29 Burst results for "Benin"

"benin" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"benin" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"Each to the rightful owner and let the rightful owner the side on the property. I reached out to the MFA Boston for comment while reporting on this story, but I never heard back. They did have a statement though on their website concerning the bronzes. It reads like this. Today, the ethics of collecting and displaying works removed from their places of origin during periods of European colonialism is a subject of debate among museums, local and national governments, collectors, and the public. The MFA displays these Benin artworks for the benefit of communities in Boston, and abroad, and holds them in the public trust where they may be studied and viewed by all. If you'd like to see the Benin bronzes for yourself, they might be in one of your local museums. After all, they're currently scattered across over a 160 institutions..

MFA Boston Benin
"benin" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

05:49 min | 3 weeks ago

"benin" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"How old is old San Juan, Puerto Rico? Funny you should ask. It's actually celebrating its 500th birthday party this year. As for the rest of the island, well, it's always a party. You can cruise the ruta de la Chan, the islands renowned barbecue highway, or kayak the bioluminescent waters of la parguera. Tour the countless coffee plantations downing the central mountain region. And of course, visit the oldest city in the United States. Old San Juan. Plan your visit at discover Puerto Rico dot com. For your next vacation spot, check out Texas for their vast landscape of culture, regions, destinations, and activities. Explore 350 miles of coastline. And every kind of hiking trail from strenuous to wheelchair accessible. Enjoy world famous barbecue and Tex mex, and check out thrilling cowboy experiences. Travel Texas even offers an online trip builder that allows users to swipe on different Texas activities and generate a custom visually led trip matched to their own unique interests. Visit travel Texas dot com slash get your own. To get the only trip to Texas that matters. Yours. The objects in this gallery date from the 15th to the 19th century owned by a succession of kings, these work of art, adorned sacred authors and on visiting courtiers and diplomats. Many date to the 16th century when Benin was at its zenith. Controlling a tent. When I got to the museum, the first bronze as I saw were these two sculptures of heads from the neck up. I'd say they were a little smaller than life size and they were kind of a dark copper color. The Benin bronzes aren't made of copper though, aside from bronze, they're also made of brass. As I look face to face with these bronzes through their museum glass encasing, I was stuck on how impressive these things were. From the eyebrows to the eyes and the lips, you can tell these casters were masters of their craft. I read on the plaque that these were the heads of what are called obus. An Alba is a king. That's professor sadipur, aside from teaching, he's also an intellectual property lawyer in Nigeria. He explained to me that the oba was more than a king. He also played a spiritual role. The heads of oba's were cast after their passing and kept on an ancestral altar in a special room within the royal palace. This is all the current oba can always go into the room and consult his ancestors. Professor Sadiq explained to me that all of the bronze casters came from a particular family. And if you go to Benin today, you go to a place called Egon street in Benin. And you couldn't be doing that unless you belong to the family. And you have been initiated into the cold of the family. And so the trade secretes was passed from generation to generation. I want to reiterate that the kingdom of Benin existed in what is now Nigeria, with its capital city, Benin city, still existing in Nigeria today. Throughout this episode, when professor sidi Po says Benin, he is referring to Benin city, not the country to the west of Nigeria that is also named Benin. The kingdom of Benin's height was from the 1600s to 1897 when the kingdom fell to the British. At its height, the kingdom was known for the trade of gold, ivory, and pepper, among other things. They traded with other African kingdoms and the nations of Europe, particularly the Portuguese and the British. There are actually bronzes that paid tribute to the Portuguese. These aren't heads like those of the oba, but instead they're sort of like 3D plaques, a little over a foot long and probably about 9 inches wide. Aside from being trade partners, the Portuguese were at one point military allies of the kingdom of Benin and the plaques I saw commemorate that relationship. The Portuguese and the upper corners referenced the importance of those foreign allies in the kingdom. A lot of the Benin bronzes are in that 3D plaque style like that of the Portuguese soldiers. Plaques of children or of ceremonies of the crowning of a new Obama are pretty common. There are also plaques that show animals that have spiritual significance to the people of the Benin kingdom. And there's a couple of animals upon crocodile with mud fish, a dangerous creature that crocodiles associated with the realm of olokun, the God of the waters and wealth and.

Benin kingdom Texas la parguera San Juan Puerto Rico Nigeria Professor Sadiq Benin city professor sidi Po west of Nigeria oba royal palace United States Travel Europe Obama
"benin" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"benin" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Cost <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> of the show <Speech_Male> and you <Speech_Male> too can be a patron <Speech_Male> of the show at patriotair <Speech_Male> dot com <Speech_Male> slash amateur traveler <Speech_Male> to get <Speech_Male> the episode <Speech_Male> before anyone else <Speech_Male> does and then <Speech_Male> also get an ad free <Speech_Male> version and to <Speech_Male> get a monthly zoom <Speech_Male> call and also <Speech_Male> some cherokees <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and special things this <Speech_Male> week to shandra <Speech_Male> latest <Speech_Male> patron. Thank <Speech_Male> you shandra. <Speech_Male> I heard from deborah <Speech_Male> on the show. We did recently <Speech_Male> on the galapagos <Speech_Male> chris. I've been listening <Speech_Male> to your podcast for <Speech_Male> a few months now. Mostly <Speech_Male> while i'm hiking. <Speech_Male> I enjoy <Speech_Male> variety of destinations <Speech_Male> and guests. <Speech_Male> Especially <Speech_Male> your dry sense of humor. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> galapagos episode <Speech_Male> was great. A <Speech_Male> walk down memory lane <Speech_Male> from me. We were <Speech_Male> there in two thousand thirteen <Speech_Male> and just loved <Speech_Male> it agree <Speech_Male> with you that the best galapagos <Speech_Male> experiences <Speech_Male> are in the <Speech_Male> water we <Speech_Male> snorkeled with turtles <Speech_Male> sea lions <Speech_Male> guavas. And <Speech_Male> even penguins. <Speech_Male> Yes the water was <Speech_Male> definitely cold. Enough <Speech_Male> for the penguins. <Speech_Male> It was a real thrill <Speech_Male> to be so close <Speech_Male> to these amazing creatures <Speech_Male> sharing of <Speech_Male> their natural habitat. <Speech_Male> You didn't <Speech_Male> mention that. There's a book <Speech_Male> about the people of flurry. <Speech_Male> On an island that tells <Speech_Male> the incredible story <Speech_Male> of the <Speech_Male> german doctrine <Speech_Male> his mistress <Speech_Male> along with the german <Speech_Male> baroness and <Speech_Male> her two concerts. <Speech_Male> What a cast <Speech_Male> of characters. <Speech_Male> I read the book before our <Speech_Male> trip but admits <Speech_Male> the stories and people <Speech_Male> are super <Speech_Male> weird so the book <Speech_Male> might not be for everyone <Speech_Male> by the <Speech_Male> way we followed up our <Speech_Male> galapagos trip with <Speech_Male> the inca trail trek <Speech_Male> which made a <Speech_Male> nice double destination <Speech_Male> vacation <Speech_Male> package for <Speech_Male> active travelers. <Speech_Male> That is <Speech_Male> yeah. There definitely <Speech_Male> is something <Speech_Male> that i see a lot <Speech_Male> of people do and i know <Speech_Male> that Quasar <Speech_Male> who i went with often <Speech_Male> will book people <Speech_Male> through <Speech_Male> to some other <Speech_Male> experience either in <Speech_Male> ecuador. You <Speech_Male> know we were talking <Speech_Male> to people on that boat who are <Speech_Male> going off to the <Speech_Male> andes or <Speech_Male> going off to the <Speech_Male> amazon <Speech_Male> or i didn't think we <Speech_Male> talked to somebody else <Speech_Male> who also went down too much <Speech_Male> impeach you. <Speech_Male> The book mentioned <Speech_Male> is flurry ana <Speech_Male> by margaret. Whitmer <Speech_Male> and i will <Speech_Male> put a link <Speech_Male> to it in the show <Speech_Male> notes at amateur traveler <Speech_Male> dot com. <Speech_Male> I also <Speech_Male> heard from former <Speech_Male> guest jeff. <Speech_Male> Who wrote about the <Speech_Male> episode. We did <Speech_Male> on florida <Speech_Male> the space <Speech_Male> coast. Who said to comments <Speech_Male> on the episode at <Speech_Male> nasice kennedy <Speech_Male> space center <Speech_Male> is a congressionally <Speech_Male> designated <Speech_Male> astronauts <Speech_Male> national memorial <Speech_Male> aka <Speech_Male> space mirror <Speech_Male> authorized <Speech_Male> in may <Speech_Male> of nineteen <Speech_Male> ninety-one which honors <Speech_Male> the twenty five astronauts <Speech_Male> who lost <Speech_Male> their lives on <Speech_Male> space missions <Speech_Male> and just north <Speech_Male> is canaveral national <Speech_Male> seashore for <Speech_Male> beaches and <Speech_Male> sea turtles. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> did not know that <Speech_Male> about the national <Speech_Male> seashore. Good to <Speech_Music_Male> know. missions <Speech_Male> and just north <Speech_Male> is canaveral national <Speech_Male> seashore for <Speech_Male> beaches and <Speech_Male> sea turtles. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> did not know that <Speech_Male> about the national <Speech_Male> seashore. Good to <Speech_Music_Male> know. Thanks jeff <Speech_Music_Male> and with <Speech_Music_Male> that. We're going to end <Speech_Music_Male> this episode of <Speech_Music_Male> amateur traveller if <Speech_Music_Male> you have any questions <Speech_Music_Male> send an email <Speech_Music_Male> to hosted amateur <Speech_Music_Male> traveler dot com <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like jeff did <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or make a comment on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like deborah did <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at amateur traveler <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com <Speech_Music_Male> and. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> so much <SpeakerChange> for listening. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> The cat said <Music> one chap- <Music> <Music> building <Music> is just me

