13 Burst results for "Bennett greenspan"

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

06:48 min | Last month

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"We're gonna give you a couple of classic rewinds here over the holidays. But it seemed to make sense to talkto Libby Copeland. She is an author based in the New York area. She's done a great book that really kind of ties together. What's happened in Didna testing? Just in 2020. It's called the Lost family. How Didna Testing is upending who we are. And Libby. Welcome to extreme jeans. It's great to have you. Oh, I'm so glad to be here. Thanks for having me. You know, I was looking at all this and course many of these themes were all kind of familiar with already. But then when you put it all together in the context That this all kind of has come to a head in 2020. It's really fascinating. And you have, like four things here that came together. Let's talk about some of them. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I think you know it's important to look back and think about the fact that the DNI testing industry DNA testing for ancestry is exactly 20 years old this year on day that is a really great opportunity to kind of look back and see how far we've come and how little we could have anticipated about where it's gone, and how little we could have anticipated the bigness of it honestly, and the ways in which it would touch Our intimate personal lives and many other aspects of our life and of our society, And I've really been fascinated by how transformative Edna testing is, especially when coupled with genealogical research. So what I one of the things that I've been interested in doing is going back and looking at the roots of this industry. Um, D n a testing, you know for ancestry purposes, the first company in the U. S. Went out its very first test kits in April of 2000. That was family treaty and I, which we all know it still exists. And it's one of the you know the smallest database but one of the four major databases for this kind of DNA's testing, and I was able to go down to Houston and interview the founder Bennett Greenspan. When I was reporting my book, and one of the things that he kept emphasizing was How little he imagined, you know, would come of this idea that he had because he was a genealogist, and he was interested in helping other genealogists. And he saw this invention as something that was merely going to be another advancement akin to taking paper records and putting them online and infecting them right. He didn't imagine that this would become a mainstream consumer item. Which is what has happened in the last 45 years as their spend more and more money, important advertising. And if this has become, you know, the holiday gift that you get for the person in your life who already has everything right on Dit became moved out of the realm of the hobbyist and went into the world of the casual consumer, which thank goodness for genealogists because now they can find all those genetic Matches that they have been looking for in order to, you know, figure out the identity of a great great grandmother. But it also means you know, and this is one of the things that I explore my book. It also me and said many, many people are now being touched by the immediacy of the past and learning things about their families and about themselves. They never could have imagined. And they and they never could have anticipated sometimes being surprised by that, and I think what that we're really in a moment of genetic reckoning as a culture, it's it's reshape. Being the American family, and it's and it's reshaping how people think about their own identities about things like ethnicity and our relationship to truth and to past. Yeah, you're absolutely right about that. You know when you think back to the very beginning I actually remember before that in the 19 nineties, there's a gentleman Dr Scott Woodward, who came to my area and did blood tests on people of my wife and I were a couple who participated in it because we were told But there was a new concept that was being developed, and they needed enough samples to try to test it and see if it would work. And basically it's matching and Scott and I are still in touch. We have him on the show periodically and talking about those pioneering days. But when you look back to that, in fact, I still talk to people. Periodically you say Okay, I need a blood sample, right? No, no, no, I just bit not anymore. Not anymore, but it's just amazing to come from that. And of course, the early days was mostly about why'd nanotech sting? And that was kind of the thing. And if you weren't mail yourself, you had to get an uncle or a grandparent or a father to to do the testing and see where it could go. And it was amazing to see how that went Just by the way side so quickly. You know, it's still but not agree, Awas. Those those early tests in comparison to what out of the movie and I can tell us are relatively crude, and they were very expensive on do you know Bennett Greenspan told me about he would go to these genealogy conferences, and he would Trying to explain to fellow geologists the utility of his product and not getting anywhere and he did all this method where he would go up to someone and he would shake their hands and then not letting go. He would just keep talking and he would walk backwards. Because he figured if he could just get them a little closer to his booth and closer to his product that he might be able to make a sale, Right? And I love that story. Because you know you have this image of this sort of CEO of a very small company like desperately trying to connect with genealogists. And now, of course, You know, many not every geologist, but many, many that probably the vast majority of geologists know that when you hit a brick wall, DNAs your friends? Yes, That's right. You can confirm your paper trail. If you've already got one, and maybe you're not quite sure of it. I just did that recently. And then sometimes you confined matches that will pinpoint right where your people come from, which is absolutely astounding. It's amazing it is And and that's because really have kind of point to here on your list of things that have come together in the DNI world in 2020, we have 35 million testers. As of this year, At least, that's what the projected total is. It's kind of difficult to know because of overlap between the companies, but That's quite a milestone. Yeah, it really is. 35 Million DNA test kits sold. Yeah. I mean, I think it would have been hard to anticipate back and say, even 2013. Which, if you think about that, that is not that long ago. That is seven years ago. And yet in the life of this technology, it is a really big span of time. And 2013 is when it's estimated that the databases if you added them together, had a million people in them. Wow. So we went from one million to 35 million in seven years. And that means that we've reached a kind of tipping point..

