37 Burst results for "Benjamin"

Fresh "Benjamin" from The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

05:17 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh "Benjamin" from The Bill Simmons Podcast

"With this. He's 5 in a row. Like, come on, stop with this. So you felt a little of that, but I think it's easier to parachute in and out when you're doing movies. You'd be like, here I am again. Well, it's different. I mean, the reason why we had so many movies was there was so many years where no one wanted to let us make anything. So we just kept writing. I think that we were very disciplined to write the next one, even though the previous one was rejected. And once they thought, oh, maybe they know what they're doing, all of them got made. Everything that we were goofing around with. I mean, pineapple express was written because no one would make super bad. And so we thought, okay, is there a more commercial movie we could do together? And then they didn't want to make pineapple express either. So now we had the two of those sitting there. And that kept happening and then suddenly, I think a lot of it had to do with Talladega nights doing well. People thought, oh, this group is onto something. And so let's take a shot at superbad. And that led to pineapple and then walk hard and on and on and on. What was the one that opened the door for the ones that you could have totally get made. But now they're like, oh, Judd wants to do this. We should do this. He's on a hot streak right now. Was there was it like after superbad or was it Talladega nights was the gateway to now I can get all these scripts that we were pushing and pushing and pushing on now, they'll make them. I think that what happened as I look back on it now was the thing that started everything was old school, which I was not a part of. But that was a big hit for will and Todd Phillips. And then also will did elf. And I think that those two movies really were the reason why we got shots. And then that, you know, that was the time when anchorman was being made. And then that success led them to think I could do the 40 year old virgin. And then knocked up. And then knocked it up in supervisor with the same summer. And so it was a big summer. They wanted to put out pineapple like two or three months after superbad. We asked to delay it 6, 7 months, 'cause I thought that's too much, then Mike. Yeah, over. But maybe that was a mistake. It might have been just a fun momentum. All of them in a row within like 8 months. And then after that, you know, we were able to get some things that were more experimental made like funny people and work hard and that's always the best moment when you realize, oh, we can have some ideas that are stranger or more challenging and get to take our shots with the well, and the cool thing about the library you had there for that whole run is you have, it's almost like a basketball team. You have people you're working in that aren't the centerpiece of the movie that a few years later they will be. And it's like, oh, look, I forgot Jonah Hill came off the bench and had ten points a game on that 2004 or whatever team. And then three years later, he's carrying a movie. I just think from a talent standpoint and you had a lot to do with it, but man, the amount of talent we had there, if you think about it like sports, it's just like one of those sports runs, where it's like, man, the NBA was loaded for those 5, 6 years. I can't believe we had all those players. And I feel the same way when I think about that comedy room. Basically from O three to 2012, all these new faces that could come in and carry things and play characters and pop into movies and they were really giving to the other actors. It's just so unusual. I almost don't feel like we're going to see that again. It's hard to know because a lot of the reason why maybe it ended was just the industry changed. Those movies used to make a lot of money on DVD. And so they were really good investments, these comedies, because they would make, you know, they could make anything, but say they made $50 million in the movie theater. They would make another $50 million on DVDs. So they made a lot of money for people. And then the DVD market disappeared. And that turned into streaming, and they didn't get that money back. And so suddenly, a comedy wasn't as easy a bet. And then people started betting on huge action or superhero franchise, and they still make comedies, but they put their bandwidth on the mega movies. The movies that can make a $1 billion. Yeah. And I think that they're also used to be a market for spec screenplays. People used to write a screenplay and then sell it. Now they basically, if you write a screenplay, if you bring in the director and the star they might make it, but they don't tend to buy any scripts or many scripts that they don't really intend to make. But there used to be this big market where every day you'd hear someone sold a script for a ton of money, but they didn't make a lot of those movies. And I think at some point they went, why are we buying so many scripts that we don't make? we did boogie nights for the rewatchables this week and it was, by the way, two parts and four hours because one of my favorite movies ever. But we're trying to figure out

Todd Phillips Judd Jonah Hill Mike Basketball NBA
Fresh update on "benjamin" discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

04:27 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "benjamin" discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Montgomery potential injury didn't practice today on Thursday. It's such good bait because Khalil Herbert has backup has been just as good in like goal line. Short yardage, third down, early down, just everything. They're running the ball extremely well. And the Giants can not stop the run. When the Giants get into passing downs, they blitz, and when fields sees a bless you scrambles, on almost 25% of the blitz is he's seen this year. He is scrambled, which is better than when he tries to throw in. So it's good news. It's awesome that the Giants are just going to spend 5 guys 6 guys 7 guys to get fields to do what he was going to do anyway. Just get out of the pocket scramble, run. This is a spot where the reason you fear the bears is because you're worried about them getting in a negative game script and then having to fill the football. They've shown that they won't do that in the third quarter. They'll continue to run it, and the giant score of three points every first half. So they're not going to get game script exactly. I like the bears a lot, especially with the hook on the field goal. It feels really good. Where does Daniel Jones rank on the, we know his coach doesn't trust him at all rankings right now. It's the first is he top three, where do you have them? Fields is probably first. He's top three. I had that feeling watching that cowboys game, but it was like, this is what it would look like if bill's ownership wasn't making sure Brian Dave didn't break Josh Allen, right? It's just like, hey, run, hit somebody. Take pressure. Listen, if you get bruised out this week, we kind of don't care about it. You're not a firm plan. Like a weapon. Titans colts is another one I like. Titans plus three and a half. As I said, I don't like the colts at all. I thought they all time pulled the game out of their ass. I mean, their sideline was spirited. They were doing all the things. The sharps were behind them, but they block worse than I thought. Ryan was getting the shit kicked out of him and that chiefs game. And then the Titans, I thought played pretty well in that Vegas game. They controlled the clock, Vegas was playing catch up. They got red zone stops. And you'd think like both of these are bad things, but Indies only scored 40 points in three games. Titans plus three and a half feels like slightly more important for the Titans where they because Vegas just beat Casey lacerate they're feeling good. Titans barely escape that Vegas game. I don't know, especially with if Burke's, if he can keep coming on week after week, they're not really getting anything from the receivers yet. But this seems like another flip a coin. So why wouldn't I take the three and a half? Yeah, so the Titans are still very scary for me to trust and a lot of it goes back to me too. The chiefs had against the colts, the Titans want to run the football. The courts are the team right now to not try to run the football against, passing devot, they're terrible passing API defense. They're terrible. Rush defens are amazing. Every time you run on first and ten against the colts, you're just asking for second and ten. Please give us one less chance to get a first down. The Titans have shown, however, under variable that they will run Derek Henry into a brick wall. So that's what scares me there. What I do like in this game are the Burke's props. They've talked a lot about getting Burke's more involved. Burke's route participation has gone up in the last three weeks in enormous ways. He started with routes on 36% of Tannehill's drop backs in week one, then 57%, done like 96% in week three. He went from I have to earn my spot in this offense too with a Kyle Phillips injury, so a little bit of a caveat to I am now a starting guy in this offense. You're still seeing receiving your props of about like 37 38 and into the low 40s. With Burke's explosive ability, that's two three catches, because he's going to be using the intermediate area of the field and he can run after the catch. So this game for me is a Burke's look, the second we get those lines on FanDuel. So little Titans money line with a little Burke's action. Yeah, this feels like an either war game, so why not take the plus or enough? I forgot to ask you, can you name when we talk about the Giants? Can you name their number one and number two receivers and receiving yards right now for the Giants? Yeah, so I think shepherd was first and then Richie James was second. Made good money on Richard James against the cowboys. Richie James is another one like a trailer Burks his route participations through the roof. Every time the Giants are dropping back, he is running around. He gets priced 40 receiving yards, right? I hit four plus receptions that game at like plus one 35. If you're going to run around, sometimes the ball is just going to end up in your hands, even if you're not the scheme guy. For Richie, they run them on screens. And so if you get Richard James three plus four plus receptions, continuing to be priced around like 50%. Minus one ten plus one ten in that area.

