17 Burst results for "Benjamin Russia"

"benjamin russia" Discussed on Euro 2020 by Keith & Pinak

Euro 2020 by Keith & Pinak

05:41 min | 3 months ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on Euro 2020 by Keith & Pinak

"The one i say that with was very unorganized. The first yes. They're hardly than when the meeting was missile. Johnson's the second would be meeting with the hidden. Did miss chances really caused him. Yeah of course okay. So let's move over the next month. The most status match of any football goldman for me. I've ever seen to see mr. Eric gordon at that has said mom that happen. So give us a from that much. Ooh wound for me. It's denmark has won't because they came back and played after one. This is one of the hospital but you still had the cut. It's unclear meds for me winner of the match the score. What do you to thing that the on the actual suspended see and kushner's was us against blue. I did that the that it came back. And that upset. Fans leaving the combined nine levels of the denver fans of events and good even though finland into chances abby johnson. I think teams probably slightly. Johnson's bud dogs at ten seventeen. Just a matter of school course. So game on sighting from their soul dud table looks like it finland wiz susan radiated binds while jozy He glue table books to be safe. And then say to that ownership. Let's get into the match. The benjamin russia automotive imagine your dime the scored on most what we hoped. But not what. I predicted you was the one goal sought by said that was. There was the missed so many john's but with to see the whole number one. Give me the gap in with the table in the war was lost yesterday thing. That's tradition was beaten back again across the added in the lead impact on the fact that they we'd is kevin the key players is good number two. yeah he was good in the huddle burr. Playing alone alert edna hazard When he came bank. And i wasn't expecting to be just a in on me was i. Think he's good willows. Yes but then substitution. Paid nice was nice financial at the show when shopping mistakes. So you're saying the the match for russia lukaku that you're thinking because the school devos or did some by knowing that he was keeping the team as brian actually donating for finishing that i put his nose shows that he had finished it because the angle for glovas lucky because i should god his body yet your pizza and that he initiating get into turn among those losses until he was that in. Let's give the as of sin. In denmark and finland does to ad executives. Then you get will get some..

Eric gordon kevin abby johnson Johnson first next month yesterday ten seventeen brian second one goal john russia lukaku two denmark nine levels denver kushner finland susan
"benjamin russia" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"To date and everything else but they but you can find a wealth of material there on the the collections. The, uh dance done that his team is done. We're up two volume six or seven now, but we're right now getting into his First years of his presidency. They're just wonderful, and they really are fascinating read. He also suffers because he destroyed his correspondence with Elizabeth. Which is a total loss because it's obvious from the comments of their friends and people that knew them how much they loved and cared for each other. And one last comment. His handwriting is terrible. Uh, when I was doing the book of Barry Benjamin, Russia is his doctor. And what of his dearest friends? And you look at Benjamin Russia's handwriting and come. Oh, he's the first doctor for the cliche. They can't do any handwriting. Mine is abysmal. Being a left hander taught by nuns. Palmer Method did not work its way into my brain. But James Monroe's handwriting is awful. So whenever he's got Secretary riding art or there's even a couple letters. Where Elizabeth Throated you always think. Oh, thank God. My eyes were saved, but I think that has a lot to do with it. Sarah, What are your thoughts about that? Yeah, I would definitely agree that you know the lack of complete publication of Monroe's letters, you know, starting with them being scattered to many repositories certainly issue and I'll go back to something I alluded to at the beginning, Which is that, I think Monroe has been misunderstood. We just slightly different maybe than the question of capacity, but he's been misunderstood for a lot of reasons. Certainly, Henry K. Adams said some damning things in the 19th century but also I think really the misunderstanding of Monroe's property at Highland Has figured into it, You know, no matter what, Even if you thought that the little standing House was a wing of a larger main house, you looked at that little house and you said You know, he's not ambitious. He's not sophisticated. This isn't a worldly man on D. I think people misunderstood him because of that. And so that's part of why it's exciting to be working on Monroe now is that we have Um, new information about what? His property actually Woz and, um, how he how he defined himself through the construction of the house and still to be discovered layout of his property. That's terrific. That just means that there's more work to do and more measures there for our friends. Thank you, Steven very much. Let's see. Let's see what's coming next. Brett would like to know. How is it that Highland became a site of William and Mary. That's a terrific question. I'd like to know that as well. Yeah, sure it was inherited from the last private owner, Jay Winston, John's upon his death in 1974. And it was given to William and Mary because, of course, Munro is an alumnus of William and Mary. Um, and so I'm sure there's a lot of discussion prior and debate. Of course, we're in the backyard of University of Virginia, to which Monroe also had, um, deep connections. So, Yeah, So it's been part of William Mary since 1974 Fantastic. Well, thanks, Brett very much. We would like to know is the era of good feelings and accurate description of his presidential years, especially his first term 10. What do you think? It's an accurate description of his tours and probably the first three years until the panic of 18 19 sets in and then this, which really is the first great Depression. In our history. And, uh, But there again is where Monroe you know, comes to the fore he does. He did a small tour after the tour of the Northern States. But then, in his third tour, he aims to go South and West. On. This is not the first time he's gone into the Western territories when they've been hit by economic and On issues he did that is a congressman, but he's basically he the powers of an FDR or two centuries away. And so he does not have that. But he does bring with him and empathy and his remarks or With you when I will see what Congress could do about this, and it is his annual messages to Congress. What we now costs the state of the Union address. He asks for help. He asked them to Think a little bit out of the box. You know? What can we do? You know, to save people who are losing their homes and their savings and the like and And after 18 20. Missouri compromise. You know, uh, that shows his Jeffersonian or Lyndon Johnson like skills of doing a lot of backdoor work because he's not supposed to be involved. But once he's re elected The Arab could feelings really comes to an end because he's come this close to eliminating partisanship on a national level. And as soon as he's starting his second term, he's got three candidates to succeed him, actually, for secretary of Baby that drops out early. Uh, plus Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson that are lusting after his job. We talk about how awful it is that today after election presidential election People start running for president. Well, it really wasn't that different back then. Sarah can probably add to that. But I think that it's Ah, It's a Name was given to all eight years but really is only accurate for the first two or three. We'll do one more question after that, But Sarah, do you want to ask you was that an era of good feelings that places like island? Well in terms of economics and agriculture. Certainly in the in the upper south and places like Piedmont, Virginia. Um it was not really the The boom years. You know, the real economic engine was in the deep south and in cotton, and so we cannot avoid the real fact that this was a terrible time of threat, especially for enslaved people on these plantations in the upper South because the domestic slave trade fueled by the need for labor in the deep South was the biggest looming threat to their their existence with Family at that time, so I think it's really important to remember that that was a critical piece of those year. Absolutely. Let's do one more question and we'll wrap this up and put a nice bow on it. And let's see what's on Our final audience members mind have a question. From Lisa. When when you were researching Monroe, What was the one moment or event where you said, Ah ha and made you feel like you knew this man better, but that the terrific question, you know, was there a moment? Of enlightenment. General start with you and Sarah will bring it home for your own home moment with Monroe. I think there were there were that's a hard one, because there were so many that just piled one on top of the other. Um Uh, I'll take one and it is not a letter of Monroe, Monroe wrote. But a letter to Monroe from Rufus King in like the late 17 85. My role is not back in Congress. And Rufus King writes to him that Basically that the court right sisters send their regard. And it's uh.

James Monroe Sarah William Mary Congress Brett secretary Barry Benjamin Elizabeth Elizabeth Throated Benjamin Russia Palmer Method Russia Lyndon Johnson Rufus King Henry K. Adams Union Missouri University of Virginia Highland
"benjamin russia" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:26 min | 8 months ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Tom pickering you describe him as the most capable diplomat for whom you ever worked When you stabbed him at the. Us embassy in moscow. What what should have made tom pickering. The giant that is rose combination of intellect curiosity. I mean he was as curious and as adept at understanding the widgets in the boiler room of embassies as he. Was you know high politics and high policy navigating in those days in nineteen ninety s. A yeltsin era russia as well. He was a really fine leader in the sensiti lead. By example. i'm no one worked harder. no one as i said before was more curious. No one was more professional in his approach to how best to carry out american policy in american diplomacy and he was always attentive to the needs of his own people as well which is also i think really important for leaders who sometimes are better at managing up managing over than they are leading and managing down in a sense. He was always very attuned to people who worked for him as well as their families. So take us to the moment. Your ambassador in russia even better benjamin russia from two thousand and five to two thousand eight looking back on. How difficult was it to be ambassador at that time given the issues that were percolating in. Us russia relations. It seemed at that point that tensions were growing certainly grown since then how challenging was your job where i mean navigating putin's russia even in that era a decade ago is not for the faint of heart. I mean it's a it's a complicated landscape. Putin himself is complicated. Personality of in many respects kind of combustible combination of grievance ambition and insecurity all wrapped together vividly remember my first encounter with putin as the newly-arrived. Us ambassador we've met at the kremlin. Which is you will know is built on a scale. That's meant to intimidate visitors. Especially newly-arrived american ambassadors. You walk through these huge ornate polls down long carter's you come to the end of one hall and there. Are these two story. Bronze doors your kept waiting there for a few minutes just to let all this sink in doors. Open a crack outcomes the amir putin who despite his bare chested persona is not the most intimidating physically that you'll ever run into but i remember him coming through the door. Great self-assurance before. I got a word out of my mouth. He said you americans need to listen more. He can't have everything your own way anymore..

Putin five nineteen ninety s. a decade ago two thousand two story first encounter tom pickering Tom pickering one hall eight kremlin yeltsin era putin russia benjamin american Bronze americans
"benjamin russia" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:36 min | 11 months ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Off a best of show. It's a really good recent interviews on Monday, All right, let's go out to Philadelphia in the first capital of the United States and talk to Steven Freed, who's on Philadelphia today? He's a Fred head. He's also an author and a biographer. Steven. Good to see you on zoo man. Richard. Great to see you. And thanks for that soon from Nashville. Perfect timing for the election, Right? And we must be doing something right? You think we are I think right now it feels like we are. You know, I'm I'm a couple blocks down from where they're finishing the counting of Pennsylvania's ballots, and here in the place where America was born. The declaration was written in the Constitution was written and we're feeling like we helped today. Do you live in the historic part of Philadelphia? Ideo. I mean, my wife and I live like several blocks away from the Liberty Bell. If you had your choice, you live in Santa Fe. But you live in Philadelphia, you know, And I think, Stephen one time when we had you on. Maybe we're talking about rush me we're talking about. Maybe you're talking about Fred Harvey. I think you said Sometimes you're kind of amazed how little you know the streets in the historic parts of Philadelphia. Maybe I dreamt that No, it is true mean part. I think part of the reason that I ended up writing a biography of Benjamin Russia, so I could finally figure out what happened here, You know, you know, cause Santa Fe. Look, I love Santa Fe. I live in Santa Fe in my mind even when I'm Sitting here in Philadelphia, but you know, if you deal with a tourist area, sometimes people don't want to deal with the tourist area. So we have a tourist area where people go to the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall and all that kind of stuff. So You know, you get stuck behind horses and buggies and you have to fight off Benjamin Franklin impersonators and stuff. But I'm feeling pretty patriotic and pretty historically relevant today. All right, we'll get to that. And you don't mind talking about that. But let's talk about friend Harvey. First of all, sure. You're Fred Head describe what That malady is mostly about. Sure. So some people in Santa Fe in the area know that Fred Harvey company was a company that basically was the first major hospitality company in the in the in the nation, and they ran all the restaurants and hotels. On the Santa Fe Railroad, and they created a Fonda so people won't know the history of La Fonda. Fonda was a Fred Harvey Hotel, the cast of NATO hotel that was just restored in Las Vegas. Is a friend Harvey Hotel, the Grand Canyon Hotels, the South Rim, El Tovar and Bright Angel Lodge. Those air Fred Harvey hotels, and there were also Fred Harvey Union station Chicago unit Station. Was Fred Harvey, Kansas City, ST Louis. Obviously, the Albuquerque station was a huge friend Harvey Outpost Union station, Los Angeles. So Fred Harvey was amazing company that spanned it started in the 18 seventies. Oh, and it existed up through the 19 sixties and seventies. And it basically invented a lot of things that we take for granted, especially in the South West, because the Harvey companies who basically took care of people when they came to the Southwest, so As tourism became one of the major industries in the southwest, especially in New Mexico and Arizona that fell on the Fred Harvey company. So the friend Harvey company got involved the restaurants, hotels. It brought the food of New Mexico to the whole world, and it brought the food of the world into New Mexico. The Harvey girls that they hired on Lee single women to be their waitresses. They were the first major national force of working women and over 100,000 women between the 18. Eighties and the 19 forties had the opportunity to be Harvey Girls and travel all over the country working for the Santa Fe Railroad, and they also married all these local people made a lot of towns in New Mexico. They're founding families are people who work for the railroad who married Harvey Girls and settle down and settle those towns. So it's the influence of of the friend Harvey Company in New Mexico is something we continue to explore. It is the reason why the New Mexico history Museum, which is where I first started talking about Fred Harvey in Santa Fe has AH permanent exhibit of Fred Harvey material in the mezzanine between The floor. That's the really old stuff and the Fords really new stuff because Harvey and the railroad really represent that middle period that period in that from the late 18 seventies into the early 19 hundreds, when Santa Fe reinvented itself as a city different And the Harvey Company, you know, brought Santa Fe merchants and the Native Americans from the pueblos to the world's fair in 1915. Both in San Diego and San Francisco. So the Harvey company has had a really interesting relationship with New Mexico. And so it's not surprising that even though the company was in all kinds of different cities, and it was based in Kansas City, and later Chicago, the resurgence of fascination with Fred Harvey as a really interesting way of dealing with American history, especially The Southwest is really taking its place in Santa Fe and the New Mexico History Museum when it opened set out to have a Fred Harvey exhibit and brought me in because I happen to write a book about Fred Harvey. And Fran Levine, who was head of the museum then and Jenny Kimble, who's known raised a weekend for me in a April night of 2010. Having no idea whether people would be interested in it or not on I gave a talk at the museum. It was one of the many days with power went out in Santa Fe, so I gave half to talk in the dark with a flashlight. And then we had this wonderful meal at La Fonda, and it turned out that there were many more Fred heads than we ever realized. And what this event did was the people who There been people dressing up his Harvey Girls in Winslow, Arizona, who didn't know there were women driving dressing up Harvey Girls in Florence, Kansas, so It started to be this thing where people who were interested in Fred Harvey people who were interested in Santa Fe Railroad people heard Judy Garland because, of course, Judy Garland played a Harvey Girl in the movie, The Harvey Girls. People inside. A lot of different subjects started to come to Santa Fe. Teo to talk about this. We we had this weekend 2010. We did another one in 2011, and more and more people just came every year. One year Jenny Campbell and Alan Affeldt, who owns La Posada in Winslow, and now the cast in ADA in Las Vegas. Did a talk at the museum A two o'clock on the on a Sunday. There were so many people waiting in line to hear them that they had to give the same talk at four. And so we realized there was there were a lot of people who were interested because there were a lot of.