"benin" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"benin" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Bags back on the road and red. It's real good passport out. Agra traveler episode seven hundred and fifty nine today the amateur traveler talks about beaches lake village colonization and colorful dress slavery and the door of no return as we go to the african nation of vanessa amateur traveler. I'm your host chris christensen. Let's talk about ben or wikipedia. Wants me to say benin. But i will defer to the guest here. I'd like to welcome to the show. Rachel day cost from year of return. Book dot com. And who has come to talk to us about the country of been in rachel. Welcome to the show. Happy to be here first of all. We're probably gonna need to put this on a map because some people are wildly googling right now in wikipedia where is the country have been in innocent a west africa the biggest countries nearby our nigeria and ghana. And why did you find yourself in banana in the first place. Let's start with that. I did a dna test years ago. I am african canadian. Meaning my ancestors. Came here as enslaved africans. We don't know where from and i thought. Dna tests would be a good way to find out where my origins were from. After i did the dna tests been in was one of the top countries along with togo. Nigeria the whole region. Really and then. I took a trip there for six months and been in was one of the five countries. I visited excellent. And why should someone go to in. What i loved about. Being in was that it was authentic in terms of it hasn't yet been too americanized to westernize is still wear the traditional clothes. Drink their traditional tease ethan traditional food and it really felt like you were transported back to a time. They've kept their culture almost intact. And that's why you would want to go to benin versus another country that might be more westernized. There's something authentic inorganic about banana. That is so heartwarming. Banana is a small country. As i recall. It's actually a smaller country in africa. But it's the same size approximately the same size of ohio. Which always surprises me. How i look at a map. And it's a small country in the map of africa. And i do forget sometimes how big africa is interesting. That's that is larger than i would have thought. Now you spent a couple of months there but if somebody only had a week or two. What kind of tenor you gonna recommend for them. You probably landed the capitol kotonu which has museums restaurants any. Big port city has similar things in west africa. But the actinium would have to go to weeda. Which is maybe an hour west of kotonu. Weena has the door of no return and it's the voodoo capital of both the country and probably the continent okay. There's a festival every year and they're very proud of their culture..

chris christensen africa nigeria ghana six months weeda Nigeria a week one five countries both vanessa two west africa ohio today wikipedia benin rachel an hour
Travel to Benin - Rachel Décoste

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Benin - Rachel Décoste

"Or wikipedia. Wants me to say benin. But i will defer to the guest here. I'd like to welcome to the show. Rachel day cost from year of return. Book dot com. And who has come to talk to us about the country of been in rachel. Welcome to the show. Happy to be here first of all. We're probably gonna need to put this on a map because some people are wildly googling right now in wikipedia where is the country have been in innocent a west africa the biggest countries nearby our nigeria and ghana. And why did you find yourself in banana in the first place. Let's start with that. I did a dna test years ago. I am african canadian. Meaning my ancestors. Came here as enslaved africans. We don't know where from and i thought. Dna tests would be a good way to find out where my origins were from. After i did the dna tests been in was one of the top countries along with togo. Nigeria the whole region. Really and then. I took a trip there for six months and been in was one of the five countries. I visited excellent. And why should someone go to in. What i loved about. Being in was that it was authentic in terms of it hasn't yet been too americanized to westernize is still wear the traditional clothes. Drink their traditional tease ethan traditional food and it really felt like you were transported back to a time. They've kept their culture almost intact. And that's why you would want to go to benin versus another country that might be more westernized. There's something authentic inorganic about banana. That is so heartwarming. Banana is a small country. As i recall. It's actually a smaller country in africa. But it's the same size approximately the same size of ohio. Which always surprises

Benin Nigeria West Africa Rachel Ghana Togo Africa Ohio
looted treasures will return to Nigeria at last

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:39 min | 1 year ago

looted treasures will return to Nigeria at last

"Catherine. This is a fast moving news story. What's the latest with. The latest is a statement from the foreign minister. Heiko maas makes it clear that is part of the policy of addressing the colonial past. He says it's part of an honest approach. And it's about justice so it's obvious that moves definitely afoot What we're talking about here. Is the government preparing the groundwork with nigeria together in order to pave the way for the restitution at some stage but obviously the restitution will have to be negotiated individually by the museums in question. Love the intent to rest These works was sort of expressed. Some time ago by the german government right. They talked about that. It was legally immorally. I'm justifiable but this is the first practical steps have been taken by the german government. Is that right. I don't think you can say that. No because the government has been funding. Providence research of last couple of years and providence research should lead to something at some point it is also setup contact had station in gemini for claimants to approach in to ask for information to be put in contact with the relevant people out the groundwork has been of the past two years has been done. And as he said that has been this agreement so the intent between the states and the and the government on the municipalities so the intent has been there for a while and this was just a matter of time. Actually so it shouldn't really be taking anyone by surprise but of course is because it's such a big deal right. yeah dan. Can you say something about that because you know it is big news this right because as your book details. There's been such reluctance from museums to in any way engaged with the idea of repatriation. That's why it's a main. I do think it's an incredibly important moment. The idea that we now have a german official. Who has undertaken a visit to nigeria in order to talk about the returns and also importantly the fact that the display in berlin is being talked about in a new language in terms of consent that we're gonna display african objects if we're allowed to we're going to ask actually that's incredibly important. It's interesting for many that this is coming from the germans. They were not from the british. So what do we make of this moment of the german reckoning with the empire that was built by the british a very very interesting.

German Government Heiko Maas Nigeria Catherine Providence DAN Government Berlin
"benin" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"benin" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Details on the example policy. It's like quote dot com slash commercials or price could vary depending on your health issue in company. Another factor is not available in all states. Written and Nigeria launching a joint archaeological project investigating a site that's hugely important to the former kingdom of beneath the New Museum of West African Art will occupy a site in what's now Benin city in southern Nigeria. In what the British museum calls the most extensive archaeological excavation there ever it on Nigerian associates will excavate the site of the new museum before it goes up in 18 97. British forces raised the whole city to the ground to avenge the killing of colleagues and huge numbers of artifact were looted. These excavations are part of a reconsideration of how in the era of Empire museums around Europe acquired treasures from other cultures. The BBC's ventured down British Prime Minister Johnson Soft advisor dominate coming is planning to step down and years in news and analysis. A town hold calm. Stuck in Travis, We've got the answer. Couple issues in Oakland like North bound 8 80 after High Street, a two car wreck last seen blocking the left lane and heavy traffic already on North 8 80 due to roadwork from 29th Avenue to 23rd Avenue north Bound eight eighties Been slow High Street to 23rd. We also have the backup on westbound 5 80. Abed, is you approach MacArthur Boulevard. After a vehicle hit hot hole. It was partially blocking the right lane. Westbound 5 80 at the Dublin interchange looks like a stalled vehicle in the center divide, starting to slow over the ultimate, but Traffic still relatively light. What could help you take advantage of today's low mortgage rates and save money Rocket can you could save.

British museum Nigeria New Museum of West African Art Benin Europe MacArthur Boulevard BBC Abed Prime Minister Dublin Oakland advisor Johnson
A New Museum to Bring the Benin Bronzes Home

Dan Proft

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

A New Museum to Bring the Benin Bronzes Home

"Written and Nigeria launching a joint archaeological project investigating a site that's hugely important to the former kingdom of beneath the New Museum of West African Art will occupy a site in what's now Benin city in southern Nigeria. In what the British museum calls the most extensive archaeological excavation there ever it on Nigerian associates will excavate the site of the new museum before it goes up in 18 97. British forces raised the whole city to the ground to avenge the killing of colleagues and huge numbers of artifact were looted. These excavations are part of a reconsideration of how in the era of Empire museums around Europe acquired treasures from other

New Museum Of West African Art Nigeria Benin City British Forces Europe
Tons of ammonium nitrate found near scene of Beirut port explosion