Titans Giants Khalil Herbert Burke Vegas Brian Dave Josh Allen Colts Titans Colts Bears Football Daniel Jones Chiefs Montgomery Rush Defens Cowboys Derek Henry Tannehill
Even the Greats Were Once Despised, Considered 'Controversial'

Mark Levin

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Even the Greats Were Once Despised, Considered 'Controversial'

"Who are the great people But they just embraced and accepted Churchill Churchill was despised He was considered extremely controversial Now we all know what a tremendous leader Churchill was George S. Patton He didn't conduct himself like other general He wasn't a Millie A Mattis a Kelly one of our greatest generals ever More recently England England was dying in the 1970s The government owned almost all the industries the labor movement had been taken over by the marxists It looked like there was no end That what was going to take place They elected the iron lady Margaret Thatcher A few years later in our own country after Jimmy Carter and the Democrats the country was sinking We elected Ronald Reagan Ronald Reagan was not supported by his party the Republican establishment In Israel Benjamin Netanyahu is considered controversial He's not controversial Again one of the great leaders of all times And if the Israelis are smart they'll bring them back especially now since they're on the brink Many of you may not know this but Abraham Lincoln was considered very controversial

Churchill Churchill George S. Patton Mattis England Millie Churchill Ronald Reagan Kelly Margaret Thatcher Jimmy Carter Benjamin Netanyahu Israel Abraham Lincoln
The Death of Learning

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:52 min | Last month

The Death of Learning

"Here is the subject that we're going to talk about. In one recent year of 300,000 undergraduate college degrees, only 37,000 in philosophy, English and history combined. That's from the depth of learning, this very moment, not 15 minutes ago. Ajit pai, the former chairman of the FCC and a genius. Pointed us to a threat on college majors which notes among other things that quote the total outlier of computer science is explosion is really clear here. So is the concentration and growth in fields that have clear career prospects. And he had tip sandy gruel and he closed at Benjamin stiff Schmidt on stem medical majors and computer science taking over the university, the humanities, the social sciences, even businesses, have plummeted, John why. Oh, God, there are so many reasons you know this. I think to get to the cuts of the chase, I think there's an awful lot, not everybody says the debt of the humanities, the debt of the liberal arts is due to people who are needing to make money. Commercialism of America, materialism, there are a lot for a buck. Nobody and everybody knows and it's true to hard to make a living and by studying the study in great books or the liberal arts. It's easier to make money in engineering or business. And now it's easy to make go out of money, has been for a while. And pharmaceuticals and in the medical field and healthcare. So that's part of it. But the part I really wanted a concentrate on partly because I actually like those of the fields. I like engineers. I like people who are in computer engineering and computer science. I like people who are in agronomy and people who are in marketing and sales. They're fine upstanding people.

Ajit Pai Sandy Gruel Benjamin Stiff Schmidt FCC John America
Benjamin Netanyahu: Biden's Iran Nuclear Deal Is Much Worse

Mark Levin

01:55 min | Last month

Benjamin Netanyahu: Biden's Iran Nuclear Deal Is Much Worse

"Former prime minister Netanyahu on Fox and Friends said the following Cut 15 go I think this is a horrible deal a dangerous deal that will pave Iran's path with gold a golden paved highway to a nuclear arsenal If Iran has nuclear weapons they don't merely threaten my country as well or the entire Middle East and America's allies They threaten you directly because simultaneously with developing nuclear weapons they're developing the means to deliver them across continents So you could have an Iran governed by these fanatic ayatollahs who will hold every American city hostage to nuclear weapons I think this is a threat to the peace of the world and that's what this horrible deal facilitates It's even worse than the first one Why Why is it worse Well because president Obama in a moment of candor said in a PBS interview in 2015 that by 2027 that's 5 years from now Iran will have a breakout time to a bomb that is near zero That's his words not mine And he was right This deal is much closer to that time frame and it gives Iran right now within two years they can develop up to fort within four years starting two years from now They can develop added enrichment capacity of uranium 3500 3500 advanced centrifuges that each is ten to 20 times stronger and more effective than the centrifuges that they have They have about 5000 So you're adding an enormous capacity to enrich uranium That's the critical element of making nuclear bombs The deal gives it to them It gives them right now hundreds of billions of dollars And by the end of the agreement a $1 trillion to pursue their terror and aggression against everyone against you and against us

Iran Netanyahu FOX Fort Within Middle East Friends PBS America Barack Obama
Carl Benjamin Wants Patriots to Define Their Own Terms

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | Last month

Carl Benjamin Wants Patriots to Define Their Own Terms

"Talk about what you're findings are. Conservative and left and right wing are kind of broken down as taxonomies. You use the phrase not globalists. You use the phrase internationalists, which I find interesting. And instead of nationalism, which of course the left is very effectively turned into a pejorative term since the national socialists of the Nazi Party, you use the descriptor patriotism. Is this of these more discrete, accurate dividing lines and descriptors should the adjective for politics in the UK and India in America be internationalists, vice the Patriots, give us your your expansion on that? It's interesting how you picked up on that. Not many people actually do. Yes, I think that the terminology that we use is very important. Because I've read a lot of leftist theory and most leftist theory is based in the idea of expanding words to mean something they do not mean. And so one thing that the Patriots can do is define their own terms. And this was genuinely a problem for people broadly called conservatives. Against the progressive wing of politics, because the progressive wing of politics is very aggressive to define the term for their enemy first. And that's deeply uncharitable and unfair. And so conservatives have to take this linguistic battle very seriously. And so what is it that we are actually talking about? So I'm personally talking about. Those people who it was roger scrutin who coined the term but he used the term. The somewheres, the people who belong. People who are in, say, America, Americans. They feel an emotional attachment to their country. The local people in England and compare that to I call them the internationalists, but it could easily be globalist as well.

Patriots Nazi Party America India UK Roger Scrutin England
Carl Benjamin AKA Sargon of Akkad Shares His Story

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:57 min | Last month

Carl Benjamin AKA Sargon of Akkad Shares His Story

"Little bit about the car Benjamin story. Right. So I come from very humble background. My father was a sergeant in the RAF before he retired. A few years ago. And he had worked his way up from the very bottom because he came from a council estate in the oval. So my mother also came from a council flat in council house in wood and Bassett. So very humble position. I was fortunate enough to do computer science at the university when I was 19. There's a degree, but honestly, I found it really boring, and so I dropped out. And so I spent the next ten or 15 years just working in tech jobs really because that was what I had an aptitude for. Until woke politics came for the things I like. So let's start at that point in time, how would you have described yourself politically? Well, I would have described myself as left wing, actually. Labor Party or that kind of thing. Yeah, I probably would have done, although I have to say I wasn't politically very interested. Because it wasn't terribly interesting at the time to me. But it turned out that. His maxim was it. Pericles maxim, that. See, he's doing it now. He's doing it now. You might not be in a little bow mow carry on pericles, go ahead. You might not be interested in politics, but politics is very interested in you. At the start of my Trotsky, yes, and it was absolutely true, and once I became aware of this was not right. So luckily, I'd always taken a deep interest in history. I just thought I'd always found it fascinating. And so even just in my spare time, I would read history books read the original text of like thucydides or theodora, so whoever. It was just things that I just found interesting. Luckily enough. And

RAF Bassett Benjamin Pericles Maxim Labor Party Theodora
Carl Benjamin Describes Americans' Patriotism and Hopelessness

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:24 min | Last month

Carl Benjamin Describes Americans' Patriotism and Hopelessness

"Hear from lots of Americans. And they all project the same sort of sentiments towards me when I'm interacting with them. And I'm very, very tangibly aware that coming out of the patriot side of American politics is this overwhelming feeling of loss and of not quite bitterness, but a growing awareness that, oh, actually, things are not as they seemed before. We thought we were playing a fair game. We thought we were having the game of cricket. We thought that both sides agreed to the rules and we were going to play by these rules, and it turns out that one side is not. And it's not the Patriots, and so if we want to be able to say that America is a good, fair, decent country, that is run responsibly by people who take the interests of Americans into their own hearts and actively govern according to those if we want to say that America is a country that is law abiding of rules that is morally correctly organized, then the, as I described in the villains, who are currently squatting on your great country, they have to lose. They have to lose, and they have to lose to Donald Trump, because I do think there is something genuinely symbolic about Donald Trump.

Cricket Patriots America Donald Trump
Whoopi Says "Whoops"

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:19 min | 2 months ago

Whoopi Says "Whoops"

"Just breaking in the last couple of minutes on the view, play cut 86. Welcome back. You know, and one day conversation about turning point USA. I put the young people at the conference in the same category as the protesters outside. And I don't like it when people make assumptions about me. And it's not any better when I make assumptions about other people, which I did. So my bad, I'm sorry. Okay. So, call you guys a bunch of Nazis, my bad. There is a great, there's a great quote from Benjamin Franklin. Which is do not ruin an apology with an excuse. It's a great quote. Look, I'm a big believer in apologizing when you're wrong. However, I'm trying to make sure I understand what she's sorry for. Is she sorry she said it? Or is she sorry that she believed it? Those are two totally completely different things. And I'm going to be very honest. It's very hard for me to believe that was sincere, it looked more kind of like a hostage situation. Of lawyers that were pointing and saying, do this. She didn't exactly look graceful while doing that.