Fred Harvey Santa Fe Fred Harvey company Harvey Girls Harvey company Fred Harvey Hotel Fred Harvey Union station Santa Fe Railroad Fred head Harvey Hotel Harvey Outpost Union station Philadelphia Harvey Company New Mexico New Mexico history Museum Liberty Bell and Independence Fred heads Southwest
"benjamin russia" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The forty year old versions one and directing award at this year. Sundance Film Festival for first time filmmaker rod blank who also wrote and starred in the movie. The story which began as a web series was inspired by Blanc's own experience as a playwright and Rapper Harlem Lena Away was one of the producers. It's now showing in some theaters and streaming on Netflix are critic Justin Chang. Has this review. While the American film industry still has a long way to go in nurturing movies made by women and people. Of Color the Sundance Film Festival has long provided an important platform for marginalized voices. This is the festival that recently introduced us to pictures like the farewell from Lulu Wong and clemency from Chinyanja Chukwu. Eight years ago Eva donate premiered her film middle of nowhere at Sundance and became the first black woman in the festival's history to win best director for an American drama. This year, a blank became the second black woman to earn that prize for her first feature, the forty year old version. It was a worthy winner, not just because it's a terrific movie, but also because it specifically about the challenges of making meaningful personal art from an underrepresented perspective. Blanks artistry has many facets. She has a sharp ear for comic dialogue and an exquisite. I, having shot this movie on Gorgeous Black and white thirty five millimeter film. She also gives a very fine performance as a fictionalized version of herself also named Rod a blank, a struggling artist from Harlem who hailed years earlier as a promising playwright. Now, just a few months shy of her fortieth birthday. She has little to show for that promise besides a play that she's been working on for ages. She pays the bills by teaching drama at a local high school in spends a lot of time commiserating with her talent agent and longtime buddy archie play by Korean. American actor Peter Kim in a sly riff on the gay best friend Trope. Archie urges rata to seize any in every opportunity. Even if it may require some compromise at a party one night, he steers her toward J Whitman. A powerful theater producer played with delicious smarmy smartness by Tony Award winner read Bernie. Whitman has red rods play and he has some feedback on the story which follows a black couple in fast gentrifying Harlem. That's it. No. No no, it's about gentrification. And how this young couple struggles to you didn't like the idea is powerful, but it rang a little inauthentic. Okay Thank you for that note, I appreciate the but the there's there's something there. I just wish you hadn't shied away from darkness if you're GonNa. Call it Harlem. You gotTA. Give me or. I should write a team mother shooting up in an alley. No No. Though no, you're missing my point. I'm talking about gentrification of Black Harlem shake under a white upstream and grab. But you play never goes there I asked myself did a black person really right this. Now. Be Her. There's definitely voice under all those words but the writing needs work. The good news is. I still need a writer for my Harriet Tubman musical. After. Some tussling Whitman does eventually agree to produce rods play like he demands numerous changes including the introduction of a White Co lead in order to show the face of gentrification itself, and of course, draw a larger audience blank clearly delights in skewering the tone-deaf condescension of white men who fancy themselves cultural gatekeepers. But one of the reasons the forty year old version is so disarming is that blank saves the toughest criticism for herself. She let's see her character grapple with deep insecurities about her talent, her calling her future sometimes with tears but more often with a well-timed. Self. Deprecating Jab. At one point rotted decides to abandon theater and reinvent herself as rapper seizing upon a long ago passion that she hopes will tie her more closely to a strong community of black artists and so begins a wide ranging tour of New York's pop scene from a boxing ring in the Bronx or female rappers go ferociously head to head to a Brooklyn club where rotted some recordings with a gruff but sensitive Dj played by Aswin Benjamin. Russia's talent in this arena is more than apparent even if her nerves sometimes get the better of her like when she freezes on stage in front of an audience that includes several of her high school students. If you cringe virata in that moment as I did consider it proof of how deeply blank has secured your emotional investment in her journey. That's no small feat considering all the crowd pleasing underdog drama cliches the story could have stumbled into, but somehow avoids more obvious. Telling of the story might have ended with Rod discovering her true calling as a rapper or figuring out how to put on a successful version of her play that stays true to her create a vision. But blank seems less interested in clear resolutions then in examining how these two distinct worlds theater and hip hop have shaped her complex identity as an artist, she doesn't feel entirely at home in either space and yet her work at its best becomes a bold synthesis of both. As fast and funny as much of it is the forty year. Old version also has a rich vein of melancholy. There's an elegiac quality to the black and white images which might bring to mind vintage New York pictures like Manhattan shadows, and she's got a it spike. Lee's equally auspicious nineteen, eighty, six debut. As it happens she's gotTa have. It recently spawned a TV series for which blank wrote a few episodes, but it would be a mistake to squeeze her into any kind of mold based on her influences Rod. A blank already has a voice that is gloriously her own, whichever version of it. We hear next. Justin Chang is the film critic for the L. A. Times. He reviewed the forty year old version coming up we hear from Lenny Kravitz his new memoirs about his life up to the release of his first album. Let love rule. This is fresher weekend. I'm right Nicole Mike I'm sending man. And on our new podcast lower than a riot, we traced the collision of rhyme. PUNISHMENT IN AMERICA We were on at least we were literally physically find it be stand on the corner drug squad Pulo. Everybody. KNEW FROM NPR music. Listen to lower than a riot. Billie holiday helped shape American music with her voice and unique style but her like a C- extends way beyond music with one song in particular how strange fruit became an unexpected hit and brought on serious consequences for Billie, holiday listen now to the through line podcast from NPR. Our guest today is Lenny Kravitz he's written a new memoir about his early life and coming of age musically with the release of his first album. Let love rule in nineteen, eighty, nine, it launched his career and made him a rock and roll star since then he sold over forty million albums and won four grammys in a robe for best male rock vocal performance. He spoke last week with fresh air producer Sam. brigger. In his memoir, Lenny Kravitz talks about growing up in New York as the child of an interracial couple. And his loving relationship with his mom actress Roxie Roker who's best known for playing Helen Willis on the Jeffersons. But his relationship with his dad's side. Kravitz a TV. News producer was much more difficult. The memoirs also about living in. L.. A., as a teen and struggling to find his musical voice while getting kicked out of his home by his dad and having to sleep in a car. When Kravitz met actress Lisa Bonet he's he found his musical voice and wrote the songs that would make up the album. Let love rule. They married and had a child actress Zoe Kravitz. Let love rules also the name of his memoir. I spoke with Lenny Kravitz from his home in the Bahamas. Let's start with the title.

rod blank Lenny Kravitz Harlem J Whitman Justin Chang producer Zoe Kravitz New York Harlem Lena Away TA Sundance Netflix Kravitz Archie Lulu Wong Chinyanja Chukwu Peter Kim Tony Award
"benjamin russia" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