John Batchelor

06:03 min | 1 year ago

Tons of ammonium nitrate found near scene of Beirut port explosion

"The Lebanese military has discovered several more tons of highly explosive ammonium nitrate at the port. Lebanese Armed forces announced Thursday these last hours that his army engineering regiment discovered more than four metric tons of ammonium nitrate during an inspection of four containers at conducted at the request of Beirut supports Customs authorities at entrance number nine. This did not explode on August 4th when 2900 tons of ammonium nitrate badly damaged the city. And the people of Lebanon known Sark. It's a very good evening to this fresh news about more ammonium nitrate has it has it made people want to leave Beirut? Are they alarmed that there will even be another explosion? Good evening. Good morning to you until now. Benny Benny said that there is no any evidence that there were either. Uh it was not my meaning by Ah lately, right? And this time they said that there was no weapon. Before the warehouse where there were those of a monument on the fourth. Onda American. Ah Continuing their investigations that I and they did not reach any clues yet. I think the first reason off this explosion is Asian and the corruption off the Benin. All government that village politicians, Lebanese institution, and that's why I think The government. Now they are forced Go back a big investigation. I don't know if it was going to reach something to conclude something, or you wouldn't have had a few months. What's this time? I think The energy is so big the muscle floods What's so big? They have to do something with the off the French novel, which are supported by the U. S. I don't know if they reach something. You have always been being in Beirut now on Ah, leading journalists. You've always given us very cogent assessments of tell us Now we hear the Lebanese government the economies and collapse. The government just switched. What is the status of Hezbollah? After this disaster, we know that there was a lot of public criticism. And what is the change in government mean for that relationship? When I think the made the big mistake when he decided not to be the one off. I need influence on the government and the critical situation. When he decided to me. A bomb off the government and Toby in the government and before the government, which is ah, supported by the Syrian but majority ofthe law. This is the same because mouth if he hasn't said. That is a lot off criticism and, ah, depending Christian community, That is when you suddenly called limit of any community. But I don't Aah! Haston enjoy Ah, off the Shia community In general. The flight from ah, small percentage off those in our community. This is not going not going to see that the French, uh before the president came too available. Wait. I have money, onion. That statement off in or around the farmer from financial efficient, saying that Give me They would try to need one off the Lebanese demands, which is to make a new AH first refugee and Sinn Fein two needle official off the hands of Hezbollah. When president cocaine to live alone in office that he made militant its life changed, But in fact it was not like he said. The people we've met. That lead. Angela is a political party he presented in the parliament. He had me but now we have other things to live with that Hezbollah and the other part is living up. Ah, you mean he political leader, Big ones A program if land for the government on the would have to wait and see It is nothing. That is why there is some sort of difference between the position with us on the position of France a lot of this issue. The French and I needed a presentation on Hezbollah and the new government. The French A fraction of its not there, not ah against the service inspiration, but in fact what the government they want to see in Middleton is a government specialist and independent. Not everybody knows that even though we have no independent, you have no people. We have people, even if they're not members ofthe Lahore, Lebanese forces or other I mean, ah, coming. How did it so I don't think this is going to Let's wait and see. But I'm not so

Government Hezbollah Lebanese Armed Forces Beirut Lebanese Institution Benny Benny President Trump Lebanon Benin France Sinn Fein Lahore Toby Angela Cocaine Middleton Official
UN Rights Chief Condemns Death Threats Against Congo Nobel Laureate

UN News

01:28 min | 1 year ago

UN Rights Chief Condemns Death Threats Against Congo Nobel Laureate

"U N High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Basch. Let has condemned death threats made against Congolese Nobel Prize laureate Dr Denis, mcquade Gay, and called for his protection. Talk to mcquaid is best known for helping thousands of women, victims of sexual violence in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC for decades he has also called for perpetrators to be brought to justice and. Advocated against the use of rape as a weapon of war, he survived an assassination attempt at his home in two thousand, twelve in Geneva spokesperson for the rights chief Rupert. Colville said that the recent surge of threats against Dr mcquaid had been conveyed via social media and in Franco's to him and his family threats, it'll to be more willing to his advocacy. So his very robust positions he's taken on accountability on protection of women. As a result of what he's seeing two decades in the hospital in terms of Protection you know the difficult part of the country s very very violent region. So that's part of our call to the authorities. It absolutely make sure they do provide really comprehensive physical protection to mccreadie enter the rest of his team. Says that they can continue vital which so many women. Mr Colville explained that the latest threats are likely connected with Dr mcquaid condemnation of violence in the highlands of south Kivu involving mainly Banya Milonga. Herders in conflict against the Bambi. By flu and Benin do communities.

Dr Mcquaid Dr Denis Mr Colville Franco Nobel Prize Congo Drc Commissioner Michelle Basch South Kivu Geneva Benin FLU Rape Rupert
Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic

