35 Burst results for "Benjamin Franklin"

Whoopi Says "Whoops"

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:19 min | 2 months ago

Whoopi Says "Whoops"

"Just breaking in the last couple of minutes on the view, play cut 86. Welcome back. You know, and one day conversation about turning point USA. I put the young people at the conference in the same category as the protesters outside. And I don't like it when people make assumptions about me. And it's not any better when I make assumptions about other people, which I did. So my bad, I'm sorry. Okay. So, call you guys a bunch of Nazis, my bad. There is a great, there's a great quote from Benjamin Franklin. Which is do not ruin an apology with an excuse. It's a great quote. Look, I'm a big believer in apologizing when you're wrong. However, I'm trying to make sure I understand what she's sorry for. Is she sorry she said it? Or is she sorry that she believed it? Those are two totally completely different things. And I'm going to be very honest. It's very hard for me to believe that was sincere, it looked more kind of like a hostage situation. Of lawyers that were pointing and saying, do this. She didn't exactly look graceful while doing that.

Benjamin Franklin USA
Were All of the Founding Fathers Slave Owners?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 2 months ago

Were All of the Founding Fathers Slave Owners?

"Charlie, my friends all say the founding fathers were slave owners. What do you have to say about that? That is what John says from Pennsylvania. So I've done a, let's say a fair amount of public commentary on this. And I have to thank the great hillsdale college for this, honestly. So look, I went down into the hillsdale online courses, Charlie for hillsdale dot com. You should all check it out. That's Charlie F war hillsdale dot com. And I did the work. A couple years ago, I'd kind of just trip over my words whenever the issue of founding fathers and slavery came up. And I probably had a response that some of you gave like, oh yeah, but we abolished it and that was then and now this was then and this is now. That's not even a proper answer. Because it's not true. The founders all knew what they were doing was wrong. They wrote openly about it. So that doesn't make them hypocrites, it makes them sinners. As the great doctor Larry arn would say. 9 out of 13 a colonies had already abolished slavery by the time the constitution was ratified. The first antislavery convention was hosted in Philadelphia in 1775 by Benjamin Franklin. Thomas Jefferson admonished king George for bringing the Senate slavery into America. In the original draft of the Declaration of Independence. The northwest ordinance, article 6, said that no slaves should be in the new territories. But Nicole Hannah Jones insists that America's true founding was not in 1776 but 1619. Now who is Nicole Hannah Jones? She is the con artist that runs The New York Times 1619 project that your kid is probably learning from right now. Let's play cut one 53. 1619 in August of 1619 is when the first group of 20 to 30 Africans were sold into the Virginia colony. And what the project is basically arguing is that that is actually a foundational to the American story as the year 1776 because nothing would be left untouched by that decision to engage in the institutional slavery. So for those of you listening on podcasts, looks as if she has Elmo on her head. I don't quite understand. That someone went crazy with a dry erase marker. She's this massive orange head of hair. That is very bright. The sunglasses watching that clip.

Charlie Hillsdale Nicole Hannah Jones Hillsdale College Larry Arn Pennsylvania Benjamin Franklin John King George Thomas Jefferson America Philadelphia Senate The New York Times Virginia
Ensuring Good Education in a Post-CRT World

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | 4 months ago

Ensuring Good Education in a Post-CRT World

"Point chapter at your Belinda high school. Awesome. So last week on April 5th in a three two vote, my school board passed a resolution to ban critical race theory in my district. So my question is, what's the next steps to ensuring that we have a good education, even after that ban? That's great. So it's a two part dance. So that's great. Now you need to say, okay, let's get pro American curriculum in our schools. So what does that look like? Hillsdale college has done a lot of work in this. We're starting to do a lot at turning point USA. But we have to teach people, what is the American story? What is the problem? What is the proper way to view American history? What is America? Was it a mistake? Was it something that has kind of fell out of the sky? There's just a couple of things I'll share here that I think could really excite high school students that they're definitely not taught in school. America was summoned into existence at a time and a place that is very unusual. In fact, it's almost never happened before in human history. Most civilizations are countries stumble into existence. They're not summoned into existence. I want you to think about that. There was a decision to create America. China just kind of existed and it was kind of the Yangtze River valley civilization is kind of built into itself. In this river valley in India and so on and so forth. But America was a group of people that made a decision founding fathers. We have a set of principles. We don't like what's happening. We're going to declare independence of things that are always true. And I'm afraid that most young people are not just being taught that even we're serving taught the opposite. They're being taught to the founding fathers were racist bigoted slave owners. And they don't know their history. They don't know that the first antislavery convention in America was hosted in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin in 1775. They don't know that 9 out of 13 states before the constitution was ratified in 1787 had already independently abolished slavery. They didn't a lot of young people never top that Vermont was the first state to abolish slavery in 1777, inspired by the Declaration of Independence. So the next step is get your local school districts and not just teach this, but inspire young people to be excited about the country they live in. A lot of young people, I think, are

Belinda High School America Hillsdale College Yangtze River Valley River Valley China India Benjamin Franklin Philadelphia Vermont
The Top 3 Things That American Christians Should Do Right Now

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:12 min | 6 months ago

The Top 3 Things That American Christians Should Do Right Now

"Just real quick lightning round. You can just quit top three things, practical things we can do as Christians that are Americans right now. Boy, top three things. First thing is, I mean, take your faith very seriously. I encourage people to make that number one. So I tell people all the time, look, my life's work, what I do is focus on the second most important thing. So before I tell you what that is, let's make sure we all agree on what the most important thing is. The most important thing that we can do is to win souls for Jesus Christ. It's the most important thing that we can do. Now, so what's the second most important thing? To make sure you could do the first thing. Yeah, there you go. Come on. That's my day job. My job every day when I do three hours of radio two podcasts today, traveled 330 days last year, college campuses, churches, organizing people, 200 plus people on staff, is to make sure that number one can keep on happening. To make sure that the church will remain open, that they'll never lock us down again that they will never persecute our faith again. So I just want to make sure we all understand the priorities, right? Well, thank you. Which, and we should always be clear about that, right? That's number one. That's number one. That's number one. You can take off your coat right now. No, it's good. You can go right now. And number two, make sure you could do number one. So I just encourage all of you to read the word every single day. Get into a very serious prayer routine. And if you're struggling with your faith, ask for help. That is what the church is supposed to be. It's supposed to be the infrastructure for people that are struggling and struggling as normal because we are in a Supernatural and a spiritual struggle right now. And understand the equipment, the spiritual equipment that God gives us to be able to win the spiritual battle. I could go deeper into this. In fact, in the next service, we might want to do some of the spiritual warfare stuff, but if you are not experiencing spiritual warfare at all and it's kind of like a weird distant concept to you. I'm going to lovingly tell you, maybe you're not doing something important enough, so Satan doesn't take you seriously. There you go. Which is every person that I encounter that is fighting for the gospel in the kingdom is experiencing some form of spiritual warfare right now. And Satan Satan we know the character of Satan. He's a liar. He's a deceiver. First Peter, it says he prowls the world like a lion looking for those to devour. Okay, that's number one. We have to take our faith seriously. Number two, which is I want to challenge all of you to become really passionate learners and educators of this country. And so it's not just about doing, but it's also about pausing and learning. Learning is a substantial activity that improves your country. When you know more about your history, all of a sudden you will be convicted more to fight. When you are able to answer to a friend where they say, this country is so racist, be like, hey, let's talk about that. Where you shouldn't be caught be caught off guard about someone that says, you know, our country was founded on slavery. Like, really? 9 out of 13 of the colonies had already abolished slavery by the time of the constitution was ratified. The first antislavery convention was held in 1775 chaired by Benjamin Franklin. The first state ever to abolish slavery was Vermont in 1776, inspired by the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson wrote in the original draft of the Declaration of Independence and monitoring king George for bringing the Senate slavery to the United States. Thomas Jefferson abolished the slave trade as one of his first acts of president in 1807 that this country said time and time again in the private journals and musings of every founding father, including the three architects of the U.S. Constitution, Hamilton, Madison and Jay that is not a matter of when it's how we will abolish slavery. We should all know that stuff, yeah? And so good. And so the third thing is this, which is you take your faith seriously, you're praying, you're fasting. Jesus said the hard things come to those that pray and fast. I'm a big believer in fasting. And so if that's a distant concept to you, I challenge you to look into it and to pray about it. I know that Greg leads you guys really amazingly on that. But I'm a big, big believer in fasting, then of course learning. The third thing is yes, it's going to take action. It is. And that means I know a lot of people here in this audience right now are saying Charles, you got to give me stuff to do. I've done everything that's been asked to me. I watched Tucker Carlson every night. I bought the pillow. I did everything I was supposed to do. Thank you. That's good. Promo code Kirk, by the way, at my pillow dot com. And the Giza dream sheets are spectacular. But all kidding aside, Greg, it's gonna take faith prayer and fasting is number one bucket. The second bucket is learning. We have a partnership with hillsdale college. It's Charlie for hillsdale dot com. Take some of the online courses. No what you have been given. If we have a national Alzheimer's moment, we don't know who we are, where we've come from a memory crisis. Then what are we actually doing here? You have to know what we're anchored to and the third thing, of course, is action. Running for office and supported a good ones that do. Homeschooling kids, shepherding those parents that might be overwhelmed that are homeschooling. Action action action and pushing yourself forward. Those are the three things that I would challenge this church to continue to do.

