lane going strong Mr shot it trailing Joe Harris comes up with the rebound Harrison verbally to get it to the front court hands to reach all face tries right in the lead to stick shot rolls off the wall it's a gold it's the opposite of fear into Alex it while it was on the rare they let you get did what he the game with five forty one to go the first sixteen nine connected for the pistons very good defensive homes set by the nets are now Kerr temple especially that's why he's out there and then it's over working extremely hard on the back for a rebound rose out of the for side counts it right away Mars speeds Frobenius and with the students have scored seven in a row out of the timeout turnovers of fuel that net time beautiful delivery sixteen eleven nets five fifteen to go the first guy read out of the right wing played by Galloway please Allah rolled around these Haber Markieff Morris with the school gym right there have hi rearing injured alums and nice Mr Hansen deliveries early on with seven points down the lei rose again gathering Mister Drummond stick will go rebound by Joe Harris Harris a little front court gives the prince told strolled to me temple gold stroll down the lady miss the shot to get knocked to the ground to go sliding into the basket statue the phallic is the basics this is the first state to then we're going to check into the game wearing number twenty six changing his number from eight to twenty six the movie was very emotional after the game on Sunday a kid that was only about four.

Berkeley
"berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

"Berkeley dot com. this is the right way out of parts story after the third time jumpstarting my car I finally realized my battery was dying so I stopped by Riley to have it checked they tested it right there in the parking lot it was bad real bad but they help me find the right battery for my car and even install it for free now my car starts like news. all the old parts. see Phil Mickelson Fred couples Brandt Snedeker Justin Thomas and many more of the world's best golfers at the Safeway open presented by chevron September twenty fifth through the twenty ninth at Silverado resort and spa in napa when the golf fans the music begins to Safeway open concert series kicks off Thursday with country music star Jaco and Friday legendary rock band Bad Company and Saturday Grammy Award winner rob Thomas daily tickets are only thirty five dollars and include admission to the golf tournament and concerts buy tickets today at Safeway open dot com. there's only one place. nobody beats Berkeley dot com. tell their football. eight. welcome back to Berkeley for forty one. remaining in the game. all their time out. the easiest way to experience every game to use for your seats and get your tickets instantly..

berkeley
"berkeley" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"It says congress shall make no has only congress makes the laws right, and it applies to the states because we passed the fourteenth amendment, which says no state shelter night any person within its jurisdiction equal protection laws. And so that incorporated various provisions of the Bill of rights out to the states. And that's why the state can't violate your right of free speech either. And then the Berkeley example because the university of California Berkeley is a state owned university. It counts as an agent of the state, so. That's how you get from congress shall make no law to your state university shall not enact a policy. That's inc. What I didn't learn into law school was. Inc. Was not at blanket thing. Inc, proceeded selectively right each and every talk about this with the second amendment. Yeah. The second amendment was not incorporated to the states until ten right? Not even right because Devi Heller was the district of Columbia. So it doesn't involve. That's why they brought that case as a test case. So that they didn't have to litigate the incorporation issue because no supreme court decision had ever held any right under the second amendment to ever invalidate a federal or state law because the second amendment that the the second amendment people like to say, it's how the founders intended except magically it didn't exist that way until two thousand ten weird. Yeah. Exactly. Right so Inc, proceeded piecemeal or selectively today, and by the way, it only makes sense to talk about Inc. In terms of the Bill of rights for the first eight amendments because the ninth and tenth amendments are about federalism, and you know, what I mean corporation. Make any sense for that. But each and every substantive provisions was then litigated, and you had to argue in federal court pay is this Inc. Is this not and today almost all of those? I eight amendments are incorporated with a couple of kind of weird exceptions. And one of those exceptions is the second half of the eighth amendment. Right. So the eighth amendment's prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment has been incorporated to the states. But what has never been incorporated states? Just because it hasn't been litigated is the question of nor shall excessive bail or fines be imposed. And so that's what this case is about facts Tyson. Tim's got a was the beneficiary of a life insurance policy and got seventy thousand dollars used it to buy a forty thousand dollar Land Rover and then use the other thirty thousand dollars to buy drugs. He was addicted to hydrocortisone we've talked about the opioid crisis. When when he was no longer able to get hydro own. He started using heroin, and and he started buying heroin from his dealer in among other places in Ohio. And so he would drive from Indiana to Ohio to pick up the heroin after he burned through thirty thousand dollars worth of heroin. He started doing what a lot of people addicted to heroin do which is he started buying and then reselling small amounts of the heroin to to pay for his habit. So he was convicted. Selling two to two separate occasions to two different undercover. Police officers two hundred twenty five dollars worth of heroin and one hundred sixty dollars worth of heroin respectively. Glad we're putting spending all his tax payer time and effort on this two hundred dollars. So so he was and I it's important echo through that. Because right. He was convicted of possession of heroin and distribution of heroin. Right. You wanna make sure this guy isn't Pablo Escobar, right? He's he's not mama Escobar personal use. And you know. Two grams of heroin. He was sentenced to to six years, but he was sentenced that was one year of home detention ankle bracelet and five years of probation..