Science Magazine Podcast

14:25 min | 2 years ago

Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic

"Now we have contributing correspondent. Gretchen Vogel she in two other science news staff Jennifer Cousin Franklin Megan. whalen worked on comprehensive story on reopening schools during the coronavirus pandemic. Hi, Gretchen Hi, this is a very complicated story and tell you the truth. I'm a little frustrated because I. Just WanNa answers, but there are so many unanswered questions out there about current Ivars in children for example, how likely are kids to get an infection if they're exposed to an infected person? Do we have any numbers on that? The story was was fascinating, but also really frustrating to work on because we kept saying. Why are these answers so? There are no hard and fast answers, but there is accumulating evidence that kids newborns up to for purposes, eighteen are less likely to be It's not clear why that is, but it does seem likely that children are about one half to one third as likely as adults to catch the virus in the first place. That's not one hundred percent clear, but let's consistently showing. Showing up in a lot of data then once we get past that question of how likely is a kit? Get infected. We ask the next question. It's still open, which is if they do get exposed to infection and they acquire it. Do they actually get sick? That is also not a number that we know in part because there's so little testing of people who don't. Don't show any symptoms and to find out if somebody is infected, but not showing any symptoms, you have to test a whole lot of people for the trifecta of unknown. How likely is a kid to transmit this infection? So there is some evidence out there saying that even if they do get infected, they are somewhat less likely to share it to other people. That's correct. Correct. There were a couple of intriguing case studies early on I was a kid. In France, who was infected, a family friend was in a ski chalet with his family, and t caught the virus. He tested positive, but didn't yet. No, that between the time he was infected, and and the time he was tested. He attended ski school and Language School in his regular school. Officials, tracked down more than seventy of his contacts and none of them ended up being infected. Even two of his siblings were uninfected. All three siblings shared other viruses, some minor cold viruses. They all had it was that they had contact with each other, but the coronavirus did not pass from this child to anyone else. They could find so that's really intriguing, but it's only one case right right, so it's hard to extrapolate from that. What our story talks about are some newer data from France that are also intriguing in a little town north of Paris. There was pretty large outbreak in high school early February. Teachers happened to get infected way before anybody knew that the coronavirus was circulated in France and so two weeks between the second of February and the fourteenth February when the school went on winter break, the virus had a chance to spread a few weeks later, when researchers looked at how many people had antibodies to the virus, they found that thirty eight percent of pupils, forty-three percent of teachers and fifty nine percent of non teaching staff had been infected, the also looked however at elementary schools in the town and there they found three kids who based on when symptoms had started, and the fact that they also had antibodies to the coronavirus. They figured these three. Three kids probably had been infected by their family members, and then attended school, because they weren't very sick, but they were infected, and they checked with all of their close contacts, and it did not look like they had passed it on to anyone. So this is getting at the idea that there is a sliding scale that younger students might be less likely to carry INS spread versus older students in the high school years. Certainly babies seem to be least impacted and toddlers, and then elementary school kids, and then as you get past the age of ten or eleven, the risk of both acquiring and passing on the virus does seem to increase and high school. School kids seem to be fairly good at both acquiring and passing on the virus be not quite as good as adults, but there does seem to be an increasing risk of both catching and passing on the virus as you age, but that's great news right if that's true, that is really good news for safety of babies for the safety of preschools, and for the safety of elementary schools we have now are setup. We have the limited knowledge we have about their risks of getting sick or infecting others, and then we are talking about reopening schools as the end of summer approaches. What parents would administrators governments are trying to do is balance the risks to. To the health of children and staff against the risk of not having their kids in school, what kinds of things that have taken consideration on that other side of the equation? What our kids missing out on besides actual learning? If they don't go to school in the fall, such a balancing act, because schools are really really important for kids and for society as a whole right, they go to school first contacts, and for their emotional and social development, and then lots and lots of kids and the world get a fair amount of their food at school. Especially, the most vulnerable kids are really dependent on some of the food programs that are at schools. Also sadly, schools are place where some of the most vulnerable kids who might be subject to abuse at home where some of those signs are picked up, and where other adults in their lives can raise red flags and say hey. Maybe something's not right here, so there have been signs that child abuse cases have also been going up as kids have been staying away from school. There's a lot of pressure to reopen schools, but there's. There's not a lot of information about how to do that safely. But as part of your reporting on this year team did some pretty extensive research into how all these different programs that have reopened have fared he. You talk a little bit about what you looked at and what you're looking for. We did to a lot of research. We're intrigued because I live in Berlin and Jennifer lives in Philadelphia and Megan lives in Washington DC. DC Jennifer and I, both have elementary and middle school aged kids Jennifer's were at home. Mine started to go back to school with other kids in Germany at the beginning of May. This part time just a couple of days a week. My fifth grader for example went four days the whole week part time, and then was two weeks off, and then again went four days, and then was two weeks off. They were trying to keep. Keep class sizes super small so that if somebody did happen to be infected and attend school, they would only infect portion of their class. Not Everybody and they tried to keep the desks spaced far apart, so they were trying to keep as few in the classroom as possible so that they can keep a distance from each other. That was my experience in Germany and we wanted to know how other countries had approached the question. We looked at everywhere from South Africa to Benin to South Korea and Japan and Taiwan and lots of countries across Europe. Canada had opened some schools. Most schools in the US had stayed closed in part because summer vacation tends to happen a little earlier in the US, so we took a look at what had happened in those countries that had opened up to different degrees, for example the Netherlands started back with their elementary schools I and small classes, and only part time, but then they gradually as. As things went well, and they saw very few outbreaks in schools gradually opened more and more than we at the same time checked to see if overall rates of infection in the country had changed and in many places we found they hadn't. There's a big caveat there. Though most of these countries had fairly low rates at the time that they open schools, and they had the system place when an outbreak maybe happened to detected and to identify context and isolate them for the two weeks that you. You need to isolate people to make sure they're not going to pass that on. So what is a common practice? When a student has positive for coronavirus, some places would close the whole school. If one student was infected, other places would only isolate the people who had been in direct contact with the student, so their classmates with a subset of classmates that they had been attending within their small reduced size classes, and then that teacher, or any other teachers. We didn't see a big difference in. In end outcome race between those approaches. What did seem to make a big difference when you looked at all these different schools what seemed to make the most difference was close a small, so the kids could stay separate and wearing masks. Now there were different approaches in different places for example, most places in Germany made them optional, although some in some schools, everybody had masks on it and others only when you came in or were in the bathroom or in the hallways. Did you wear your mask? Israel was one interesting example where they did not try and reduce class sizes, so they went back to their fairly large classes thirty to forty kids. But they really did mandate masks for everybody, and that seemed to go k, until it got super, Super Hot, and then it was just impossible to ask people to wear masks all day, and so the health department and the Education Department said Okay Fine. Let's leave the masks away, but then about two weeks later they had a humongous outbreak in one high school, and some other smaller outbreaks in other places as well so it it. It suggestive that asks. There were making a difference when they couldn't do. The distancing that were happening in other places like Denmark where they they went to great lengths, and even held classes, churches, or outside, or whatever to keep kids as far apart as possible and as much fresh air between them as possible I'm in Indiana and I actually have my daughter in daycare right now because I'm in a county with st low levels. I am very nervous about it, and we keep our eye on the numbers. Because that's what I see as really important gauge for whether or not, it's safe to have my kid go to a situation with six other kids. Do you feel like that background level what your community spread like is important for what's happening at your school. Absolutely, Yes, that is a huge caveat that cannot emphasize enough that the background level of community spread needs to be at A. A low enough place that you can identify outbreaks when they happened in noticed them, and that you can take measures to try and slow them down I. Think if that situation then the harm to kids. Keeping schools close vastly outweighs the potential risk of opening schools right now. Schools are closed colleges or closed, but once the university kids come back, and all the schools are open. We might see a very different background that we need to take into consideration. And Be Flexible. If school need to close again, absolutely universities are such a different situation than high schools elementary schools I mean as we talked about the risk increasing with age, so I think that's going to be a real issue in the fall as universities try to open back up. What do you think are the main takeaways from your review of all these different openings in different countries and in different schools? It's still a little unsatisfying, yeah. Is operatives data are really of still released sparse and it super frustrating, because it's such an important question. It feels like we should have better answers, but we simply don't yet. I do think the main takeaway is is you have to be flexible if to recognize that you can't go back to pretending that the viruses and there or if you do you're GONNA end up with big outbreaks and you're. GonNa have to shut everything down again. Like happened in Israel. One other interesting takeaway that I found was that when we looked at the outbreaks that had been identified, it was frequently teachers who were more affected than kids often. Often it was hard to tell because there were very very few cases where people had really carefully done the tracing that they did in that town in France, but it looked at first glances, or maybe the teachers were spreading it to each other more than to and from the kids. I think that's something that's important to keep in mind as we move toward reopening, because teachers are better able. I think than kids to do the physical distancing. I think it's it's helpful to realize that. Maybe adults are the bigger risk factor than the kids I know. A lot of teachers are super worried about going back for good reason we know as parents and teachers. The kids are generally really good at spreading germs. Happens every single winter exactly and so when the middle of pandemic where people are dying, and then somebody says well. You have to go back and stand in a classroom with even half of the normal kids. In contact with these lovely little people who you really enjoy being with, but you also see his German accelerators All, day long is definitely giving a lot of teachers. Pause for good reason, but I think one of the things that we did see emerging as a pattern was the teachers maybe should be wary of each other more than they need to be wary of their of their students I do think also that reducing class sizes and finding some sort of creative hybrid solution where kids. Kids are in school part of the time, but then doing the distance learning also part of the time. I think that's GonNa to be unfortunately the way forward for now until we get things a little bit more under control. We've talked mostly about anecdotal findings, so far are their studies in schools that are taking a look at this and going to give us some good. Good answers. That's another thing that the story mentions. There are a couple of real studies that are starting in the UK there researchers who have started projects at several schools where anybody who wants can be tested both for antibodies and active virus, and so they're hoping to get a better picture of when somebody's infected. How far it spreads in a school and in Berlin and in. In the state, German state of Bavaria also very projects have started all right. Thank you so much, Gretchen thank you Gretchen.

France Jennifer Cousin Franklin Megan Germany Gretchen Vogel Berlin Israel Language School United States Bavaria UK Canada Paris Education Department Indiana Europe Washington Dc South Africa Denmark Megan
Massive amount of cocaine worth $1 billion seized in Uruguay's capital

BBC World Service

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Massive amount of cocaine worth $1 billion seized in Uruguay's capital

"The authorities in Uruguay say they've confiscated a record hole of almost four and a half tons of cocaine calling it the biggest blow to drug trafficking in the country's history but is it Kerr reports this huge pool had been hit in in Saudi flower containers destined for low may the capital of Togo's and had a street value of about two billion dollars it was seized in a joint operation between the navy and customs directorate in the post of Montevideo last month also in Montevideo a container was three tons of cocaine was discovers mines for Benin the two huge discoveries followed the seizure in August in Germany have a container with four and a half tons this is arrived in Hamburg from Uruguay

Uruguay Cocaine Kerr Togo Montevideo Benin Germany Hamburg
Cannibalistic Beanie Babies

The Ladies of Strange

10:00 min | 2 years ago

Cannibalistic Beanie Babies

"Lucienne in the late fifteenth century. This story occurs between the fifteenth and a Sony learned from his hardworking father who was a hedger richer which I just mm-hmm motes notes full of crocodile castles in Scotland that is what it means to ten making sure we're not the Jersey his new bride relocated to Irish Shire Scotland and set up their home in Benin it's worth noting that some sources say that Agnes was accused by her hometown of being a witch Beneton Gabe was imposing with tunnels warming their way through the rock for over a mile sleet researching something about the hey I have to reference this ah no thanks you're on your own best friend so this cave which so basically they were like we hate people P. Right yeah we're going to live in the fair too much light is coming into the entry way but some nice drapery being family over the next twenty five years five years of this cave came with a water feature Oh that's Nice Weiss today at high tide the cave's entrance ah yeah this is a great neighborhood to raise my family claustrophobia and drowning are door no side doors French doors being flooded sorry mom I'm moving out before you cut the after a while Sony had a great idea thing in order to prevent these disappearances I applies trips that also involved the disposing of evidence his cited to start passages get blocked one off and say kids this is daddy's cave back off so you guys understand what I so the high protein diet speaking babies seemed to be exactly what Mrs Bean needed I really hope one of them was named ty I've no idea there's fourteen of them there's saying that in fifteenth century Scotland it's highly unlikely all children survived to swatow holy Cannoli as children grew up a clan was born why did you imagine can you imagine on your tender like enjoys the want that animal ism sure whatever you do you but the cave thing to not only board children of their own as in with each other but also bore children wolfpack pretty much with one source stating they produce eighteen grandsons and fourteen daughter Bernice son child members total living in one cave yeah eating human yeah and having sex with each other eleven gave as wondering amble cuisine how could they possibly kill enough people to feed fifty people Mila nowhere and when a family butchered a cow a lot of times the cow will be split up into but the point I'm making is like it it it can go ways either way they learned the segway does it make sense now why I chose the blood prince go yeah oh gross so a major component of pickling in this eventually resulted in decaying body parts that showed signs of preservation sounds like a really stupid way to get caught well that's not what got them caught oh but they do get caught it was that the U. Q. was some sources stating any persons could've hundre person pickle pickle person because we're hundred persons per person if they're I don't know how many people can one cannibal eat the cannibal good eat I performing the robbing and murdering causing some of them to leave to prove their innocence and

Sony Twenty Five Years Five Years
"benin" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"benin" Discussed on The Archive Project

"My father once told me he never wished anyone to live in an orphanage and that is all he said about his adoption. I find it difficult to ask about the experience because of how shaken he looked in that moment in transfer hats by a memory a grown man so far removed from the traumas of childhood occasionally he would make mention of what preceded the adoption. Uh his mother's death but there was never much talk about those who went on living his father himself his six young siblings who were divided under the certainty certainty of poverty if they remained a family. The tragedy was inevitable unbearable even when he considered it happening Benin to someone else to the modern mind. That came has always been a wild place. When I was there I turn my head in the darker to rock growl and say it liked living like an animal this folder? Twice the size of any bear echoed through everything even me me. He had to have been enormous in life. A combination of prehistoric bacteria and seafood and mammals. Now part of the cave itself I imagined engined all the chemical reactions inside the stomach of that bear frozen in time turning red as they solidified all that blood and salmon flesh that buried into rock. The story of a life light has a way of changing everything. The intricate muscles of his is like mine died. Long ago do the bare always had to feel his way through the dark and the staleness of sea level made him realize he didn't particularly want to instead of camp caverns he preferred river canyons. The endless void the outright destruction of something he could even see without a lantern even if it hurt at first now imagine ten thousand dead bears a mile deep. A river comes in carves. The Reddaway carries those ruby granules to the floors and valleys of the jagged coastline. A Canyon.