Satan Satan Satan Thomas Jefferson Benjamin Franklin King George United States Peter Vermont Greg Senate Madison Hamilton JAY Tucker Carlson Alzheimer's Jesus Hillsdale College Charles Hillsdale Charlie
The US Senate Has Finally Done Something Meaningful!

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:41 min | 6 months ago

The US Senate Has Finally Done Something Meaningful!

"Meaningful. The U.S. Senate has finally done something I approve. This shouldn't have taken so long, but it's finally done. The United States Senate has passed the sunshine protection act by unanimous consent to make daylight savings times permanent. I'm not a fan of daylight savings time. Falling back, springing forward should just remain the same time throughout the entire year. In fact, we should spring forward even more. So that the fall, it's the opposite. I never understood that in the most depressing time of weather, we also made it darker intentionally. Who thought of this thing? Makes zero sense. Now, I know you're gonna say it's Benjamin Franklin. And all this, no way, he was too smart for this. I think it's a Nicole Hannah Jones conspiracy against Benjamin Franklin. There's no way. A 2015 study published in sleep medicine, researchers compared the rate of strokes during the week after daylight saving to the week two weeks after the tweaks before. They found the rate of 8% higher the first two weeks after the shift, and people with cancer were 25% more likely to have a stroke later than the other times of the year. People over 65 were 20% more likely. A 2019 report found a higher risk of heart attack after both time changes, but particularly during daylight savings times. Interruptions to circadian rhythm can also impair focus and judgment. A 2020 study found fatal traffic accidents increased by 6% in the United States during daylight savings time. This shouldn't have been taken so long, but it did, and the U.S. Senate has finally done something useful.

U.S. Senate Benjamin Franklin Nicole Hannah Jones United States Heart Attack Cancer
Col. Allen West and Rick Green Tell Us About the Patriot Academy

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:38 min | 7 months ago

Col. Allen West and Rick Green Tell Us About the Patriot Academy

"It? When did the patriot academy start and how does it function? How can people get involved? Patriot academy dot com to learn more, but we started at 20 years ago in Texas at the Texas capitol, and then we started spreading across the country and hosting other capitals. And then when we created the constitution coach program, that's for anybody anywhere. You don't have to have any background in this. And Eric, these are the only constitution classes known to mankind where you will actually stay awake. And finish the class, all right? That you're setting a high bar. Yes, it is. You say awake. Come on. Throughout this entire class. Well, I'll tell you something. And I confess these things because I just think we should. But it wasn't until not even ten years ago. I wrote a book called, if you can keep it, which comes from the words of Benjamin Franklin, exiting the constitutional convention. And for the first time in my life, I was ashamed, and I am still ashamed that it took so long that I finally understood some things about how our glorious system of self government and liberty works. And the bigger takeaway for me was that if I had missed this generally speaking over the decades, it means that everyone my age and younger almost everyone has missed this. This used to be part and parcel of an American education. You could not get a high school diploma if you didn't get this stuff. This was the most basic thing, and that has, since the 60s effectively evaporated, which is why I wrote my book and I wrote it hopefully for young people, not just for all adults, but specifically for younger people, but they're all kinds of folks like you working along similar lines because it seems to me you understand what I finally understood that if you have a citizenry that doesn't get this, America is over. No, you're absolutely right. You're absolutely right, Eric, and I think that's the whole purpose here. You said American education. We don't have an American education. We have a cultural Marxist indoctrination that is happening in our school system. I mean, the left started out at college and university campuses. Now's in high school and now is down to middle school and they're trying to get it down into elementary school. And so what we have to do is start retaking that back in our homes in our communities and our churches even. And I think that's what the whole purpose is with the patriot academy is to specifically look at our young people 16 to 25, but then also we have this constitutional coach program where we have 12,000 of these constitutional coaches across the country because we have got to get people more engaged and more involved.

Patriot Academy Texas Eric Benjamin Franklin America
James O'Keefe on Finding Moral Consensus in Journalism

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:06 min | 7 months ago

James O'Keefe on Finding Moral Consensus in Journalism

"But I'm sitting in the studio with James O'Keefe, founder of project veritas, who this minute in Thursday, on Thursday, is not here in New York with me, as you can see, but in Orlando at cpac. Kind of creepy, isn't it? But you and I, we were just talking about a lot of things, but you ended, I wanted to follow this line of thinking. You said people are looking for information. What do you mean exactly? I think you have a choice to make between coercion and informed consent. So I think our country, our country, was founded on this concept of informed consent. Newspapers are more important than government said Benjamin Franklin. Public opinion is everything said Abraham Lincoln. And I think right now we're so divided, which is I mean, what do we even agree on? What is the left even mean anymore? What is the right these ideas of division? So I'm trying to find moral consensus in journalism. I think journalism can provide a framework, real journalism. American muckraking because if you don't change hearts and minds and bring people together, you're going to have to use coercion

Project Veritas James O'keefe Orlando New York Benjamin Franklin Abraham Lincoln
James O'Keefe: People Choose Between Coercion & Informed Consent

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

James O'Keefe: People Choose Between Coercion & Informed Consent

"But you and I, we were just talking about a lot of things, but you ended, I wanted to follow this line of thinking. You said people are looking for information. What do you mean exactly? I think you have a choice to make between coercion and informed consent. So I think our country, our country, was founded on this concept of informed consent. Newspapers are more important than government said Benjamin Franklin. Public opinion is everything said Abraham Lincoln. And I think right now we're so divided, which is I mean, what do we even agree on? What is the left even mean anymore? What is the right these ideas of division? So I'm trying to find moral consensus in journalism. I think journalism can provide a framework, real journalism. American muckraking, because if you don't change hearts and minds and bring people together, you're going to have to use coercion to get them to do the things you want them to

Benjamin Franklin Abraham Lincoln
Brian Kilmeade on Latest Book About Lincoln: 'We're the Most Successful Multi-Racial Society'

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 11 months ago

Brian Kilmeade on Latest Book About Lincoln: 'We're the Most Successful Multi-Racial Society'

"But by the time he runs for election the guys in abolitionist by the time he runs for election he's seeing African Americans fight with tremendous valor in the Civil War I talk about this November on Sunday I know you own Sundays You own the weekends at Fox but at ten o'clock doing a special the president of freedom fighter And the he runs on the second inaugural on basically like an abolitionist And then he works with Douglas to make sure that the southern African Americans would have a shot at freedom and here's how to do it and they go in and they go in and list all these African Americans to get into the get into the war effort and fight for their own freedom 200,000 strong Now you look some early quotes at Lincoln He's cutting edge He's pushing society but today he'd be look at somebody that didn't think the races were equal He'd look at somebody that would be viewed maybe with racist racist views But in his day and to Douglas himself use anything but Benjamin Franklin had slaves he died in abolitionist in life we improve our little levels and big levels in life our country constantly improves The thing that makes us great is we keep trying to be perfect It's not that we're not great because we're perfect It's great because we try and these individuals rise up from obscurity and lead us whether it's Truman for some whether it's Reagan for others certainly grand for all it's these figures rise up for the most unexpected circumstances not perfect but man pretty special And I just think that's great about our country I mean we are the most successful multiracial society in the history of man And if you're caught up in today's headlines you don't realize it because we're not perfect but if you travel if you educate yourself if you go back in our history you will feel better about our country every day

Douglas FOX Benjamin Franklin Lincoln Truman Reagan
How the Post Office Grew America

Tracing The Path

02:10 min | 1 year ago

How the Post Office Grew America

"Story starts with the crown post post office of the british crown. The thirteen colonies were quite isolated and independent of each other. Few people had relatives or friends at the other colonies thus neither male nor good roads connecting them were important. Thirteen drivers freedom in how this letter was too many places to send it now. It's a different story in the beginning. The only real mail that was sent or received was to the uk but without a post office sending things and receiving them was problematic. The first colony to request to remedy for this problem was massachusetts bay on november fifth. Sixteen thirty nine. The general court of that colony directed that richard fairbanks has tavern would be where letters were delivered and picked up giving richard one cent for each letter. Managed in the new netherland. Coney the dutch west indies company. Who ran the colony made a similar determination. They constructed a box at the port for letters to be picked up and mailed but there was no general consensus or common interest among the colonies to take it any further and the only times. The problem came to a head as when the colonies faced a common emmy but had no roads or male to aid in their communication. It wasn't until the reign of william the third new england in sixteen ninety that any sort of postal system was established williams. Third had assessed. His call is which had now grown to two hundred thousand people and decided he wanted to have postal communication between massachusetts pennsylvania and new york. He had some roads built but didn't send money to do much more than that. But in seventeen fifty three all would change. Benjamin franklin became the postmaster for the crown post and philadelphia.