Benjamin Franklin USA
History Will Not See BLM as a Champion for Civil Rights

The Officer Tatum Show

01:52 min | 2 months ago

History Will Not See BLM as a Champion for Civil Rights

"Just to finish up on the topic of the civil rights movement and all of this. And people were probably thinking of what made Brandon go down his path. And it's because I see what BLM is doing, I see what these black activists are doing today, and they are literally lying to the world about what's really going on. We are going to look 20 years from now. You Mark my word. In the record books in the historical documents, people are going to put that Black Lives Matter was one of the biggest, most effective, civil rights movement, organization ever, and that Black Lives Matter was created to thwart police brutality, police brutality, I'm hearing feedback. So Thorpe police brutality and other things like that. And we know that's not to be true. Know that not to be true. It's going to say that their policing in America was systemically racist. And that nobody on earth should be able to be, you know, to be subject to the racism, from police, and all this stuff y'all here. They're going to push this agenda and we're going to go back and realize or hear from our history books that Black Lives Matter was a great thing for our country. And we're going to hear that Maxine waters and all of these people, Benjamin crump, they're going to have a statue of Benjamin crump saying that he was an activist and leader of his time he was a Martin the next Martin Luther King. When Benjamin crump chase ambulance. And all he wanted to pay out because I ain't never seen that joker when black people need him. I ain't never seen him there. He only show up when there's money to be made. That's what it appears to be in my opinion.

Benjamin Crump BLM Brandon Thorpe Mark Maxine Waters America Martin Luther King Martin
Black Twitter Cries Racism Over Sesame Place Interaction

The Officer Tatum Show

01:54 min | 2 months ago

Black Twitter Cries Racism Over Sesame Place Interaction

"Every time something happens, it seems as if and this is not all black people. A lot of black people are just making it a point to feel like everybody's racist against them. And in reality, most people probably couldn't care less about black people. If you want to keep it real nobody cares about you at a Sesame Street event with a million people there, all year long. And the person in the mask probably couldn't care less about your kids and nobody else kids. They're there to do a service and high 5 people and make their little chick at the end of the day. But now you can't nah, it's not enough. It's not enough. Why can't you tell your children? Oh, the person just probably missed your sweetheart. We'll catch them when they come around next time. But you know what they're doing to their kids? All these old racist white people. They hate y'all. You know, they ain't right. They ain't right they doing y'all like that. Man, you got your kids growing up thinking that white people are racist. Now they have not seen one person behind that mask. That person behind the mask can be a black person. They don't know. It's a fake character. But now is racism. Benjamin crump is racism. And you look at black Twitter, everybody sharing it. Oh, they wrong. It's a 5. I think this clip could be like 5 seconds long. It doesn't show them high 5, another white person, it doesn't show them high 5, another white person after the kids, there's no context of there's a thousand kids walking down this little street. There's no indication that the kids that they I see black kids down the street. It doesn't show an indication that they avoid all the black kids. None of that stuff is apparent. In this video, or any context that's been that's been expressed to us,

Benjamin Crump Twitter
Minneapolis Police Snipers Fatally Shot Andrew "Tekle" Sundberg

The Officer Tatum Show

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Minneapolis Police Snipers Fatally Shot Andrew "Tekle" Sundberg

"I want to talk about another shooting. Then I'm going to talk about you all day a little bit. Not the nuance of the volley, but just the rhetoric is blowing blowing my socks off. But before then, I want to talk about this shooting that occurred, let me see if I can find the city it happened in. I just, I just did the story earlier. I was actually on the news talk about, oh, many Annapolis, right? So Minneapolis police. This kid name is tiko. I think that's how you say his name, tiko. So let's explain this real quick. This is how I know people are absolutely stupid. This guy tickle for whatever reason, he's in an apartment complex. He's going crazy. He's shooting a gun. It goes through this woman's house. She got two kids in her house. She's a person of color, shoes to our House. I mean, I saw the pictures. She got bullets going through her bathroom through doors through walls. And this guy shooting up the place. Police show up to the scene. He's shooting at the police. Multiple guns, multiple grounds fired at the police. They are literally scrambling with the S.W.A.T. team to rescue everybody they can out the apartment complex to isolate this one idiot. By himself now, they don't just pull up to the scene and say check yourself fool and just shoot the man in the head like Benjamin crump and these other race hustling and attorneys will have you figure, Benjamin crop on Twitter said that this is a good articulate great man who was having a mental crisis. I don't care what is going on in your mind. You're shooting a gun, potentially killing other people with no remorse.

Tiko Annapolis Minneapolis Benjamin Crump Benjamin Twitter
How John Ondrasik Found Himself Recording With a Ukrainian Orchestra

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 2 months ago

How John Ondrasik Found Himself Recording With a Ukrainian Orchestra

"You know it's out there on the streaming the streaming platforms the video with the Ukrainian orchestra that we filmed in key 6 weeks ago in front of the Maria the plane that Putin destroyed is available on all the youtubes rumble So just Google save the world with Ukrainian orchestra and it's out there You actually want to give you where'd you find the orchestra That was a good question It's kind of a crazy story Ironically it started with Afghanistan after I had written blood on my hands I somehow find myself embedded with these incredible private groups rescuing Americans and Afghan allies and one of the groups was a group called save our allies You know them well marked because they were the people who saved Benjamin hall's life In Russia I literally saw the ambulance that he was in and I met the man who drove it and saved his life And they were operating in Afghanistan and we were doing some work there and when Ukraine started they moved their operations I'd written the song and one man saved the world And they knew about it And we thought well why don't we do a song with the Polish orchestra because Poland has been so great in this conflict And I asked when to say about Alex folks to connect with them and they said let me call you back And two days later they said how would you like to do with the Ukrainian orchestra And I said exactly what you did Do they exist And it turns out they're scattered across the country but the Ukrainian military was really on board for this project And so we somehow got them a 6 hour window to record the song and I found myself in Kyiv after a crazy journey and there we were in front of the Maria with the orchestra playing this song It was surreal and a minor miracle

Benjamin Hall Afghanistan Putin Ukraine Maria Google Poland Alex Kyiv
Were All of the Founding Fathers Slave Owners?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 3 months ago

Were All of the Founding Fathers Slave Owners?

"Charlie, my friends all say the founding fathers were slave owners. What do you have to say about that? That is what John says from Pennsylvania. So I've done a, let's say a fair amount of public commentary on this. And I have to thank the great hillsdale college for this, honestly. So look, I went down into the hillsdale online courses, Charlie for hillsdale dot com. You should all check it out. That's Charlie F war hillsdale dot com. And I did the work. A couple years ago, I'd kind of just trip over my words whenever the issue of founding fathers and slavery came up. And I probably had a response that some of you gave like, oh yeah, but we abolished it and that was then and now this was then and this is now. That's not even a proper answer. Because it's not true. The founders all knew what they were doing was wrong. They wrote openly about it. So that doesn't make them hypocrites, it makes them sinners. As the great doctor Larry arn would say. 9 out of 13 a colonies had already abolished slavery by the time the constitution was ratified. The first antislavery convention was hosted in Philadelphia in 1775 by Benjamin Franklin. Thomas Jefferson admonished king George for bringing the Senate slavery into America. In the original draft of the Declaration of Independence. The northwest ordinance, article 6, said that no slaves should be in the new territories. But Nicole Hannah Jones insists that America's true founding was not in 1776 but 1619. Now who is Nicole Hannah Jones? She is the con artist that runs The New York Times 1619 project that your kid is probably learning from right now. Let's play cut one 53. 1619 in August of 1619 is when the first group of 20 to 30 Africans were sold into the Virginia colony. And what the project is basically arguing is that that is actually a foundational to the American story as the year 1776 because nothing would be left untouched by that decision to engage in the institutional slavery. So for those of you listening on podcasts, looks as if she has Elmo on her head. I don't quite understand. That someone went crazy with a dry erase marker. She's this massive orange head of hair. That is very bright. The sunglasses watching that clip.

Charlie Hillsdale Nicole Hannah Jones Hillsdale College Larry Arn Pennsylvania Benjamin Franklin John King George Thomas Jefferson America Philadelphia Senate The New York Times Virginia
German Protestor: Protests Against Mask Mandates Are Fun & Peaceful

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:48 min | 3 months ago

German Protestor: Protests Against Mask Mandates Are Fun & Peaceful

"I live in Florida where the governor there in Florida, he is not, he is not on board with mandates. Right. I mean, there are many Germans to say what probably better go to Florida, but I always say, well, it's not probably going to be the solution in the long haul. You have to fight where you are and if everything falls except for Florida, probably Florida will fall too. Well, Benjamin I must tell you to see a protest here. It's a lot more peaceful and fun than protests in America because these days protests in America are not fun and they're not peaceful. Well, I mean, the protests I have seen against the men they were fun and peaceful. The other protests, a lot of protests that yeah, you couldn't really consider fun and peaceful. But I have to say we also had an evolution here. At first it was also a lot of anger and over the time people just recognized that we have to be we have to represent something good, something that people from outside want to join. So we finally came to being really funny and having a good to not to not be aggressive but to be open hearted and to welcome everybody. And I also say, if you're vaccinated, we love you. We have nothing against vaccinated people. If you want to wear masks, we love you. It's all okay, but if we don't want to, that's all right too. So we feel like we are defending our constitutional republic and I feel there's a lot of people in other places that are feeling the same. And also always say we are a worldwide civil rights movement, the likes of which we have never seen before.