Benin
World Bank Contest Aims to Help 1 Billion People Who Lack Proof of Identification

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:25 min | 3 years ago

World Bank Contest Aims to Help 1 Billion People Who Lack Proof of Identification

"I'm joined today in the studio by daring woods and his excellent Kiwi. Accent Darren Horia get I might. Yeah. I'm having it up daring, you have brought us not just an indicator, but a whole story to go along with that indicator. That's right. Today's indicator is one billion, and that's the number of people who don't have any official identification. According to the World Bank, nearly one in seven people have no possible. No, driver's license. Not even a best ticket to one in seven people in the whole world. Don't have any kind of ide-, and this is serious problem. Right. It can stop them from getting public services like food vouchers or opening a Bank account. And that's what happens when the government in the country in which you live doesn't even register that you exist. Yeah. And it's something that the World Bank is especially concerned about and so you're at World Bank headquarters in April to witness exactly what the World Bank was trying to do to change that. I had to see it myself. I was hearing that global faceless organization was encouraging governments to keep. Of everybody say I needed to know. It sounds scary. When you put it that way, you know, like some kind of dystopia in vision, those concerns are actually legitimate, and we're gonna get into that in the shar, why bad idea designed can have deadly consequences, and we'll go to the World Bank to see what they're doing about it with the kind of shot tank style pitch contest. Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from WordPress dot com with powerful site. Building tools and thousands of themes that us from users can launch site that's free to start with room to grow. Get fifteen percent off any new plan. Purchase at WordPress dot com slash indicator. Support also comes from Jimmy the regulated exchange making it easy to add bitcoin and other crypto currencies to your portfolio, protecting your investments with oversight and state of the art cybersecurity open a free account at Jim ni- dot com slash indicator. The idea came because I was actually at a meeting that we had internally. And I heard somebody else talk about an innovation challenge for a country that they were doing and I was thinking. We should think about doing something like that for that. Is why John D Desai, and it is her job to help places countries that want to build a good identification system for their citizens. She works at the World Bank. Would it be fit? Assay? Your job is to get a billion people. And I do know. So what we've been doing is supporting countries on their journey. There's a reason she's committed to this by Johnny says that the costs of not having an ID ends up hitting low income people the worst, even in the low income countries. It's the bottom twenty percent of the population. The poorest twenty percent off of the one billion people without any form of ID come from just five countries, India, Pakistan, bungalow dish, if yo- Pia and Nigeria for jumpy says getting an ID can really improve someone's life if done right? So whether it's being able to open up Bank account, or when you think about government. And they -bility for them to really deploy services making sure that they're the actual recipients of let's say cash subsidies, opening a Bank account in of itself is one thing. But it's also a gateway for a number of things like savings, and and greater empowerment and other things too. Not just banking. There's also voting healthcare government handouts, even getting a phone connection. All these things are really hard to do if you don't have an ID. Now, there's a few reasons why people tend not to have an ID first. There's the cost creating in maintaining national identity database is a really expensive business. India, for example, has been rolling out a huge idea programme since two thousand and nine it's called odd Har it's a twelve digit number tied to your fingerprint or to your IRA scan kind of like a social security number that recognizes your body or your iris. It's it's a little creepy over one point two billion people in India have an odd har- number. They use it for. Food subsidies for voting basically for participating in Indian society and to run this program. It is cost Indian government the equivalent of more than one and a half billion US dollars. And there's a couple of other reasons why so many people don't have ID, for example, women Bod from applying ideas themselves countries, like Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Benin, and then this trust some people don't want the government tracking them nothing for good reason. Yeah. Dentist is a really controversial area in part because it gives government so much control over what they know about their citizens. We need to build trust in the system. We don't want forms of ide- that can be harmful. It's not as simple as just giving every on a digital ID by jonky had a deep a- problem. How do you really leverage technology to solve some of these problems like lack of identification? But while also mitigating against. Some of the potential risks like on privacy and data protection. So to get the best ideas to support countries in building their identification systems. But Johnny set up this Silicon Valley like pitch contests and called it. Mission billion contestants from all over the globe came to World Bank headquarters in Washington DC in mid April to pitch their ideas in a PECS room over one hundred people somewhere hits it to listen in different languages, the momentum around this issue is utilize. These is an issue that arrived among the entries a way of securely sharing your address online number one question. What is endless? There was a web based platform that lets you take control of daughters used. Is yours forever. And those even a game called idee land one of the finalists. Toby Norman set off to the side. He was getting ready to pitch his idea to solve the trust problem. Give it pre pitch ritual. I usually try and take four really really Debretts big as I can go Norman, Ryan's nonprofit called sim prince simp- rinse makes fingerprint scanners to register people like for health services, and when he was trying to roll out this system simp- Ren's in Bangladesh, he hit a snag. How do you actually get genuine form consent from someone who said maybe three to five years of education in their entire lines? And Toby made it into the final six for this World Bank contest. So next up. We're going to have Toby Norman as our second finalist pitching today. Welcome Toby on the stage, Toby explained how he and his team came up with a tool to use audio recordings of trusted local leaders to ask for consent. We've worked with human rights lawyers from the university of Oxford to design a layered consent approach repropose embedding layered and after all six pitches. Lavina is simply

World Bank Toby Norman India Johnny Pakistan Darren Horia Official Indian Government Woods John D Desai University Of Oxford NPR Lavina Jimmy Washington Jim Ni
French Government, Burkina Faso And Benin Elliott discussed on Radio Yesteryear

Radio Yesteryear

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

French Government, Burkina Faso And Benin Elliott discussed on Radio Yesteryear

"The French government says four foreign hostages have been freed by French forces and the west African country burkina-fasso Francaise the hostages with freed following a military operation in northern Bukovina. Fassa two of them with French tourists had been kidnapped in neighboring Benin Elliott this month, they would visiting national punk when they were ambushed and they local guide with killed. The French government has thanked thority inventing and Burkina Faso full that cooperation and says FRANZ remains committed to supporting those countries in the fight against violent extremism in the

French Government Burkina Faso Benin Elliott Bukovina Franz Thority
Explainer 164: What happened to democracy in Benin?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:04 min | 3 years ago

Explainer 164: What happened to democracy in Benin?

"There are few sites so stirring, and hopeful as a free fair and transparent election in a country unaccustomed to holding them. There are few spectacle, so wretched and disheartening botched rigged and violent election in a country that was growing into democracy Benin used to have the former kind of election. It has just had one of the latter. And the Beninese citizens who got used to the idea of voting for their leaders are left wondering whether the country has mealy taken a wrong turn or performed a complete one hundred eighty degree handbrake skid back in the direction of dictatorship. Benin's most recent parliamentary election was held on April twenty eighth the results which were announced last week looked at least to anyone who only read the headlines like a fumbling endorsement of the progressive union a coalition led by veteran politician, Bruno Musso and closely allied to president patriots talent the progressive union one fifty six percent of the vote comfortably but not overwhelmingly ahead of their rivals from the Republican block who won forty four percent on the face of it a splendid victory for pluralist democracy. The problem is that the vanquished Republican block are also closely allied to president Patrice tell on who not content with having money each way in this fashion over sorry process, which reduced the contest to a two-horse race may new electoral code was introduced a head of the elections the rules and requirements of which was so strict and expensive to meet that bias, Donna Shing, coincidence, only the two groupings favored by president on qualified. Nobody else was permitted to compete. The rationale for the new rules for what it may be worth was essentially that Benin was suffering from a surfeit of democracy that a small west African nation of some twelve million people had become bamboozled by proliferation of more than two hundred fifty political parties, even organized into various blocks alliances and coalitions this still left voters at Benin's previous parliamentary elections in two thousand fifteen choosing from a field of twenty. But at least they had a choice of which they generally availed themselves at the two thousand fifteen parliamentary election turnout was around sixty six percent about what it was when Benin elected president talent in two thousand and sixteen for this latest election barely one registered voter in for bothered. And indeed you kind of have to wonder why one in four did. It's a shame for all the obvious reasons but much more. So because one does not need a long memory to recall Benin seeming, something of a Pathfinder for democracy in west Africa. Domain through pity? What in nineteen Ninety-one president Matthew Carrico who had seized power in an old school data in nineteen seventy two became the first leader in the region to stand down after losing an election. He was re elected in nineteen ninety six and served. Another decade. So this looks like a straightforward power grab by president talent or those close to him but to extend some credit where do this would not be consistent with his previous behavior in two thousand seventeen he tried and failed to persuade the national assembly to restrict presidents to a single six-year term as recently as April President talented, mid the new electoral law was not a good look stating accurately that it bought discredit on Benin's democracy and on himself. If only president Telo knew someone who could perhaps do something about it, a politician occupying position of influence, for example. The news emerging from Benin in recent days has not been encouraging soldiers have been seen on the streets incidents of violence. Some fatal have been reported on and around election day, the internet was cut off and before it several journalists and opposition activists were arrested. Members of Benin's barely elected new national assembly a Jew to be sworn in next week, the incoming MP's may discover that the price you pay for lack of opposition is deducted in legitimacy. Nobody has ever thanked those who took vote away from them. Article twenty four around.