Libby Copeland DNI Bennett Greenspan Dr Scott Woodward New York Dit Houston geologist CEO founder
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"About this whole business about culture and change everything else well so this all has this has been a fascinating change in in criminology in in in crimes is DNA in so how long have been since they found out that you have a different I mean O. J. Simpson what was that nineteen ninety five was the trial and that was a huge big deal about the the weight well they said the L. A. P. D. did not handle the blood right and therefore the blood sample wasn't usable but they went through the whole deal about how the blood on the glove or at the murder scene or whatever it was match Jay's blood one in like a Brazilian people so it's been around it was it's gotten a lot better now than it was back in nineteen ninety five and it was still pretty advanced embers gone way beyond them and then we move forward and we find out I'm who was one of the one of the Google founders I don't remember which one this is wife started a one of the the DNA companies about why don't you why a send off I don't know what it cost fifty Bucks or something and we'll give you your your DNA test your will tell you all about your family tree and so my my mother was a big genealogy not but when she was alive they did not have they didn't she had to go to court houses and the Mormon church libraries and things like that on the genealogy so all of these twenty wanted me I think is the name of the company that the the Google I believe the divorce now the global founder's wife started be at war yeah she had some money Sir start twenty three in me forget what it was but there was some sort of hick up about it and now it's come back stronger than ever did you see the ads in there it they apparently now no a lot more and give you a lot more information than they did just five years ago about your DNA I guess for this kind of built kind of a little bit of a I don't even know if you want a car a family tree but they gave you some information about okay you're twenty three percent sweetie sure in your you know forty percent German or whatever was now they give their their advertised anyway that medical history all kinds of things that you can find out so family tree is another one that did this and so became kind of fun in people wanted to find out more about their family background then we did not think of this your father is not really your father or your brothers nod your whatever and we found out that well things happen in life and maybe mom I had a boyfriend add that boyfriend is your father and that's not the manta rays you and well all those kinds of horrible things that have happened the families that have gone no I'm crushed by this my dad always he been my dad my whole life is not my real dad so is gone through all kinds of iterations about what you want to die I don't even know if you want to know about your DNA maybe you don't but I think a lot of people and the way I see the ads on television our it's kind of fun how much how much of this is that everything else of ethnicities of belong to you another words who are you and I don't know if you really want to know everything about your background I think I know my background we're just talking about it during the break I would I went back to the town where my grandfather picked up his wife and children and said let's go down here and get on this boat and they sailed away from Ireland they sailed up to England to Southampton and then got on an ocean liner and came to America and I went back to that town and if you're not if you're a Heinz fifty seven I'm sorry but if you know where your family came from I highly recommend that you get on the next airplane go there ed it is humbling when I walked into this I drove into this little town this little tiny town in Ireland and a young woman I pulled into the gas stations of low on gas pulled in the gas station a young woman comes out the gas in my car and I looked at her and I'm telling you it was I she was identical to my sister she looked identical to my sister there's no one there was an issue with a point and so the more I went around town I thought well I rich people don't have an ethnic ethnic look we only have C. too there was lots of people look like my family because back in those days the Solomons and the Murphy's were about the only names and how they work very great with names so the Solomons all married to Murphy's and Murphy's armored Sullivan's and then you had big John Sullivan then you had a John the Baker Sullivan and then you had all these various ways to try to distinguish so with DNA brings on a gets right down to the brass tacks you can find out exactly what you've got out there so now leave a big story out today by the Wall Street journal that customers have handed over their DNA and that some of the DNA companies our fielding requests from police from the FBI so this one company Bennett Greenspan owns this company called the family tree DNA that it was used to feel request from genealogist even friends of friends seeking help with DNA testing and the FBI was like I said one of them that golden Mister Greenspan his company has a database of over one and a half million customers and they help solve all kinds of terrible crimes so there's some apparently are people that are that are upset about this they did not expect that their genetic data might be part of a criminal investigation so what got Mister Greenspan to go along with the the DNA wise there were other of of a crime involving a dead child whose body had never been plain and they say could you find out who this little child was and the other FBI request was from a horrific rape scene yeah he said absolutely I'll help you with them so he's been running this company in Houston the nineteen ninety nine he's I make decisions on my own for a long time in this case it was easy we're talking about horrendous crimes so I made the decision sure you want the information I'll give it to you so then we move forward two I'm what was the name of that guy the Golden State killer and now that that has now opened the door for law enforcement where they had some some DNA and but they did not know who it was and so they ran it through this data bank of of DNA and they found out they found family tree at all in that family tree they found the guy who lived in the area where the crimes have been committed they zeroed in on him and then they got his DNA from copper something he threw in the garbage and cold case to solve so what is wrong with the law enforcement asking for the your date for DNA from a company where you gave them there your DNA I know you went into it with the idea wouldn't it be fun to find out how much ethnicity I have how much French I have how much you know whatever ethnicity Japanese whatever might be so if you've done that would you be offended would you be upset if the company were you gave them your DNA you swab your cheek send it to them they now have your DNA they gave you a report about who you are and who you're related to would you be offended if they said the police have asked for your DNA file I look at it this way if my cousin Billy I committed some heinous crime and they know that bye bye figuring out the family Deanna I've fallen I don't care if he's my cousin if he committed a heinous crime lock him up so I don't get this big concern I get I get it you know and if you're a privacy really a privacy that because we gave our privacy away long long time ago but if you're a big privacy not then don't do one of the sons but you also know don't you that if you're going hi not a new I'm not going to give my DNA to that no no no because the F. B. I. might come along and at well guess what if anybody in your family distant cousins uncles aunts nieces nephews if your children did it where any of them gave their DNA then then you basically your DNA is in that particular file so would you be upset if your DNA was given to the police I would not eight five five nine five sixty six hundred take a short break and we'll be right back.