Florida America Benjamin
German Protestor on Mask Mandates: 'We Don't Feel Represented'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:01 min | 3 months ago

German Protestor on Mask Mandates: 'We Don't Feel Represented'

"Maria square in front of this beautiful building, the mayor's building and Benjamin is one of the organizers of this protest. Benjamin, it's nice to see that I come all the way to Germany and you Germans are just as fed up with the mandates and the taking away of freedoms as we Americans are. Yeah, I mean, you could argue that probably even a bit more because I would argue in Germany there's even less representation of it doesn't feel like less like being represented. So I think we have more protests on the streets because we even feel less represented than you in America. So that's the basis of the protest that you've had no voice in these unlawful mandates. I mean, that's basically it. I mean, there's always someone has more focus on the children and others more on the vaccination mandates, but the bases is that we don't feel represented. So we have to go out in the street and make our

Maria Square Benjamin Germany America
Israel’s Parliament Dissolves, Paving Way for Election in November

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

Israel’s Parliament Dissolves, Paving Way for Election in November

"Israel's parliament dissolves itself to set up another election Has voted to dissolve itself marking the end of a year old experimental coalition government and sending the country to the poles on November 1 for the 5th time in less than four years following the vote Israel's foreign minister and architect of the outgoing coalition government embraced Naftali Bennett Israel's shortest serving prime minister before they swapped chairs The government has collapsed just over a year after it was formed in a historic move to saw longtime leader Benjamin Netanyahu ousted after 12 years in power by a coalition of ideologically diverse parties the

Israel Naftali Bennett Benjamin Netanyahu Government
 Israel's parliament dissolves, sets 5th election in 4 years

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

Israel's parliament dissolves, sets 5th election in 4 years

"Israel's parliament dissolves itself to set up another election Has voted to dissolve itself marking the end of a year old experimental coalition government and sending the country to the poles on November 1 for the 5th time in less than four years following the vote Israel's foreign minister and architect of the outgoing coalition government embraced Naftali Bennett Israel's shortest serving prime minister before they swapped chairs The government has collapsed just over a year after it was formed in a historic move to saw longtime leader Benjamin Netanyahu ousted after 12 years in power by a coalition of ideologically diverse parties the

Israel Naftali Bennett Benjamin Netanyahu Government
'How dare you!': Grief, anger from Buffalo victims' kin

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

'How dare you!': Grief, anger from Buffalo victims' kin

"A plea for the nation to end racial violence 86 year old Ruth whitfield was one of ten black people massacred in an attack on a supermarket in Buffalo New York her daughter Robin Harris during a Thursday news conference first shouted how dare you referring to accuse gunmen Peyton gendron before she called on people in this country to take action I need this Violence to stop We need to fix this And we need to fix it now Attorney Benjamin krupp says gun makers know what they are selling and who their customers are What did they think this 18 year old young man was going to do with an AR-15 that can shoot 70 rounds and 20 seconds Authorities are investigating the possibility of hate crime and terrorism charges against children who posted hundreds of pages of his plans before the shooting I'm Tim McGuire

Ruth Whitfield Peyton Gendron Robin Harris Attorney Benjamin Krupp Buffalo New York Tim Mcguire
Ensuring Good Education in a Post-CRT World

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | 5 months ago

Ensuring Good Education in a Post-CRT World

"Point chapter at your Belinda high school. Awesome. So last week on April 5th in a three two vote, my school board passed a resolution to ban critical race theory in my district. So my question is, what's the next steps to ensuring that we have a good education, even after that ban? That's great. So it's a two part dance. So that's great. Now you need to say, okay, let's get pro American curriculum in our schools. So what does that look like? Hillsdale college has done a lot of work in this. We're starting to do a lot at turning point USA. But we have to teach people, what is the American story? What is the problem? What is the proper way to view American history? What is America? Was it a mistake? Was it something that has kind of fell out of the sky? There's just a couple of things I'll share here that I think could really excite high school students that they're definitely not taught in school. America was summoned into existence at a time and a place that is very unusual. In fact, it's almost never happened before in human history. Most civilizations are countries stumble into existence. They're not summoned into existence. I want you to think about that. There was a decision to create America. China just kind of existed and it was kind of the Yangtze River valley civilization is kind of built into itself. In this river valley in India and so on and so forth. But America was a group of people that made a decision founding fathers. We have a set of principles. We don't like what's happening. We're going to declare independence of things that are always true. And I'm afraid that most young people are not just being taught that even we're serving taught the opposite. They're being taught to the founding fathers were racist bigoted slave owners. And they don't know their history. They don't know that the first antislavery convention in America was hosted in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin in 1775. They don't know that 9 out of 13 states before the constitution was ratified in 1787 had already independently abolished slavery. They didn't a lot of young people never top that Vermont was the first state to abolish slavery in 1777, inspired by the Declaration of Independence. So the next step is get your local school districts and not just teach this, but inspire young people to be excited about the country they live in. A lot of young people, I think, are

Belinda High School America Hillsdale College Yangtze River Valley River Valley China India Benjamin Franklin Philadelphia Vermont
"benjamin" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

03:58 min | 7 months ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Code Story

"Is modern, then I think you should make that investment. Before I was editing nginx configs. Now I don't even think about the nginx because I'm using something totally different to host. The last code you maintain the better it is. Let other much more skilled and much more much better funded developers worry about some of the heavy lifting. So how do you find product market fit? The grand question, right? How do you know when you've hit it? I hope you heard my deep breath. This is a heavy topic. To be perfectly honest, I myself have not found that recipe. To me, product market fit again, it comes down to the retention and building something that people want. I have to do that. Sometimes you get lucky, but at the end of the day it comes down to iterating fast. There is also a caveat through which I found which keeps me thinking about, okay, but what is an experiment? What is an iteration, right? Because when you're a perfectionist, you really want to test something out to the point that you say, okay, checkbox. It's a dilemma. This to me is a dilemma every day, and we do a test. Did we do this test good enough so that we know the real result or not? Some people say, yeah, but even if it's sketchy, you should get some result that then on the basis of that, then maybe you do iterate more time. Of consider myself as a perfectionist in that sense. And this is an everyday dilemma. What is enough? Well, last question. So how much of product building creation is art versus science? I'm a creator myself. You're a creator and I'm curious how much do you believe is its art versus science? Before starting mentor, I presented the impression that this is art. And now I know that it's not a science pure science. It is just that in some, in some cases, you do something artistic and you think that something happened because of that, but I know something happened because of some underlying reasons. This is something I learned from my cofounder, who's got a very kind of a domino thinking guide. If we do this, then that will happen. And I think it's pure pure science. I mean, I think a really good example is I got inspired by the material design when Google came up with it and I felt it was so amazing. But when I started actually using it for mentor camp, early days, I realized this is too engineered. And then I logged into Apple a lot apple is like engineered, but in the same time, it's more emotional. It's more kind of romantic in that sense. So I think apple is the Holy Grail in terms of the design, product design. You get both. If you look at mentor come today is to engineer we are working on making it automatic. I would say. Well, Benjamin, thank you for being on the show today and answering my questions about all things product. I really appreciate your expert advice on building amazing products. Thank you very much for having me. Well, this concludes another great chat and expert advice from our Friends over at mentor cam. Check out all the great mentors and experts by going to code story dot co slash mentor cam today. Make sure to use the promo code code, for 20% off. Stay tuned in next week for another great chat and expert advice from our Friends over at mentor.

apple Google Benjamin
"benjamin" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

08:01 min | 7 months ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Code Story