15:09 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Also its distribution could creep northwards during the warmer months especially in port cities thanks to the widespread distribution of age if die and even in those more northern or more southern places like a little bit outside of the mosquitoes year a year long environmental requirements it would just be reintroduced yet to be like. Oh it's warm. In the summer I'll die off in the winter and then be reintroduced Yep knowing the the evolutionary origins of Donges one thing but when did humans actually I recognize the disease. Yeah so it's around the late eighteenth century seventeen seventy nine to be exact act that we see what is considered to be the first angie pandemic in seventeen seventy nine. There are descriptions of donkey like illness and Java in in Egypt and in the following year we see it pop up in Philadelphia and this is actually when it gets its colloquial name breakbone fever was coined by Benjamin Rush and He was also a physician. And so to give you an idea of the scale of this epidemic in Philadelphia. He saw over the course of. You've like two months around a thousand people. He treated them for donkey two months. One thousand people in Philadelphia he alone. Yeah wow and so. I couldn't find an exact estimate of the total number of people likely infected but probably it was pretty high. Wait a second at this. Is the one recovered. Memory I have from the time that we talked about Dan game. Florida Benjamin Rush is one of the founding father. Yeah Ah so glad souci one. Bit of Trivia Trivia at the blind pig Mhm Benjamin Rush Rush Snail founding fathers. Gosh moving on anyway. So this. The epidemic in Philadelphia from Benjamin Russia's description was pretty likely donkey. Okay Egypt Tipton. Java may have been chicken Guna. There's been a lot of recent debate over whether these early descriptions are actually chicken Guna virus as opposed to donkey virus but in any case case it seems that Philadelphia was pretty likely and that's the earliest more like convince most convincing instance there there are descriptions of donkey like disease and a Chinese encyclopedia dating back to the year. Nine nine two. whoa yeah and in this encyclopedia? This disease is referred to as water poison and was known to be associated with flying insects that kind of water so -squitoes in the symptoms of this disease. Sound a lot like Danke. You've got the fever rash. I pain bleeding sometimes. High mortality and this also lends further support to do the hypothesis that the virus originated in Asia But anyway the virus was circulating throughout like much of the world during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with an estimated eight pandemics each lasting three to seven years while seventeen seventy nine to nineteen in sixteen. Wow Yeah with the disease that is as old and in particularly as wide ranging as Dan Ghei it makes sense sense it would accumulate a few names over its lifetime. I love the name Yes. I hope that there's another one that you remember because I did a little more digging. Okay Okay so the word Dong I seems to pop up in Spain around eighteen o one and researchers think that the most likely origin of that was actually from the Sahili name for for the disease. Key Dinka PEPO. Meeting a disease characterized by sudden cramp like seizure caused by an evil spirit at sounds familiar. Okay yeah so it was called Dingo Donga from the early nineteenth century on but it had a lot of other names we already heard water poison Pretty heard breakbone fever break riccarton fever. Oh yeah you ever that one I do that all the all. The women that Benjamin rush treated were crying. They were crying women. Yeah Ben and was like well these poor ladies and their heartbreak. No Sh one of one of the supposed patients who have like you should call it braveheart fever because I'm just broken hearted gracious scar. Latina Rheumatic polka fever. Ephemeral fever and are the most baffling one at the time. Dandy Fever Dandy fever. Yes you remember this. We were like what the heck is a dandy and I I was thinking of that character in American horror story. That's who I think of. I still haven't seen that so no well everyone else. You know the circus season then. It's the guy who is a really horrible person. But he's like a dandy. I think he's a dandy. Tell me what's a dandy. Okay so I did a little sleuthing which basically basically means that. I went to wikipedia article for Dandy which is pretty lengthy. Actually cool all right. So according to wikipedia quote Dandy historically is a man who places particular importance on physical appearance refined language and leisurely hobbies pursued. With the appearance of nonchalance. It's in a cult of self like Yankee doodle Dandy Yankee doodle Dandy added feather picket. He puts a feather in his cap because he's concerned about his appearance. He called it macaroni. He he wanted to stand out exactly. Yeah Yeah Okay. So that's a dandy. That's Dandy I'd still don't understand me in terms of Dandy fever. It doesn't make any sense. It's any hypotheses. Send them our way. Yep Okay so that stink at and also hopefully a little bit more about out Dandy Fever. Yeah than we still not. An answer still unanswered okay. So anyway the Disease Dung was known by at least the late seventeen hundreds but it would take a bit before some of its biological characteristics were discovered so once scientists may the link between mosquitoes and yellow fever which is in the late eighteen hundreds. They kind I got the feeling that donkey was also transmitted by mosquitoes and that took a little bit longer to show but they did show it. Let's have these infected mosquitoes bite bite. Humans human volunteers quote unquote. And then right after that researchers discovered that donkey was caused by filter bowl transmissible agent which back then Dan before microscopy microbiology advanced was pretty much going. It was a virus. The viruses would isolated until nineteen nineteen forty-three. This was during a right after the Nagasaki Dangi epidemic of nineteen forty two which had over twenty three thousand reported cases. Wow and so at this time. Researchers isolated some serum from someone who was infected and then they injected it in to the brains of suckling mice. Nice Oh and it gave them Dangi. Okay Weird but the important thing about this was that this isolation of this virus allowed allowed researchers to also look at the different strains in which strains causing outbreaks So that was pretty important so speaking of strains up up to this point this history is mostly about the history of dengue viruses but not specifically Denki hemorrhagic fever right. And that's because that's really its own part of the story so so let's go to the nineteen forties for that so I've talked before many times every episode probably about how important war there is in terms of disease transmission don gay and Dengue Hemorrhagic. Fever are no exceptions to that during World War Two especially in the Pacific and Asian theaters ters of war. There was massive destruction of like everything. The landscape both natural and urban was just destroyed aid and so in urban areas in particular the infrastructure for water supplies or draining and plumbing essentially collapsed and people had to store water in large containers. There's a lot of water. Pools would form rather than drain your speedo populations grew enormously and they found plenty of hosts as people. We're also on the move. Both during and following the war with a huge influx into urban centers and the urban centers couldn't keep up with the growth both in terms of infrastructure. And so you just have like all all of a sudden these mosquitoes are like while we have plenty of hosts theory to be able to do our thing and collapsing infrastructure with plenty of places for water to collect and exactly YEP. It's sort of like a perfect storm of yes bad things happening so the other thing it is that during the nineteen forties during the war. And after you have masses moving of people not just like from the rural centers to urban centers you who have like movement across the entire world. What this turned into was no longer a one strain one city situation Suddenly there were two or three or four dengue virus strains mixing in the same location and that as we know is how you get dengue hemorrhagic fever. Of course this has been described before but it was really sporadic. Okay and like the exception. But in the in the years after World War Two two there were epidemics of dengue hemorrhagic fever of a very large scales and since then they have pretty much only. Correct me if I'm wrong. But only increased in frequency and and geographic spread size many cases. Yeah Yeah so we see the first epidemics of dengue hemorrhagic. Fever in Southeast Asia in the nineteen fifties and sixties starting starting in one thousand. Nine hundred three in Manila in the Philippines and then these epidemics up first words sporadic every few years but then they grew in size as trade and urbanization populations increased epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic. Fever in the Americas lagged. A bit behind these epidemics in Southeast Asia popping only in the late nineteen seventies early nineteen eighties and this delay was possibly due to simple geography but also probably had something something to do with the widespread mosquito eradication campaigns throughout the Americas in the twentieth century. I WanNa talk a little bit about these campaigns because I think they're important not only in understanding the current landscape of mosquito borne disease risk across the Americas. But also it's a really good example of why it's so important to work interdisciplinarity and how quickly things can be undone. Oh Yeah Yeah. The anti-mosquito campaigns in the Americas were initially spurred on by a desire to get rid of pest. Mosquitoes like it was. It was before the the true extent of the disease causing capabilities that the mosquitoes were known. And so mostly it was just like these are annoying. These are horrible annoying. And till until you've read some of these quotes like I can't really blame them like it. Sounds Madness okay let me. Here's one this is an English settler. Okay they said the noise they make in. Flying cannot be conceived by persons who have only heard nats in England. That's one and a Catholic priest said the greatest torment in comparison with which all the rest would be but sport is the mosquitoes the cruel persecution of the mosquitoes. The plague of Egypt. I was no more cruel. Little insect has caused more swearing since the French have been in Mississippi than had previously taken place in all the world so we're swearing in Mississippi than in all strange sentence. That is a really weird attendance but it does seem that mosquitoes were like unheard of. Were annoying super annoying. Yeah and they did drive people out of towns they slowed tourism and they reduce property values and so people particularly landowners wanted something to be done even though it started out as this like. Let's get rid of nuisance mosquitoes angle. It soon took on public health. You know motivations as well once the links between yellow fever and mosquitoes Dan game. Mosquitoes and Malaria Clarion mosquitoes. Wants those were all uncovered right and also once the in the in the yellow fever episode. We talked about the elimination of mosquitoes and reduction in in yellow fever in the predominantly White Panama Canal Zone. Exactly so that kind of was like oh it can be done so maybe we should try it and it started started in New Jersey of all places New Jersey New Jersey. They were one of the most vocal about mosquito problem. And so that's where this began. Basically the first strategy of this campaign was to essentially use oil as they did in Panama to dump it in mosquito breeding grounds like standing water water and then this side and whatever but it's really bad for the environment dump oil in so bunch of fish died. Ride a bunch of other animals. Use any aquatic animals. Plants also died. Did the in. Castor oil kidding throwback two weeks ago and also only a subset of mosquitoes were affected by the oil and so they were like we need another solution. Yeah the fishermen women were like this. Can't we don't have standing for this. Yeah so they were like let's drain these marshes and swamps and wetlands great great Plame mm-hmm guys rate plan. And they were like well no matter that there are hundreds of thousands of acres of this. Let's do it anyway And they did run into some problems. One was just the sheer size of the project that they were trying to undertake one was funding. And the other was that not everyone wanted to have their land be drained so then there were laws put in place starting a New Jersey Than California followed suit saying that any standing water is a public nuisance and the person would either be fined or agree to comply to have their land drained. Mosquito engineering is what it was called called by the Nineteen Twenty S. This anti-mosquito campaigns were pretty much set up across the US. With one exception being Florida Florida's seemed to be strangely resistant. They love their mosquitoes down there. It's always mosquito Gita season as we learn as we learned when we were there but whiskey to control cost money and it wasn't exactly promising Missing results because it would be like. Oh yeah new. Jersey was doing great and then there would be heavy rains. One year all work would be undone shocking and everything else died so yeah but then some unexpected.

fever Dan Ghei Benjamin Rush Fever Philadelphia Dandy Americas dengue New Jersey Southeast Asia Egypt Nineteen Twenty Asia Florida Mississippi Spain Egypt Tipton
"benjamin russia" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Of Glen we do the show after going back here on blaze TV radio and podcasts noon to two eastern and today we're gonna talk about how did we get here as a people why is it getting crazier out there and what are these seven deadly world views that I teased earlier now before we get to those we are quickly wind up though lay out what's the world view and founded the country what what is that and a world view is simply how you see the world and your place in it how you choose to answer the biggest questions in life why am I here where am I ultimately heading what is the main purpose of my life and and human life in particular why is the world the way that it is why am I the way that I am and then what can be done about that those are those are the the factors that make up your world how you answer those questions we all have a world view we all do it's just a matter of what we plug in to those blank spaces to fill in the blanks that that's the only difference is what we plug in there now your country the one that we live in west was founded on a principle that rights come from god N. as G. K. Chesterton said it was the only country ever founded upon a creek and what was that creates the opening mission statement of the declaration of independence we hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal didn't doubt by their create to war with unalienable rights pre existent rights cannot be taken away these are rights that existed before government debt therefore government cannot grant that which take away that which you did not grant that's what your constitution begins with the words we the people in order to form a more perfect union that the constitution was made by the people for the people not the people by and for the constitution of course if you have god given rights then we've got to have an understanding of who's god now your founding fathers came out of an era where they believed in general there was only one true living god the god of the Bible now they had varying viewpoints on what that god commanded all of them and expected of them and what they must do in in response to that you had the intellectual curiosity about Thomas Jefferson yeah the C. A. dot C. a logical fit fidelity of a Benjamin Russia Patrick Henry and then you you had the inquisitiveness a salute to religious cynicism about Thomas Paine not very much unlike the day and age in which we live today if you were to come over to the blaze and blaze TV you'd see a whole lot of personalities that are kind of modern day emulations of all the caricatures I just laid out there was a lot of diversity of thought but what they ultimately understood is that they were if they were going to have self government they had to be accountable to something larger than themselves and that something was going to be the one that true what living god where our rights come from and you know we're in a time of year where people have a different opinion of what's to celebrate this time of year if you're like me you believe Jesus is the reason for the season you may light the menorah this time of year but ultimately there is a time and place for us to have those debates and they're necessary and it's probably the most important debate of them all who is god but ultimately we can't live in a civil society with people a realistic view points unless we understand to render unto Caesar that which is easier to render to god that which is god's and so this is what your founders understood this is why they put a clause in the constitution like no religious test for office for example because the state colonies were almost all chartered by churches well how are they going to navigate Quakers in Pennsylvania Catholics in merry land Presbyterians and in in in Episcopalians in Virginia and and Baptist in Georgia Congregationalist in Connecticut how are they going to do this and they realized early on that the only way to just go right down the same road of these Christian sects killing each other on the battlefield as they had in in Europe for hundreds of years the only way to win the game was to not play is simply say you are the master of your own conscience and you are accountable to your ultimate master for your conscience not to the state and the state is not here to play master over your conscience the state is here to protect and defend your god given rights and one of those chief among them is your own conscience and this is how we can get people here on our show for example I am an evangelical taught as a Catholic our forefathers slaughtered each other for hundreds of years on the battlefields of Europe we have some deep theological disagreements and if you listen to our show on a daily basis on the blaze TV radio podcast you know that without you know killing one another we're not shy about sharing them we even went through the five hundredth anniversary of the reformation two hundred year or two years ago and had this all out in the open correct we did it was fun yet so I'm proud I'm I'm I'm an evangelical you're a Catholic Aaron's a millennial it doesn't get more despair than that right okay he's still trying to figure out as cynically and bitterly as he possibly can his way in this world that is I have you pretty much tags yeah that that takes me all right so we we are we manage to do this out in the open as grown men we don't hide our convictions in theology from one another where we agree we agree we're we don't we don't but that's in that's in this that's in the sacred arena in the civic arena you've got to leave room for differences are there in an otherwise I'm you're not gonna tolerate those differences and we don't tolerate those differences that's when you get a lot of the worst pages in your history books and that's the code that our founders cracked that's that's why we have with stood all of the trials and tribulations against liberty and freedom of the last two hundred and forty some odd years it's why we have withstood them here in the United States of America we came up with a system that said that is for another sector of the culture to hash out and we're gonna give you the freedom to have those debates and the disagree with one another but you are not to use the coercive power of government to infringe on the god given rights of somebody else that's the world view that established America it's why we had the ten commandments posted in every classroom why they're still posted at the US Supreme Court which is banning them from public buildings today that's why your your politicians say so help me god when they take an oath of office that's that's what permitted the most flourishing by one culture of human achievement in all of human history is that world here and it is that world view that is under attack but not now this is actually been going on for quite awhile it's just becoming so prevalent now so systemic now that we are forced to have existential debates and questions that go beyond the jobs numbers and the price of gas or what the deficit is or even with the crime rate is America has been introduced to black nationalist anti Semites in New York City and on the east coast in the last couple weeks we even know this existed ten minutes ago and now it's in the headlines several times how did we get here what are these world views and why do they hate the one that found it America will begin explaining them to you when we return here on the Glenn Beck program you're listening to Glenn Beck mortgage rates are so low right now it is truly the right time to review your financial goals and set the course for your family's future my choice is American financing their.