Crown Post Post Office Of The General Court Of That Colony Richard Fairbanks Massachusetts Bay West Indies UK Richard New England William Williams Massachusetts Pennsylvania New York Benjamin Franklin Crown Post Philadelphia
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Inquisikids Daily

Inquisikids Daily

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Inquisikids Daily

"Explore interesting facts about history science and more in five minutes or less. I'm luke and welcome to the podcast. Have you ever known a person who seemed to be good at everything today. We're talking about one of those people. He's one of the only american founding fathers to not service president benjamin franklin benjamin franklin even though he was never president ben franklin accomplished a lot. Ben franklin was born in boston massachusetts in seventeen o six. He was the youngest son in a family of seventeen children. His father joe cya was a soap and candle maker. Soap and candles were very important items to have but being a soap maker was not a highly respected job at the time. Joe cya wanted his sons to do better. He wanted ben to be a preacher so he sent ben to school to learn to read and write as it turned out. Ben only went to school for two years. He was apprenticed to his older brother to learn to be a printer. When that didn't work out. Ben ran away and ended up in philadelphia. Living and working in philadelphia. Ben was busy. He was a printer of course but he did. Lots of other things to for instance. Ben franklin led the philadelphia militia against the french in the french and indian war. A militia is a group of local men who volunteered to serve in war. Ben wasn't trained to be in the army but he was very good at organizing and leading people after the french and indian war. Ben was sent to england to argue in parliament against the stamp act. This was a law that forced the american colonists to pay taxes on printed materials like documents and newspapers as a printer. Ben didn't want these items taxed of course that just made them more expensive and hurt his business. Parliament is the governing body that makes the laws in england like congress in the united states then argued for the stamp act to be repealed or cancelled. The good news was that the act was repealed. The bad news is that the colonists were frustrated and this led to the american revolution. Ben franklin was a loyalist. He didn't think the american colonists should break away from england. He argued against it but once he saw that there was no other choice. He went to france to ask the french to help the colonists of course we know now that the french did help and the colonists did break away from england. Ben franklin helped form the new country that those colonists formed the united states of america. He invented an odometer that let him know how far he traveled and he marked the roads on every mile. Now everyone knew where places were along the road and how far apart different places were. Of course ben. Franklin invented more than just the odometer he invented by focal lenses for eyeglasses. By taking the top half of one prescription lens and the bottom half of a different lens that way when you look up to see something far away you look down to read something close up. You don't need to change your eyeglasses. I this was a huge convenience and many people still use bifocals. Today ben franklin also invented the lightning rod every time lightning struck wooden house in philadelphia. It caught fire and burned to the ground and sometimes it other nearby houses on fire to ben knew from his famous kite experiment. That lightning is attracted to metal so he attached a metal rod to the top of a building and he ran a metal wire from the ride down into the ground. If lightning struck the house it would be more attracted to the metal rod than the wooden house and the electricity would run down the rod down the wire and into the ground. Leaving the house unburned pretty soon. Everyone wanted a lightning ride. Ben also invented the franklin stove. Everyone in his day had fireplaces in their homes but lots of heat from the fire went straight up the chimney and that left people shivering. He built a cast iron box to set in the fireplace. He built his fire inside the box. The iron box didn't burn of course but it did heat up. He radiated from all sides of the box into the room. It was so much more efficient than a plain old fashioned fireplace. Then invented several other useful things and did good deeds philadelphia. He helped found the school that became the university of pennsylvania and he started the first book lending library. I am a big fan of libraries and library books. So i'm very grateful to ben franklin..

ben franklin Ben philadelphia benjamin franklin benjamin fra joe cya Joe cya ben england parliament luke massachusetts united states of america boston army congress france Franklin university of pennsylvania
Benjamin Franklin Sends a Message to France With His Outfit

Now & Then

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Benjamin Franklin Sends a Message to France With His Outfit

"Is sent during the revolution he sent in seventeen seventy six to try and get french aid for the revolution which was desperately needed so he sent with a commission and before when he had got to francis he'd been there before he had dressed as a french gentleman. He writes to friend actually a female friend and says they basically in six days in france or quote him here my taylor and peru ta had transforming into a frenchman. Only what a figure. I make in a little bag and with naked ears. They told me. I was become twenty years. Younger look very gallant. So he's made into a frenchman. But now seventeen seventy six heat goes back at. Something is very different. He's dresses himself deliberately very different to send a message as he says later in a letter actually to another woman friend which is i was gonna say slip in those in there. I just noticed for the first time. He dresses in very plain clothes. Which i suppose would have been typical of a quaker in the period. He just has his own hair down street. And he's wearing a very prominent for hat which i'll bet a lot of people listening have probably in one way or another seen that image because becomes so famous and franklin wrote think how this must appear among the powdered heads of paris. I wish every gentleman and lady in france would only be so obliging is to follow my fashion cone. Their own heads as i do mine. Dismiss their frontiers. There again. kind of hairdresser and pay me half the money. They paid to them so he comes there. As the sort of plane dressed person no frill to his hair and this big for cap on his head and the french obviously notice it. It's meant to be noticed. And they say things like you. The contrast the contrast between as one noble onlooker in france puts it the contrast between the luxury of our capital of the elegance of our fashions the magnificence of versailles and the still brilliant remains of the monarchic bride of louis the fourteenth and the almost rustic apparel the powdered hair. The plane but firm demeanor the free and direct language of the

France Francis Peru Taylor Franklin Paris
Marxists Smear Our Great Revolutionaries, When Marxists Have Contributed Nothing to Society

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Marxists Smear Our Great Revolutionaries, When Marxists Have Contributed Nothing to Society

"They're mostly reprobates who hate the country in which they live. Have contributed nothing. So it's betterment. Indeed, they live off the sweat and toil of others while they pursue a destructive and diabolical course for our nation. Undermining and sabotaging virtually every institution in our society. Their ideology and worldview are based on the arguments and beliefs of a man Karl Marx, whose writings are responsible. The enslavement, impoverishment, torture and death of untold millions. This is a hard fact. Despite the predictable protestations from some in our society. Embrace an advanced Marxism score ideas. Attempt to disassociate themselves from responsibility for its inevitable outcomes. These are the useful idiots who occupy influential or leadership positions in the Democratic Party, media, academia, the culture and etcetera and I might add. Many in the Republican Party. But we must take solace and find strength in the sacrifice and bravery of our early revolutionaries. Joseph Warren. Samuel Adams. John Hancock. Paul Revere. Thomas Paine, to name a few. And become energized and spirited by the wisdom and genius of George Washington. Thomas Jefferson. John Adams. James Madison. Benjamin Franklin. And many others. Well. They have been smeared and degraded by American Marxists and their ilk. We continue to celebrate them be invigorated by them. And remember that together they defeated The most powerful military force on Earth. And found the greatest and most extraordinary nation in the history of

Karl Marx Joseph Warren Democratic Party Samuel Adams Republican Party John Hancock Paul Revere Thomas Paine John Adams James Madison Thomas Jefferson George Washington Benjamin Franklin
We Must Find the Strength of Our Early Revolutionaries: Hancock, Revere, Paine, and More

Mark Levin

01:46 min | 1 year ago

We Must Find the Strength of Our Early Revolutionaries: Hancock, Revere, Paine, and More

"Indeed, they live off the sweat and toil of others. While they pursue a destructive and diabolical course for our nation. Undermining and sabotaging virtually every institution in our society. Their ideology and worldview are based on the arguments and beliefs of a man Karl Marx. His writings are responsible for the enslavement, impoverishment, torture and death of untold millions. This is a hard fact. Despite the predictable protestations from some in our society. Embracing advanced Marxism, Marxism score ideas. An attempt to disassociate themselves from responsibility for its inevitable outcomes. Bear with me. I'm reading with one eye. These are the useful idiot to occupy. And influence our leadership positions in the Democratic Party media academia in the culture. But we must take solace. Find strength in the sacrifice and bravery of our early revolutionaries. Joseph Warren Samuel Adams. John Hancock, Paul Revere, Thomas Paine. To name a few. Become energized and in spirited by the wisdom and genius of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson. John Adams, James Madison. Benjamin Franklin and many others. Well, they have smeared and degraded. While they have been smeared and degraded by American Marxists and their ilk. We must continue to celebrate them be invigorated by them. And remember that together they defeated the most powerful military force on Earth. Founded the greatest and most extraordinary nation in the history of mankind.