"From the age of 15. He's designed and developed apps for Lamborghini for Visa for Maserati and he started up several startups as well around empowering individuals. Benjamin, thank you for being on the show today. Thank you very much for having me. Really excited to jump into all things product. Before we jump into that, tell me a little bit about you. Tell me in the audience about you. My dad has a software hardware company. They actually ran away theaters. Me starting coding when I was at like 1415 was not a strange thing. Although back then was definitely a stretch thing in the eyes of everyone else. So I remember for Christmas I asked my parents to buy me this book that the flesh Bible it was called two books. I got that. I remember it was, I think. $40. And I just started taking those books to school instead of the books that I was supposed to take. At this, that's how I got started. Many people I think from the current generation don't even know what flash flash was, but essentially flash was the only way for us to be able to create something that has motion in the browser, beautiful animations and it was a big thing amongst photographers. And I was also an amateur photographer, so I wanted to build a great beautiful photography website for myself. So I got into flash. Well, let's jump into the product world, right? So you've done quite a few things in product and development. And so all my questions are going to center around that space. So let's start out with this question. So what makes a solid MVP for a startup? That's a pretty open ended question, but the MVP is a topic that's talked about quite a bit. In your expert opinion, what makes a solid MVP? I consider something a solid MVP when you either have retention or great feedback. Some people love your product and they voice it. Either to you directly or to their peers. To me, it's not necessarily about numbers. I think in the beginning, if you have a few people who love your product, I think if you have ten, you know that you can go up to a hundred. If you have a hundred, you can do a thousand and thousand you get the thinking. That's my short answer. But I think this is something that we all learn as we go. And it's a process that just never ends. Even refining the terminologies and what it is that we consider something solid. So with an MVP, you do have to decide where to stop engineering, right? Or where to stop building. How do you go about finding that line of this is when an MVP is engineered enough? This is something that I myself I would say I have to get better at because it's an engineer you always want to ship more and more features, right? The golden rule is that you have to publish your product, even if you think it's embracing. If you don't think it's embarrassing, this is your so late. To give you a more detailed answer, I would say, I always like to build products that I know that I myself would use. So you can be your first customer. But there is a caveat here. Is that you really need to be your first customer in a sense that you need to use your product in action. Not in a hypothetical or theoretical way. So when I built my first startup just before I graduated, like I said, I wanted to build a great photography website for myself. So my first startup was about a platform that enables anyone to build beautiful photography websites, right? My criteria was that okay, well, if I can build a great website for myself and if that website gets some kind of recognition, okay, now I have something because now I know that this is actually built through my platform. And I always tell everyone that I think even when it comes to learning how to code, the best way to learn coding is by is by building something that works. And not the other, where you don't learn to code just for the sake of learning it because it's cool. You have to want to build something that works. So, okay, from a product standpoint, you know, there's this term, technical debt, right? And us and the tech world kind of know what that means. But give it your own voice-over. What is technical debt to you and when is the right time to pay it? As an example of it mentor camp, 6, 6 months into building the MVP, I realized that we have a technical debt that can not be pushed down the line. We actually took a step back and changed the back end completely. We started that. It would be, and then we switched to Firebase. And even though it was not easy in the beginning, because it's not that easy to secure Firebase on a level that I wanted to have it secured. But essentially, I got it done in four to 6 weeks. And that was like the best decision. To transfer your question directly from my own customary experience perspective, it just didn't work. It was so clunky that I was like, no, no, no. It's just a bad user experience. And that was a good decision. Ever since we are running on Firebase and I'm very happy with it. We will never have to re-engineer anything that even we developed two years ago. Sounds like it's a little bit of an experience based way to find it. To find it, you kind of got to go through it. Yeah, and there are two ways to experience this is a customer and as a developer in terms of maintainability and extensibility. If it's hard to build a new role out, you will feature that you should know deep in your heart that should take a day and then you spend four days on it. Now you have technical debt. This is something to be honest. I never really had to deal with it because I was always obsessed with keeping the code base super clean. Now, of course, I wasted time. I shipped things much later than I could have. That was definitely a trade off. But I'd rather sleep well in terms of knowing that I can keep extending my code base and capitalize on it then. One day hitting the iceberg, right? Makes total sense. And actually, that's a really good segue into another one of my questions. So when is the right time to factor in scalability? When is the right time to think about building it to explode in the future? Explode in a good way. Yeah, for disclosure, the products that I've built, these products are not being used by millions of users in a database. It's right. So on that note, my experience is limited. I personally like to think of scalability from days zero. Again, because I want to sleep well, I'm making a bet that whatever I built will be used by millions of people one day and we all hope that this will happen overnight. Even when I was building my previous startup, I think that 40 years ago, I went totally serverless. And so let's just kind of start the gap. I switched everything over. So my view is that if you can make if you don't have to re-engineer your whole stack but kind of like tweak it a little bit and use something that.

Lamborghini Benjamin
"benjamin" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

The Addicted Mind Podcast

05:09 min | 10 months ago

"benjamin" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

"And so right now, I have no clue how to achieve the goals that I'm currently trying to achieve, you know, and just to be blunt and open. I really want to try to sell millions of copies of this book. And the reason for that is because I have a future self that would unlock a lot of opportunities for my future self to do what I want there. I don't have the same goals as what I used to have in the past. Not that I've even outgrown them, but sometimes I've recognized that they weren't the right goal to pursue. And I can now set better goals. But then you can actually go through the process of moving forward. And once you just are open and honest about what you're trying to accomplish, you're no longer hiding anything. You're just saying this is this is me and this is what I'm going for and then you can start either getting the help and the support you need, and you can also help and support the people who can get you there. And then your life has direction and intention, where if you look at your daily behavior, you can look at it and you can say, you know, at least a third of my day was spent on activities that were moving me in the direction I want to go. Versus looking at your day and saying, I have no clue why I'm even doing any of this stuff. Right. Definitely. Well, Benjamin, I want to thank you for coming on and sharing your wisdom. You know, if people hopefully people are listening to the podcast, but if they're listening out there and someone struggling maybe wanting to move forward, but stock or feeling like, what would you want to tell him? Definitely I'd want to tell them that whoever you are that where you're at right now is just a snapshot in time. And that things can and do and will change..

Benjamin
"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"Simple <Speech_Music_Male> life is short <Speech_Music_Male> is h by <Speech_Music_Male> me just <Speech_Music_Male> long. <SpeakerChange> It is <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> by you christian <Speech_Music_Male> long. You also <Speech_Male> see produce said <Speech_Male> along with <Speech_Music_Male> megan v <Speech_Male> monaco <Speech_Male> and interim <Speech_Music_Male> producer <Speech_Male> katie allen <Speech_Male> and see <Speech_Male> your producers machel. <Speech_Male> Mitch lands <Speech_Male> audio. <Speech_Male> Engineer is <Speech_Music_Male> sergio <Speech_Music_Male> and rica's <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> executive producer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Is marshall <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> louis <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for a company <Speech_Music_Male> called <SpeakerChange> wondering <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> a big brother <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and he was in <Speech_Male> use <SpeakerChange> like a <Speech_Male> a of the boys <Speech_Male> they <Speech_Male> definitely pass together. <Speech_Male> You've you've <Speech_Male> you'd like him too much <Speech_Male> you it'd be what <Speech_Male> little bit <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> be like intimidated <Speech_Male> by my thing and <Speech_Male> you try too hard. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> He's still <Speech_Male> a little kid. <SpeakerChange> He's <Speech_Male> still like thirteen <Speech_Male> evidence. A jeopardy <Speech_Male> champion <Speech_Male> yet. <Speech_Male> he's done. he's <Speech_Male> really smart. <SpeakerChange> he's smarter. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> She knows more stuff than <Speech_Male> may any fighters. <Speech_Male> Better brian than me. <Speech_Music_Male> She kind <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> made. No 'cause <Speech_Male> i've experienced things <Speech_Male> that he'll never <Speech_Male> get to experience. Do <Speech_Male> you think people would find <Speech_Male> it weird if you <Speech_Male> want to bring him play <Speech_Music_Male> album socially <Speech_Music_Male> i bet <Speech_Music_Male> you these dow <Speech_Male> smarter <SpeakerChange> than me. <Speech_Male> No <Speech_Male> but i think you'd like him <Speech_Male> so much. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> i but i can <Speech_Male> hang up. Who smarter than <Speech_Male> an enoch. Itunes <Speech_Male> secure not <Speech_Male> fourteen year old. <Speech_Male> Well i'd be like he's <Speech_Male> the wurmser <Speech_Male> he's special. He's <Speech_Male> not like a normal <Speech_Male> although <Speech_Male> he does <Speech_Male> this he does. Maybe <Speech_Male> it'll be intimidated. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> He's got <Speech_Male> a devil-may-care. Yeah <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is all <Speech_Male> it's all <Speech_Male> a it's like <Speech_Male> kind of it's <Speech_Male> never thought <Speech_Male> he didn't care <Speech_Male> he <Speech_Male> knows we will <SpeakerChange> like even <Silence> if he is weird hair <Speech_Music_Male> yet he seems <Speech_Male> like <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> little michael sarah <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> like <Silence> a free thinker. <Speech_Male> Yeah i <Speech_Male> like him. <Speech_Male> Maybe i couldn't mentor. <Silence> Maybe he's a mentor <Silence> me. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I mean it's <Speech_Male> also very flattering. <Speech_Male> You that you would be <Silence> able to mentor him. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> He's <Speech_Male> so like smart cool. <Speech_Male> He's still a kid. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> made in terms of <Speech_Male> like mode. <Speech_Male> You teach them about <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Male> a big brothers and <Speech_Male> sisters do. I don't think <Speech_Male> about teaching. It's about <Speech_Male> being there <Speech_Male> for advice. Like if he <Speech_Male> says this kid <Speech_Male> social stuff. <Speech_Male> Yeah i think so. It'd be really. <Speech_Male> I would love <Speech_Male> to help <Speech_Male> boost math homework. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I love to <Speech_Male> teach them about the <Silence> or try to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> talk to girls. <Speech_Male> There's much yes <Speech_Male> so much promise. <Speech_Male> Because <Speech_Male> i'm sure one day he <Speech_Male> will be better than <Speech_Male> Girls right now <Speech_Male> is probably nine of <Speech_Male> probably <Speech_Male> but maybe <Speech_Male> it could <Speech_Male> be like a little savant <Speech_Male> little <SpeakerChange> social <Speech_Male> mass social <Speech_Male> subodh. <Silence> <Speech_Male> He's too <Speech_Male> smart. he's been on <Speech_Male> his own too much. She's <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> he'll and girls <Speech_Male> that age it's it's <Speech_Male> they won't recognize <Speech_Male> the charm. I don't <Silence> think <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> really. <Speech_Male> I don't think we'd <Speech_Male> be like to play. He'd be <Speech_Male> polite. Maybe <Speech_Male> right and he's gotta <Speech_Male> make joe <Silence> like go and they just think you're weird.