heroin congress Pablo Escobar university of California Berke Berkeley Devi Heller Land Rover Columbia mama Escobar Tyson Ohio Tim Indiana thirty thousand dollars two hundred twenty five dollar one hundred sixty dollars
"berkeley" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"And then and the media is gonna be like, look, do you really want me to have to report to the judge that we blew up the settlement over the difference between ten thousand and seventy thousand you know, Berkeley with a. Nine to ten figure operating budget DP really want me to do that. And at the end of the day, you're gonna give right? You're gonna say fine. We'll give him we'll give them their attorney's fees. If if that's what it takes to to to put this to bed, so and by the way, they negotiated his in the settlement agreement that the payment of the attorney's fees in no way is an admission or suggestion that the underlying claims were in any way meritorious. You know, I don't wanna I don't want to overplay the importance of that that is spoiler plate language in a settlement agreement. But nevertheless, it's there. Okay. So they pay their attorney's fees, and they make changes to the major events policy, and again, and this is included exhibit. If you scrawl about halfway down, the hilly important thing that will strike you. If you scroll through this policy is how very little was changed. So right before the settlement in bold, the major events policy says all criteria for assessing major events must be applied in viewpoint neutral manner without regard to the content of any performance or speaking aspect of the event that was that way before it's that way after there are some changes with respect to. How the policy is administered. That are really just. Kind of administrative changes. The the big change is that the is that Berkeley will not has promulgated a fixed, which we're gonna talk about a fixed matrix for how it will assess security fees, and if the university decides that additional security is necessary, it has agreed to take on those costs rather than pass those costs on to the student organization that is sponsoring the event. Now, I defended on the show a principle based reason why the university shouldn't have to do that. I continue to think that that's valid. I'm not surprised that they would voluntarily agree to do that again because you're talking about ten thousand dollars or less in additional security costs and the cost of litigation is greatly going to exceed that. So I'm not surprised that they would give that away as an. Accommodation. That is really the only thing that can be described as a concession in. These changes the the rest of the policy right remains in force the schedule at the end, by the way, and I just want to point this out. And again, you know, it's gonna be up to Berkeley to decide how they get to interpret this. But the schedule at the end sets forth the table of minimum security required for events, but gives the university latitude to determine that that's going to require more security than that at those events. It sets out the the rate at which they are to be compensated. It provides that those rates can be increased quote at the start of each fiscal year due to increased salary and benefit costs. Sure, why that matters if they're agreeing to take it on anyway. Well, no because remember the these are. Are the let's clear, but they entered secured the standard, right? So every event that falls into a certain category, right, which is type of event capacity of the venue anticipated attendees type of staffing, whether there's going to be cash transactions whether you need metal detectors, whether there's going to be alcohol at the event, right? All of those things are the neutral criteria, and the the principle that we defended from the beginning, if you have a large popular event that requires a lot of security they can absolutely pass on the actual costs of securing the facility to the student organizations..