Karl Marx Joseph Warren Samuel Adams Democratic Party John Hancock Paul Revere Thomas Paine John Adams James Madison Thomas Jefferson George Washington Benjamin Franklin
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on We The People

We The People

08:54 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on We The People

"This was a much bigger deal because for the most part the constitution stayed away from telling individuals in their daily lives within the states. What they could do so congress wasn't gonna pass laws for example against murder. No that was a state consideration. And congress wasn't gonna tell the states whether women could vote or not congress couldn't establish or establish churches within the states that was for the states to deal with so there were a few people given them morrison's one in in various others who did bring up the issue of slavery the constitution convention but there was nothing like a consensus that said this is really our business but secondly there was an understanding. If we tell georgia if we tell virginia that you have to get rid of your slaves. Almost nobody is going to sign this new convention. I mean this new constitutions can go on because even if people in massachusetts riposte to slavery they realized that if this new congress has power to tell states what they can do on this subject they can tell us to disestablish the you know the congregational church or whatever it might be and this was not something that this new constitution was supposed to do. And so i would say that. The the question of slavery at the convention was last A compromise over the principle of slavery or not within republic as simply ns knowledge that. That's not actually within our purview. We're going to have to deal with that another way. In fact franklin believed jefferson believed. That people are going to have to be persuaded that it has their own self interest to get rid of slavery and all right after do it state by state. But this isn't something we can do in seventeen eighty seven this constitutional convention. And if we do this thing will never get ratified well. It is time for closing thoughts in this superb discussion. Both of you have talked about how meaningful it is to read franklin final speech at the convention. I'm going to have the pleasure of just reading one sentence from it and ask you for your final reflections on it so much in the spirit of the thirteenth of the virtues that he had recommended as a young man imitate jesus and socrates. This speech is full of the virtue of intellectual humility. Franklin begins by saying having lived long. I've experienced many instances of being obliged by better information or further consideration to change opinions even on important subjects which i once thought right but found to be otherwise it is there for that. The older i grow the more apt. I am to doubt my own judgment and to pay more respect to the judgment of others at your final thoughts on. Franklin's frontal speech. I think franklin's final speech was actually motivated by the fact that the other potential anti-federalists the the left wing as it were Gerry and mason and an randolph had broken and wooden saw. He wanted to get everyone to sign on at least to say that They backed the constitution and when those people broke off and you had other people leave. You had the new york delegation lead. You had Luther lead from from maryland. He was afraid that he was gonna lose it on the left they anti-federal side and this was an appeal to try to bring them back to bring them back on board. He was the one person who who wanted these changes that the on the presidency. And maybe the bill of rights that the stayed with and that he pushed it and i think what he was trying to do was to and his speech was published remembered. The convention would supposed to be secret and the one thing that leaks out and is published immediately as this one speech so this was an appeal to try to bring this country together to because he wasn't going to be around for another convention to weaken the anti federalists to br- to bring in that side. And that's what. He was appealing to if this ichi recognized that these problems and then on the slavery when i said he compromise too much slavery that was going to be an issue it was a big issue in states like massachusetts the compromises otherwise were not so much we're going to allow slavery in the states but the fugitive slave provisions The three fifths compromise those were big pill for for the northern states to swallow the power that gave tip to to slavery to entrenching slavery. Specially those and the limitations. You can't end the slave trade because there was almost universal. Consensus is bilas. Said that the slow at least a winning slave trade that hellish atlantic slave trade in taking slaves away from from their parents in african throwing them in these awful ships and bring that should be ended. And yet they those three things those are compromises on slavery that may be more than with needed and those were going to be issues and so this was an appeal to bring people together to yet this over the final hurdle and on that. I think this speech was absolutely critical. Because when you when you look at what appeared in the newspapers when the can when the constitution came out they printed the constitution they premise. Washington's cover letter to congress which is washington's appeal for passage actually was written by morris but it was signed by washington. It was very effective and you had franklin speeches so when the people of america saw the constitution they saw it looked to them like the product of washington and franklin washington's cover. Letter franklin's closing speech and the constitution and those were the two big names and the two people who respected some sort of an ideological difference center right center left on it was on that force and the speech was central to that it is a magnificent speech that the crafting of every word is perfect. I urge all of people listening this pulling out and read it absolutely. Yes indeed we the people listeners. Please read. Franklin's closing speech as ed suggests an ed you're suggesting that franklin's closing speech and washington's cover letter were the main thing that folks knew about the convention making his influence and that of washington all the more central so that franklin's final words are i cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the convention who may still have objections to it would with me on this occasion doubt a little of his own infallibility and to make manifest our unanimity. Put his name to this instrument. Bill your final thoughts on franklin's closing speech and his contributions to the convention as with many things that franklin said and wrote he in this case was speaking not only for the moment but for the ages the moment was can we get the convention all to get behind this thing that we have produced and send it out as a united front to the states. So they can make a decision upon it but what he was also saying was republics. Only gonna work if we have this sense of humility if we have this understanding. None of us is omnipotent. None of us has all the answers so this is something had. Every generation can read and basically apply it to their own views of politics if if lawmakers today would read every morning when they got up. I think we'd all be better off for a republic will only work if we have this sense of humility beautifully. Put thank you so much. Ed larsen and h w brands for a wonderful discussion of franklin and his contribution to the convention dear people friends in addition to reading. Franklin's final speech. Please treat yourself to the learning and light of reading at larson's franklin in washington and the founding partnership and h w brands the first american the life and times of benjamin franklin. Ed larson h.w browns. Thank you so much for joining. Thank you so much has been an honor to be with bill. That's always a treat and did anything with 'institutions center. Thank you jeff. It was my pleasure. Jeff and ed thank you very much and jeff and the constitution center. Keep up the terrific work. Today's show was produced by jackie. Mcdermott and engineered.

franklin congress Franklin washington massachusetts bilas morrison jefferson georgia ichi virginia randolph Gerry mason Luther maryland new york morris Washington
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on We The People

We The People

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on We The People

"They're appointed by the state legislatures but for terms long terms and he figured that would make them independent think nationally. They would live off in this rather than living in their states. And the adding god's go back to work political power with six years they would move to this new federal city that they were going to create member. The constitution also called for creating federal city and some new place and they would have these terms and suddenly they'd be more interested in the central government. They were the government so they threw a wrinkle into this connecticut compromise but franklin was central absolutely central to the entire process and he actually worked very closely with governor morris. He'd often gib- when he couldn't give a speech he'd pass it on. Either gouverneur morris or wilson to read for him at the convention. So this was this was You know this was in so many ways. I view this as more his compromise than the connecticut compromise bill. You quote the language that franklin offered to the convention that the legislature of the several states choose and send an equal number of delegates namely and then he fill in the blank became too of course who are to compose the second branch of the general legislature. And you say. Franklin's motion became the basis for the grand compromise that saved the convention and made the constitution possible. Just so i on our listeners. Understand who actually came up with the idea of franklin or or sherman or or someone else and exactly. What was franklin's role and tell us more about how that related to serve pragmatic compromising vision. We'll possibly. It has more insight on this than i do but i find it impossible to tell exactly where this originated. These were people who were gathering daily to discuss this stuff and they were gathered at that was in convention hall and then they were meeting outside and they were speaking to one another and the this idea of turned up to senators from each state was just in effect of variant of what worked at the didn't work in the confederation congress where each state got one vote so you could make it one you could make it to attend but the key is that you make it an equal number and so the idea was in the air. I can't say that. Franklin was i come up with sherman whoever it might have been but it was one. That was pretty obvious. Once it was articulated. And i'd like to add something here that i think contributes to franklin national view of all of this franklin of course was born in massachusetts but then he spent most of his young adult life in philadelphia but then he spent much of the latter part of his adult life overseas in britain for nearly twenty years and then in france for the better part of the american revolution. And it's i think an experience that lots of people have had that when you get out of the united states us tend to think sort of more as an american rather than a resident of texas or california wherever you might be and so franklin was only well. They've made extreme version of this is the astronauts who went to the moon and look back now. I'm an earthling now. I'm a part of the human race. Rather than just an american and so franklin have had been thinking of the united states this united states sort of looking from the national view and it came to him more naturally than it did to people like washington who never left the united states like virginia. I'm doug jefferson who was virginian through and through and they adams's were massachusetts men and so it was. It was easier for franken to see things in these national terms now. It sort of came naturally to him in and supporters at points out for the idea that representation should be by population rather than by state because he was from one of the biggest states and so it would benefit pennsylvania. but i think he wasn't thinking in pennsylvania terms he was he had the ability to think nationally and think sort of where all this would lead and he really was a of a belief that republican principles mean that people should be represented more or less equally and i won't say that he thought of the the divisions between the state's artificial divisions but he thought if it is indeed a national republic rather than simply a confederation because that's what they had and that simply confederation that hadn't worked so they need to do something else they may need to make this a national government so it came naturally to him but at the same time he understood that this simply isn't gonna fly although agreement was made at the beginning of the constitutional convention that we're not simply going to propose amendments to the existing articles confederation. We're gonna start over again. There's still an understanding that this thing is going to have to be ratified state by state. And if we leave all of their rhode island's in the delaware's you know out of this then we're not gonna get sufficient consensus to make this thing fly so we have to bring them on board. There was something else as well. And this is reflected in franklin's closing speech where he says this isn't a perfect constitution but it's the best we can do at the moment and franklin was enough of a pragmatist and enough of a a believer in human nature that you never get anything perfect you never get anything right for all time and franken look back on his own life and that of washington the next oldest in the convention and the younger man. No we've done a lot. We have won independence or the united states we got we won our war against britain and our setting up this government. And so okay. We didn't get it off done week. Leave something for the next generation. So we'll do what we can with this. And if their problems with this next generation or the generation after that you fix it it'll be your job to do in the future before we close by digging into the closing speech. Let's just review. Franklin's final contributions to the convention. You bill note that he advocated requiring not one but two witnesses to the same overt act of treason which would become crucial in the treason trial of aaron burr. He's second emotion calling for an executive council to assist the president and he acquiesced although it didn't take the lead in the infamous compromises over slavery. Ed what can you tell us about. Franklin's contributions to the debates over slavery and the other contributions think that we haven't discussed. I agree with bill On this is to emphasize In you're going into those slavery compromises And here we have to work with some of his letters and some of his comments and we have to sort of piece together what he was thinking..