O. J. Simpson twenty three percent forty percent five years
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"You go buy a toll booth you tip your hat and expose it and put back down. I'll do that next time. I'll send perfect. I know going across the bay bridge and a couple of weekends so i'll do it for that here. You go and i think you could probably figure if as long as you have a secondary backup anti-static bag you can probably really put it in the microwave and if it explodes then probably blocks then you know that there's meddle in it and it probably blocks the z. but yeah otherwise wise. It's probably just a static pouch not a faraday cage. It's air bag. I think i'll get one of those yeah and the wall street journal. Today has an article about a a company called family tree d._n._a. That shared their customers data with the f._b._i. Or actually let the f._b._i. Search the database of their customers data <hes> mhm so this is a guy named bennett greenspan. Who's the president and c._e._o. Rather and the company has one point five million people in its database records for of d._n._a. People oblivious these are people who have submitted d._n._a. Like spit in a tube d._n._a. Things <hes> and then the f. b. is steve kramer. Who i think is an attorney with them. <hes> called up mr greenspan to ask him for help to particularly difficult cases or horrible cases. Rather and kramer wanted to upload d._n._a. From these two cases to see if there are any matches or any relatives take one of them was for a deceased child whose body had never been claimed and they were looking for possible relatives to the child and the other one was for a rape case which was later linked to the golden state murderer who is a serial killer. These cases were so bad that the greenspan agreed on the spot the let kramer search through the database database using the d._n._a. That he had now. There's a woman named natalie ram down in at the university of maryland. She's an associate professor of law there and she makes a very good point saying that dna tests does not just tell a story about me d._n._a. Tests inevitably reveal information about how many other people to without their consent yes. That's why we've been arguing on the show that <hes> there's no point in not doing it anymore. Because probably early enough people related to you have already done it. They all your date is out there right yeah that you're you're already exposed as it is when the d._n._a. was uploaded by the f._b._i. They had a match. They would see the same information. The paying customer would see they get the name of the person <hes> if the customer had provided it the name the match the amount of d._n._a. That was shared in common and and the contact information if the customer <hes> had had provided that as well. Here's what strikes me as most i guess chilling about this article and i don't i know it's kind of buried in the middle of the article. Not really a lot is made of it but after the second case <hes> that that greenspan investigated this f._b._i. Attorney pressured him to cooperate with the agency she regularly and he said greenspan said the f. b. I. let him know that if i didn't find a way to work with him i would perpetually be dealing with a subpoena right well. That's the way it should be. He should have to get subpoenas over and over again for every case that comes in the door. That's how it works. That's that's that's cost of doing business for for these these people yeah it should be and but the idea here is that the i'm not sure how comfortable i am with the f._b._i. Going listen if you don't give him the information mation. I'm just going to have to subpoena you for it over and over again. I talked to a lawyer friend of mine about this this morning and he was telling me the attorneys can issue subpoenas. I didn't get <hes> enough time to chat with him because as you can imagine very busy you can fight these subpoenas. You don't have to immediately comply with them right right so you can take that before a judge go yeah. This is way too broad. He's looking to search way too much information and essentially just doing fishing campaign here with an f..

bennett greenspan steve kramer attorney associate professor wall street journal bay bridge rape university of maryland president
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"The ability to test DNA samples from crime scenes and upload the results into databases like any other customer, can and it appears they've been doing it at other companies for the past year. The distinction is that according to our terms of service and privacy policy. We expect the FBI and lawn. Horseman agencies to let us know when they submit something to our database. We move to something transparent rather than having them work in a stealthy way other than that. Nothing changed that affects the privacy of our customers as previously stated law enforcement can only receive information beyond that which is accessible to standard users by providing family tree DNA with valid legal process such as a subpoena or search warrant again, this is specified in terms of service Justice with all other companies, we want you to understand as many of you already do that you have the same protections that you've always had and that you have nothing to fear. So that was just the gist of it. I didn't give the entire letter there. But those are the key points from Bennett Greenspan from family tree DNA and David, obviously, there are others who have a different point of view on this. What are you really are? And of course, our good friend. Judy Russell has been longstanding the release of DNA permission owned by companies should not be given to law enforcement based. On fourth amendment rights. And of course, we'll get Maryland. We talked about last week in regards to the ruling that make afford that would restrict law enforcement from getting it because it's just the beginning. And you know, you think about it. I don't take the position that if you're on one side of this. You're a good person. And you're on the other side of this. You're a bad person. There are complications here. And if your concern is largely privacy, you have every right to that position. And likewise stand. My people say, hey, I'd love to have my DNA in there to help law enforcement to solve horrendous. Crimes which is they've been doing. I actually decided to go on deal Genealogists my Twitter feed. And I get about eight thousand people that follow me. So is it let's see in a day. How many people have an opinion on this? So I asked him are you in favour against companies like F T DNA to allow your DNA to be used by three hundred and six people on Twitter responded, and they can only vote once we have thirty four percent in favor. Forty five percent against and twenty one percent uncertain. All right. Really interesting stuff. And the debate is not going to end anytime soon. You know, I think it's important to point out that there has not to my knowledge been a single conviction yet through the use of genetic DNA in finding accused criminals and the courts have not yet ruled on the legality of this as a search techniques. So I'm sure there's gonna be a lot more coming in this particular topic in the years ahead. It really will be. In fact, I'd love to see someone from Maryland who's sort of really in the know this might be the first state that actually passes or does not pass legislation. So maybe that might be someone we can dig up to talk to. Absolutely, all right. David. Thank you so much. We'll talk to you again next week and coming up next. We're going to talk to a woman from Connecticut who got an unexpected DNA result. And she's gonna tell us her story. And then talk to us about how we can help people who we may be assisting who find themselves in the same situation. That's coming up in three minutes on.