Berkeley attorney ten thousand dollars
"berkeley" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"So that I can free up to take on some other case, and in particular when it's a civil suit there. There's no there's zero math those were the marching orders to Berkeley. Now, it puts Berkeley in a difficult spot. Cousin entirely seem fair to me. Well, you know, this is part of the dynamic that that a, you know, clever lawyers can take advantage of right? And so so what did what did Berkeley agreed to do? They entered into a settlement agreement. I'm going to post this on the show. I would encourage everybody to look at this, particularly if you have numb skulls and Yahoos who are in your on your Twitter feed in your family on your Facebook who are doing a ha they want, and you can see exactly what Berkeley promised to do. And why the amendments that they made to their major events policy are attached in a red line. So you can you can see what they agreed to do. And in particular what they didn't agree to do. And so the big things there is absolutely note discussion or change or admission or acknowledgment or anything. Evan to do. With a magic secret invisible. Double top secret super probation policy against bringing right wing organizations to campus that has never been bored at Berkeley's policy. It's not part of the settlement. So when I said that was nonsense if it were not nonsense, you would expect that the plaintiffs would want to get some sort of concessions on that point. And in fact, there are no such concessions that is an admission that you were just making that whole secret hidden policy up and the major events policy has always said and continues to say that the criteria being used are non viewpoint discriminatory based criteria. Right. Most importantly, and to me, this is the thing that I haven't seen any of the like. Maga- hat wearing contingent acknowledge and understand the university retains the right to assign the event to the venue of its choosing. Right. So the whole idea the complaint that oh, you can shuttle us off in this room. Instead of this like the that's going to continue to be the case. What this does is? Oh, and one more thing, and I can tell you exactly how this came about. It does involve Berkeley paying and this kind of makes me sick Harmeet Dylan's attorney's fees. Not the least of which is a nobody should be paying her for anything and B. It's seventy thousand dollars associated with this litigation. And that's outrageous. That's outrageous. I will I will stop at that. But again from Berkeley's perspective Berkeley's council is Munger tola here, which is Covington and Burling style white shoe firm that they're paying a thousand bucks an hour for and undoubted. Really if I'm the mediator in this case the way a mediator works in in court is a good mediator goes between the parties and conveys the most sceptical position to each side that that they're in front of right. And so the mediator is gonna go before. Yeah. And go guys you got pretty much crushed on on your motion to dismiss and you probably gonna lose. If this goes forward to summary. Judgment and hermit Dylan is gonna say, yeah, I don't care right. This is all about us winning the PR battle. And if we come out of here, and we don't have a settlement because the university has decided to fight on. I feel pretty good that the judge is going to take it out on them and not us. And even if they were willing to take that risk because this is just about us winning the fight. They really have nothing till it's hard to bang on them. Right. Then you go back. You know, you start crafting. The the potential of a settlement that we want all our attorney's fees, and and what the mediator is gonna tell Berkeley he's going to go to Berkeley and me like they want all their attorney's fees, and the Berkeley lawyer is going to be like get outta here with that, you know, we'll find we'll give them, you know, ten grand..

Berkeley Harmeet Dylan attorney Twitter Facebook Evan Maga B. It Covington Munger seventy thousand dollars
"berkeley" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"Here's our host concert pianist, Christopher o'riley. Thank you. Thank you. And welcome. It's great to be back in the beautiful university town of Berkeley, California, and to be coming to you from one of the bay area's premier performing arts venues, zellerbach hall on the campus of the university of California, Berkeley, our thanks to calperformances or hosting us. Not only do we love being here for this approach Californian cuisine. We love it because it's a chance for us to dip into the endless spring of young talent that lives here and restarting show with an extremely local string quartet from the crowd in school right here in Berkeley. Please welcome the Morocchino Cortez. The Milwaukee Cortez made up of all fifteen year olds Jun Wu and Sophia Matthews violins. Or if you'll list is Anna, Renton, and our cellist is is Bill Nichols, their violist and Renton is at the Mike. And what does miraculous mean rocky is a Greek word, which means leaving a piece of yourself into your work? That's great greed name tell everyone what you ladies are going to perform we are going to perform the first movement of Debussy string quartet in g minor so exciting when you're ready, please take it from the top. And..

Berkeley Christopher o'riley Morocchino Cortez Renton university of California Bill Nichols zellerbach hall Jun Wu California Milwaukee Sophia Matthews Anna fifteen year
"berkeley" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on Omnibus