franklin governor morris general legislature Franklin sherman united states doug jefferson massachusetts franken legislature connecticut wilson pennsylvania britain congress philadelphia washington france adams texas
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on We The People

We The People

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on We The People

"I'm jeffrey rosen. President and ceo of the national constitution center and welcomed the we the people a weekly show of constitutional debate. national constitution center is a nonpartisan. Nonprofit chartered by congress to increase awareness and understanding of the constitution among the american people. During the summer of seventeen eighty seven constitutional convention was well underway. And today we discuss benjamin franklin and the constitution franklin the first american in the words of our two great franklin historians today played a central role at the constitutional convention. A often underappreciated. And it's such an honor to discuss. Franklin's contribution to the constitution with two of america's greatest historians of franklin and two of the authors grace books written about franklin which. I'm so excited to share with we. The people listeners. Ed larson holds the high end hazel. Darling chair in law and his university professor of history at pepperdine university. He is the author of franklin washington. The founding partnership edit is wonderful to have you on the show thank you. Your center is a national treasure. Thank you so much for that. And h w brands is professor and jack s blanton senior chair in history at the university of texas austin. He is the author of the first american. The life and times of benjamin franklin which was a finalist for the poetry prize in history. It's such an honor to have you as well jeff. I'm delighted to be with you. And ed and i look forward to a good conversation. I've learned so much from both of your books. Franklin in washington and the first americans. I want the people listeners to learn from them as well. And i'll just begin by asking you to sum up franklin's contribution to the constitutional convention ed what would you say. Franklin's contributions work well. Franklin was the host. He was the governor or president was exact title of pennsylvania so he was the host of the event and a wonderful host often with meetings at his home inviting people over. He lived only a couple blocks away from where they met and he could meet with them under his mulberry tree or up in his new new he just added a wing to his house. That was lovely and so in that sense. He contributed in unsure. Bill has much more to say about that His book just captured that so beautifully i also would say though that he had a vision for a federal union and Certain powers that needed to be with the central government. I mean a federal union was something news or no and it goes all the way back to his albany plan so it goes back years fifteen years. And he's had this consistent view that central government needed certain powers which included control over interstate and international commerce so he could grow the economic pie. He had that vision because he had print shops. All over the colonies. Any knew they needed to break down these these barriers because each state was essentially a separate economic union. Also power to deal with native americans to deal with the open. The frontier over things about military power over international power so our ambassadors could have effective control and the to tax and spend for the general welfare and those are important powers and they didn't exist under the old articles of confederation and he knew those were needed so he brought that vision he brought the sense of compromises. And i'm sure we'll talk about how the leader in working the compromises and finally he was one of the to truly national figures with along with george washington and for my study of the ratification process. It would not have been ratified without his committed support and critically. He represented distinctly different ideology. George washington i would say would be some viewed as somewhat right of centre. Franklin is you'd have left of center and he was about the only trustworthy person who might have become an annual anti-federalist who didn't and his support of constitution as reflected in his closing speech which was published the only the only thing from the convention that was published at the time published nationwide. That was critical for ratification. Thank you so much for that. You've emphasized franklin's commitment to union to compromise the fact that he was a nationalist who has left of center. And your wonderful book you call him along with washington and enlightenment. Pragmatist who sense of compromise was crucial to the fact. That convention was passed. Bill as ed says your book so beautifully brings us to philadelphia gives us a sense of what the streets felton smelled like and how franken was walking near a tell tell us about the role. He played his host and also the crucial role of his temperament in making the constitution possible. Sure i'd be happy to. But i actually. I want to build on what ed said about. Franklin's vision i think. This is absolutely critical. Because franklin was he had been a reluctant revolutionary franklin had been a great fan of the british empire and he had hoped that the british empire could become enlightened enough that it would find room for a growing america and that america and britain could become the twin pillars of this atlantic spanning empire and he was grievously disappointed when british officials to his way of thinking. Were too short sighted to be able to embrace this. So franklin had seen the american colonies now the united states grow from very little in the early eighteenth century he was by far the oldest delhi to the the constitutional convention and so he had seen in his lifetime. The growth of this and he assumed that it would continue to grow and so he understood the need for and the potential in this federal union. That they were putting together that philadelphia because there had to be room for growth. There had to be room for new state to enter this thing so there had to be accommodation for what was going to happen. Not just next year next decade but the next century he had lived most of a century himself. The other thing he brought you refer to this. This franken brought a a certain temperament to the proceedings at philadelphia. The the driving spirits were ambitious. Young men like james madison and alexander. Hamilton they had much of their political futures ahead of them. Franklin's political career was behind him. He knew this his his life. Most of his life was behind. He knew this was sort of his swansong and so he wanted to remind the delegates at things. Don't turn out as you expect. So you have to make accommodations for that that in the real world as opposed to the world of your ambitions or.

franklin Franklin national constitution center jeffrey rosen benjamin franklin Ed larson franklin washington jack s blanton university of texas austin pepperdine university ed america george washington washington congress central government Bill jeff albany pennsylvania
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"All over reese. The flaming alcohol scolded him with severe burns. Reese was badly hurt. Sadly he died two days later. Once authorities learned how reset died they charge the masonic pranksters with manslaughter. The philadelphia freemasons immediately distance themselves from the case claiming. They had nothing to do with the fake and inhumane rituals franklin even testified for the prosecution. He confessed that he'd laughed about the murderers joke but denied any other involvement in rhesus homicide. Ultimately only one of the men was penalized for the crime. His sentence to be branded on his hand it appeared. The courts weren't interested in bringing justice theresa's killers but the general public was a lot less forgiving soon after the trial rumors swirled suggesting that franklin had intentionally befriended res manipulated him in egged him onto his death. Franklin tried to defend himself in the gazette saying he detested abuse but that was a hard sell specially since he'd already admitted under oath that he thought the hazing was funny with few sympathetic years. Franklin leaned into his friendships with pennsylvania's wealthy and influential who apparently considered the scandal a minor affair seemingly not even murder could color their impression of the friendly successful businessman. Franklin continued to make friends win.

reese franklin Reese philadelphia theresa Franklin res pennsylvania
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Franklin carved himself a reputation as a distinguished gentlemen now only needed was a wife to keep him honest and add to his wholesome image but franklin kept getting in his own way the more commercial success he saw the harder it was for him to follow his own plan for future conduct before long he backslid into old habits like sleeping with women from lower social classes who he considered unsuitable for marriage. Franklin's seemed well aware of his own hypocrisy even while he slept around. He wrote about his disdain for quote low women and quote he complained. They were expensive arm. Candy and they'd become inconvenient when they got pregnant in other words franklin wrote a lot about relationships but he wasn't all that invested in monogamy or marriage which makes it pretty astonishing that in seventeen thirty franklin somehow reconciled with his former fiancee deborah. It's not clear if they actually fell back in love or if they're a union was for some other reason. It may have been that. Franklin wanted a way to help shore up his reputation because he was about to become a father soon after he reunited with. Deborah franklin's illegitimate child. William was born. The mother's identity never became public knowledge. But she probably wasn't deborah. It's hard to say for sure because deborah and franklin had a complicated relationship. They lived as though they were married. Which wasn't exactly true after their first broken engagement. Deborah had wed another man who ran away to the west indies never filed for divorce since bigamy was illegal. The franklin's kept quiet about deborah's past nonetheless. Rumors began to fly about their marriage and their alleged son. It didn't take long for people to realize that william was too old to have been conceived before franklin endeavors alleged wedding and complicating matters. Even further franklin refused to say.