katie allen michael sarah
"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"That has an amazing voice. Is like i consider him like goals for me. Well like having a recording studio in your house. Yes recording animated. Oh my god you doing voiceovers. That's if any was listening. Yeah and you want like a knockoff. Should he version of h jon benjamin christian long it's pood- dollar seventy two. Yeah instagram reach out See long benjamin about. He's john bench. he's got the perfect career. You do sound like him. i could be knock version. Yeah i really off blind to a little self deprecating. Sure i can do what he does about the gas that we have Okay this is from any any e. n. e. How would you say what the last name lag guns. Add lions ad l. a. g. u. n. z. Noggins loggins art. Noggin said a an here. I think subject hello from the philippines. Hey i think this might be our first letter from the philippines that we've read dear jason christian. I am happy. I discovered your podcast late into the game because i can choose which interviews to listen to i. I haven't caught up yet because work books chores lessons than netflix. Interrupt my listening Okay any that's a lot of things. I get work and chores get lessons. But i get netflix. To okay ad book. Sorry never mind the shame on me and he says no shame on you even though i tried to she or she oh That i could not tell you. Oh i can't tell you because there is a photo accompanying it. I don't know if i can say adorable photo. Storable of a young na or maybe that's an age now but it looks like an older photo if that's any now he is like the most advance human alive and just shamed her for doing chores toddler. She she looks about three in this photo. She is truly adorable. One of the cutest photos. I've ever seen okay back to any. But on days that i have to go out. I'm sure to have it on in the car. I enjoyed the banter a lot and look forward to your post game analysis. Well hopefully you're enjoying this post game I like diarrhea stories. Like to know. I'd like i'm sure a did her share diarrhea when she was that age. I'm sure yeah. Maybe not in her pants at hotel I'd like to know. Would you rather be a zombie. Apocalypse survivor is great..

jon benjamin john bench jason christian philippines netflix Noggin benjamin lions diarrhea
"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"That would be the. That's jackie earle. Haley for airbnb. I'm i'm trying to think okay. Go it smells like shit. This has been jackie roy. Haley for airbnb. I'm trying to think of the person who i would be most ashamed to diarrhea in my pants in front of and tom brady has got to be up. There is pretty like affable affable. But also like really impressive and clean like fish like probably shits like perfect like the compact. You know right with that with that. Tb twelve is right. Shits or like little pellett readjusted shits there so perfectly feed considered food. Yeah it's actually like a totally. He's a sustaining system. Yeah oh shit. I haven't eaten breakfast. I just have a brady bar. It's just all like hey. It's like speaking of brady bars. What is your go-to snack. Food what is your favorite if you have one snack food for the rest of your life. The chip search a specific brand. You shut me. Send you products lately. What am i. it's a i think. K. e. o. g. h. It's either irish crisps. Hilo keys key codes. I have no idea how to pronounce representative for representative for who's is listening right. But i also might be wrong but it's close to that okay. That's what i've been eating. That's what i've been eating late late very good sour cream and onion and the really good plane pepper. That's a good lesson to if you're going to start a potato chip company i mean. Of course you want to concentrate on making delicious potatoes but also like it'd be nice to have to name your company something that is like very clear and easy to say rick right. I see. it's only because of my failing memory. Okay ahmad picturing me okay. So we shouldn't blamed. Don't don't blame or haro okay What what's the movie john that you were really excited when you had kids that you're really excited to introduce your kids to that. There was like a movie to you may be growing up. Oh Two thousand one really. What what was the reaction was actually. The was the first movie i ever. It didn't work out for me or my kid but that was i remember being traumatic from when i was a kid took me to see that in the theater when it came out. Oh my god. Yeah i remember like I still remember the feeling of being insanely afraid of the beginning like that yet. He's like existential threat to really dark light. Nanhai like literally like thirty minute. Like psychedelic slyke. No dialogue yes. Parents probably thought into space movie star. Yeah yeah he'll be fun. I but that did not show. I think was excited to show my kid..

airbnb jackie earle jackie roy Haley tom brady diarrhea Tb Hilo ahmad rick Nanhai john slyke
"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"Your kids are they into your show. They watch your show bob's burgers archer. Yeah he used to think he follows either anymore. Do you have voices. does he sound like you. He does have kind of a deep voice But he stopped watching both of them. Maybe when he was in like fourteen or fifteen. We used to watch bob swingers together. When i was young young it's been so long now it has when it started. We he was. We would watch together but now he doesn't yeah. How often do you get to record. East i mean obviously now. We're recording everything separately but Was there a time when you guys were able to record together. It was that let you and kristen. And the rest of the gal that was pre pre pandemic. That was the last time we did that now. They record archers was recorded separately since the beginning. Show the we all did our parts Individually so you never really see each other until you're doing some sort of promotional thing exactly. Yeah i didn't meet the cast of archer till a year the summer after the show came out my when we first promoted it. Yeah Funny when i met them at a to. Cca's yeah yeah and now we're mid pooh-pooh in my car right before a long story. I know we have time. That's the nice thing about podcasts. Pooping i've told the story on aisha podcast so i won't tell the whole thing ago. Version is i- diarrhea and my shorts and they played it. It was like the worst night of my life. And then i met the cast that like we had like an eight. Am had had diarrhea all night. John p on people will people to the aftermath of flying first class. Maybe for the first time..

bob swingers bob kristen archer Cca diarrhea John p
"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"That's my grandma's name. I love the name. Jody and no offense to i don't mean that that's an old fashioned but you don't hear a lot of jobs. Is it josephine short for josephine. I know i've current name is just jaw like mine just a nickname like thing. I think john wall. John i guess is not nickname. Could be jonathan for. Yeah could be especially j. o. n. Yes you would think yeah. Jody i think This is short for Nothing jody that. I haven't asked joe. Joe joe defending jonathan. You guys were you close growing up from the bible and there's done jonasson bhagat jonathan. Cain slade jonasson. When you were growing up. Did you have a penchant for for performance where you would you have funny kid growing up. Were you Like a gregarious. Little john i was little. Yeah that's about it. I very little you started. Little kid. To qualify was not like For former cy but by how to magnetism that way. I think honestly because i was very small how i think people like small things. Children and adults like small people. I was to john. Yeah and i was cute. I think yeah so i did get a sort of The attention that one might get without having to perform in a weird way. Yeah that's interesting. I i think. I was kinda shy but i still had a lot of people. Always like wanting to like me round right. My experience was similar. In and i was so little in fact that i was a threat to anyone so i wasn't really picked on. I was like almost too easy. A target it was just too. That's funny tiny's definitely picked on At the same time like that was you know there were bright. Levels of attention would get some some being punched in the face all the way to be lifted up and that. Yeah yeah yeah a little guy. It's funny to imagine. Let's put them up on the top shelf of the closet. Yeah hey guys. It's funny to came down now. It's it's funny..

josephine Jody jonasson bhagat jonathan Cain slade jonasson jonathan john wall Joe joe jody john joe John
"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"Much more frequently once people started airing. My voice has so I think sean benjamin a lot more after hearing a lot of mentions of meat too. But now i'm curious you if i really agree. Because i've only heard him as those now as these carriers so you know. I've also gotten a an ex girlfriend. Used to save that ice hound. I think she's right. I sound like the dog in family. Oh yeah oh yeah brother We're doing today just kind of at that kind. Yeah it's seth macfarlane but it's like a sort of doing we'll say he's seth mcfarland he doesn't he kind of fancy himself like a rat pack dean martin and he kind of does that. That's very natural sounding voice for him as it is for you. But i've heard that too. But i'm curious to hear the real version of h benjamin except only hurt his character. Well you're everyone's about to. Let's do it okay. here it is. I was just gonna say one thing about your that. brian impression that you do sounds like my impression of you. Let them a little bit dozen your repression me is gonna look worse your voice down. Yeah 'cause we have pretty much the same. I would say Pitched voice right whenever you do your impression since like puberty well christian. Now sit down so low because you always used to be a little bit. I'm not crazy about talking on the phone but you used to hate talking on the phone. I still kinda do yes. Yeah well when you would so when you'd answer the phone and this is being i'd make you feel more self conscious otago. My impression of you answering the phone was low. Have a gun into who cares territory. I think we've been there for quite some time brought thirty. Yeah that's could be the name of the show here. We go with another episode of who cares but luckily people care about our guests so and they care about the show. We shouldn't set it because that's isn't that inherently kinda shitting on the people who listen now. It's not shitting ourselves okay. Well let's ourselves. I don't want to get into any shit on people who listen okay. We're shooting ourselves. I want to relegate the ship. No we love we listeners. We've come full circle in in this contro- shit was. Can we start the show. Stewart fury is my introduction to the legendary voice after back after and very very funny man. H jon benjamin injuring sweetheart.