"benjamin russia" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"You through these final two days of two thousand and nineteen in place of Glen we do the show after going back here on blaze TV radio and podcasts noon to two eastern and today we're gonna talk about how did we get here as a people why is it getting crazier out there and what are these seven deadly world views that I tease earlier now before we get to those we are quickly wind up though lay out what's the world view and founded the country what what is that and a world view is simply how you see the world and your place in it how you choose to answer the biggest questions in life why am I here where am I ultimately heading what is the main purpose of my life and and human life in particular why is the world the way that it is why am I the way that I am and then what can be done about that those are those are the the factors that make up your world how you answer those questions we all have a world view we all do it's just a matter of what we plug in to those blank spaces to fill in the blanks that that's the only difference is what we plug in there now your country the one that we live in west was founded on a principle that rights come from god and as G. K. Chesterton said it was the only country ever founded upon a creek and what was that creates the opening mission statement of the declaration of independence we hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal didn't doubt by their create tore with unalienable rights pre existent rights cannot be taken away these are rights that existed before government debt therefore government cannot grant that wish or take away that which you did not grant that's what your constitution begins with the words we the people in order to form a more perfect union that the constitution was made by the people for the people not the people by and for the constitution of course if you have god given rights than we've got to have an understanding of who's god now your founding fathers came out of an era where they believed in general there was only one true living god the god of the Bible now they had varying viewpoints on what that guy did it commanded of them and expected of them and what they must do in in response to that you had the intellectual curiosity about Thomas Jefferson yeah the C. A. dot C. a logical fit fidelity of a Benjamin Russia Patrick Henry and then you had the inquisitiveness it said it to religious cynicism about Thomas Paine not very much unlike the day and age in which we live today if you were to come over to the blaze and blaze TV you'd see a whole lot of personalities that are kind of modern day emulations of all the caricatures I just laid out there was a lot of diversity of thought but what they ultimately understood is that they were if they were going to have self government they had to be accountable to something larger than themselves and that something was going to be the one that true living god were our rights come from and you know we're in a time of year where people have a different opinion of what's to celebrate this time of year if you're like me you believe Jesus is the reason for the season you may light the menorah this time of year but ultimately there is a time and place for us to have those debates and they're necessary and it's probably the most important debate of them all who is god but ultimately we can't live in a civil society with people a realistic view points unless we understand to render unto Caesar that which is easier to render to god that which is god's and so this is what your founders understood this is why they put a clause in the constitution like no religious test for office for example because the state colonies were almost all chartered by churches well how are they going to navigate Quakers in Pennsylvania Catholics in merry land Presbyterians and Indian and Episcopalians in Virginia and and Baptist in Georgia Congregationalists in Connecticut how are they going to do this and they realized early on that the only way to just go right down the same road of these Christian stacks killing each other on the battlefield as they had in in Europe for hundreds of years the only way to win the game was to not play as simply say you are the master of your own conscience and you are accountable to your ultimate master for your conscience not to the state and the state is not here to play master over your conscience the state is here to protect and defend your god given rights and one of those chief among them is your own conscience and this is how we can get people here on our show for example I'm an evangelical taught as a Catholic our forefathers slaughtered each other for hundreds of years on the battlefields of Europe we have some deep theological disagreements and if you will this into our show on a daily basis on the blaze TV radio podcast you know that without you know killing one another we're not shy about sharing them we even went through the the five hundredth anniversary of the reformation two hundred year or two years ago and had this all out in the open correct we did it was fun yep so I'm from I'm I'm I'm an evangelical you're a Catholic Aaron's a millennial it doesn't get more despair than that right okay he's still trying to figure out as cynically and bitterly as he possibly can his way in this world that is I have you pretty much tags yep that that takes me all right so we we are we manage to do this out in the open as grown men we don't hide our convictions in theology from one another where we agree we agree we're we don't we don't but that's in that's in this that's in the sacred arena in the civic arena you've got to leave room for differences other in an otherwise if you're not gonna tolerate those differences and we don't tolerate those differences that's when you get a lot of the worst pages in your history books and that's the code that our founders cracked that's that's why we have with stood all of the trials and tribulations against liberty and freedom of the last two hundred and forty some odd years it's why we have withstood them here in the United States of America we came up with a system that said that is for another sector of the culture to hash out and we're gonna give you the freedom to have those debates and they disagree with one another but you are not to use the coercive power of government to infringe on the god given rights of somebody else that's the world view that established America it's why we had the ten commandments posted in every classroom why they're still posted at the US Supreme Court which is banning them from public buildings today that's why your your politicians say so help me god when they take an oath of office that's that's what permitted the most flourishing by one culture of human achievement in all of human history is that world here and it is that world view that is under attack but not now this is actually been going on for quite awhile it's just becoming so prevalent now so systemic now that we are forced to have existential debates and questions that go beyond the jobs numbers and the price of gas or what the deficit is or even with the crime rate is America has been introduced to black nationalist anti Semites in New York City on the east coast in the last couple weeks we even know this existed ten minutes ago and now it's in the headlines several times how did we get here what are these world views and why do they hate the one that sounded America will begin explaining them to you when we return here on the Glenn Beck program you're listening to Glen mortgage rates are so low right now it is truly the right time to review your financial goals and set the course for your family's future my choice is American financing.

"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

17:02 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I'm happy to welcome back to my show for the third time. Harlow ongo Harlow has just written. Dr Benjamin rush, the founding father who healed a wounded nation. Dr Benjamin rush is unfortunately, a lesser known member of the founding generation this show at Harlem's book hopes to cure that Harlow to doctor give us some idea of the causes. If you will that Dr Benjamin rush devoted his attention to and also you explain in your book his skill as of all things a lobbyist. No. He wasn't clad in Gucci. Shoes. He didn't have an office on K street. There was no K street, of course. But he was a skilled lobbyists, and you have hinted that Harlow when you talked about how he persuaded general Washington who perhaps initially wasn't all that sympathetic to build the first field army hospital, and he did so just by becoming a pain in the pain in the neck to Washington. So, but he got the job done. And I think that is a a subtext in Dr Russia's life. How skillfully was at persuading his friends and using his relationships with the rich and famous if you will to accomplish significant social goals. So tell us some of you can't cover all that. We simply don't have enough time. But tell us the issues that Dr rush sometimes singly. All by himself adopted and how his skill as a lobbyist and using his friendships accomplished meaningful changes in the life of colonial America. He basically he appealed to the selfish interests of the rich and famous after all with Washington to start at the beginning with Washington, the more troops that rush saved who could fight. Again. The fewer troops Washington had to recruit, and it was a big problem recruiting enough troops. Rush managed to heal enough soldiers if they could go back and fight again similarly in Philadelphia. The the the more more he cured diseases and illness in the poor sections the more workers the rich merchants had to work for them. This is one of the things. You ask how? He developed as a doctor because medicine was so primitive. He intuited a lot of the so-called cures that he developed people didn't bathe in that time. Most people thought bathing was dangerous that you could get you could get sick by taking a bath washing yourself. He intuited the opposite. The first thing he did was to clean the wounds and that poor people. He ran in it that he treated contracted. And those ones would would heal by washing them with whatever soap, they were very strong soaps in those days mostly lie, but they would get better. So he intuited a lot of the medical. Miracle said he performed in those days naturally for serious diseases. He relied on bleeding, which did not work. But the interesting thing about bleeding is that those that did get better from the disease. It was a huge yellow fever epidemic. Those that did get better for those who contracted it and got better from bleeding. We've gotten better anyway. And a little bleeding can make a person feel a little woozy and euphoric. And and in the presence of the great rush. They would always feel a little bit better after bleeding if they died while they were anyway goes didn't die would have lived anyway. So no, one realized that bleeding was not effective. But other things that he did were he in in hospitals that he worked at he got the directors to clean up the hospitals. He got town town fathers to clean the streets had been no they didn't clean the streets in those days, and then the poor sections the sewers ran out into the streets. So when you walk down a street in Philadelphia and any other major town you'd be walking Schumer JR. He got convinced the town that it would be healthier and wealthier if they cleaned up the streets, and they did and he got rid of the mass odors that fills the streets. It got rid of it diminished, the incidence of disease diseases, and he did the same thing in the hospitals where he got them a clean up the hospitals to limit patients to one in each bed. So that they wouldn't get each other's diseases with the army, he talked Washington and getting the soldiers to have their hair very very closely along the sides to get rid of body life and get rid of the diseases that life carried. The soldiers were taught to to bathe or wash themselves three times a week minimum and cut their hair. So that they were cleaner and we're less subject to illnesses in the field in the hospital. He he worked out he found a group of patients naked in the basement naked chained to the walls and these were the insane. The Mandalay yell. They were starving to death. Witch versus sleep by sadistic guards for demanding food or anything else. Rush went tearing up to the board room and board of directors of the hospital together. He had seen better treatment in France. And so he demanded that he the each of these mentally ill patients be transferred to a special wing in the hospital where they each had cleaned beds and were treated as patients not as the the victims of of Satan ization, they thought that mental illness was worth of the devil. So he got got religion out of the hospital and got the mentally ill too treated as patients, and he found that many of them responded to all sorts of different treatments. One was what we now. Call physical therapy or exercise made them healthier. And so they felt better about themselves and their mental illness declined bit. He found that other. Others were had talents. And he he had those talents trained. It's what we now. Call occupational therapy. And the biggest discovery a century before Freud. The biggest discovery was what he called talk therapy. He would take each patient aside. And just listen and talk with him or her and lo and behold, many of them got much much better. Some better enough to go to go home and leave lead productive lives. The century later. The American psychiatric association recognized him as the father of American psychiatry and his image is on the official seal of the American psychiatric association. He was a pioneer in modern medicine and really is the father of modern medicine in many, many ways basic hygiene that is now practicing medicine is a result of Russia's efforts. The rush designed the first code of ethics that made fee. Splitting illegal or unethical not illegal. But unethical among decent men and women in in the medical profession until until rush. And and really long after rush doctors, referring a patient to another doctor would split the fees. So obviously. They were often sent to doctors who were not very good simply a partnership that had nothing to do with healing the patients. So he developed the first code of ethics for modern medicine. They were in so many areas he was revered. He was a great teacher. He wrote the first tech medical great medical textbook. He he was first faster to teach chemistry in America. And then he wrote a foreign volume work on medicine and medical care at became a bible for medical care for at least a couple of decades after he went and his work on mental health on basically, the was basic tech in in psychiatry for more than a century until the end of the nineteen hundred medical his work, medical inquiries, and observations upon the diseases of the mind was basic psychiatric text in America until the end of the nineteenth century. So his influence on American medicine has just is is infinitesimal. And indeed in Chicago. Of course, there's a huge rush your. University. Complex with a medical school nursing school, and it's enormous and very very central to medical life in Chicago. Harlow up. I I you mentioned Benjamin Franklin with whom Benjamin rush had a very close personal relationship. And also you point out we may have time to discuss it his relationship perhaps with Thomas Paine. And if we take those three founding era men, Benjamin, rush Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Paine, this one thread that may be coincidental. And maybe not Dr Benjamin rush was not in it for the money was never rich. Although he married a wealthy woman. And that was the source of some financial security, but he was not in any of this for the money. He for he served the poor for free. He wasn't into for the money Benjamin Franklin because he felt he had lots of inventions. But. His inventions like the stove and other inventions. He refused to patent many. He gave them to the public domain because he felt he didn't want the money, but he wanted to encourage the development of mechanical science and of other science Thomas Paine similarly wrote the best seller in the founding era in common sense, but he would not take any royalties. He he wanted the book to get out. So those three men all of whom are in the same arc as Benjamin rush. All although frankly, became very wealthy all of them would subordinate their desire for money in favor of the public. Good. I found that to be an interesting connection between three the two other men in Benjamin Russia's life and Benjamin rush. Bet BB coincidental. It may be there are others. But I thought I would mention that now Benjamin rush. Also, he's interest was we we use the phrase humanitarian, his interest was beyond pure medical science science is in quotation marks. He was passionate about women's rights child labor. And of course, slavery. We're running out of time a bit, but tell us if you will how important these issues and others were to Benjamin rush and how much of a visionary. He was in seeing issues that we are still talking about today this morning in the news. Well, I'm glad you mentioned these other social issues because he was passionate about women's rights. And again, he talked the legislature. Into allowing girls should go to school by telling them that do do you want your boys to grow up as ignorant masses? Who's the first teachers of your of your voice? They are your lives and your wife should have as good an education as you. They are going to take the responsibility of raising your boys. So that's how he coaxed the Pennsylvania. Let he was a lobbyist he was a skillful lobbyists. And he showed everyone how it was in a better interest to improve the launch of everyone. He was a great humanitarian and wanted. Everyone to have a decent life as for slavery. He went into the black neighborhoods help. Talk them into and help them raise the funds to build the first African American church in America in Philadelphia. He actually went to the slave market bought a slave himself. So that he could Ray he was a teenager. So he could raise the boy educate him, and and then free him soon as he was educated enough to get a job, and boy, I got a job on a ship. And as a Freeman and whenever the ship came to town. He went to stay with with rush swipe feet that was now his own. So he made the rush house his home Russia's I said was deeply involved in the fight for the patient. I'm glad you mentioned that his his running with Thomas Paine whom he met in in a bookstore. Thomas painted come over and was eager to wasn't was an enemy of royalty and was eager to help Americans gain independence. And he was writing an essay he got a job as an editor of a magazine. Was a great writer his words just leapt off the page and gripped readers, and he was working on a on a document that he wanted to a pamphlet. He was writing on liberty and independence of American liberty. And the the horrors of the. The whole concept of divine right of kings. He said, why should some baby is born some woman have the right to rule the world. And so he wrote this pamphlet. He showed it to rush. Rush edited it and rush came up with the title commonsense, which spurred which pain then delivered to Washington on the banks of the Delaware opposite, Trenton, Washington, ordered commonsense. Which you may remember began these are the times try men's souls..