"It feeds into the Clark fork which ends up draining the Clark fork. Goes through Missoula drains, all of this part of Montana because Butte is on the continental divide. Wow. So you could contaminate, you know, both sides of the continent, either direction, and then the Clark fork ends up going into lake pen. Doria l. how's that pronounced? There can't be right. Tend to Ray maybe Pendrey. There's a street. There's a road named for on the university of Washington. Let's call it Pendrey. I liked Pandora ya'll. It's like weird. Al Bandar girlfriend. It drains into lake pend oreille in Idaho, which then forms a part of the headwaters of the Columbia River. This is by the way, essentially the plot of the new mission impossible movie, is it? Yeah, the you could contaminate like a whole continents water by doing something dirty in the wrong place. Well. So if if the groundwater continues to rise or the, the water in the Berkeley pit continues to rise and reaches the level of the groundwater, it in fact, could contaminate this entire watershed all the way. Across all the way up into Canada down at as far as Oregon and into the into the Columbia all the way to the Pacific Ocean. So we're speaking to an audience for whom this could have already happened, how can we possibly mitigate it? What are we trying to do? Well, like all super. This is the premier Superfund site and we're, you know, it's not just find. It's like Hoover funds, super duper, fun metaphor. Super. They are. I mean, we're using all of our. We're using all of our strength who's who is we hear you in the hundreds of Montana. It's like the, you know, it's like the scene where the godfather goes and asks the undertaker to use all of his powers to bring to make his boiler better for life. Yeah. Yeah. But this is a kind of like. Literally a backwater in the American culture. Now, nobody's really thinking about this looming catastrophe I am now John. Thank you and future links may in fact be giant copper creatures that are that were all formed from the sludge electro plated. They were living in the ocean as little little mini, chlorine, 's, and then they became electroplating with copper. And then that was what turned them into world conquering monster. I understand that there are like Aljian microbial populations that live in the Berkeley pit and are being studied for whatever kind of, you know some new life form. Surely they're very resilient and also are capable of to a certain extent processing, heavy metals and neutralizing them as they eat their component toxicities. So this could be our successors on the planet. This could be the Berkman fit could be the old of I gorge of future laying life. That's right here. It all started future links will will be listening to this program and going the Berkeley. Pit. You mean the cradle of civilization where we had makes us go on vacation the message patina of our entire peoples. They all go back to the to the Berkeley pit and celebrate the beginning of an entire culture, I guess. Yeah, that's right. And let's hope that it is contained that those organisms do spawn from the Berkeley pit, but that it doesn't overflow its banks and. Stink up the whole, the whole of the west. I mean, and further down the Columbia River. Of course, we have the Hanford Superfund site which also has the same exact problem that the the, the, the nuclear waste of Hanford is seeping into the groundwater there. And at a certain point will having reached the groundwater well, Ben potentially contaminate the Columbia River. From that point down, these microbes are Adam and eve for somebody to us. They're just some weird yeast, but to somebody they could be out of an east. Eve. And that concludes the Berkeley pit. Number one, one, five dot PS eight eight zero six certificate number five, zero three, six, five..

Berkeley pit Clark fork Columbia River Berkeley Montana Pacific Ocean lake pend oreille Missoula Doria l. university of Washington lake pen Adam Al Bandar Canada Hoover Ray Idaho Oregon Butte Berkman
"berkeley" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on Omnibus