seth macfarlane sean benjamin h benjamin dean martin brian otago Stewart fury jon benjamin
"benjamin" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

True Crime Brewery

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

"Erica agreed to cooperate with the state in the prosecution of benjamin her husband and further agreed to testify truthfully. On behalf of the state at benjamin's trial the mo you stated that the state would not seek a sentence of death or life without parole against erica as long as she provided reliable information to the state the mo. You also said that. If erica took a polygraph examination and was found not deceptive on all questions related to the homicides. The state wouldn't prosecute her for homicide. But when erica came in for her polygraph exam she ended up confessing to helping to commit the murders. Maybe even being behind them in her pre polygraph interview so pre polygraph interviews is just a way for the person taking the test to be made more relaxed. Comfortable with the interviewer but erica. Being who she was could not resist talking about herself. She talked nonstop. She started out talking about her relationship with. Dj in she ended up telling the interviewer about her telling dj. Just fucking do it and about how she had cut genie without knowing whether or not genie was dead or alive so it turned out that erica. Never even took the polygraph. Her deal to not be prosecuted for homicide was gone and then she was charged with homicide. Erica should have kept your mouth shut. Well i'm glad she didn't. I'm glad she's locked up so because of the publicity in this case the trial the secrets trials were moved out of worcester county maryland. Benjamin's i was held in rockville and erica's was held in frederick at benjamin's two thousand melissa testified that she was subjected to the same ritual that joshua genie had gone through although she wasn't killed on the night when she and her friend justin had been inside. The secrets condo lucky for them. It was very lucky. So erica's convicted of the first degree murder of joshua ford. The second degree murder of genie crutchley the she was sentenced to life for the first degree. Murder joshua twenty years to run consecutively for the second degree murder genie and eighteen months to run concurrent for theft in a separate trial. Benjamin sea freight was sentenced to thirty years for the second degree. Murder of genie. Twenty five years to run concurrent for first degree assault of genie and five years to run consecutively for accessory. After the fact he was actually acquitted of the murder of joshua primarily. Because erica's gun had been used to kill joshua so. I really am kind of stunned. That he didn't get more punishment but he didn't talk and i think that's what was in his favor not to talk. He gave name rank and serial number and he was done but in two thousand ten. Benjamin siefert filed for divorce which was granted both eriksson. Bj have filed. Numerous appeals and all have failed. Benjamin exhausted his last appeal in twenty ten so he'll be eligible for parole this year. But it's highly unlikely that he'll get it and i'll keep my fingers crossed erica's appeal citing ineffectiveness of counsel was denied in two thousand fourteen. And she'll still be eligible for parole in twenty twenty four such thinking of punishments of different people who committed different crimes. It seems like they got off kind of lightly for what they did to me. These are brutal planned murders. They didn't get charged. Anything for the dismemberment. There is something like that. Abusive corpses lily. There is yes. Plus i would think there's i both first degree murders and both of this couple are.

erica benjamin Erica joshua genie joshua ford genie crutchley joshua twenty Benjamin sea worcester county Benjamin rockville joshua Benjamin siefert melissa maryland justin eriksson Bj
"benjamin" Discussed on We The People

We The People

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on We The People

"I'm jeffrey rosen. President and ceo of the national constitution center and welcomed the we the people a weekly show of constitutional debate. national constitution center is a nonpartisan. Nonprofit chartered by congress to increase awareness and understanding of the constitution among the american people. During the summer of seventeen eighty seven constitutional convention was well underway. And today we discuss benjamin franklin and the constitution franklin the first american in the words of our two great franklin historians today played a central role at the constitutional convention. A often underappreciated. And it's such an honor to discuss. Franklin's contribution to the constitution with two of america's greatest historians of franklin and two of the authors grace books written about franklin which. I'm so excited to share with we. The people listeners. Ed larson holds the high end hazel. Darling chair in law and his university professor of history at pepperdine university. He is the author of franklin washington. The founding partnership edit is wonderful to have you on the show thank you. Your center is a national treasure. Thank you so much for that. And h w brands is professor and jack s blanton senior chair in history at the university of texas austin. He is the author of the first american. The life and times of benjamin franklin which was a finalist for the poetry prize in history. It's such an honor to have you as well jeff. I'm delighted to be with you. And ed and i look forward to a good conversation. I've learned so much from both of your books. Franklin in washington and the first americans. I want the people listeners to learn from them as well. And i'll just begin by asking you to sum up franklin's contribution to the constitutional convention ed what would you say. Franklin's contributions work well. Franklin was the host. He was the governor or president was exact title of pennsylvania so he was the host of the event and a wonderful host often with meetings at his home inviting people over. He lived only a couple blocks away from where they met and he could meet with them under his mulberry tree or up in his new new he just added a wing to his house. That was lovely and so in that sense. He contributed in unsure. Bill has much more to say about that His book just captured that so beautifully i also would say though that he had a vision for a federal union and Certain powers that needed to be with the central government. I mean a federal union was something news or no and it goes all the way back to his albany plan so it goes back years fifteen years. And he's had this consistent view that central government needed certain powers which included control over interstate and international commerce so he could grow the economic pie. He had that vision because he had print shops. All over the colonies. Any knew they needed to break down these these barriers because each state was essentially a separate economic union. Also power to deal with native americans to deal with the open. The frontier over things about military power over international power so our ambassadors could have effective control and the to tax and spend for the general welfare and those are important powers and they didn't exist under the old articles of confederation and he knew those were needed so he brought that vision he brought the sense of compromises. And i'm sure we'll talk about how the leader in working the compromises and finally he was one of the to truly national figures with along with george washington and for my study of the ratification process. It would not have been ratified without his committed support and critically. He represented distinctly different ideology. George washington i would say would be some viewed as somewhat right of centre. Franklin is you'd have left of center and he was about the only trustworthy person who might have become an annual anti-federalist who didn't and his support of constitution as reflected in his closing speech which was published the only the only thing from the convention that was published at the time published nationwide. That was critical for ratification. Thank you so much for that. You've emphasized franklin's commitment to union to compromise the fact that he was a nationalist who has left of center. And your wonderful book you call him along with washington and enlightenment. Pragmatist who sense of compromise was crucial to the fact. That convention was passed. Bill as ed says your book so beautifully brings us to philadelphia gives us a sense of what the streets felton smelled like and how franken was walking near a tell tell us about the role. He played his host and also the crucial role of his temperament in making the constitution possible. Sure i'd be happy to. But i actually. I want to build on what ed said about. Franklin's vision i think. This is absolutely critical. Because franklin was he had been a reluctant revolutionary franklin had been a great fan of the british empire and he had hoped that the british empire could become enlightened enough that it would find room for a growing america and that america and britain could become the twin pillars of this atlantic spanning empire and he was grievously disappointed when british officials to his way of thinking. Were too short sighted to be able to embrace this. So franklin had seen the american colonies now the united states grow from very little in the early eighteenth century he was by far the oldest delhi to the the constitutional convention and so he had seen in his lifetime. The growth of this and he assumed that it would continue to grow and so he understood the need for and the potential in this federal union. That they were putting together that philadelphia because there had to be room for growth. There had to be room for new state to enter this thing so there had to be accommodation for what was going to happen. Not just next year next decade but the next century he had lived most of a century himself. The other thing he brought you refer to this. This franken brought a a certain temperament to the proceedings at philadelphia. The the driving spirits were ambitious. Young men like james madison and alexander. Hamilton they had much of their political futures ahead of them. Franklin's political career was behind him. He knew this his his life. Most of his life was behind. He knew this was sort of his swansong and so he wanted to remind the delegates at things. Don't turn out as you expect. So you have to make accommodations for that that in the real world as opposed to the world of your ambitions or.

franklin Franklin national constitution center jeffrey rosen benjamin franklin Ed larson franklin washington jack s blanton university of texas austin pepperdine university ed america george washington washington congress central government Bill jeff albany pennsylvania
"benjamin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Late summer seventeen sixty five pennsylvania colony an angry mob lumber towards market street wielding pitchforks and torches. They were on their way to burn down. Benjamin franklin's house. The pennsylvanians were furious that franklin had supported the british empire's stamp act. The policy imposed even more unpopular taxes on the american colonies as the streets rang with chance of no taxation without representation. A family friend urged. Franklin's wife deborah to flee but debra refused to run even as the mob surrounded her home instead. She begged her cousin to come over and to bring his guns. Not only did he arrive as asked. He brought other armed defenders with him. They successfully scare the mob away before it could hurt anybody deborah. Her cousin and his friends all proved their bravery that day. But obviously one key person was missing benjamin. Franklin the statesman hadn't been there to protect his home or loved ones because he was in london with his second family. The threat against deborah wasn't enough to bring franklin back to the states nor were the growing rumblings of an american revolution. In fact he spent much of his political career supporting england in just as he betrayed his wife for a british partner. Benjamin franklin may have also been a traitor to the united states. Welcome to conspiracy theories a spotify original from par cast. Every monday and wednesday we dig into the complicated stories behind the world's most controversial events in search for the truth. I'm carter roy and i'm molly brandenburg and neither of us are conspiracy theorists but we are open minded skeptical and curious. Don't get us.