Dr Benjamin rush Thomas Paine Harlow ongo Harlow Washington Benjamin Franklin America Philadelphia Dr Russia Harlem field army hospital Benjamin Russia Russia American psychiatric associati Chicago army fever Miracle
"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

19:56 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"We are today. And always this show of ideas, never ever, the show of attitude. My first exposure to Dr Benjamin rush a name that probably most of my listeners are not familiar with. But will be before the hour is up. My first exposure was when I read what I became interested in American history somewhere around the end of the nineteen eighties. A book was published by Joseph Ellis, call passionate sage discussing the retirement years of John Adams, John Adams has become my favorite founder. I learned in that book as I became fascinated with life, John Adams. Is that a doctor Dr Benjamin rush was instrumental in reuniting? Former president John Adams with former president Thomas Jefferson who had stopped communicating with each other after Jefferson one beat Adams in the presidency campaign in eighteen hundred Dr Benjamin rush, the brought them together started them corresponding to each other which produced a rich history of our country in the hundred and fifty odd lettuce. I believe that they wrote to each other. Then Dr Benjamin Russia's name was filed away as being an important figure in the founding generation. I never knew much about him. Now, I know a lot thanks to this morning's guest Harlow Harlow is a historian. He has written about twenty six bucks. Harlow if I have shorted you buy a book or to my apologies. He is a student of the revolutionary era. He is a distinguished visiting fellow in American history at George Washington's mount Vernon. He's a journalist veteran journalist broadcast, educator and historian Harlow is visiting us again this morning for the third time on my show, and we'll continue to visit each and every time he writes, a book that captures my imagination. Harlow has written just published. Dr Benjamin rush, the founding father who healed a wounded nation, Dr Benjamin Russia's you will learn is a fascinating and quite important figure in the founding generation. He was always on the scene and so much of what makes life better today can be traced directly back to Dr Benjamin rush. Harlow? Welcome to the show this morning. Thank you, very much pleasure and an honor to be back on your show. And how will thank you so much, of course for being on my show. But most importantly for all of the scholarship, you have given us you are on you, you you. I I spoke in two thousand thirteen when you wrote thugs and gangsters real story, if the Boston tea party, and of course, you then caused Samuel Adams to fall from grace, at least in my mind, he was not the flowery figure I thought he was then we visited again in nineteen in two thousand fourteen when you wrote a wonderful book, which I commend to our audience how Washington invented the presidency. So Harlow, Dr Benjamin rush a medical doctor. What the only doctor I believe who signed the declaration of independence. Tell us. What brought Dr rush. To your attention. And why did you determine at have you shown? He was worthy of an entire book explaining his life. Benjamin rush was as you said, the only MD there were five others you call themselves doctor, but they hit never studied medicine. They were quacks as most people call themselves. Dr. Were in that era. Dr Benjamin rush was the only MD who signed the declaration of independence, and he was America's first and only at the time only great humanitarian all of the other signers are almost all of the other signers were wealthy merchants bankers and plantation owners. Most of them with slaves to do their bidding and do do the work and earn the money for them. Dr to rush was a man of modest means who. That was the first great humanitarian who who signed the declaration of independence, actually believing. In the words, or the preamble that all men were created equal on entitled to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. He was a champion. He became a champion of the Americans that all the other founding fathers for dot women slaves. Indentured workers laborers prisoners, the poor the indigent sick the mentally ill ninety percent of the population of the United States lived in that other America without money without education barred from voting barred from the right to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness by the constitution, which declared independence from Britain concentration did. I'm sorry by by the declaration of independence, and then the constitution the neither document ever. Did. It gave women the right to vote. It didn't give didn't free the slaves. It didn't give rights to indentured laborers in most states only property owners could vote. So the cons both the declaration of independence and the constitution were documents written by the wealthy for the wealthy. Only Benjamin rush signed the declaration of independence because he heard the cries and pleas from the rest of the Americans that other founders forgot, and he actually did sacrifice his life his fortune, and is sacred honor to try to heal and bring Justice to these other people. The phrase, you just mentioned, of course, is the last phrase in the declaration and to these ends, we we pledge our lives our fortunes and our sacred honor. You can't pledge very much more than that, can you hollow? And remember what Jefferson who wrote those words after he wrote them. He fled back to his home in Virginia and Monticello up on the mountain outside Charlottesville and never fired a shot against the British. He didn't risk his life at all. It's certainly didn't risk his fortune didn't risk anything. I know the revolutionary war. I'm smiling. Harlow because I know you are not a great fan of Thomas Jefferson. And I was wondering how many minutes into our discussion of Dr Benjamin rush. Would you find that opportunity to mention Jefferson, not in the most laudatory of phrases because I know you're not a fan of Jefferson and Jefferson was of course, a complex figure. Quite complex, and of course, somewhat somewhat but quite hypocritical between what he wrote and how he lived. He didn't really walk the walk. He just talks the talk that of course, is for another show. Now, Dr Benjamin rush was perhaps I don't know if I can say this statistically, but he was not a political animal many of the founders were steeped in political study and political knowledge, of course, Madison, especially the consummate politician, but that's not to exclude. Adams or Jefferson or the other founders? But Dr rush was as you have said and what what makes him special. He was a from the heart and from the mind, a true humanitarian, not a politician, so his interest in the revolutionary era and didn't independence was only because of the humanitarian that only but was primarily because of the humanitarian benefits he saw in a country, which was true to the principles of the declaration. He was not a student of politics. He was a doctor first and foremost in the greatest sense of the word, isn't that? So that's correct. And and there was no way for him to be a politician. He didn't own any property only property owners could. Involve themselves in politics after all the nations of the south covered most of the land. So the the the the man who owned these plantations ruled the land and with with a man who made all the political decisions for that territory in the north of the major brick merchants and bankers people like John Hancock were those who had their communities. They alone had the power to do. So the rest of the population really in the south. They were mostly slaves and in the north they were mostly working people who. Many of them indentured which meant they were under contract to work for their employers for specific periods of time usually six to eight years at a would each contract. So they had no rights they could not involve them. So they couldn't vote. They couldn't involve themselves in in politics and under British rule. They had absolutely no rights. The governors of each province says the states will call that governors were appointed by the British government. So there was no self rule after the constitution after the declaration of independence. And then the constitution the those who were named governor. We're usually one of the big bankers or merchants in the north like John. Hancock or big plantation owners in the south like Benjamin Harrison, Patrick Henry, and and eventually Thomas Jefferson, although he resigned after a year because she was terrible governor and failed to defend Bill defenses to protect Virginia against British troops. Now, Dr Benjamin. When would reach your book. One of the real pleasures of your book and one of the real takeaways besides that of being quite impressed with Dr Benjamin rush is his wisdom has foresight. And his humanness is the book gives us a wonderful social history of the times, most biographies of the founders focus on the founders, and you don't know very much. Don't learn very much about the environment in which they lived what life was like you have a vague picture. But you describe it with great understanding and passion, tell us about the the world the revolutionary era the country that Benjamin rush saw. And what what he dedicated his life to curing. Tell us a tiny bit about what life was like. And what bench? Rush thought ought to be different rush. Of course was a grew up on a farm. He was so farmers son. So he was not born to wealth when he returned. A he did studied medicine at the university of Edinburgh in Scotland which was the finest medical school in the world at the time. He was very fortunate to come under the patronage of Benjamin Franklin who was kind of quit. Of an ambassador for the provinces of Pennsylvania, Massachusetts. And a couple of other provinces in London. And he Franklin was very very warm in welcoming Americans who were lucky enough to come to study in England, and he patronized Benjamin rush. Benjamin rush stayed with him. When he finished his studies. You went to London and had the good fortune of being able to study more medicine under a great scientists and doctors in London and then travelling to France where the government still Royal governments nonetheless worth had taken measures to provide for the poor and especially for the orphaned children bake unwanted babies were left on the doorstep of the hotel. God's hotel hospital was called and put up for. Option. Rush was really overwhelmed by by what he shot and he came back to America. Without a penny in his pocket, and he stayed with an older brother and in Philadelphia and didn't know how to get started in medicine. So he just. Trucking's instruments in his bag and went into the poor sections of Philadelphia knocking on doors saying anyone need a doctor. Well, they sure did. They came flocking down. The stairs stairs of these tumbledown some shocks and bringing their children who were sick or hungry. And and rush took care of them. All and soon gained a reputation as a fine. Dr. Yeah. When the the I the second congress came to Philadelphia to to write the declaration of independence in reaction to what had happened in Lexington. A lot of people raced out of town to greet these people coming from all these other states and rush was among them, and he jumped into one of the carriages and sitting in the carriage in that particular guards was John Adams and his cousin Samuel Adams. And they got to talking and then finally rush invited them to stay at the rush home in Philadelphia. The atom says, we're terribly please. They did not look forward to sleeping in taverns which that were not hotels in those days. Visitors slept in taverns on the second floor where they were pallets on the floor and everybody stuck together. With with the lice and the and the body odors and everything else that went with travelers. So that's how rush became friends of the both Adams is at the time. And in turn was introduced to other members of the second congress, and because of his good service to local Philadelphians has doctor. He was named to that congress that second congress which signed the declaration of independence, and instead of just continuing with his daily life as most signers dead, including as I mentioned Jefferson went home to his plantation. Didn't wanna do with fire fighting a war. Rush went up to Trenton to to the West Bank of the Delaware river where Washington's troops had retreated after disastrous battle at Brooklyn. And they they they then lost Manhattan. They fled across New Jersey. And finally settled on the opposite Bank of the Delaware river opposite, Trenton, it was there that they started planning the attack on Trenton Christmas day Russia arrived at the same time went with them in the aftermath of the battle and started treating wounded troops on the penalty of actually was never done before never done never been done before hoops were fodder. That's all and they were left to die because they couldn't if they couldn't walk or crawl off the battlefield. They were left to die because they were they were considered useless. And they weren't they they had no rights anyway, citizens they they didn't own any land these were ordinary workers. So. Rush. Started tweeting them any realized they needed shelter. And he went to Washington and demands and some help on a big argument with Washington in Washington just wanted to rush off his back and told one of his officers to commandeer a house on the edge of the battlefield and rush turned it into a field hospital the very first field hospital in American military history from that from there he continued his efforts to treat the wounded. He went through several battles, including brandy wine where he also treated wounded British troops and won the praise and safe passage of. Through British lines while it's American lines. I I talked to do that safe. Passage for health workers now is is is part of international law in in wartime. So that was that he that he planted the seeds of what later became the the the medical corps the army medical corps, and one lesson one lesson that came about that comes about from your book is when you said he studied medicine in Edinburgh. And he he practiced medicine help our audience understand how difference that phrase.