franklin Franklin deborah Deborah franklin William west indies william
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Late summer seventeen sixty five pennsylvania colony an angry mob lumber towards market street wielding pitchforks and torches. They were on their way to burn down. Benjamin franklin's house. The pennsylvanians were furious that franklin had supported the british empire's stamp act. The policy imposed even more unpopular taxes on the american colonies as the streets rang with chance of no taxation without representation. A family friend urged. Franklin's wife deborah to flee but debra refused to run even as the mob surrounded her home instead. She begged her cousin to come over and to bring his guns. Not only did he arrive as asked. He brought other armed defenders with him. They successfully scare the mob away before it could hurt anybody deborah. Her cousin and his friends all proved their bravery that day. But obviously one key person was missing benjamin. Franklin the statesman hadn't been there to protect his home or loved ones because he was in london with his second family. The threat against deborah wasn't enough to bring franklin back to the states nor were the growing rumblings of an american revolution. In fact he spent much of his political career supporting england in just as he betrayed his wife for a british partner. Benjamin franklin may have also been a traitor to the united states. Welcome to conspiracy theories a spotify original from par cast. Every monday and wednesday we dig into the complicated stories behind the world's most controversial events in search for the truth. I'm carter roy and i'm molly brandenburg and neither of us are conspiracy theorists but we are open minded skeptical and curious. Don't get us.

debra Benjamin franklin franklin Franklin pennsylvania benjamin london england carter roy molly brandenburg united states
Finding Europe in America

Travel with Rick Steves

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Finding Europe in America

"Says you have to actually go to europe to taste of the old world after all many american and canadian cities and towns were settled by european immigrants. Sometimes they tried to recreate a bit of what the new from the old country. Even if we can't go to europe we can discover benefit prayed here. In our hemisphere samantha. Brown hosts public television travel series places to love where she films from destinations. Both around the world in closer to home. She joins us today on travel. With rick steves to look at some of her favorite places to find a bit of europe. In america samantha. Thanks for joining us. Pleasure to be here rank. Boy know all i do is go to europe again and again and again but i really. There's a lot of europe hiding out here in the united states during covid lockdown times so we can't travel overseas like we'd like to but we can find little knockoffs here in the united states from all around the globe knockoffs because some of them are terrific kind of constructions and others are honest to goodness immigrant communities. That are still the way they were hundred and fifty years ago when they were there were settled just in my state washington. We've got leavenworth which is a famous little german. It's kind of a touristy. Gimmick but poulsbo is originally a norwegian town and its norwegian to this day and we have linden up by the canadian border which is a very dutch was settled by holland immigrants. What are your favorite slices of europe in america. Well one of my favorites is a city that i had gone to my entire life. My family Was brought up right outside of it and then after doing two years of europe came back to and it just hit me like a ton of bricks that this was a european city and that is philadelphia pennsylvania. It is by far the most for me. The most year of paean city in the united states and so then i started like do a deep dive like why is it so it was just a feeling i had like. Wow i just feel like. I'm in europe. And there were so many connections One of the main architects was an emigrant from leon france. He designed the ben. Franklin benjamin franklin parkway which is now. We're all the museums are lined. And he designed that off of the sean z z. and along this beautiful roadway parkway where they're abuse. There's the rodin museum. there's the philadelphia museum of art. Which has the largest collection of renoir in the world. Incredible and others rittenhouse square. They're all these not just pockets. Because i think you know there's places we'll talk about today the have pockets but this is a city that is just so of france and the best connection that i love about philadelphia is that it is also it has the most mural arts i think in the world and its sister city is leon so if you ever go to leeann france and the kuala rouge is where you see those phenomenal murals and that art that is available to all end. It's all over the city. That's what the to share so the city a definite of brotherly love is a great. If you want that. European and more specifically french you know kick

Europe America Samantha Rick Steves Poulsbo Franklin Benjamin Franklin Par Brown Linden Holland Philadelphia France Washington Rodin Museum Pennsylvania Philadelphia Museum Of Art Rittenhouse Square Kuala Rouge Leon
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Few were the readers at that time in philadelphia and the majority of us. Poor that i was not able with great industry to find more than fifty persons mostly young tradesman willing to pay down for this purpose forty shillings each and ten shillings per annum. On this little fund we began. The books were imported. The library was opened one day in the week for lending to the subscribers of their promissory notes to pay double the value of not duly returned the institutions soon manifested at utility was imitated by other towns in other provinces. The libraries were by donations. Reading became fashionable and our people have no public amusements to divert. Their attention from study became better acquainted with books and in a few years were observed by strangers to be better instructed and more intelligent than people of the same rank generally are in other countries when we were about to sign the above mentioned articles which were to be binding on us our heirs etc for fifty years. Mr brockton scrivener said to us. You are young men but it is scarcely probable than any of you will live to see the expiration of the term fixed in the instrument. A number of us however are yet living but the instrument was after a few years rendered no by a charter that incorporated gave perpetuity to the company the objections and reluctancy i met with in soliciting subscriptions made me soon feel the impropriety of presenting oneself as the proposer of any useful project. That might be supposed to raise one's reputation in the smallest degree above that of one's neighbors when one has need of their assistance to accomplish the project. I therefore put myself as much as i could out of sight and stated it is a scheme of a number of friends who requested me to go about and propose it to such as they thought lovers of reading in this way my affair went on more smoothly and i ever after practiced it on such occasions and for my frequent successes can heartily recommend it..

fifty years brockton philadelphia more than fifty persons one day forty shillings each double ten shillings per annum Few friends few years
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"The autobiography of benjamin franklin by benjamin franklin but this affair having turned my thoughts to marriage i looked round me and made overtures acquaintance and other places but soon found that the business of a printer being generally thought a poor one. I was not to expect money with a wife and less with such a one as i should not. Otherwise think agreeable. A friendly correspondence says neighbors and old acquaintances had continued between me. And mrs read's family who all had a regard for me from the time of my first lodging in their house. I was often invited there and consulted in their affairs wherein i sometimes was of surface..

benjamin franklin first
No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

"The minute with kevin mason. I've never considered myself a lucky person. Everything i've gotten. I've worked hard for and that's where the mantra of no pain. No gain comes in. I was thinking about that the other day. I've never had anything just handed to me. Not that lucky. But i was wondering to myself. Where does this phrase no pain. No gain come from so of course. I decided to look into it most famous in the nineteen eighties. It became an exercise. Mantra thanks to jane. Fonda used to always talk about no pain no gain energy and fonda tapes but of course it actually predates that it goes back to the second century in hebrew literature. In fact benjamin. Franklin talked about no pain no gain his way of saying it in poor. Richard's almanac there are no gains without pains and there some days. That's frustrating by the way today happens to be one of those days just had one of those two steps forward three steps back kind of weeks. It's not a bad thing. It just frustrating. Can i get something. I probably don't deserve just because i deserve it. Just ask it.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Franklin Nineteen Eighties Jane Today Two Steps Richard Hebrew Fonda ONE Three Steps Second Century Benjamin
No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

"The minute with kevin mason. I've never considered myself a lucky person. Everything i've gotten. I've worked hard for and that's where the mantra of no pain. No gain comes in. I was thinking about that the other day. I've never had anything just handed to me. Not that lucky. But i was wondering to myself. Where does this phrase no pain. No gain come from so of course. I decided to look into it most famous in the nineteen eighties. It became an exercise. Mantra thanks to jane. Fonda used to always talk about no pain no gain energy and fonda tapes but of course it actually predates that it goes back to the second century in hebrew literature. In fact benjamin. Franklin talked about no pain no gain his way of saying it in poor. Richard's almanac there are no gains without pains and there some days. That's frustrating by the way today happens to be one of those days just had one of those two steps forward three steps back kind of weeks. It's not a bad thing. It just frustrating. Can i get something. I probably don't deserve just because i deserve it. Just ask it.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Fonda Jane Benjamin Franklin Richard
No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