Benin President Trump Beninese Bruno Musso Donna Shing Patriots Matthew Carrico Patrice West Africa Telo One Hundred Eighty Degree One Fifty Six Percent Forty Four Percent Sixty Six Percent Six-Year
"benin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stevenson, the director of tape. Whitten Alex Farquharson, we also have comedy from L flying and live music from the legendary Shinji will be performing her debut solo single and the banjo hearing now the incredible London trio Benin City more from them later. Thank you. Let me start by asking each of you to name the one thing. The only London can give you in your creative life ice. Let me ask you coming from a Pakistani Muslim background, and I've been to many cosmopolitan cities around the world, I've often found for example, somewhere like New York, you have to kind of amalgamate in a way, which strips you of certain aspects of your identity and London I mean up until recently anyway has been a place where you can be both. So you can have the eastern and the western any kind of go together really joyously in a way that I've never experienced in any other place in the world, Alex, Ferguson. I might choose London screen spaces, which I think London does better than anywhere else. But every community in London has won their reflective of the whole history of how London developed as a kind of patchwork of little towns and villages mass interest. Saying to brief Stevenson. What about you? I think it has the fire, and it has the refinement, you know, I was raised in a Mormon household, and that's didn't serve me when I hit my teenage years for homeless culturally, and then institutions like the roundhouse and the Southbank centre in the rural. Call up know, I got several degrees worth of education completely for free in London. Stephen willie. What about you? I think for me history in my history growing up in London through the sixty s which provided the great canvas for the films that I've been fortunate enough to produce L Flynn says a comedian the comedy scene in London is incredible. And it's so vibrant and the queer arts scene, especially like the drag that we've got coming through and the absurd. It's just amazing in connect the Nikkei two that's coming through Shinji. Do you want to tell us something about what London gives you and your creative life? I hear rhythms in London. Like when I'm going cross Waterloo bridge when I'm on the underground like the Victoria has a different within the Victoria line to the bake Lou line, for example. So I've got wild imagination. But the sounds and the ribbons the pulse of the city. That's what keeps me coming. Back alley Vokic. Thank you Joshua from Benin City. What about you? What does London give you and your creative life? I think is the venues. London is still the only place where you can have a space that has a film show in the morning people's kitchen in the afternoon, and then swing dance lessons and then there's jar somewhere in between the late in the night. It's top step. Thank you so much Londoners pride themselves on being tough resilient, and tolerant qualities that are currently being put to the test in two thousand sixteen the UK voted to leave the European Union. Well, fifty two percent of the UK population was in favor of leaving Londoners themselves voted to remain fifty nine point nine percent of them. How might this affect the creative industries here in the capital? They account the sixteen point nine percent of all jobs and a worth forty two billion pounds to the London economy. So how do our creative see the future and what role can artists play in bridging any divides? That's a question for later before any of our comedian elf Lyons invites you into her London over to you, Al..

London Whitten Alex Farquharson Stevenson Benin City Stephen willie director Southbank centre UK Waterloo bridge elf Lyons Nikkei New York European Union Al Victoria Joshua L Flynn Ferguson Lou
"benin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Asians from his album, Wayne new collection of modern, very electronically, processed Syrian wedding music will hear a piece called Kaba you'll hear a little of the traditional sounds of near eastern flute and violin. But you'll hear lots of Omar Suliman and lots of electronics is well, I here's or cast Polly written. Oh, a brass happy band out of Benin to get started on this set of new sounds. Yes. I did..

Omar Suliman Benin Polly Wayne
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Be that. You are listening to this podcast from the independent nation of Catalonia. It could be that you are Scotland Yard in the nation of Benin or the the the nation of by afro or the nation of begin or Equitorial begin. Can you imagine the revolutionaries coming together? And being like, let's begin again begin the beginning. Of course, there could be five hundred separate nations within what is now Nigeria or there could be a pan Africa where all people see themselves as one giant. People of peace their lead from Kanda for sure for sure. I think I'm rooting for one planet. One people. What are you rooting for every single different ethnic group gets its own autonomous nation because then we'll call balkanisation Nigeria's -ation. Rename it because it would be more balkanized. Well, we hope and pray that some resolution to this issue comes and probably will come in the form of giant Khufu that wipes out all mammalian life. But if the worst comes soon this recording all records APR funnel. So if providence in the form of self-same allows we hope to be back with you soon for another entry in the omnibus. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. The host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts.

nation of Catalonia Nigeria Benin Joe McCormick Robert lamb Scotland Africa apple
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Ternal just the fact of being a airtime is what scares them, right? And in a lot of cases, he would Stephen would offer to take the twins and the elder. Or the the village would refuse. And it wasn't a case persists. And it isn't always a case where the mother of the children protests because the the feeling within the local cultures so strong that this is the twins are evil that the mother also doesn't want this association. What's your evil might be strongest on her own family? And there is a lot of then suspicion of mothers that give birth to twins. But of course, this is the region that has the highest incidence of twins in the world. So this affects a lot of people and gradually. I think the humanitarian sense is that they are having success in at least taking some of the children away. And they're they're not encountering situations where they they realize twins have been born they go to the village and say we would like to take these twins and the responses that the twins have disappeared or that they never what do you mean which twins that type? Thing. Is it connected to Christianity. Like is this an evangelizing because this is kind of a tricky topic. You're talking about the Enron attempt to see mandatory and efforts. You know, is there some attempt to cure it by baptizing animist villages out of existence. It's this is kind of tricky topic because we're uncomfortable with the idea of, hey, this this one religious practice is actually clearly worse than this other one. Because you know, this one's dumping virgins divall Kino's, right? It's pretty extreme case before you can get someone to say. Yeah. Yeah. Actually, no, clear ectomy is not valid religious practice, or whatever it is. That's been a long a long standing problem as we've become more and more conscious of cultural imperialism at what point do you say, this is a cultural imperialism, and we a horrid or a shoe it and in another case like female genital mute. Elation is a thing that we are going to try and intervene in local cultures and hopefully not try to counteract it with Christianity. But I was thinking that would go badly. If that's the cure that would go badly in the west within. I mean, I'm sure Igbo evangelists think that that is the solution. But I think it might not go over well great in the region as well. If the forces of relentless teach you better way are also tied with the better way is imported European religion. Right and on in the Rupa part of Nigeria there, there is a lot of fluidity of religion religious practice. So there you could you could conceivably be practicing Christianity and still believe in the kind of animist, you know, feeling about twins that they have supernatural powers just as the Germans claim to be practicing Christianity, but also go out into the woods end, leave berries and Ferber's to their Elka God's. Let's be on. They're always doing that. So much pigging in northern Europe. Germany, Germany, you'll find a druid on the millimeter of any. They have a big cross right on the front of the chappatis in this people flips around, and it's just like Holly and mistletoe side. There's a wreck wearing a crown. So this now this persist to this day. And there is I think within the the wokers people within Nigeria a feeling that you cannot just go in and and change this one belief because it is connected to an entire belief system. They often say that the twins. They feel are witches or wizards. And you need to snip that off at the, bud. Get them out of the culture because they'll just bring evil and evil upon the family. This is also true of children who kill the mother and child birther. If a mother dies in childbirth often taken out on the kid at child is also removed from the population. Do you think we could just import Harry Potter like they got really into Harry Potter in there like wizards. No amazing. That's I think that even in Salt Lake City. Harry Potter is looked scans at. Scholastic book fairs, they're very small. It's just barren stain bears. Wait a minute. No. They also are talking bears very popular in Germany in Germany. They worship that Barron. Steam bears. So the twinning or the preponderance of twins in central Africa is for the most part kind of a wonderful and celebrated anomaly still a mystery still still what exactly is we cannot tubers are causing right?.