Dr Benjamin rush Thomas Jefferson Dr Benjamin Harlow Harlow Dr Benjamin Russia John Adams Benjamin Franklin Samuel Adams Washington Philadelphia Benjamin Harrison America Virginia Trenton Delaware river Joseph Ellis president George Washington Manhattan Adams
"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

16:58 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I'm happy to welcome back to my show for the third time. Harlow Unger Harlow has just written. Dr Benjamin rush, the founding father who healed a wounded nation. Dr Benjamin rush is unfortunately, a lesser known member of the founding generation this show and Harlow book hopes to cure that Harlow to doctor gives us some idea of the causes. If you will that Dr Benjamin rush devoted his attention to and also you explain in your book his skill as of all things a lobbyist. No. He wasn't clad in Gucci. Shoes. He didn't have an office on K street. There was no K street, of course. But he was a skilled lobbyists, and you have hinted that Harlow when you talked about how he persuaded general Washington who perhaps initially wasn't all that sympathetic to build the first field army hospital, and he did so just by becoming painted the pain in the neck to Washington. So, but he got the job done. And I think that is a a subtext in Dr Russia's life. How skillfully was at persuading his friends and using his relationships with the rich and famous if you will to accomplish significant social goals. So tell us some of you can't cover all of that. We simply don't have enough time. But tell us the issues that Dr rush sometimes singly. All by himself adopted and how his skill as a lobbyist and using his friendships accomplished meaningful changes in the life of colonial America. He basically he appealed to the selfish interests of the rich and famous after all with Washington to start at the beginning with Washington, the more troops that rush saved who could fight again. If you're troops Washington had to recruit, and it was a big problem recruiting enough troops. Rush managed to heal enough soldiers. If think they could go back and fight again similarly in Philadelphia. The the the more more he toured diseases and illness in the poor actions. The more workers the rich merchants had to work for them. This is one of the things. You asked how? He developed as a doctor because medicine was so primitive. He intuited a lot of the so-called cures that he developed people didn't bathe in that time. Most people thought bathing was dangerous that you could get you could get sick by taking a bath. Or at washing yourself. He intuited the opposite. The first thing he did was to clean the wounds and that poor people he ran in that he treated contracted. And the those ones would would heal by washing them with whatever soap, they were very strong soaps in those days mostly lie that they would get better. So he intuited a lot of the medical. Miracle said he performed in those days naturally for serious diseases. He relied on leading which did not work. But the interesting thing about bleeding is that those that did get better from the disease. It was a huge yellow fever epidemic. Those that did get better for those who contracted it and got better from blading we've gotten better anyway. And a live bleeding can make a person feel a little woozy and euphoric. And and in the presence of the great, Dr rush, they would always feel a little bit better after bleeding if they died while they would have died anyway, those that didn't die would have lived anyway. So no, one realized that bleeding was not effective. But other things that he did were he in in hospitals that he worked at he got the directors to clean up the hospitals. He got town town fathers to clean the streets had been no they didn't clean the streets in those days, and then the poor sections the sewers ran out into the streets. So when you walk down a street in Philadelphia and any other major town, it'd be walking from Schumer JR. He got convinced the town that it would be healthier and wealthier if they cleaned up the. The streets, and they did and he's got rid of the mass odors at fill the streets. It got rid of it diminish the incidence of disease diseases, and he did the same thing in the hospitals where he got them a clean up the hospitals to limit patients to one in each bed. So that they wouldn't get each other's diseases with the army, he talked Washington and getting the soldiers to their hair, very very closely along the sides to get rid of body life and get rid of the diseases that life carried the soldiers were taught to two days wash themselves three times a week minimum and cut their hair. So that they were cleaner and we're less subject to illnesses in the field in the hospital. He he worked at. He found a group of patients naked in the basement naked chained to the walls and these were the insane. The mentally ill. They were starving to death. Witch versus by sadistic guards for demanding food or anything else. Rush went tearing up to the board room and board of directors hostile together. He had seen better treatment in France. And so he demanded that the each of these mentally ill patients be transferred to a special wing in the hospital where they each had cleaned beds and retreated as patients not as the victims of of Satan as Asian they thought that mental mental illness was the work of the devil show. He got got religion out of the hospital and got the mentally ill too treated as patients, and he found that many of them responded to all sorts of different treatments. One was what we now. Call physical therapy or exercise made them healthier. And so they felt better about themselves and their mental illness declined a bit he found that other. Others were had talents. And he he had those talents trained. It's what we now. Call occupational therapy. And the biggest discovery a century before Freud. Biggest discovery was what he called talk therapy. He would take each patient aside. And just listen and talk with him or her and lo and behold, many of them got much much better. Some better enough to go to go home and leave lead productive lives. The century later. The American psychiatric association recognized him as the father of American psychiatry and his image is on the official seal of the American psychiatric association. He was a pioneer in modern medicine that really is the father of modern medicine in many, many ways basic hygiene that is now practicing medicine it was all Russia's efforts. The rush do designed the first code of ethics that made fee. Splitting illegal or unethical. Not illegal unethical among decent men and women in in the medical profession until until Russia, and and really long to rush doctors, referring a patient to another doctor would split the fees. So obviously. They were often sent to doctors who were not very good simply a partnership that had nothing to do with healing the patients. So he developed the first code of ethics for modern medicine. They were in so many areas he was revered. He was a great teacher. He wrote the first tech medical great medical textbook. He he was I faster to teach chemistry in America. And then he wrote a foreign volume work on medicine and medical care at became a bible for medical care for at least a couple of decades after he went and his work on mental health on. Basically, the basic tech in in psychiatry for more than a century until the end of the nineteen hundreds medical his work, medical inquiries and observations upon the diseases of the mind was basic psychiatric text in America until the end of the nineteenth century. So his influence on American medicine has just is is infinitesimal. And indeed in Chicago, of course, is a huge rush university complex with the medical school nursing school and. It's enormous and very very central to medical life in Chicago. Harlow up. You mentioned Benjamin Franklin with whom Benjamin rush had a very close personal relationship. And also you point out we may have time to discuss it his relationship perhaps with Thomas Paine. And if we take those three founding era men, Benjamin, rush Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Paine, this one thread that may be coincidental. And maybe not Dr Benjamin rush was not in it for the money was never rich. Although he married a wealthy woman. And that was the source of some financial security, but he was not in any of this for the money. He for he served the poor for free. He wasn't there for the money Benjamin Franklin because he fell he had lots of inventions. But. His inventions like the stove and other inventions. He refused to patent them many. He gave them to the public domain because he felt he didn't want the money, but he wanted to encourage the development of mechanical science and of other science Thomas Paine similarly wrote the best seller in the founding era in common sense, but he would not take any royalties. He he wanted the book to get out. So those three men all of whom are in the same arc as Benjamin rush. All although frankly, became very wealthy all of them would subordinate their desire for money in favor of the public. Good. I found that to be an interesting connection between three the two other men in Benjamin Russia's life and Benjamin rush. I bet BBC cO which. That'll it may be there are others. But I thought I would mention that. Now Benjamin rush also his interest was we we use the phrase humanitarian, his interest was beyond pure medical science. Although science is in quotation marks he was passionate about women's rights child labor. And of course, slavery. We're we're running out of time a bit, but tell us if you will how important these issues and others were to Benjamin rush and how much of a visionary. He was in seeing issues that we are still talking about today this morning in the news. Well, I'm glad you mentioned these other social issues because he was passionate about women's rights. And again, he talked the legislature into allowing girls should go to school. But. Telling them that you do you want your boys to grow up as ignorant masses? Who is the first teachers of your of your voice? They are your lives and your wife should have as good in education as you if they are going to take the responsibility of raising your boys. So that's how he coaxed that Pennsylvania. He was a lobbyist he was a skillful lobbyists. And he showed everyone how it was in a better interest to improve the lodge of everyone. He was a great humanitarian and wanted. Everyone to have a decent life as her savory. He went into the black neighborhoods. Help. Talk them into and help them raise the funds to build the first African American church in America in Philadelphia. He actually went to the slave market bought a save himself. So then he could Ray he was a teenager. So he could raise the boy educate him and then free him as soon as he was educated enough to get a job and the boy got a job on a ship. And as a Freeman and whenever the ship came to town. He went to stay with with rush feet that was now his own. So he made the rush house his home. Russia's I said was deeply involved in sight from anticipation. I'm glad you mentioned that his his running with Thomas Paine whom he met an in a bookstore. Thomas painted come over and was eager to wasn't wasn't enemy of royalty and was eager to help Americans gained independence, and he was writing an essay he got a job as an editor of a magazine. He was a great writer his words just leapt off the page and gripped readers, and he was working on a on a document that he wanted to a pamphlet. He was writing on liberty and independence of American liberty and the the the Harz of the whole concept of divine right of kings. He said, why should some baby is born some woman have the right to rule the world. And so he wrote this pamphlet. He showed it to rush. Rush edited it and rush came up with the title commonsense, which spurred which pain then delivered to Washington on the banks of the. Delaware opposite, Trenton Washington ordered the common sense, which you may remember began..

Dr Benjamin rush Harlow Unger Harlow Thomas Paine America Washington Philadelphia Benjamin Franklin Russia Dr Russia Trenton Washington Benjamin Russia field army hospital American psychiatric associati Chicago army fever BBC
"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