F T DNA Twitter Maryland David FBI Bennett Greenspan Judy Russell Connecticut thirty four percent Forty five percent twenty one percent three minutes
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"A lot of DNA slant to the show today. We're gonna be talking to a woman from Connecticut named Jenny Horan and Jenny like so many people do went out and did her DNA test and discovered that her father was not her father and Jenny gives us some insight into her thought processes, she's gone through this adjustment inner life as to her identity, and how to answer some of those questions that people have and how to support them through what's often a very difficult time. So we're gonna be talking to Jenny in about ten minutes or so, hey, just a reminder sign up for our weekly genie newsletter. You can do so at extreme jeans dot com. You got a blog for me each week links to current and past programs links to stories that will be of interest to you. You. And of course, it's absolutely free right now, let's head out to Boston and talk to my good friend, David Allen Lambert. He is the chief genealogist of the New England historic genealogical society and American ancestors dot org and first of all, David, congratulations. I I know you had to go through the challenge of going through another victory parade in downtown Boston recently. And you know, it's something the rest of us can't relate to. But there you go again championships against LA. I don't know about lecturing in California anytime soon. Oh, either from a west coast. Absolutely. What we were saying just a few moments ago that this show is going to be largely about DNA, and that is absolutely true. Because the big story this week is the news that started out from BuzzFeed went to Fox News and went to all kinds of other outlets around the country about family tree DNA and the use of their database by law enforcement, and because of this DNA community has been arrested with attention. Yes. Absolutely true. Yeah. And I'll I'll read just a Tich of this from the the FOX report they say that family tree DNA confirmed that it is working with the FBI and allowing local law enforcement access to its genealogy database. There are a number of active cases that haven't been solved because there's DNA evidence. But no one to match to it by opening up the genealogy database to the FBI family tree DNA is potentially going to help solve a number of those crimes in particular historical murders, and rapes now that's where it starts. And of course, then we got the response which came from Bennett Greenspan who is the founder of family tree DNA and anybody who has an account with family tree DNA got this letter. So I'm going to share some highlights with you. If you haven't taken a look at it. But then it says I'm writing to address the news that are gene by gene laboratory, which processes genetic tests for several commercial clients. In addition to all of the family tree. DNA tests has processed a handful of DNA samples for cold cases from the FBI in many cases, the news reports contain false or misleading information. Let me start with this categorical statement law enforcement does not have open access to the family.

Jenny Horan Fox News FBI David Allen Lambert Boston Connecticut LA FOX Bennett Greenspan California New England BuzzFeed founder ten minutes
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"The ability to test DNA samples from crime scenes and upload the results in databases like any other customer, can and it appears they've been doing it at other companies for the past year. The distinction is that according to our terms of service and privacy policy. We expect the FBI and lawn. Horseman agencies to let us know when they submit something to our database. We move to something transparent rather than having them work in a stealthy way other than that. Nothing changed that affects the privacy of our customers as previously stated law enforcement can only receive information beyond that which is accessible to standard users by providing family tree DNA with valid legal process such as subpoena or search warrant again, this is specified in terms of service Justice with all other companies, we want you to understand as many of you already do that you have the same protections that you've always had and that you have nothing to fear. So that was just the gist of it. I didn't give the entire letter there. But those are the key points from Bennett Greenspan from family tree DNA and David, obviously, there are others who have a different point of view on this. What are you really are in? Of course, our good friend. Judy Russell has been longstanding the release of DNA information owned by companies should not be given to law enforcement days. On fourth amendment rights. And of course, we'll get Maryland. We talked about last week in regards to the ruling that make afford that would restrict law enforcement from getting it because this is just the beginning. And you know, you think about I don't take the position that if you're on one side of this. You're a good person. And you're on the other side of this. You're a bad person. There are complications here. And if your concern is largely privacy, you have every right to that position. And likewise, Andrew why people say, hey, I'd love to have my DNA in there to help law enforcement to solve horrendous. Crimes which is what they've been doing. I actually decided to go on deal Genealogists my Twitter feed. And I get about eight thousand people that follow me. So I it let's see in a day. How many people have an opinion on this? So I asked him are you in favour against companies like T DNA to allow your DNA to be used by law enforcement three hundred and Forty-six people on Twitter responded, and they can only vote once we had thirty four percent in favor. Forty five percent against and twenty one percent uncertain. All right. Really interesting stuff. And the debate is not going to end anytime soon. You know, I think it's important to point out that there has not to my knowledge been a single conviction yet through the use of genetic DNA in finding accused criminals and the courts have not yet ruled on the legality of this as a search techniques. So I'm sure there's going to be a lot more coming in this particular topic in the years ahead. It really will be. In fact, I'd love to see someone from Maryland. Who's really in the know this might be the first state that actually passes or does not pass legislation. So maybe that might be someone we can dig up to talk to. Absolutely, all right. David. Thank you so much. We'll talk to you again next week and coming up next. We're gonna talk to a woman from Connecticut who got an unexpected DNA result. And she's going to tell us her story. And then talk to us about how we can help people who we may be assisting who find themselves in the same situation. That's coming up.