Germany Harry Potter Nigeria Stephen Enron Barron Salt Lake City Kino Africa Holly Ferber Europe
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"But the is that if anyone's unusual it must be the universe. Trying to tell you something and we must harness their power either for good or for ill. That's true. Certainly of a lot of other kind of anomalous people in like children in Africa like bike. Oh albinos. By knows movies albums, are always it's always the other on their evil, assassins, henchmen or something. And that is that's often the case here, it isn't a some tribes have twins as as a. Mitigated blessing. But there's a lot of there's a lot of feeling that twins are powerful. And not always benign, even Benin. They're not benign a- at the in Benin the benign, which is great again. Benin the benign. So a lot of the care that goes in and the and the celebration of twins is also somewhat cautionary they fear twin little if they're fraternal you could try to cover it up. You could go away for nine months, and then come back with two kids and be like, yeah, they were. I was Irish twins say, but they all they always. I mean, there's not a ton. I don't think in particularly in cultures where there isn't a lot of wealth of going away for nine months and coming back. It's sorta like everybody knows when your baby's coming. But there were among some some people in Mali or kina fassulo. There were ideas that twins were under the protection of river gods, and they could walk on water and solve disputes and foretell the future. Some of these seem easy to test easier to test than others like for solving disputes. You have to watch the twin and action. And finally be like, yeah, he might be a little better than ever. He told me where to put the fence, but the walking on water once very easy to disprove. Well. There's a lot. There are a lot of rivers. Shallow rivers. Right. So walking on water. It's harder to prove. That's what's the legend aren't a ton of waiting. That's amazing. Not as many giant lakes to be like. Okay. Go ahead. Walk on water. It's like, yeah. You made it across the river. And is the Monty python problem? We're the ones that don't survive, you know. Well, it must have been a with the drawing board or must not have been a witch. Right. And I think for telling the future is probably easier in an agrarian economy where the same thing happens every year. Right. Like, I predict Nick summer will be warm. I predict we, you know, like, it's not it wouldn't be the same as here where you would say how much money I'm I gonna make next month, you know, into over educated Seattle. How many people do, you know who read their horoscope and think that is so me that's exactly what happened have re single person. I know thinks that they can mitigate or. You know, mitigate dispute so you kidding me there every every single person, I know is a marriage counselor and a yen to and all the rest besides. So in fact, there's a town in the Uruba part of Nigeria called the twin cities. No, Don, Knapp alas. No. Neither thing. They're called the town is called Igbo ORA, which to me at least is is confused Rita or as sister in sister. But it's also not in the Igbo part of the country at all it's in the Uruba partly country, but it's called negro in your rubel Jamaica. So I can't rubel. Igbo? It's so hard. And sing Igbo the letter. So we don't know why it's called Igbo. I don't know why. And if any of our listeners are from Nigeria and can explain why this town in the you're ru but well into the Aruba part is called Igbo ORA. I would love to hear it. But Igbo RO is is actually known as the twin capital of the world..

Benin Nigeria Uruba Knapp Africa Nick summer Mali kina fassulo Seattle Aruba Rita Don nine months
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Is that? Right. Yeah. So again, big families someplace like. But then I got him in or or Salt Lake City. Catholics. Are you have a lot of younger twins who are also game? It is our nature, or it's our instinct, I think to imagine that twins are going to be the result of affluence the more able you are to care for large family, the more able you are to care for two babies at once the more likely you would be to have twins. And so if your mother is taller and a little bit older, it sort of naturally follows that she would be more established and more likely to have children. And also, it would seem that if there was an abundance of food. You're just saying evolution narrowly. The gene that creates twins would go away or would be stronger in people who could propagate it by being more fit for it. Right. And so that was for a longtime sort of scientific theory. But of course, the people in banana and central Africa tend to live very agrarian lifestyles, and very, you know, hand to mouth, it's not it's you wouldn't describe it as an area with a pro. Fiery God twins being like where do I put these twins? You put them in Denmark, and now with fertility drugs, they I it is it is rising in Denmark. So then there was some speculation that the because one of the main elements of the diet of this region is the cassava root kind of GAM and the people of the region all kind of feel like it's the Yam something on their solve that's their folk belief. Yeah. Of course, we have twins. She she had a lot of cassava. And a lot of science has been thrown at the idea that it's yom's that there's a correlation, but no one has been able to develop a definitive link. Well, we most of our yams in late November. Which means you just have to look at the numbers to see if in the US a lot of July babies or or or? August august. Yes. If you have more twins in late summer as a result of all the November Zana being only time we eat ams. Right. I mean, do you eat any spring yams? Don't I don't even like yams spring Yam. Maybe we are diluting its potency by putting marshmallows and Brown sugar. Yeah. Because they probably don't have, you know, craft marshmallows in Benin a well. I don't know. That's not a thing that you and I have enough information about I suppose, we Google it. But that'd be a long Google. I'm gonna suspect they do not have smart long. Yeah. Although, you know, although like organizations that donate food to Africa, probably like small marshmallows are makeup. Big portion of that. It does seem like the weird thing that gets donated to a food drive. And so, hey here the poor enjoy these this canned, salmon and. The world. Here's some clam chowder. So but the incidence of twins in this area is not something new. It's been true since long history. People were like their early visitors were like these villages ton twin? Yeah. From long before the colonial era. Oh, even before Europeans visited, yes. Because twins are they play a big role in the the local culture in the religious aspect of the culture, which kind of animist, and, you know, a traditional African religion in the Igbo region as I said before they adopted Christianity, very strongly, but the U rubel maintain a kind of of fluid religiosity. So there is a lot of Christianity there. There's also Islam, but there's also a lot of traditional practice and with this day to this day and within those traditional practice. Ses practicies. That's the plural of practice. One practices or to seize to practice. I. Twins are seen as a real blessing. They're regarded as two souls combined into one four is can penetrate the garment that lies between us and the other world, they have supernatural powers super. That's something. That's not unique to Africa. I mean, even in even in the United States in the twentieth century. We still have the remnants of superstitions about people with red hair or you got a houseful of somebody's red hair or baseball teams used to have a little person dwarf that you would touch for good luck. Which is you know, objectified. Dwarves by making them into vehicles for home runs and ground rule doubles. There was an awful lot of objectification of little people in the past..

Africa United States Google Denmark Salt Lake City Benin U rubel
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"I mean a lot of their neighbors a World Cup bracket. But by Afrah was supported by France Israel, Portugal, South Africa, Italy, the pope and China, so they just draw lots crazy like world conflict, and all of these different, you know, nations kind of provided material support and economic interest was like it was just keeping an eye on the oil is that is that where people were placing their bets. Yeah. And sort of previous colonial loyalties, and you know, a lot. There was a lot going on very complicated. And by Afrah was a was a terrible conflict. And ultimately the. So were reunited with the rest of Nigeria somewhat on. The damage is an entirely repaired. Although there wasn't a genocide or anything. There was a lot of humanitarian crisis. But and it gave the name to jello Biafra of the Kennedy. That's that was real. So anyway, within this northern I'm sorry within this sort of southwestern region of Nigeria and edging into -benin the non house apart. There is this like anomalous bubble of twins. It's not literally a bubble. Right. There's not a dome there's not a dome of twins. No. Although dome of twins is the plot of the next Mad Max movie to two twins end or one twin leaves? But this is a region where the twin we rates are what compared to the rest of the world. Well, so scales of measurement vary, and it's why we should get the French in here and find a news new form of Kelvin to describe what the percentage of twins standard unit for twins. But the sense is that with a global average of about thirteen twins per thousand which is still pretty small number of twins in Benin. It's almost thirty twins. Per thousand two or three times as likely to have twins right now that's changing also because in the west artificial fertility drugs are increasing the number of twins people implant Mullings, but you could implant multiple eggs in hopes that you know. And then you'll actually have multiple birthing decide to keep them for whatever religious or personal or family, planning reasons. Right. I have triplets for that mini triplet cousins for that reason was that right? That triplets were conceived. And then it was. Yeah. It was let's just have triplets. Have as many as we can. I guess it's aren't it's really feast or famine because these are people who can't have kids, and then well how about three. So twinning is changing. But there's a lot of speculation as to what? Because there isn't a ton of technologically. There isn't a lot of artificial for Tilleke work happening in central Africa. Right. This all seems to be baked into I guess heredity. Do we think it's genetics? Well, so there was a there were a lot of theories some of them like derived from a time when phonology was popular. But but what if everywhere in the west has the should have that same number of twins? But because we're more warlike people. They're always killing each other in utero. Well, and there is a difference in the number of twins conceived on the number of twins born because twins don't thrive at the same rate as non twins. Also, there seems to be a correlation between the age of the mother you're more likely to have twins as the mother gets older up to about thirty eight or forty years. Old and then it starts to decline. Well, then you can certainly see why a place with less access to contraception where women continue to give birth older could have a higher twin rate. Right, right. Although there's also a correlation between how tall you are. How tall the mother is. And how likely she is to have. I just have to know which way this goes taller. You are the more likely you are to have twin make sense you've got a lot of you had a lot of room. Well, so their birth order under interested in this phenomenon whereby we now know that the more kids, you the more sons, you have the more likely one is to turn out to be gay right later in life. The more children. You have the more likely you're subsequent children will be twin..