"Well, some effort was made by the Anaconda copper company to pay market value for the land of the homes that were being torn down to dig this pit. Although, you know what was the market value of a home in Dublin, Gulch in Butte Montana. You're on bargaining position to their amalgamated and the Chinese are not. Here's your, here's your five hundred and twenty dollars take it or leave it. But they did dig this pit and they extracted a tremendous amount of copper from the whole, but they dug a pit seventeen hundred feet deep and while about a mile long and a half a mile wide, a huge, a huge hole as part of their extraction of all this precious metal and and in addition to an enormous amount of copper, they also pulled golden silver out to it was a, it was a very profitable load. It doesn't have a big pile of dirt next to it, like the one in Utah, like it must well seventeen hundred feet in a mile long. Yeah, mine tailings surround the pit. They're cleaning up the one in Salt Lake by there's kind of a big process under way to make it less to defy the mine tailings of the Kennecott mine. Well, the pro. What you do paint them. The problem in the Berkeley pit is not just a problem of ugliness. Okay. What's the problem in the Berkeley pit? So by the late seventies where why is it by by the way you just drop then? And why is it the Berkeley pit? Well, so it was named after the original mine on the site, the shaft mine was called the Berkeley mine and they all get names. There's the Harvey mind and there's the Anaconda mine which gave its name to the company. The Brooklyn pit sounds like a club. Remember when we saw. I don't. I mean, I saw Jefferson airplane at the Berkeley pit in nineteen sixty seven or something like that. Sure. Like the Greek theater, it's right next door to the Berkeley pit. Right. Well, it's not related to. You're, you're not wrong. But it's not related to Berkeley, California, it's probably guy named Berkeley. Yeah, some some other connection to it. Yeah. And I, I think I think being called the Berkeley pit maybe initially was kind of complimentary, but it has become a, at least in the west a. I mean, Berkeley pit is synonymous with with an environmental catastrophe which I will explain now what happened? So in the in the mid seventies, the Anaconda copper company was purchased by the Atlantic Richfield company ARCO who thought that they were ARCO was Chris petroleum companies. They are, but they were trying to diversify in the style of the time amalgamate a little. They wanted to amalgamate and become a resource extraction company. I have a little LLC of my own that I use for my endeavors, and I, I would like it to amalgamate things. Would you like to buy any of my companies are any of them compromise? Not presently. If you ever have a Coppermine like settlers of Catan I will give you two grains and one. Water for your copper. Mine. Hey, it's Caitlyn, and this is Jamie from the Bechtel cast and we want to talk to you a little bit more about our little show. That's right. We talk about the portrayal of women in movies. That's right. We use the Bechtel test as a jumping off point for more discussion. We bring him one of our funny friends every week. One of our funny friends brings in a movie and we tear that movie to shreds using a feminist lens. We have talked about such movies as a toy light tame Jacob. Actually, I m team Jacob Spiderman two team. Jacob is well and Snow, White, and some bore Jacob. My favorite dwarf Black Panther team. Jake lead and Jay Star Wars. Even Jake, Harry Potter. We'll wizard Jacob and finally clueless, and we're gonna wanna be team Jacob for that one as well. So check out the Bechtel cast chant and. That pass the Bechtel test? No it. Okay. Is Such such guy. was. What ended up happening was Atlantic Richfield, determined that the mine was not profitable and in one thousand nine hundred to maybe not coincidentally on Earth Day..

Berkeley pit Anaconda copper company Berkeley Jacob Spiderman Bechtel ARCO Jacob Atlantic Richfield Butte Montana Dublin Salt Lake Utah Jake Kennecott Brooklyn Jefferson California Jamie
"berkeley" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on Channel 955

"Berkeley with three for me in your body language as you back the year rob switched years the lear the atmosphere of things so he could make you clean three we in the five five w k q i detroit it's mojo in the morning on detroit's number one.

Berkeley rob detroit five five w
"berkeley" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"Artistry and we wish you all the best thank you abigail arkley seventeen years old from bloomington minnesota today's show maybe halfway over but you're from the top experienced doesn't have to end here sign up for mailing list to keep in touch with all things from the top will send you all the latest news plus let you know when we're coming to a town near you sign up at from the top dot org support for npr comes from this station and from glenmede an investment and wealth management company believing that an investment in arts education impacts and enriches lives of today and future generations from the massachusetts office of travel and tourism offering visitors information about the arts culture and history of boston the journey begins at mass vacation dot com and from the jack kent cooke foundation providing scholarships to high achieving students with financial need j k cf dot org from npr from the top celebrating the power of music in the hands of america's kids this week we're coming to you from zellerbach hall on the campus of the university of california berkeley coming up the fantastic choir that when this year's local vocals high school choir sing off performs the music of stephen polus today show in berkeley is made possible by calperformances special thanks this week to katie fc my name is i'm seventeen and i play the cello that's my mom and me off to yet another and my teacher lives about an hour away so for many years mom and i had a lot of talk it was during one of those talks in the car that i decided to pursue music seriously i told myself that whatever happened i was not going to music i wanted to be every other child wanted to be doctor lawyer and architect cetera but my mom told me that i looked the happiest when all's holding my cello she also told me that you only live once and you might as well do something that you really really love a lot of time to process my mom told me she my daughter still supportive and i'm so grateful and i definitely wouldn't have come this far without them.