Twitter Maryland Andrew FBI David Bennett Greenspan Judy Russell Connecticut thirty four percent Forty five percent twenty one percent
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"A lot of DNA slant to the show today. We're gonna be talking to a woman from Connecticut named Jenny Horan and Jenny like so many people do went out and did her DNA test and discovered that her father was not her father and Jenny gives us some insight into her thought processes, she's gone through this adjustment inner life as to her identity, and how to answer some of those questions that people have and how to support them through what's often a very difficult time. So we're gonna be talking to Jenny in about ten minutes or so, hey, just a reminder sign up for our weekly genie newsletter. You can do so at extreme jeans dot com. You got a blog for me each week links to current and past. Programs links to stories that will be of interest to you. And of course, it's absolutely free right now, let's head out to Boston and talk to my good friend, David Allen Lambert. He is the chief genealogist of the New England historic genealogical society and American ancestors dot org and first of all, David, congratulations. I I know you had to go through the challenge of going through another victory parade in downtown Boston recently. And you know, it's something the rest of us can't relate to. But there you go again championships against LA. I don't know about lecturing in California anytime soon. I haven't had any calls either from a west coast. Absolutely. What we were saying just a few moments ago that this show is gonna be largely about DNA, and that is absolutely true. Because the big story this week is the news that started out from BuzzFeed went to Fox News and went to all kinds of other outlets around the country about family tree DNA and the use of their database by law enforcement, and because of this DNA community has been arrested with attention. Yes. Absolutely true. And I'll I'll read just a Tich of this from the the FOX report they say that family tree DNA confirmed that it is working with the FBI and allowing local law enforcement access to its genealogy database. There are a number of active cases that haven't been solved because there's DNA evidence. But no one to match to it by opening up the genealogy database to the FBI family tree DNA is potentially going to help solve a number of those crimes in particular historical murders, and rapes now that's where it starts. And of course, then we got the response which came from Bennett Greenspan who is the founder of family tree DNA and anybody who has an account with family tree DNA got this letter. So I'm going to share some highlights with you. If you haven't taken a look at it. But then it says I'm writing to address the news that are gene by gene laboratory, which processes genetic tests for several commercial clients. In addition to all of the family tree. DNA tests has processed a handful of DNA samples for cold cases from the FBI in many cases, the news reports contain false or misleading information. Let me start with this categorical statement law enforcement does not have open access to the family.

Jenny Horan Fox News FBI David Allen Lambert Boston Connecticut LA FOX Bennett Greenspan California New England BuzzFeed founder ten minutes
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"The ability to test DNA samples from crime scenes and upload the results into databases like any other customer, can and it appears they've been doing it at other companies for the past year. The distinction is that according to our terms of service and privacy policy. We expect the FBI and lawn. Horseman agencies to let us know when they submit something to our database. We move to something transparent rather than having them work in a stealthy way other than that. Nothing changed that affects the privacy of our customers as previously stated law enforcement can only receive information beyond that which is accessible to standard users by providing family tree DNA with valid legal process such as a subpoena or search warrant again, this is specified in terms of service Justice with all other companies, we want you to understand as many of you already do that you have the same protections that you've always had and that you have nothing to fear. So that was just the gist of it. I didn't give the entire letter there. But those are the key points from Bennett Greenspan from family tree DNA and David, obviously, there are others who have a different point of view on this. Whether they really are in. Of course, our good friend. Judy Russell has been longstanding the release of DNA information owned by companies should not be given to law enforcement. Based on fourth amendment rights. And of course, look at Maryland, we talked about last week in regards to the ruling that make afford that would restrict law enforcement from getting it because it's just the beginning. And you know, you think about I don't take the position that if you're on one side of this. You're a good person you're on the other side of this. You're a bad person. There are complications here. And if your concern is largely privacy, you have every right to that position. And likewise Anderson, why people say, hey, I'd love to have my DNA in there to help law enforcement to solve horrendous. Crimes which is what they've been doing. I actually decided to go on deal Genealogists my Twitter feed. And I get about eight thousand people would follow me. So I said let's see in a day. How many people have an opinion on this? So I asked them are you in favour against companies like f- Keaveney to allow your DNA to be used by law enforcement three hundred forty six people on Twitter responded, and they can only vote once we had thirty four percent in favor. Forty five percent against and twenty one percent uncertain. All right. Really interesting stuff. And the debate is not going to end anytime soon. You know, I think it's important to point out that there has not to my knowledge been a single conviction yet through the use of genetic DNA in finding accused criminals and the courts have not yet ruled on the legality of this as a search techniques. So I'm sure there's gonna be a lot more coming in this particular topic in the years ahead. It really will be. In fact, I'd love to see someone from Maryland who's sort of really in the know this might be the first state that actually passes or does not pass legislation. So maybe that might be someone we can dig up to talk to. Absolutely, all right. David. Thank you so much. We'll talk to you again next week and coming up next. We're gonna talk to a woman from Connecticut who got an unexpected DNA result. And she's gonna tell us her story. And then talk to us about how we can help people who we may be assisting who find themselves in the same situation. That's coming up in three minutes on extreme jeans,.