debra Benjamin franklin franklin Franklin pennsylvania benjamin london england carter roy molly brandenburg united states
"benjamin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"The autobiography of benjamin franklin by benjamin franklin but this affair having turned my thoughts to marriage i looked round me and made overtures acquaintance and other places but soon found that the business of a printer being generally thought a poor one. I was not to expect money with a wife and less with such a one as i should not. Otherwise think agreeable. A friendly correspondence says neighbors and old acquaintances had continued between me. And mrs read's family who all had a regard for me from the time of my first lodging in their house. I was often invited there and consulted in their affairs wherein i sometimes was of surface..

benjamin franklin first
"benjamin" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Pantheon

"That song survived but think about that. He goes into the basement and says okay. I got a strip this down even more write a whole new batch of songs and he wrote that debut and cars album before i ever even wrote this book. I told you i was a big fan. I mean every son on this thing has been a little rock radio and he wrote that all in one back within a few months thing that is so we know the rest. I know the history of the cars. So then benjamin. He decided to when all was said and done for the moment with the cars do his first solo album the lace and eighty six and he crow co wrote the music to deliver ix with his girlfriend. Diane page right is her name. Saying becky rankles and the album. They had one hit. I.

benjamin becky rankles Diane
"benjamin" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Pantheon

"That song survived but think about that. He goes into the basement and says okay. I got a strip this down even more write a whole new batch of songs and he wrote that debut and cars album before i ever even wrote this book. I told you i was a big fan. I mean every son on this thing has been a little rock radio and he wrote that all in one back within a few months thing that is so we know the rest. I know the history of the cars. So then benjamin. He decided to when all was said and done for the moment with the cars do his first solo album the lace and eighty six and he crow co wrote the music to deliver ix with his girlfriend. Diane page right is her name. Saying becky rankles and the album. They had one hit. I.

benjamin becky rankles Diane
"benjamin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"But the why did not give them any satisfaction they contented themselves with admonishing me and dismiss me considering me perhaps as an apprentice who was bound to keep his masters secrets. During my brothers confinement, which I resented a good deal notwithstanding our private differences, I had the management of the paper and I made it to give our rulers. Some rubs in it which my brother took very kindly while others began to consider me in an unfavourable light as a young genius that had a turn for libelling and satire my brothers discharge was accompanied with an of the house a very odd one that James Franklin should no longer printed the paper called the new. England current. There was a consultation held in our printing house among his friends what he should do in this case. Some proposed to obey the order by changing the name of the paper. But my brothers seeing inconveniences in that it was finally concluded on as a better way to let it be printed for the future under the name of Benjamin Franklin and to avoid the center of the Assembly that might fall on him as still printing it by his apprentice. The contrivance was that my olden denture. Should be returned to me with a full discharge on the back of it to be shown on occasion but to secure to him the benefit of my service, I was to sign new in dentures for the remainder of the term which were to be kept private a very flimsy scheme. It was however, it was immediately executed and the paper went on accordingly under my name for several months. At length a fresh difference arising between my brother and me I took upon me to assert my freedom presuming that he would not venture to produce the new in dentures. It was not fair in me to take this advantage and this I therefore reckon one of the first era of my life. But the unfairness of it weighed little with me when under the impressions of resentment for the below his passion too often urged him to bestow upon me though he was not otherwise and ill-natured man. Perhaps. I was too saucy and provoking..

James Franklin Benjamin Franklin England
"benjamin" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

The Addicted Mind Podcast

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"benjamin" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

"Hello. Everyone. Welcome to the addicted mind podcast. My guest today is Benjamin Hardy and he is going to talk about his upcoming book personality isn't Herman. INT- and Benjamin excited to have you on the show. I really want to talk about as we were talking about earlier talking about <hes> science-based changed. So before we do that, you want to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your story. Yeah. Absolutely. Man. Yeah. I guess the beginning of it really or at least the major kind of huge event that started my journey was my parents getting divorced at age eleven and I came from a background where my parents were kind of a religious family and When my parents divorced that stopped being a big part of our life at all. But my father was so torn up by the addiction in the depression of it. All that he ended up becoming an extreme drug addict actually while yeah, he was. It was intense man i. mean our house became literally a crazy place filled with drug addicts. ooh. Here, was also there's anything everything you can think of out in the open, really interesting to see <hes>. My Dad was a hero to me. He was also like a really successful guy in it. Just kind of really threw him down. You know he was an attorney and he was it just really was interesting to watch this kind of experience lasted. I, was eleven the oldest of three boys at lasted until I was around. Around nineteen or twenty. I have no clue how I graduated from High School I was the oldest of three and I was kind of suppressing everything that was going on and ultimately we shut out my dad and my mom was living apartment to apartment just trying to she was actually trying to run a health club with her sister a small business, and so she was kind of go go go new zero stability in. In, my younger brother ended up dropping out of high school. He tried joining the Marines ended up <unk> getting kicked out. I, ended up at age nineteen. I was living at my cousin's house on his couch playing world of warcraft all day doing nothing and just was incredibly unhappy, Viktor. Frankl. Who wrote the book man's search for meaning he talks a lot about in that book and he's referencing the Holocaust, but he talks. Talks about how when a person loses hope and purpose for their future. The present becomes meaningless and that was kind of where I was at I. Didn't really have much hope or purpose for my life in my life was very meaningless. I was my purpose may have been to like get to the next level on world of war craft. It was not creating an enormous amount of meeting in my life and so I've. Connected with my face. I ended up serving a church mission for a few years. Totally changed my life, expose myself to a lot of things. Read. A lot of books saw a lot of people helped. A lot of people did a crazy amount of journaling. I. Reconnected With My Dad. He ended up overcoming addictions while I was on that experience. We've since become amazing friends. So you have a lot of his personal experience with addiction and Canada chaos that comes with all of that Oh. Yeah. Yeah. My life was chaos for a long time man I. Mean I was eleven year old boy and I had zero stability. There's capital T. Trauma. There's lower trauma you know in capital. T I. Guess You could say would be just like a cute events that occur just intense events that shaped your identity, but like lower t from what I understand is being in a chaotic environment and just kind of having zero footing zero. Zero certainty at. All right. So it Kinda leaves you lost and all of that and things like world of warcraft craft allow you to escape. Yeah. Yeah. That's kind of how I view addiction. I learned that from Gabor Montana, Polish really is addiction really is a solution, right? It's short term solution, but it's a solution to handling the pain and right. It actually can be a very good solution in the moment although there can be repercussions. So I had my own addictions, I've had my own experiences with that in the past. So what I want to ask you about too because I definitely want to get. Get, into your to your books and stuff and some of the things that you talk about in making change in your life. But before we do that, how did you start to make this change or what was the moment where he said I got to do something different I, mean you talked about going on a mission and starting to see different parts of the world and starting to see things differently. But when did it really start to change for you? There are a few things like when I was living my cousin's at first off I was completely unhappy with my life which I think is. something. A lot of people can relate with as part of the process of going on a mission you have to at least in various religions or situations. You also have to go through what they call a repentance process, which is similar to I. Think what? Like a twelve step process would be where you have break openly acknowledged in admit to everything you've done I, forgive. Forgive people in. So part of my process was forgiving my dad like redeveloping relationship with him. I also got into running so like even though I was not working and I was playing world of warcraft <unk> start exercising <unk> running, and you know it started with just a mile a day I. am the reason I started on because my cousin invited me to go with. With, him and we would just run like two or three days a week and I kind of enjoyed it, and he stopped going with me and I just kind of decided to keep going in. It ended up actually turning into me running a marathon or I was yeah. Like when I was nineteen, but I mean it started small and I would just run two miles. Miles couple times a week, and then I started running a little bit more and listening to music in getting a little bit more into it. I'd run in the middle of the night like <unk>. Right. I watched the movie on Fight Club on like repeat like I'd be I. Get get from running a movie fight club would be in the background I'd be playing. Playing was warcraft and the only thing that changes that running and I just jumped straight my mom's hot tub in her apartment complex. But while I was running I, think I was not consciously kind of subconsciously the building confidence. But also I was I was thinking I was not distracting myself as much as actually thinking about my life thinking about my future

Benjamin Hardy facebook attorney High School Herman Viktor Frankl