19:48 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"For listening Sunday morning. We are today and always the show of ideas, never ever this show of attitude. My first exposure to Dr Benjamin rush a name that probably most of my listeners are not familiar with. But will be before the hour is up. My first exposure was when I read. What I became interested in American history somewhere around the end of the nineteen eighties. A book was published by Joseph Ellis, call passionate sage discussing the retirement years of John Adams, John Adams has since become my favorite founder. I learned in that book as I became fascinated with life John Adams that a doctor Dr Benjamin rush was instrumental in reuniting. Former president John Adams with former president Thomas Jefferson who had stopped communicating with each other after Jefferson one beat Adams in the presidency campaign in eighteen hundred factor. Benjamin rush brought them together started them corresponding to each other which reduced a rich history of country in the hundred and fifty odd lettuce. I believe that they wrote to each other. Then Dr Benjamin Russia's name was filed away as being an important figure in the founding generation. I never knew much about him. Now, I know a lot thanks to this morning's guest Harlow Harlow is a historian. He has written about twenty six bucks. Harlow if I have shorted you buy a book to my apologies. He is a student of the revolutionary era. He is a distinguished visiting fellow in American history at George Washington's mount Vernon. He's a journalist veteran journalist broadcast that educator and historian Harlow is visiting us again this morning for the third time on my show, and we'll continue to visit each and every time he writes, a book that captures my imagination. Harlow has written just published. Dr Benjamin rush, the founding father who healed a wounded nation, Dr Benjamin Russia's you will learn is a fascinating and quite important figure in the founding generation. He was always on the scene and so much of what makes life better today can be traced directly back to Dr Benjamin rush. Harlow? Welcome to the show this morning. Thank you very much, Bob. It's a pleasure and an honor to be back on your show. And harlow. Thank you so much, of course for being on my show. But most importantly for all of the scholarship, you have given us you on you, you you're I I spoke in two thousand thirteen when you wrote thugs and gangsters the real story of the Boston tea party. And of course, you then caused Samuel Adams to fall from grace, at least in my mind, he was not too flowery figure I thought he was then we visited again in nineteen in two thousand fourteen when you wrote a wonderful book, which I commend to our audience how Washington invented the presidency. So Harlow, Dr Benjamin rush a medical doctor. What the only doctor I believe who signed the declaration of independence. Tell us. What brought Dr rush. To your attention. And why did you determine and have you shown he was worthy of an entire book explaining his life? Benjamin rush was as you should the only MD there were five others you call themselves doctor, but they hit never studied medicine. They were quacks as most people call themselves. Dr. You were in that era. Dr Benjamin rush was the only MD who signed the declaration of independence, and he was America's first and only at the time only great humanitarian, all the other signers almost all of the other signers were wealthy merchants bankers and plantation owners. Most of them with slaves to do their bidding and do do the work and earn the money for them. Dr rush was a man of modest means who. What's the first great humanitarian who who signed the declaration of independence, actually believing? In the words of the preamble that all men were created equal and entitled to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. He was a champion. He became a champion of the Americans that all the other founding fathers for dot women slaves. Indentured workers laborers prisoners the poor the indigent sick mentally ill ninety percent of the population of the United States lived in that other America without money without education barred from voting barred from. Right to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness by the constitution, which declared independence from Britain constitution did. I'm sorry by by the declaration of independence, and then the constitution, the neither document ever gay. It gave women the right to vote. It didn't give it didn't free the slaves. It didn't give rights to indentured laborers in most states only property owners could vote. So the both the declaration of independence and the constitution were documents written by the wealthy for the wealthy. Only Benjamin rush signed the declaration of independence because he heard the cries and pleas from the rest of the Americans that other founders forgot and he did sacrifice his life. His fortune and is sacred honor to try to heal and get bring Justice to these other people. The phrase, you just mentioned, of course, is the last phrase in the declaration and to these ends, we we pledge our lives our fortunes and our sacred honor. You can't pledge very much more than that, can you hollow? And remember, what can Jefferson who wrote those words after he wrote them? He fled back to his home in Virginia and Monticello up on the mountain outside Charlottesville and never fired a shot against British. So he didn't risk his life at all. It's certainly didn't risk fortunes risk anything. I know the revolutionary war. I'm smiling. Harlow that goes, I know you are not a great fan of Thomas Jefferson. And I was wondering how many minutes into our discussion of Dr Benjamin rush. Would you find that opportunity to mention Jefferson, not in the most laudatory? Of of phrases because I know you're not a fan of Jefferson and Jefferson was of course, a complex figure. Quite complex, and of course, somewhat not somewhat but quite hypocritical between what he wrote and how he lived. He didn't really walk the walk. He just talks the talk that of course, is for another show. Now, Dr Benjamin rush was perhaps I don't know if I can say this the typically, but he was not a political animal many of the founders were steeped in political study and political knowledge, of course, Madison, especially the consummate politician, but that's not to exclude. Adams or Jefferson or the other founders? But Dr rush was as you have said and what what makes him special. He was a from the heart and from the mind, a true humanitarian, not a politician, so his interest in the revolutionary era and didn't independence was only because of the humanitarian not only, but was primarily because of the humanitarian benefits he saw in a country, which was true to the principles of the declaration. He was not a student of politics. He was a doctor first and foremost in the greatest sense of the word, isn't that? So that's correct. And there was no way for him to be a politician. He didn't own any property only property owners could. Involve themselves in politics after all the plantations of the south covered most of the land. So the the the men who own these plantations ruled the land and with with a man who made all political decisions for that territory in the north of the major Brooke merchants and bankers people like John Hancock were those who had their communities. They alone had the power to do. So the rest of the population in the south. They were mostly slaves and in the north they were mostly working people who. Many of them indentured which meant they were under contract to work for their employers for specific periods of time usually six to eight years at a at a with each contract. So they had no rights they could not involve them. So they couldn't vote. They couldn't involve themselves in in politics and under British rule. They had absolutely no rights. The governors of each province says the states will call them governors were appointed by the British government. So there was no self rule after the constitution after the declaration of independence. And then the constitution the those who were named governor. We're usually one of the big bankers or merchants in the north like John Hancock or big plantation owners in the south. I Benjamin Harrison Patrick Henry, and and eventually Thomas Jefferson, although he resigned after a year because she was terrible governor and had failed to defend Bill defenses to protect Virginia against British troops. Now, Dr Benjamin. When would reach your book, one of the real pleasures of your book and one of the real takeaways besides that of being quite impressed with Dr Benjamin rush is his wisdom, his foresight. And his humanness is the book gives us a wonderful social history of the times, most biographies of the founders focus on the founders, and you don't know very much. They don't learn very much about the environment in which they lived what life was like you have a vague picture. But you describe it with great understanding and passion, tell us about the the world the revolutionary era the country that Benjamin rush saw. And what? And what he dedicated his life to curing tell us a tiny bit about what life was like. And what Benjamin rush thought ought to be different. Rush. Of course was a grew up on a farm. He was farmed son. So he was not born to wealth when he returned a he did studying medicine at the university of Edinburgh in Scotland which was finished medical school in the world at the time. He was very fortunate to come under the patronage of Benjamin Franklin who was kind of the equivalent of of an ambassador for the provinces of Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and a couple of other provinces in London. And he Franklin was very very warm and welcoming Americans who were lucky enough to come to study in England, and he patronized. Benjamin rush Benjamin rush stayed with him. When he finished his studies. You went to London and had the good fortune of being able to study more medicine under great scientists and doctors in London. And then travelling to France where the government still Royal government. Nonetheless worth had taken measures to provide to the poor and especially for the orphaned children Baig unwanted babies were left on the doorstep of the hotel. God show tell the hospital was called and put up for adoption. Rush was really overwhelmed by by what he shot and he came back to America. Without a penny in his pocket, and he stayed with an older brother and in Philadelphia and didn't know how to get started in medicine show. He just rookies instruments in his bag and went into the poor sections of Philadelphia knocking on doors saying anyone need a doctor. Well, they sure did. They came flocking down the stairs. Shares of these tumble down some shots and bringing their children who were sick or hungry. And and rush took care of them. All and soon gained a reputation as a fine. Dr. When the the I the second congress came to Philadelphia to. To write the declaration of independence in reaction to what had happened in Lexington. A lot of people raced out of town to greet these people coming from all these other states and rush was among them, and he jumped into one of the carriages and in the carriage in that particular carriage was John Adams and his cousin Samuel Adams. And they got to talking and then finally rush invited them to stay at rush home in Philadelphia. The atom says, we're terribly pleased. They did not look forward to a sleeping in taverns which were not hotels in those days. Visitors slept in taverns on the second floor where they were pallets on the floor. And everybody's sucked together. With with the lights and the and the body odors and everything else that went with travelers. So that's how rush became friends of the both had is at the time. And in turn was introduced to other members of the second congress, and because of his good service to local Philadelphians says a doctor he was named to that congress that second congress which signed the declaration of independence, and instead of just continuing with his daily life as most signer is dead. Including as I mentioned Jefferson went home to his plantation didn't wanna do with fire fighting or. Rush went up to Trenton to to the West Bank of the Delaware river where Washington's troops had retreated absent disastrous battle at Brooklyn. And they they they then lost Manhattan. They fled across New Jersey. And finally settled on the opposite Bank of the Delaware river opposite Trenton. It was there that they started planning the attack on Trenton on Christmas day. Russia arrived at the same time went with them in the aftermath of the battle and started treating wounded troops on the penalty of never done before never done never been done before hoops were fodder. That's all and they were left to die because they couldn't if they couldn't walk crawl off the battlefield they were left to die because they were they were considered useless. And they weren't they they had no rights anyway, citizens they they didn't own any land. These were ordinary workers. So rush started tweeting them, then he realized they needed shelter. And he went to Washington and demands somehow on a big argument with Washington and Washington just wanted rush off his back and told one of his officers to commandeer a house on the edge of the battlefield and rush turned it into a field hospital. The very first. Field hospital in American military history from that from there he continued his efforts to treat the wounded. He went to several battles, including brandy wine where he also treated wounded British troops and won the praise and safe passage of through British lines as well as American lines. And I I talked to do that safe. Passage for health workers now is is is part of international law in in wartime. So that was that he that he planted the seeds of what later became the the the medical corps the army medical corps, and one lesson one lesson that came about that comes about from your book is when you said he studied medicine in Edinburgh..

Dr Benjamin rush Benjamin rush Benjamin rush Harlow Harlow Thomas Jefferson Dr Benjamin Dr Benjamin Russia John Adams Samuel Adams rush Washington America Benjamin Franklin Philadelphia Trenton Benjamin Harrison Patrick Henr John Hancock Delaware river Virginia Joseph Ellis Bob
"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

19:35 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"For listening. This Sunday morning. We are today. And all the ways the show of ideas, never ever, the show of attitude. My first exposure to Dr Benjamin rush a name that probably most of my listeners are not familiar with. But will be before the hour is up by first exposure was when I read what I became interested in American history somewhere around the end of the nineteen eighties. A book was published by Joseph Ellis, call passionate sage discussing the retirement years of John Adams, John Adams has become my favorite founder. I learned in that book as I became fascinated with life John Adams that a doctor Dr Benjamin rush was instrumental in reuniting. Former president John Adams with former president Thomas Jefferson who had stopped communicating with each other after Jefferson one beat Adams in the presidency campaign in eighteen hundred Dr Benjamin rush, the brought them together started them corresponding to each other which produced a rich history of country in the hundred and fifty RV lettuce. I believe that they wrote to each other. Then Dr Benjamin Russia's name was filed away as being an important figure in the founding generation. I never knew much about him. Now, I know a lot thanks to this morning. Scarcest Harlow auger Harlow is a historian. He has written about twenty six bucks. Harlow if I have shorted you buy a book to my apologies. He is a student of the revolutionary era. He is a distinguished visiting fellow in American history at George Washington's mount Vernon. He's a journalist veteran journalist broadcast, educator and historian Harlow is visiting us again this morning for the third time on my show, and we'll continue to visit each and every time he writes, a book that captures my imagination. Harlow has written just published. Dr Benjamin rush, the founding father who healed a wounded nation, Dr Benjamin Russia's you will learn is a fascinating and quite important figure in the founding generation. He was always on the scene and so much of what makes life better today can be traced directly back to Dr Benjamin rush. Harlow? Welcome to the show this morning. Thank you, very much pleasure and an honor to be back on your show. And harlow. Thank you so much, of course for being on my show. But most importantly for all of the scholarship, you have given us you on you, you you're I I spoke in two thousand thirteen when you wrote thugs and gangsters the real story of the Boston tea party. And of course, you then caused Samuel Adams to fall from grace, at least in my mind, he was not the flowery figure I thought he was then we visited again in nineteen in two thousand fourteen when you wrote a wonderful book, which I commend to our audience how Washington invented the presidency, so Harlow Dr Benjamin rush a medical doctor. What the only doctor I believe who signed the declaration of independence. Tell us what brought Dr rush to your attend. And why did you determine at have you shown? He was worthy of an entire book explaining his life. Dr Benjamin rush was as you said, the only MD there were five others you call themselves doctor, but they hit never studied medicine. They were quite as most people call themselves. Doctor were in that era. Dr Benjamin rush was the only MD who signed the declaration of independence, and he was America's first and only at the time only great humanitarian, all the other signers are almost all of the other shiners wealthy merchants bankers and plantation owners. Most of them with slaves to do their bidding and do do the work and earn the money for them to rush was a man of modest means who. That was the first great humanitarian whose who signed the declaration of independence, actually believing. In the words of the preamble that all men were equal and entitled to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. He was a champion. He became the champion of the Americans that all the other founding fathers forgotten women trades indentured workers laborers prisoners, the poor the indigent sick the mentally ill ninety percent of the population of the United States lived in that other America without money without education barred from voting barred from the right to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness by the constitution, which declared independence from Britain the concentration did. I'm sorry by via the declaration of independence. And then the constitution the neither document ever gate. It gave women the right to vote. It didn't give it didn't free the slaves. It didn't give rights to indentured laborers in most states only property owners could vote. So the cons both the declaration of independence and the constitution were documents written by the wealthy for the wealthy. Only Benjamin rush signed the declaration of independence because he heard the cries and pleas from the rest of the Americans that other founders forgot and he did sacrifice his life his fortune, and is sacred honor to try to heal and and get bring Justice to these other people. The phrase, you just mentioned, of course, is the last phrase in the declaration and to these ends, we we pledge our lives our fortunes and our sacred honor. You can't pledge very much more than that, can you hollow? And remember. Jefferson who wrote those words after he wrote them he fled back to his home and in Virginia and Monticello up on the mountain outside Charlottesville and never fired a shot against the British. So he didn't risk his life at all. It's certainly didn't risk his fortune. They didn't risk anything. I know revolutionary war. I'm smiling. Harlow the goes, I know you are not a great fan of Thomas Jefferson. And I was wondering how many minutes into our discussion of Dr Benjamin rush. Would you find that opportunity to mention Jefferson, not in the most laudatory? Of of phrases because I know you're not a fan of Jefferson and Jefferson was of course, a complex figure. Quite complex, and of course, somewhat somewhat but quite hypocritical between what he wrote and how he lived. He didn't really walk the walk. He just talks the talk that of course, is for another show. Now, Dr Benjamin rush was perhaps. I don't know if I can say this statistic, but he was not a political animal many of the founders were steeped in political study and political knowledge, of course, Madison, especially the consummate politician, but that's not to exclude. Adams or Jefferson or the other founders? But Dr rush was as you have said and what what makes him special. He was a from the heart and from the mind, a true humanitarian, not a politician, so his interest in the revolutionary era and didn't independence was only because of the humanitarian not only, but was primarily because of the humanitarian benefits he saw in a country, which was true to the principles of the declaration. He was not a student of politics. He was a doctor first and foremost in the greatest sense of the word, isn't that? So that's correct. And there was no way for him to be a politician. He didn't own any property only. Property owners could involve themselves. Lives in politics after all the plantations of the south covered most of the land. So the the the man who owned these plantations ruled the land and with a with a man who made all political. For that territory in the north of the major Brooke merchants and bankers people like John Hancock were those who had their communities. They alone had the power to. The rest of the population really in the south mostly slaves in the north. They were mostly working people who. Many of them indentured which meant they were under contract to work for their employers for specific periods of time usually six to eight years at a at a at with each contract. So they had no rights they could not involve them. So they couldn't vote. They couldn't involve themselves in in politics and under British rule. They had absolutely no rights. The governors of each Harbin says the states were called the governors were appointed by the British government. So there was no self rule after the constitution after the declaration of independence. And then the constitution the those who were named governor. We're usually one of the big bankers or merchants in the north like John Hancock or big plantation owners in the south like Benjamin Harrison, Patrick Henry. And and eventually Thomas Jefferson, although he resigned after a year because she terrible governor and fail to defend Bill defenses to protect Virginia against British troops. Now, Dr Benjamin. When would reach your book, one of the real pleasures of your book and one of the real takeaways besides that of being? Quite impressed with Dr Benjamin rush is his wisdom has foresight. And his humanness is the book gives us a wonderful social history of the times, most biographies of the founders focus on the founders, and you don't know very much. Don't learn very much about the environment in which they lived what life was like you have a vague picture. But you describe it with great understanding and passion, tell us about the the world the revolutionary era the country that Benjamin rush saw. And what what he dedicated his life to curing. Tell us a tiny bit about what life was like. And what Benjamin rush thought ought to be different rush. Of course was a grew up on a farm. Farmer's son. So he was not born to wealth when he returned. A he did studied medicine at the university of Edinburgh in Scotland which was the finest medical school in the world at the time. He was very fortunate to come under the patronage of Benjamin Franklin who was kind of the equivalent of of an ambassador for the provinces of Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and a couple of other provinces in London. And he Franklin was very very warm in welcoming Americans who were lucky enough to come to study in England, and he patronized. Benjamin rush Benjamin rush stayed with him. When he finished his studies. You went to London and had the good fortune of being able to study more medicine under great scientists and doctors in London. And then travelling to France where the government still Royal governments. Nonetheless worth had taken measures to provide for the poor and especially for the orphaned children Baig unwanted babies were left on the doorstep of the hotel God show. Tell us the hospital was called and put up for adoption. Rush was really overwhelmed by by what he shot and he came back to America. Without a penny. His pocket, and he stayed with an older brother and in Philadelphia. And didn't know how to get started in medicine. So he just. Rookies instruments in his bag and went into the poor sections of Philadelphia knocking on doors saying anyone a doctor. Well, they sure did. They came flocking down the stairs. Shares of these tumble down some shocked and bringing their children who were sick or Hungary. And and rush took care of them. All and soon gained a reputation as a fine. Dr. When the the I the second congress came to Philadelphia to to write the declaration of independence in reaction to what had happened in Lexington. A lot of people raced out of town to greet these people coming from all these other states and rush was among them, and he jumped into one of the carriages and sitting in the carriage in that particular carriage was John Adams and his cousin Samuel Adams. And they got to talking and then finally rush invited them to stay at the rush home in Philadelphia. The atom says, we're terribly pleased. Did not look forward to sleeping in taverns which that we're not hotels in those days. Visitors slept in taverns on the second floor where they were pallets on the floor. And everybody's stuck together. With with the lice and the and the body odors and everything else that went with travelers. So that's how rush became friends of the both had him at the time. And in turn was introduced to other members of the second congress, and because of his good service to local Philadelphians as a doctor. He was named to that congress that second congress which signed the declaration of independence, and instead of just continuing with his daily life as most signers dead, including as I mentioned Jefferson went home to his plantation didn't wanna do with fire fighting or. Rush went up to Trenton to to the West Bank of the Delaware river where Washington's troops had retreated absent disastrous battle at Brooklyn and. They they lost Manhattan. They fled across New Jersey. And finally settled on the opposite Bank of the Delaware river opposite, Trenton, it was there that they started planning the attack on Trenton Christmas day, rush arrived at the same time went with them in the aftermath of the battle and started treating wounded troops on the penalty of actually never done before never done never been done before hoops were fodder. That's all and they were left to die because they couldn't if they couldn't walk across the battlefield. They were left to die because they were they were considered useless. And they weren't they they had no rights anyway, citizens they they didn't own any land. These are ordinary workers. So rush started tweeting them and he realized they needed shelter. And he went to. Washington and demands somehow got a big argument with Washington's and Washington just wanted Russia off his back and told one of his officers to commandeer a house on the edge of the battlefield and rush turned it into a field hospital the very first field hospital in American military history from that from there he continued his efforts to treat the wounded. He went to several battles, including brandy wine where he also treated wounded British troops and won the praise and safe passage of through British lines as well as American lines. And I I talked to do that. Safe passage for health workers now is is is part of international law and in wartime. So that was that he that he planted the seeds of what later became the the medical corps the army, medical corps and one lesson. What one lesson that came about? That comes about from your book is when you said he studied medicine in Edinburgh. And.