Twitter Maryland FBI David Anderson Bennett Greenspan Judy Russell f- Keaveney Connecticut thirty four percent Forty five percent twenty one percent three minutes
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Shake your family tree and watched the nuts fall out and very excited today. A lot of DNA slant to the show today. We're going to be talking to a woman from Connecticut named Jenny Horan and Jenny like so many people do out and did her DNA test and discovered that her father was not her father and Jenny gives us some insight into her thought processes, she's gone through this adjustment inner life as to our identity, and how to answer some of those questions that people have and how to support them through what's often a very difficult time. So we're gonna be talking to Jenny in about ten minutes or so, hey, just a reminder sign up for our weekly genie newsletter. You can do so at extreme jeans dot com. You get a blog for me each week links to current and. Pass programs links to stories that will be of interest to you. And of course, it's absolutely free right now, let's head out to Boston and talk to my good friend, David Allen Lambert. He is the chief genealogist to the New England historic genealogical society and American ancestors dot org, and that first of all, David, congratulations. I know you had to go through the challenge of going through another victory parade in downtown Boston recently. And you know, it's something the rest of us can't relate to. But there you go again championships against LA. I don't know about lecturing in California anytime soon. Either from the west coast. So what we were saying just a few moments ago that this show is going to be largely about DNA, and that is absolutely true. Because the big story this week is the news that started out from BuzzFeed went to Fox News and went to all kinds of other outlets around the country about family tree DNA and the use of their database by law enforcement, and because of this DNA community has been arrested with attention. Yes. Absolutely true. Yeah. And I'll I'll read just a Tich of this from the the FOX report they say that family tree DNA confirmed that it is working with the FBI and allowing local law enforcement access to its genealogy database. There are a number of active cases that haven't been solved because there's DNA evidence. But no one to match to it by opening up the genealogy database to the FBI family tree DNA is potentially going to help solve a number of those crimes in particular historical murders, and rapes now that's where it starts. And of course, then we got the response which came from Bennett Greenspan who was the founder of family tree DNA and anybody who has an account with family tree DNA got this letter. So I'm going to share some highlights with you. If you haven't taken a look at it. But then it says I'm writing to address the news that are gene by gene laboratory, which processes genetic tests for several commercial clients. In addition to all of the family tree. DNA tests has processed a handful of DNA samples for cold cases from the FBI in many cases, the news reports contain false or misleading information. Let me start with this categorical statement law enforcement does not have open access to the family.

Jenny Horan Fox News David Allen Lambert FBI Boston Connecticut LA FOX Bennett Greenspan California New England BuzzFeed founder ten minutes
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is Catherine. Saint Clair living Conroe, Texas. On my fifty fifth birthday, my four older siblings gave me a DNA tests as a birthday gift. Katherine has a striking face the sharpness of her cheekbones offset by the warmth in her eyes. She welcomes us into her kitchen where she offers cans of soda and snacks. While her granddaughter watches TV in a room next door, Catherine who walks in procurement for the county government comes across as a quick witted character. But when the results can through from the lab, she couldn't make head or tail of them. So she phoned the testing company this customer service person immediately what she was saying. And she very gently walked me through an educated me about how the DNA testing is done. And how you share a certain number of Cinta Morgan's essentially Morgan is a unit for measuring genetic linkage. It tells you how much DNA share with another person in the database siblings, typically share around two thousand six hundred seventy Morgan's, but Catherine's older brother who also sent a sample to the lab only shed one thousand eight hundred forty three. Three with her. That's when I realized that this test was telling me that we were only half siblings. So I was at work. So I just got up and left and came home and walked in the door and burst into tears. It was months before I could go full day without starting to cry. Just thinking about it. I had a hard time even standing in front of me to put on my makeup. Really? Yes. Because when I looked in the mirror, my whole life took for granted that that reflection was a piece of my mom and a piece of my dad and a piece of their parents and now looking in the mirror, and I'm seeing the familiarity of my mother, but there's parts of that person. I'm looking at in the mirror. I don't know who that is. I felt like I was looking at a ghost, and it was very disturbing. So I just avoided looking in mirrors. If Catherine felt her identity was falling apart. She also wanted if she'd ever really known her own mother Bill Griffith, the financial journalist also spoke of growing up with a stranger. But at least he had a chance to ask his mom some questions before she died by the time, Catherine took the DNA test. It was too late. Well, see that's the that's the part that so frustrating for me. She wasn't the kind of person who would. Be unfaithful to my father. So I really honestly do not know what relationship if any that my mother had with my biological father. I don't know. And I'll never know. Did the testing companies take any responsibility for turning people's lives upside down? Kids do come with warnings attached. The is the small print enough. I asked Bennett Greenspan a.