minnesota npr america zellerbach hall stephen polus berkeley abigail arkley bloomington glenmede massachusetts boston jack kent cooke foundation university of california berke katie seventeen years
"berkeley" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"From the tops podcast is made possible with support from the massachusetts office of travel and tourism offering vacation ideas for food these families film buffs and others learn more about the bay state at mass vacation dot com welcome to the podcast christopher o'riley here and get ready for fun listening to this very californian show we recorded at hugh cal berkeley one of my favorite moments was the performance of the team pianist on the program she brought us a craggy and dramatic piece fi finish composer i know juhani route avar and not only is it the first time we've ever had it on the program it's the first modern piece she's ever played but i've got to say it's like she was born to reform the material and then the massive choir on the show one hundred ten kids sing both allowed rousing african call and response song as well as an extremely serene and quiet prayer piece by american composer stephen paulus enjoy at all from npr it's from the tom celebrating the power of music in the hands of america's caves here's our hose concert pianist christopher o'riley thank you thank you and welcome it's great to be back in the beautiful university town of berkeley california and to be coming to you from one of the bay area's premier performing arts venues zellerbach hall on the campus of the university of california berkeley our thanks to calperformances for hosting us not only do we love being here for the superb californian cuisine we love it because it's a chance for us to dip into the endless spring of young talent that lives here and we're starting to show with an extremely local string quartet from the crowd and school right here in berkeley please welcome the moroccan cortez.

christopher o'riley hugh cal berkeley america california berkeley massachusetts stephen paulus university of california
"berkeley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the beloved grocery stores diverse food options and she's here with us now talk about how berkeley bowl inspired her to get out of her culinary comfort zone welcome thank you i'm so excited to be here i remember the first time i went to berkeley bowl the old one on adeline lane header it's on were they street corner i was just struck by how many kinds of oranges and apples and that's just the beginning right i mean they're known for this vast array of variety what what was it what is it about berkeley bothered inspired you i think that's it is it's for any when if it's your first time in the store it's really difficult to not be inspired by the vast quantity produce they have if you go depending on the season if you go in fall it's like they have thirty or forty types of apples and that's not even including the organic ones right and right now they have a lot of citrus but beyond that beyond just having a lot of variety of things we commonly find the other really inspiring thing about the store is just have so many things that you maybe haven't seen before and we know what to do yeah definitely definitely don't know what to do with but definitely haven't even seen before so things like african horned melon which literally looks like it's from outer space and so it's hard to not want to stop and pick it up and touch it and just for those who have never been in the store kind of distracting others to now there's the the original one and then there's an older new one that's more berkeley west closer to the freeway by ashby there describe it like what's it.

berkeley
"berkeley" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on From Scratch

"Berkeley and had spent the prior years working as a management consultant focused on the telecommunications industry so i definitely spent time thinking analytically about telecommunications and mobile phones and could see the ri rapid rise of mobile phones and at that time in nineteen ninety nine not everyone had a mobile phone even as it was brainstorming business ideas i just thought well all these people are going to have mobile phones it just seems like they're gonna wanna do things with it other than make phone calls actually at that time in the united states people weren't even sending text messages on mobile phones and a big way so just that's really i think what leads me thinking about ideas related mobile phone i just felt like everyone's walking around with these devices to going to there's going to be other things that they're gonna wanna do and the amodia seem like a great complement to that you mentioned texting and that's how your service was initially launched it was called to five eight zero because if you dial two five eight zero and you held up the phone then the phone would identify the song and text it to you what's interesting about the two five eight oh number because it sort of non obvious to the average listener but is that that's a short code so when you doubt five eight oh it's like dialing four one one or five one one it's initiating voice call even though you're only dialing few digits and those short codes are not readily available to companies so essentially or to people i mean basically the only people that control them are mobile phone companies themselves and so we knew that we're going to have to go into goshi eight to get a special short code for ashes am but what's really interesting is that we had to figure out what code that would be so it'd be memorable and brilliant designer said well how about the only four digit number on the phone that in a straight line why did you choose to to base the company in england.

Berkeley consultant england united states four digit
"berkeley" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Explained the article though they get money for this sometimes fivefigure ito consultant fees for these these projects if they're not taking in the money they're not profiting from it personally why i understand that none of them get salaries for all this despite the fact that for a lot of them it's like a fulltime job you madam hours a week they're not taking salaries and they do you get in a pretty it sounds like pretty hefty amounts from these contracts said five figures m but they put that back another one of their big ames's education so they they run a whole bunch of you know conferences in and meet ups and things out of berkeley that they use the money they came from consulting to put toward those those things and you're getting snacks and you event space and that sort of thing you hiring speakers so i think that kind of ecosystem is important to them as well as in research and development to having the funds to be able to do that i think is what interesting so using the fees to power the conference business have any of them indicated to you that they would considered robbing out to pursue this fulltime i mean this is a real this is a gold rush right now for them there are so many companies that would want to pull on their expertise why notches dropout work on this fulltime and then know be like all these other tech millionaires billionaires who drop out of school and find success that way also found have spin out there alan startups because of this i don't know if any the month dropped out necessarily bad know they're starting vc firms they're starting startups they're working on you know i is with companies that you're moving a big companies advisement blac chyna may think none of these kids are gonna have a hard time finding a job.