"The minute with kevin mason. I've never considered myself a lucky person. Everything i've gotten. I've worked hard for and that's where the mantra of no pain. No gain comes in. I was thinking about that the other day. I've never had anything just handed to me. Not that lucky. But i was wondering to myself. Where does this phrase no pain. No gain come from so of course. I decided to look into it most famous in the nineteen eighties. It became an exercise. Mantra thanks to jane. Fonda used to always talk about no pain no gain energy and fonda tapes but of course it actually predates that it goes back to the second century in hebrew literature. In fact benjamin. Franklin talked about no pain no gain his way of saying it in poor. Richard's almanac there are no gains without pains and there some days. That's frustrating by the way today happens to be one of those days just had one of those two steps forward three steps back kind of weeks. It's not a bad thing. It just frustrating. Can i get something. I probably don't deserve just because i deserve it. Just ask it.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Franklin Nineteen Eighties Jane Today Two Steps Richard Hebrew Fonda ONE Three Steps Second Century Benjamin
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"He liked to have as often as he could. Some sensible friend or neighbor to converse with and always took care to start some ingenious or useful topic for discourse which might tend to improve the minds of his children by this means. He turned our attention to what was good. Just and prudent in the conduct of life and little or no notice was ever taken of what related to the visuals on the table whether it was well or ill dressed in or out of season of good or bad flavor preferable or inferior to this or that other thing of the kind so that i was brought up in such a perfect in attention to those matters as to be quite indifferent. What kind of food was set before me and so unobservant about it. That to this day if i am asked i can scarce tell a few hours after dinner. What i dined upon this has been a convenience to be traveling or my companions have been sometimes unhappy for want of a suitable gratification of their more delicate because better instructed tastes and appetites. My mother had likewise an excellent constitution. She suckled on her ten children. I never knew either. My father or mother to have any sickness but that of which they died he at eighty nine and she at eighty five years of age. They library together at boston. Where i some years since placed a marble over their grave with this inscription. Footnote this marble having decayed the citizens of boston in eighteen. Twenty seven erected in its place a granite obelisk twenty one feet high burying the original inscription quoted in the text and another explaining the erection of the monument quote. Joe cya franklin and abaya. His wife live here interred. They lived lovingly together in wedlock fifty five years without an estate or any gainful employment constant labor and industry with god's blessing they maintained a large family comfortably and brought up thirteen children and seven grandchildren. Reputable from this instance reader be encouraged to diligence in thy calling and distrust not providence. He was a pious and prudent man. She a discrete and virtuous woman their youngest son in feel you'll regard to their memory places this stone j. f. born sixteen fifty five died. Seventeen forty four at eighty nine af born sixteen. Sixty seven died. Seventeen fifty to eighty five by my rambling..

seven ten children fifty five years Twenty seven eighty five years sixteen twenty one feet eighty nine Sixty seven Seventeen fifty eighty five eighteen fifty five thirteen children boston Joe cya franklin Seventeen forty four abaya
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Mold and the moles were cast candles attending the shop going ahrens et cetera. I disliked the trade and had a strong inclination for the sea but my father declared against it however living near the water i was much in and about it. Learnt early swim well and to manage boats and when in a boat or canoe with other boys i was commonly allowed to govern especially in any case of difficulty and upon other occasions i was generally a leader among the boys and sometimes lead them into scrapes of which i will mention one instance as it shows and early projecting public spirit though not then just like conducted. There was a salt march that bounded part of the mill pond on the edge of which at high water. We used to stand to fish for minnows by much trampling. We had made it a mere quagmire. My proposal was to build a warf their fit for us to stand upon. And i showed my comrades a large heap of stones which were intended for a new house near the marsh and which would very well suit our purpose accordingly in the evening when the workmen were gone. I assembled a number of my play fellows and working with dull gently like so many emmett's sometimes two or three to a stone. We brought them all away and built our little wharf the next morning. The workmen were surprised at missing the stones which were found in our wharf inquiry was made after the removers. We were discovered and complained of several of us. Were corrected by our fathers. And though i pleaded the usefulness of the work and convinced me that nothing was useful which was not honest. I think to know something of his person and character. He had an excellent constitution of body was a middle stature but well-set that very strong he was ingenious could draw prettily was skilled in music and had a clear pleasing voice so that when he played some tunes on his file in and sung with all as he sometimes did in the evening after the business of the day was over it was agreeable to hear he had a mechanical genius to and on occasion was very handy in the use of other tradesmen's to but his great aunt's lay and a sound understanding and solid judgment in a prudential matters both in private and public affairs in the latter. Indeed he was never employed the numerous family he had to educate and the straightness of his circumstances keeping him close to his trade. But i remember well. His being frequently visited by leading people who consulted him for his opinion and affairs of the town or of the church she belonged to and showed a good deal of respect for his judgment and advice. He was also much consulted by private persons about their affairs. When any difficulty occurred and frequently chosen an arbitrator between contending parties at his table..

two three next morning one instance both a stone
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"My denial of it will be believed by nobody. Perhaps i shall a good deal gratify my own vanity indeed is scarce ever heard or saw the introductory words without manatee i as et cetera. But some vein thing immediately followed. Most people dislike manatee and others. Oh whatever share. They have a themselves. But i give it fair quarter wherever i meet with it. Being persuaded that it is often productive of to the possessor and two others that are within his fear of action and therefore in many cases it would not be altogether absurd if a man were to thank god for his vanity among the other comforts of life. Footnote in. this connection. Woodrow wilson says and yet these surprising and delightful thing about this book. The autobiography is that. Take it all in all. It has not the low tone of conceit but is a staunch man's sober and unaffected assessment of himself and the circumstances of his career gibbon and hyun the great british historians who were contemporaries of franklin express in their autobiographies the same feeling about the propriety of just self-praise and now i speak of thanking god. I desire with all humility to acknowledge that. I owe the mentioned happiness of my past life to his kind providence which led me to the means i used and gave them success. My belief of this induces me to hope. Though i must not presume that the same goodness will still be exercised toward me in continuing that happiness or enabling me to bear a fatal reverse which i may experience as others have done the complexion of my future fortune be known to him only and whose power it is to bless to us even our afflictions. The notes of one of my own also had the same kind of curiosity and collecting family anecdotes. Once to my hands furnished me with several particulars relating to our ancestors from these notes. I learned that the family had lived in the same village acton in northamptonshire for three hundred years and how much longer he knew not perhaps from the time when the name of franklin that before was the name of an of people footnote a small landowner was assumed by them as a surname when others took surnames all over the kingdom on a freehold of about thirty acres aided by the smiths business which had continued in the family till his time. The eldest son being always bread to that business a custom which he and my father followed as to their eldest sons. When i searched the registers at acton i found an account of their births marriages and burials from the year. Fifteen fifty five only there being no registers kept in that perish at any time preceding by that register. I perceived that. I was the youngest son of the youngest son for five generations. Back my grandfather. Thomas who was born in fifteen ninety eight lived at acton till he grew too old to follow business longer when he went to live with his son. John a dire at banbury in oxfordshire. With whom my father served an apprenticeship there. My grandfather died and lies buried. We saw his gravestone in seventeen fifty eight his son. Thomas lived in the house at acton and it with the land to his only child. A daughter who with her husband one fisher of wellingborough sold it to mr..

Thomas Woodrow wilson three hundred years John five generations acton oxfordshire wellingborough northamptonshire year banbury two others about thirty acres fifteen ninety eight british Fifteen fifty five one fisher seventeen fifty eight gibbon one
Big Brass Banned

Your Brain on Facts

06:08 min | 1 year ago

Big Brass Banned

"Goes way way back and was created in distant disparate places egypt rome india italy hungary. You name it. There are ancient roman coins that depict niro playing the bagpipes so while we can debate whether or not nero fiddled while rome burned hinging mostly on what the definition of fiddle is. It seems clear. He played the bagpipes. It's not clear when bagpipes made it to scotland. But we do know that at the time they had only a single drone. The pipe put makes the characteristic constant background note until the fifteen hundreds won a second drone was added and the last drone was added in the seventeen hundreds all of the chiefs of the highland clans employed pipers for both peacetime and war spurring their troops on victory until seventeen forty five bagpipes were linked to jacobite ism the movement that sought to remove james the second from the british throne and restore the catholic. Stuart kings the jacobites saw the bagpipes. As an icon of scottish national belonging and military pride while there are loyalist opponents saw it at best as a risible accessory for unflattering caricatures and at worse as an instrument of war carrying pipes was viewed the same as carrying a weapon. And a your command was tried for treason. The court declared quote no highland regiment data piper and therefore. His bagpipes in the eyes of the law was an instrument of author and sentenced him to death but john gibson author of traditional gaelic bag piping seventeen forty five to nineteen forty-five said it didn't happen that way the bagpipe man. Not the execution. That part happened. In fact the execution of the piper james reid might have to the muddling of the historical waters. Some of the confusion seems to stem from the disarming act of seventeen forty six which would get an amendment quote restraining. The use of highland dress this outlawed tartan plaid but didn't say anything about bagpipes. James reid may well have been piper. But that wasn't why he got the short drop and sudden stop he'd taken part in jacobite rebellion's and conviction had nothing to do with the disarming act so a case could be made that the seventeen forty five ban. Didn't actually happen. That makes that one line from braveheart. Goodbye plan outlawed. Choose twice as wrong. Since that set over four centuries earlier the bagpipes were verifiably band. In the nineteen forties in poland. Germans forbade the polls to play their pipes for a similar reason. Because of its ability to stir up nationalist spirit. Just think about that the next time you say it sounds like a bag of cats and a garbage disposal in fairness though you're not completely alone in your entirely wrong hatred of bagpipes in eighteen ninety seven. Belgium sent an expedition to antarctica with the intention of being the first party to over winter there even in modern antarctica with modern transportation. A lot of planning goes into keeping a crew alive. If you're in charge of the food you might have to plan out a years worth of meals and order your supplies eighteen months in advance. And that's today so imagine what it was like more than one hundred twenty years ago. Part of the plan of the rv gca that being the ship that they took was to hunt and eat penguins which would not only provide them with fat and protein but also vitamin c to ward off scurvy catching animals perfectly adapted to the harshest climate on earth turned out to be much easier than they thought. The supplies of the ship included a few musical instruments to maintain morale and whatnot. Apparently all you had to do was play the trumpet and the penguins would come right up to you when one man took out his banjo and played. It's a long way to tipperary a whole raft of penguins which is the collective noun gathered to listen. The reception was somewhat more critical for the bagpiper. The penguins fled in terror and plunged back into the sea tremendous tinkerer. Benjamin franklin had been so captivated by performances on musical glasses. Were you rub your fingers around the rim of glasses with different amounts of water in them to produce different notes. It was big in the eighteenth century and franklin wanted to see if he could make it even better. He saw that before each concert. The performer would tune the instrument by filling each glass with just the right amount of water. That sounds like a half. And if you watched miss congeniality by choice or because it was on in the waiting room you know that musical glasses are one of the few instruments that can be ruined by being mistaken for craft services in a letter written in seventeen sixty two to the italian scientist. Giambattista macharia franklin described a musical instrument. He had designed that made use of thirty-seven cups to help you. Visualize it rather than cups think bolts each one a little bit smaller than the last picture them in a neat stack. Now imagine a rod going down through the lot turning it on its side and having them spin on that rod as an axle thanks to a foot pedal and