Dr Benjamin rush Benjamin rush Benjamin rush Thomas Jefferson Dr Benjamin Harlow auger Harlow Dr Benjamin Russia John Adams Samuel Adams rush Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Harrison Philadelphia John Hancock Washington George Washington America Virginia Joseph Ellis president Manhattan
"benjamin russia" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"For no reason. But guy never speaks like, we don't even know what he sounds like you don't think about that. Booming voice. Like god. Maybe sounds like Mickey Mouse, we don't know you could come up with and be like obstruction of Justice. Wouldn't it be various if we found out Robert Muller had a Jamaican accent? The whole time. We didn't know and then he just come. And I was like I and I'll find tons of collusion. Benjamin russia. This concludes investigation, blah. Doughnuts in congress. Because GM got a Republican Senator Obama club. That was daily show last night. Hey, we got some relatively breaking news. And it's not good news for the president or for the dreamers. The supreme court just announced that it will allow President Trump to temporarily enforce restrictions on transgendered transgender individuals in the military. That's one the other thing. The supreme court is not doing is taking up the condition of Dhaka the president wants to spend it right away that President Obama put into place now, they can stay for the receivable future until this is brought up and a separate way. The the administration asked for the supreme court look at it right away. The supreme court goes now, they're fine. We'll leave it with the Democrats wanted to do. I just wanted to came to the table last year was because they thought the DACA kids being tossed now. There's no rush. Now. There's no word gency. That's not gonna help the the holdout at all Jim Wilson WABC in New Jersey. Hey, jim. Hey, brian. I'm a huge fan, Brian. Thank you. Listen. Listen, Brian dish, this situation with the mullahs probe is so infuriating that they think the American public is just a bunch of idiots if you check the calendar since he's been in office every time there's a bombshell. John Solomon's bombshell. Sarah, spunk shells. Shows the corruption collusion and the DOJ and the FBI and the deep state somehow some way something comes out to change the narrative, it always comes out on a Friday. So this way to news could run with it the whole weekend. I honestly believe at a lot of people do that the media ninety five percent of it is just a propaganda arm for the democratic the DNC and really the Republicans are just as guilty. It's like a government run propaganda machine. Take it is frustrating to see them. They'll have the equal curiosity on the FBI side when there's so much intrigue. There's so much been uncovered look at everybody has been fired quitter retired. I mean, they were running for the hills. It's not just call me. It's McCabe Peter Struck the text messages, this is empirically evidence that there's a problem. Now, we find out from Bruce sore? He had a luncheon he had a breakfast at the Mayflower Hotel at which time who's explaining. He was explaining to the lawyer for the FBI. Hey, we got this dossier. It is opposition research. I'm sure most of it is not verified and not verifiable nixed. The, you know, the using it to get a of they're getting a Pfizer a warrant, and they're going after Carter page, so all this stuff is happening to just no interest for some reason. It never gets to Anderson Cooper's desk. I can't understand it Debra. Yeah. Thanks. Appreciate it. Jim. Deborah WHO in Dayton. Debra. Yes. Martin Luther King was alive today. He'd be horrified at the people that spoke out yesterday and used what he proposes piece to split a bigger wedge between the racers. They did nothing to bring peace together. They made it more of a bigger issue than what he had. Listen, and for guys like Al Sharpton Reverend Jesse Jackson dealt with the president for thirty years when he was just a businessman. They know he's not a racist. They dealt with them. They got money. They got support. They got his they got his presence. They've given them awards. So I know they can't even have their heart in it. When they go after them and try to label them one way in which he's not, hey when we come back. We're going to find out a little bit of go inside the business side of the Super Bowl with Steve cannon a man in charge and making it come off without a hitch back in a moment. This is news ninety six point five WDBO where Orlando turns first for breaking news, weather and traffic twenty four hours a day. It starts now. Breaking news.

president Jim Wilson WABC FBI Robert Muller Jesse Jackson Brian dish Debra Anderson Cooper President Obama Senator Obama Martin Luther King Mayflower Hotel Pfizer Benjamin russia New Jersey DOJ congress GM
"benjamin russia" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"He came this close Brett they were so close to routing the British and in the last minute is fog rolled in the American militia started shooting at each other. It was just a mess. A giant mess of friendly fire which gave the British enough time gave general Cornwallis in time to get out of Philadelphia with reinforcements for half. And they turned what looked for sure. Like it was going to be a continental victory into this rousing route of retreat. So now Washington's over three in the west, of course, when the British took Philadelphia, the continental congress, such as they were abandoned the city and most of them went back to their their own districts, but a small core at if anyone point between eighteen and twenty three delegates took over the courthouse in the inland. Philadelphia town of York and now the whispers that I spoke about about Washington, they're they're full blown roar. John Adams wants him out, Dr Benjamin rush and Slovenia surgeon, very respective and signer of the declaration of independence. He writes, an anonymous screed calling Washington a full blown dictator with no military skills. Now, there's a courses turned into a pamphlet it circulated up and down the east coast. Roll the colonies Patrick Henry. As a matter of fact, he saw the original. And he writes, the Washington he said this is Benjamin Russia's hand. Right. I just want you to know the kind of statesmen kinda heavy hitters you're up against once you out and Washington oddly enough, he was a great militia commander and if tree commander, but he knew nothing about cavalry tactics for about a about military, engineering or bad artillery. So when he was named commander in chief. He ran out, but all these books about how does this work? So now, he was not only learning how to be a military commander. He was learning. How to be a savvy politician if the knives are out for me, I'm gonna turn I'm gonna turn the situation around to make knives out for them. So when he did was he didn't respond to rush right away. Instead, he asked congress in York, the delegates were there, can you said the commission out here unin inspection tour. I want you to see what's happening out here. And when the five delegates who eventually arrived Valley Forge saw the condition of the army, right? When I'm saying, naked or half bacon. I'm not talking metaphorically foreign officers who came to Valley Forge. Either. Volunteer to fight for the Americans or observe were shocked to see continental centuries naked under a ratty blanket. Barefoot standing on their hats in the snow or the freezing muck. I mean this army was on the on the verge as Washington wrote to congress of starving dissolving dispersing when these five delegates Valley Forge they were. So embarrassed started taking off their own shoes and Eum two soldiers. So now Washington starts manipulating what came to me known as the camp committee these five delegates and without them really knowing they're putting into action everything that Washington wants every day. He sends over one of his young aids props to John Lawrence Alexander Hamilton, and controlling and kind of putting into mind. Oh, God, we need food. Washington's not an autocrat is the only thing keeping his army together, which effect was true. So it was almost like the tail sorted wagging. The dog the five delegates to the camp committee began wagging the dog of..

Washington Benjamin Russia Philadelphia Valley Forge commander Patrick Henry army Cornwallis Brett John Lawrence Alexander Hamilt Dr Benjamin rush York John Adams Slovenia congress
"benjamin russia" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Because the pay too much longer but here's creek cree mercury was some kind of bureau in cure yeah it's poisonous yeah so i mean whatever details details i'm telling you lewis and clark go poo okay so trekking out west and they have now the lewis and clark trail as you're familiar with they've had to actually move in recent years the trail and some instances as far away as a mile because they have found traces of this mercury where benjamin russia's thunderclap irs home have given away oh they were actually a mile up to the north we didn't realize that based on the traces of mercury they found along the way you're well how weird i love it that's really nasty story thank you welcome that was worth waiting for triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three jerry in maine you're on the blaze hi okay let me breathe for just a second okay the clip from filler hillary clinton don't tell me you disagree with that doesn't your husband tell you who to vote for yeah they mad you know like like i'm kinda little puppet my husband tells me what to do tells me when to get up tells me when to go to you know come on century she living in and this woman who's been fighting for women her entire life i yeah like yeah yeah like the ones that she went after that are husband raped dass ity city of this woman and and think that we should kowtow to to her political agenda.

clark lewis benjamin russia jerry maine hillary clinton clark trail irs
"benjamin russia" Discussed on Freak Out and Carry On

Freak Out and Carry On

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"benjamin russia" Discussed on Freak Out and Carry On

"For public policy grudge you've been there many times love the place barbara hello why why as we thing at the university of virginia great to be when he load barber in the new yorker historian jolted goldstein from st louis university said the mike pence was syncophantic in chief historically or vice president were likely to be yes men to presidents are not this is something you hear a lot of course the famous john nance garner of and vice president fdr that the vice president is not worth a warm book of this do they could the road four pitcher i sometimes put pictures that you're and then he nine hey saying that sometimes they did spit i've heard spit and piss both uh sam encounter catholic school we would have only been allowed to say okay right all right so let's go with spin the nothing that raises at all that much in addis uh falls thinks is says big give me some history here barbara about this vice president's role all right well that's just one of the the best quotes about it i'm sitting here at mr jefferson's university uh founded by thomas jefferson he wrote to benjamin russia about the vice presidency is he was approaching and taking over the office a more tranquil and offending station could not have been found for me uh so in typical 'jeffersonian diplomatic language i i think that uh for uh for shadowing of john nance garner and putting it a more colorful texas language first of all we we start with this fascinating concept that the person who comes in second in the electoral college they also randy they runnerup i is the person who is vice president so before the twelfth amendment.

barber goldstein st louis university mike pence john nance garner vice president fdr catholic school thomas jefferson electoral college university of virginia new yorker benjamin russia texas randy