ames berkeley consultant
"berkeley" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Patty friday everybody welcome to the information's four one one uh podcast about the tech industry i'm tom dotan one of the reporters here at the information today's episode can be a little shorter than normal because uh i forgot to deal with this yesterday but we've got some great stories nonetheless just uh more tightly packed or compressed talking to sarah kuranda who wrote a great story about the berkeley blockchain's group a group of undergraduates at berkeley who are consulting for major companies with advice on uh how to integrate the blockchain's consulting on their block chain smart kid the for some reason this is a nonprofit they're not raking in the money personally against they will soon enough and that i'm talking to until early and pre non about their story on the alexa developers funded why it may not be such a great idea for aspiring alexa developers to take money from amazon uh always a risky bed when you are getting into bed figuratively with uh with a large tech company an amazon has a history of sometimes taking advantage of that relationship sony would really good story by them did really well this weekend we are going to go deep into that relationship so sorry by the way before we get to the show i apologies for last week's episode not having a theme song i was trying to edit the whole thing while sitting in a coffee shop in la which normally goes well but this time seemed drop off the theme song so i probably sounded a little disgruntled than i normally do easily to music covers all that up but that's not going to be a problem this week i'm back and all is going to be well all right let's go to the show with sarah mm mm mm uh all right cerezo sounds like you've been hanging out with some cool kids from uc berkeley over the last couple of weeks ads and find the room in a single over undergrads days accept these kids are way more ambitious than i was then maybe you were an underground i can definitely say that we're we're was younger grid at boston university okay yeah i'm i'm sure boston has many many probably had many block chained groups popping up now but these kids are the ones.

Patty berkeley blockchain amazon sony la boston tom dotan alexa boston university
"berkeley" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

"We're going to pass a law that says it our 40s police whatever are not going to be allowed to cooperate with the federal government on drug interdiction mainly pot so we're a sanctuary pot city berkeley california so what this is is very interesting so i to civil war same thing site we're not going to obey laws we don't like now in california a legalization of drugs but there's a lot up subtext to it okay so you can only have a certain amount can't do this you can't be near a school on and on and on and on so the federal government federal law supersedes local law so say you lived in berkeley california i right on the bay and you decide to put a four greenhouses and grow marijuana way in excess of what the california state law let you do the feds come in rescue our all right now even if you were in within the confines of california law fits could arrest you all right for possession marijuana because federal law takes precedence over local law or state law so berkeley's basically say look we let him do whatever they want with marijuana so you want to grow ten greenhouses villa marijuana put it in a truck and send it over to idaho would you do it and our people are not going to cooperate with any federal investigation against this gets a law so i'm telling you i'm getting radicalized here and i'm saying to jeff sessions the attorney general number one please wake up and number two if this passes arrest the mayor and city councils.

california marijuana berkeley idaho attorney
"berkeley" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"berkeley" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Tools and we thought like what are you talking about like you lost your scalp and you can see it in the broader seven dry director idle investigator range of internal conditions until now it's not impossible perform these functions without using lars xray machines so this is a in office machine that you don't you sent somebody out radio jeers something okay necking look quicker in sooner fast i think that's great jess there are still think a radiologist is imperative to read some of these things to not every doctors up to speed how to read a service of bill or read what they see it everything i don't know if your doctor retailers of you know the about the story your according to the rankings released by the us news world report ucla is tied with uc berkeley as best public university in the country the rag he's are based on criteria like average graduation rates standardized test scores in over 1800s schools were evaluated ucla berkeley tie but i think we know the real winner go bruins bite fight fight in berkeley snow there right of course who's now horns called the stone leaking nerve he's you know god is snow mm sydney it's funny add these shoes saw so some oh and on sale man seethed furs.

director berkeley investigator us