Catherine Cinta Morgan Katherine Texas Saint Clair Bennett Greenspan Bill Griffith Conroe two thousand six hundred seven fifty fifth
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The customers say that they want to test to be rerun how mistakes made or assistant totally infallible. Well, nothing's totally infallible except my wife and so to really emphasize that right off the bat. I would say we probably get a couple people a week who want us to rerun. And if there's a lab mix up more than once a year, then I'm embarrassed really just. What that means is when people think that there is a mistake. The mistake is generally long before the DNA comes to us. And such mistakes, usually illicit affairs, which led to pregnancies and now revealing themselves in their hundreds if not that thousands across the country. Bill's story is far from unique. My name is Catherine. Saint Clair living Conroe, Texas. Unless fifty fifth birthday, my four older siblings gave me a DNA test as a birthday gift. Katherine has a striking face the sharpness of her cheekbones offset by the warmth in her eyes. She welcomes us into her kitchen where she offers us cans of soda and snacks. While her granddaughter watches TV in a room next door, Catherine who walks in procurement for the county government comes across as a quick witted character. But when the results can through from the lab, she couldn't make head or tail of them. So she phoned the testing company this customer service person new mmediately what she was saying. And she very gently walked me through in educated me about how the DNA testing is done. And how you share a certain number of Cinta Morgan's essentially Morgan is a unit for measuring genetic linkage. It tells you how much DNA you share with another person in the database siblings, typically share around two thousand six hundred sent him organs, but Catherine's older brother had also sent a sample to the lab only shed one thousand eight hundred forty three. Three with her. That's when I realized that this test was telling me that we were only half siblings. So I was at work. So I just got up and left and came home and walk in the door and burst into tears. It was months before I could go full day without starting to cry. Just thinking about it. I had a hard time even standing in front of me or to put on my makeup. Really? Yes. Because when I looked in the mirror, my whole life took for granted that that reflection was a piece of my mom and a piece of my dad and a piece of their parents and now looking in the mirror, and I'm seeing the familiarity of my mother, but there's parts of that person. I'm looking at in the mirror. I don't know who that is felt like I was looking at a ghost, and it was very disturbing. So I just looking in mirrors. If Catherine felt her identity was falling apart. She also wanted if she'd ever really known her mother Bill Griffith, the financial journalist also spoke of growing up with a stranger. But at least he had a chance to ask his mom questions before she died by the time, Catherine took the DNA test. It was too late. Well, see that's the that's the part that so frustrating for me. She wasn't the kind of person who would. Be unfaithful to my father. So I really honestly do not know what relationship if any that my mother had with my biological father. I don't know. And I'll never know. Did the testing companies take any responsibility for tanning people's lives? Upside down. Kids do come with warnings attached. The is the small print enough. I asked Bennett Greenspan a.

Catherine Bill Griffith Katherine Cinta Morgan Bennett Greenspan Texas Saint Clair Conroe fifty fifth
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The day. It was just my mom and me. We had a piano, and she would sit and play it. And I would I would be down near the pedals of the piano. She played watching her feet. She most often were play hymns out of the Methodist hymnal. Finally, Bill plucked up the courage to phone his mother Francis. She lived three thousand miles away in an assisted living complex in California. So I said to her I took this DNA test. And I got a weird result. And I paused and she didn't say anything. It was silence on the other line. Then I could hear soft sobbing. And I panicked. I thought oh my God. What have I done? I tried to backpedal a little bit. I said don't worry. You're still my mother. Ha ha ha. Two days later, he flew to see his mother in person for her ninety fifth birthday. It was a long planned family celebration. After some awkward, small talk. Bill got straight to the point. She immediately said, okay. I made a mistake when I was younger. And I stopped her right there. And I said I want you to know I'm glad you made that mistake because if you hadn't I wouldn't be here. But by the same token, I wanted to know what the deal was. So slowly the story came out. My biological father and his brother owned a construction company. And my mother was the office manager what I would have wanted to know in your shoes is given your mom's character. How did this happen? I'm a journalist. And often I have to ask the tough questions I failed that day. That night. Bill poured out his feelings in his diary. He reads me except there are moments. Like right now when I think this must all be a cruel joke. You're telling me that the first fifty six years of my life. We're one big lie, and what I'm left with is a stranger a man, I never knew existed until a week ago who was my real biological father a man who died thirteen years ago, which means I will never meet him. I never met. My father never shook his hand. Never hugged him. Never heard him laugh. Plus, I have a mother who has walked away from it. All. I feel empty. My mother lived to be one hundred I didn't want this to define our relationship in her final years. Unfortunately, I think it did though. There was a coolness to our relationship after that. I think she was hoping mightily that she could slip out the back door at the end of her life without this becoming revealed. I flown three hours south to the Texan laboratory which process bills results family, tree DNA was one of the fast places in America to offer genetic testing direct to the consumer. Okay. So shall we? Go into the lab. Yep. Great. We're being shown around by Bennett Greenspan who founded the company while researching his own family tree. So this this young woman the paint telling a blue rubber gloves. Just tell me again putting in staining the DNA onto.

office manager Bill Bennett Greenspan California Francis America fifty six years thirteen years ninety fifth three hours Two days
"bennett greenspan" Discussed on Correspondents Report