Stuart Kings Rome James Reid Niro Nero John Gibson Hungary Antarctica Egypt Penguins Italy Scotland India Piper James Confusion Poland Belgium
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"But the why did not give them any satisfaction they contented themselves with admonishing me and dismiss me considering me perhaps as an apprentice who was bound to keep his masters secrets. During my brothers confinement, which I resented a good deal notwithstanding our private differences, I had the management of the paper and I made it to give our rulers. Some rubs in it which my brother took very kindly while others began to consider me in an unfavourable light as a young genius that had a turn for libelling and satire my brothers discharge was accompanied with an of the house a very odd one that James Franklin should no longer printed the paper called the new. England current. There was a consultation held in our printing house among his friends what he should do in this case. Some proposed to obey the order by changing the name of the paper. But my brothers seeing inconveniences in that it was finally concluded on as a better way to let it be printed for the future under the name of Benjamin Franklin and to avoid the center of the Assembly that might fall on him as still printing it by his apprentice. The contrivance was that my olden denture. Should be returned to me with a full discharge on the back of it to be shown on occasion but to secure to him the benefit of my service, I was to sign new in dentures for the remainder of the term which were to be kept private a very flimsy scheme. It was however, it was immediately executed and the paper went on accordingly under my name for several months. At length a fresh difference arising between my brother and me I took upon me to assert my freedom presuming that he would not venture to produce the new in dentures. It was not fair in me to take this advantage and this I therefore reckon one of the first era of my life. But the unfairness of it weighed little with me when under the impressions of resentment for the below his passion too often urged him to bestow upon me though he was not otherwise and ill-natured man. Perhaps. I was too saucy and provoking..

James Franklin Benjamin Franklin England
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"To recommend yourself in pleasing your hearers or to persuade those whose concurrent you desire. Pope says, judiciously, men should be taught as if you taught them not and things unknown proposed as things for God. Father, recommending us to speak though sure with seeming diffidence and he might of coupled with this line that which he has coupled with another I think less properly for want of modesty is want of cents. If you ask why less properly I must repeat the lines immodest words admit of no defense for want of modesty is one of sense now is not want of sense where a man so unfortunate as to wanted some apology for his want of modesty. And would not the lines stand more justly thus. Immodest words admit but this defense that want of modesty is want of sense. This however, I should submit to better judgments. My brother had in seventeen twenty or seventeen twenty one begun to print a newspaper. It was the second that appeared in America and was called the New England current. The only one before it was the Boston newsletter, I remember his being dissuaded by some of his friends from the undertaking as not likely to succeed one newspaper being in their judgment enough for America at this time seventeen, seventy one, there are not less than five and twenty. He went on however with the undertaking and after having worked in composing the types and printing off the sheets, I was employed to carry the papers through the streets to the customers. He had some ingenious men among his friends who amused. By writing little pieces for this paper, which gained it credit and made it more in demand and these gentlemen often visited us he reigned their conversations and their accounts of the approbation. Their papers were received with I was excited to try my hand among them but being still a boy and suspecting that my brother would object to printing anything of mine in his paper. If he knew it to be mine I contrived to disguise my hand and writing an anonymous paper, I put.

America Pope Boston New England
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Rhyme would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for variety and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind and make me master of it. Therefore, I took some of the tales and turn them into verse and after a time when I had pretty well forgotten, the pros turn them back again. I also sometimes jumbled my collection of hints into confusion and after some weeks indifferent to reduce them into the best order before I began to form the full sentences and complete the paper. This was to teach me method the arrangement of my thoughts by comparing my work afterwards with the original I discovered many faults in amended them. But I sometimes the pleasure of fancying that in certain particulars of small import, I have been lucky enough to improve the method of the language and this encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer of which I was extremely ambitious my. Time for these exercises and for reading was at night after work or before it began in the morning, we're on Sundays when I contrived to be in the printing house alone evading as much as I could the comet attendance on public worship, which my father used to exact a me when I was under his care, and which indeed is still thought a duty though I could not as it seemed afford time to practice it. Win About Sixteen years of age I happen to meet with a book written by one try on recommending vegetable diet I determined to go into it. My brother being getting married did not keep house but voted himself in his apprentices in another family. My refusing to eat flesh occasioned in inconveniencing and I was frequently Chid from my singularity I made myself acquainted with tryon's manner, a preparing some of his dishes such as boiling potatoes or rice making hasty pudding and a few others, and then propose to my brother that if he would give me weekly half the money he paid for my board, I would board myself..

tryon writer
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Benjamin Franklin. John Adams. James Madison. Dolly Madison. The great Frederick Douglass. Abraham Lincoln. Harriet Tubman. Harriet beat your stone. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. Flower of Barton. Daniel Boone. Davy Crockett. Henry Clay. Susan B. Anthony. Booker T. Washington. Orville and Wilbur Wright, who are looking down and you're going to see some blames like you have never seen before, because we build them better than anybody in the world. Greatest air force. The greatest fighters, the greatest everything. You're going to be seeing something. I just wonder what Orville and Wilbur would have been thinking. If they ever got to see that, but they're looking. They're checking it out right now, Along with us, Amelia Erhard. A great great athlete, no matter where he went, he was the best athlete Jackie Robinson. George S. Patton. General Patton, He didn't know how to lose. He didn't know how to lose. General Douglas MacArthur. Audie Murphy. Great Billy Graeme. An incredible man respected by everybody. Martin Luther King. President.

George S. Patton Harriet Tubman Orville Wilbur Wright Dolly Madison Jackie Robinson Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain James Madison Davy Crockett Audie Murphy Frederick Douglass Benjamin Franklin Martin Luther King Abraham Lincoln Daniel Boone Booker T. Washington Amelia Erhard Susan B. Anthony John Adams Henry Clay
"benjamin franklin" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin franklin" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Heater from Benjamin Franklin plumbing if you have a water heater that is on its last leg call Benjamin Franklin plumbing to come replace it today and save a hundred dollars on a new water heater your water heater has to work the hardest when it's cold outside to replace that old water heater now and be prepared for the coming winter months don't wait for failure that flood your home to replace that water heater because it's going to be a downright Masson who needs that headache don't call a plumber that also does electrical in AC work call the punctual plumbers of Benjamin Franklin plumbing and rest easy that your plumber is a true expert and don't forget Benjamin Franklin plumbing is the punctual plumber they will be there when they say they will be there guess what they will pay you five dollars a minute for every minute they are late up to a three hundred dollar maximum because if there's any delay it's you they pay call Benjamin Franklin plumbing today eight six six the number for bed now that's eight six six number four Ben now we've got a ton to cover let's get to it Glenn back on five seventy K. L. I. F. Hey it Hey everybody welcome do idiots Friday I feel as though I don't understand America anymore ever feel that way he is not just me right but I but I I want to listen because I don't know why people are feeling this way and I'll explain here in a second it's about the coronavirus I don't know why people are going out and buying all the toilet paper barring the toilet paper on the other hand I also don't understand these people like going out right now to accomplish on getting together were coughing in each other's faces but not saying why would you do that at any time and the middle conspiracy all can we stop by real I want to understand from reasonable people if you feel like this is just all garbage and your reasonable not somebody's like aren't going to call the phone no I don't want to talk to you reasonable people I really want to understand what I'm missing here and I'll explain and get your phone calls eight eight eight seven two seven BTC K. Steven Crowder bill Riley and Steven Moore all on today's program we began in one minute this is the Glenn Beck program as you prepare for self quarantine I think it's important look back at some classic films thank god with this one all remember all Robin Williams wanted was to get these kids back in his life right you know but the lord has decided to you know.

Masson Ben Glenn America bill Riley Robin Williams Benjamin Franklin K. L. K. Steven Crowder Steven Moore Glenn Beck