Correspondents Report

09:54 min | 2 years ago

"bennett greenspan" Discussed on Correspondents Report

"It. List of squid Jude station. Uncommon to Cambridge circus. And I'm in front of a building. And this appears to me to be exactly the kind of building John LeClair I described where he plays his fictional British intelligence service, two one two three four five. It's a six story red brick building across the bottom. There's a office at which you can buy tickets to some of the musical theater in London. And worst of all underneath the building. There's a brand new McDonald's restaurant la-, Kerry fashioned a city teeming with spies and traitors. And so in my imagination sprung a metropolis permanently dogged by the professional deceptions of secret agents, and this niches and I've thought about this since moving here because on the fifth of September. This was my first major. Story. Good evening and welcome to the BBC news at six two Russian military intelligence. Officers have been accused of carrying out the novato ca types in Salisbury. I was thrust onto the scene of a real life spy drama where a chemical weapon was disguised as perfume and smuggled into the country in an international assassination plot they enter the UK on Russian passports under the names, Alexander Petrov, and Russell and Bauchi rove. But authorities say these would be covenant and the two men were in fact, secret agents working for Russian military intelligence la- as readers would hardly recognize the apparent bungling of these two men whose assassination attempt on the Fulmer Russian double agent Sergei scruple filed and whose faces had been captured by Cici TV cameras and were now being splashed across the front pages of the world's newspapers. His readers far more used to the quiet extraction of secrets from highly placed sources in the Cold War hot spots of Berlin. And prague. Now, I'm walking up king. Charles street. The old cabinet Warrors just off Whitehall. And it's so easy to imagine that up in one of these offices about me. They would have been the plotting and scheming and strategizing of diplomats and intelligence offices who replying what John Kerry and many others have described as the great game. The botched hit jawbone Sergei scruple rocked the country when a civilian of British mother of three accidentally stumbled over the deadly nerve agent and subsequently died to resume told the house of Commons. She had little doubt who is to blame. This was not a rogue operation. It was almost certainly also approved outside the U two senior level of the Russian state. It's rare for the secret and duty work of governments to slip into view, though. The British government dragged its most secretive agency into the public glare in nineteen ninety four when it opened the new headquarters of m I six in a massive pyramid like building add Vauxhall unle- a short walk from my new ABC office. It's just enormous. What a worldwide is German. Architecture intelligence, the John Kerry. Since I've been here. I've sat down with a former British spy master for coffee. And he assures me the great game is alive. And will it might have shade the Cold War anachronisms that John Kerry skew it, but somewhere in London there are men and women being pressed into service still minister, if you consider the right man, I shall be happy to accept the assignment, whatever it may be. This is Lynton besa in London for correspondence report, where do you come from DNA history is changing the very nature of identity. It's now a much used tool in both health and criminal investigation. A budgeting commercial industry in family and history hunting with DIY testing kits popular birthday or Christmas prison. In fact, it's now one of the most popular hobbies in the United States. But as the BBC's Lucy ash has found rummaging around in your DNA can reveal more than you bargained for. I got some cotton buds in the post recently, not for removing my makeup or cleaning my is. But to learn more about my ancestry. I use them to scrape the inside of both cheeks for forty five seconds as instructed put the samples into a test tube and sent the package back to Texas. A few weeks later, I'm at the top of a tower block in Houston in a white. Coat being shown around family tree. DNA one of the first labs in America to offer genetic testing direct to the consumer Bennett Greenspan founded the company in two thousand after research into his own family tree hit a dead end. I know sagely as he rattles on about magnetic bead processes and chip readers. But I'm more impressed by the numbers involved, this lab processes more than seven thousand samples a day Bennett shows me what looks like a joint Bank safe. You DNA is in that storage freezer with two million other samples he tells me don't worry Lucy. We have you on ice Bill Griffith who co anchors nightly business programme on American TV sent his own sample to this lab for years, he'd visited graveyards cathedrals, libraries and courthouses all over the country to research his roots. Bill's cousin dug shed his passion for family history and bugging Bill to follow him and do a DNA test. It would be a great way to trace distant relatives. He said eventually Bill agreed but his Sompo through a wig result. And the lab wanted to rerun the test Bill push the whole thing from his mind until he was sitting in the newsroom one lunchtime. When he got an Email. It said he was in the wrong hapless group. That's the term for people who share a common ancestor, the why chromosome never changes as it's passed from male-to-male to mail throughout the generations. And yet the lab results showed dog and Bill belong to completely different hapless groups Bill, then go his older brother Chuck to take the test and found their y chromosomes didn't match either that was devastating. It meant Chuck was only a half sibling and. And the man who had raised him wasn't his dad when Bill learned all this. He felt angry and bereft. How ironic the I'm the unofficial historian of our family. He tells me I've spent years learning about all of these people, and it was taken away from me just like that Bill also face the unenviable talk of confronting his elderly mother Frances about a decades-old old secret. It seemed preposterous that she could have been unfaithful to husband. She was a devout Christian. She was a teetotaler. She was the classic church lady. Bill says Francis was ninety five when they had this awkward conversation. And she admitted she made a mistake with a former boss, I think she was mightly hoping that she could slip out the back door the end of her life without this ever being exposed. He says. Stories like bills a far from unique across the country. Do it yourself genetic testing kits? A dragging skeletons out of the closet in their thousands. Another man I spoke to bought a DNA kit for his teenage daughter just for fun. But when the results showed she wasn't his child. He divorced his wife. Oh, my return from the US, I decided to get my parents tested. I share a healthy three thousand three hundred eighty four center. Morgan's with my dad that's the unit for measuring genetic linkage, and it tells you how much DNA you have in common with another person. I'm still waiting for my mum's results and hoping to find out more about her background because she was never told who have father was her mother always change the subject when asked but proving ethnic origin is still much more of an art than a science. It relies on how many people from a given country have contributed to a company's database, the BBC's Lucius reporting, and that's all from correspondents report this week Thomas rate EMA, thanks to technical producer. Came was join us at the same time next week for more thoughts in stories from the foreign correspondents. You've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great ABC podcasts. Live radio and exclusives. On the ABC. Listen up.

Bill Griffith John Kerry BBC London Sergei scruple John LeClair United States Lucy ash ABC squid Jude station Cambridge circus McDonald prague Texas novato