Nigeria Afrah Benin Portugal Tilleke Kelvin China Biafra Mullings utero France Israel South Africa Italy Africa Kennedy forty years
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"It's it's I guess if you need if you need a place where it's really a sign of American geographical ignorance about the world in general, but about Africa in particular that and also a lot of the names of countries in Africa changed in the twentieth century. So all of the names of countries that my mother memorized in school in nineteen forty four. There's no more bet you on a land lot of a lot of that went away. Right. Right. So there is enough confusion that it feels like you could throw a Monday in there and people and it's plausible, right? There are other parts of the world where that happens we add central European countries sometime if you put. Zone at the end of any word, basically, you could make a new country, right? Little little order attain. His Dan and then little little Latin American countries, you can make up a Caribbean island without too much trouble or some kind of troubled banana Republican Central America these invented for fictional purposes. All the time, and it's a little bit. Now that I'm if I'm going to be woke about it's a little problematic because you're essentially creating some kind of composite you're saying that all these countries are about the same. So here's San Christo ball. You know, it's like all the other ones, you know, about enjoy well, west Africa, and these countries of Liberia coat of wa Ghana Togo Benin, and especially Nigeria. They were also the they were the locale of the majority of the slave trade. So maybe on jumping ahead. But does that mean the population that became the ancestors of today's large African American population have some of this twi-? Win tendency. I don't think that that is documented. No. And in fact, even within Nigeria. Much greater portion of the transatlantic slave trade came out of the Igbo people rather than out of the Uruba people and twins are much more common within the Aruba than they are the Igbo. So it's not just being from Nigeria. Doesn't mean it varies by tribe. So within geria-, which is a large country and populous country, it has on this two hundred million people now more than any other country in Africa. And though it has the largest city in Africa in the form of logos. Which I hear is maybe not a fun place to visit. It's growing even still, but within Nigeria there are over five hundred ethnic groups and over five hundred languages spoken while so Nigeria itself is the product of a colonial administration on the part of the British who came in and said, well, this is all very complicated, all these different groups. So why don't we draw a line around them hither? And really the line is going to be. Goes up till what the French claim right goes up to how far the railroad went. It's not even a best guess as to what fits culture or anything. Right. John. Do you have a website?.

Nigeria west Africa Ghana Togo Benin Caribbean island Liberia geria Dan John Uruba Aruba
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Right. Just as there were as there were more hospital birds and more. Twentieth century, even in the US. John Carter, I president born in a hospital because that was it was routine for people to born at home through the early twentieth century shirts, sat right? Jimmy Carter was the first president born in a hospital. Yes. Yeah. All the rest were born in not just thirty one. For the same log cabin. Yeah. Right Lincoln's log cabin. They all parents would go on Twitter midges and give birth in the gift shop candidate hope becomes president. We'll do it. Think of all the people who had children in that log cabin whose children did not ultimately become president Grover Cleveland was born twice in that gift. Sean and lots of parents tried to concede in the log cabin this while, but they were shown out by dose. I had sex Lincoln's cabin. I wasn't trying to conceive. It was just you know, just convenient exhibits were boring. Well, so it was discovered in the twentieth century and in in recent times, even that the incident incidence of twins twins, the twin since was dramatically more common in central Africa. Interesting in and sort of centered in Benin, and bordering Nigeria is a small west African country bordering very large west African country, which I was by the way, I was very fascinated with Benin when I was like a very young kid because it had just changed its name from Donnie, and I thought that was delightful to homey, and and banana Nina's they sounded very exotic, and I still never been to this place. I fixated on a kindergartner when I was a kid. We my friends, and I really loved Equatorial Guinea, it was the smallest country in Africa and got a funny name. We just thought it was so great Equatorial Guinea, so Equatorial Guinea became our stand in. Whenever we needed to place that was obscure or fun or where magical things happened. It sounds very much like the the fake African country on the west wing, which is Equatorial Kundu Equatorial does sound like Equatorial Guinea sounds like someone invented a fake African country hit neighbors will conduct right? But it's more of the average where on where they don't have Carinthia m- or whatever also, I know quite a few Equatorial Guinean, if you ever wanna meet one house that is it's the it's the only Spanish-speaking African country. It was kind of the although they do speak Spanish in portions of Morocco. That's true. Yes. But you know, leftover from sub Saharan African colonial colonialization. That's not the word, the really the only Spanish-speaking outpost of, you know, the only Spanish Africa is what is today Guinea. And so when they emigrate to Europe emigrate to Spain. And so a lot of the Africans you run into in Spanish cities. A lot of them are just English speakers. From west Africa, or whatever. But a lot of them are from Equatorial Guinea, and there they just call it Guinea to that in Spain Equatorial Guinea's the main Guinea because it was their Guinea, so these people are just Guinea on hills. Right. As opposed to get. Cold. What we call. Gimme. Right. His which was a Guinea Bissau of French class. Guinea herb part CS column Guinea might have been a British. Dutch. I'm looking it up. And I still don't know. French it turns out. Well, it's it's interesting to me now to that in twentieth century, like popular culture, it's somewhat common to invent a country in Africa right at the movie coming to America has Munda..

Equatorial Guinea Equatorial Kundu Equatorial Spain Equatorial Guinea west Africa Guinea Bissau of French class president Jimmy Carter Lincoln John Carter Spain US Benin Twitter Grover Cleveland Africa Sean Carinthia Europe Donnie Morocco
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"That's that's that's a rational choice. You know, the middle support you in your old age, not just China that's true in India and Africa, and I mean infanticide. And killing female children is common kind of worldwide. Also in untouched earn in cultures that haven't, you know, adopted a science based understanding of which is not great value of both genders just not great for the infant baby girl, but not great for society and Eggert once you get some fifty six forty four gender balance. And that's when everything goes down all the boy star blowing stuff. Yeah. You know? What's good? Then a war on nice cleansing war solve everything. But of course, once you realized that rates of twins very considerably around the world. It would only naturally follows that people would want to know where there are more twins, and where there are fewer twins. So they can move their or so they can write it down in a book and go to the World Health Organization and have a study and get tenure at their university and cetera et cetera. And it was I think for a long time to discovering what the rate of twin births was in any given place was dependent on accurate recordkeeping of live births right Easter, and so we say Minnesota Twins. The mayo clinic there they've got good healthcare. We know that in Minnesota. There's a lot of twins. Everyone in Minnesota was a Virgo weird. Another another seven months of the year. Go by not a child is born in Minnesota Virgo season. Phil OBGYN you just do not sleep. Right. It's like being a tax accountant during taxis all year long, you just push papers around, and then it's like h and R Block, but for obeys it just occurred of you, probably meant Gemini or Gemini, oh, Gemini are those that the twins Virgo. I only know this because I'm Gemini aren't the virgos virgos are virgins not all of them, obviously. Okay. Well, I'm Virgo. And I have no idea what my astrological sign isn't. It's a it's a maiden a maiden. It's a young. It's not, you know, just because you're into that does not mean a change after logical assigned to that. Okay. I meant Gemini that makes it a lot funnier. I thought it was funnier when it was Virgo it's like absurdist humor. Like, I really liked that. I may have said this. There's that running joke in a hard day's night where they're always saying that Paul's grandfather is very clean old, man. No. Oh that one us grandfather. That's not he. It is you know, senior grandfather he lives in your house, smell the grandfather. But he's my grandfather as well. Time to to smuggle. Is another toe mount any. It's very clean. And I thought that was hilarious absurd joke. And then I realized it was actually a reference to the British sitcom Steptoe and son, which is the basis for our Sanford and son where the old junk man is often called a dirty old man, and it was played by thus actor. So everyone knew that this guy was the dirty old man on their Sanford and son. And so it's a hilarious. Oh, children rice inside. Joe sixties? I don't like it. I don't like knowing that. I loved that. It was absurdist and weird. Isn't it much funnier before, you know, clean Oldman? Yeah. So I just I just ruined it for him. Sorry. Well, it just makes Paulin John George and Ringo seem less smart and less funny and Wilfred Bramble played the old, man. It wasn't his fault. No. It wasn't his fault is written into the script. So as record keeping improved globally. Right. You're talking about where more versus fewer twins are born..

Minnesota Sanford Eggert China World Health Organization Wilfred Bramble Phil OBGYN mayo clinic Paulin John George India accountant Joe sixties R Block Steptoe Africa Paul Ringo seven months
"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"benin" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"And the other at the bath. So my understanding is that there there are some twins in your wife's family is that right? They twin producers. How did you know this? Did you find this out? She and I are carrying on a separate correspondence about about her family and twins going on in her life. I feels kind of isolated in your marriage. But also she has a lot of times in her in laws. Never come over though. They're all afraid of you. When I knew we were talking about twins today. I had some vague memory that she comes from interested in the heredity of twins, which I assume will come up too. So I wanted to find out if she came from a family of twins, right? It turns out I misremembered because she's quite isolated in our marriage, and we never speak. It turns out it's her aunt's family who she's only related to by merit. I see an aunt who married her blood related uncle, but they do have twins in her aunt's family. Yes, she has set of cousins that are twins and her aunt who gave birth to those cousins has siblings who are twins. And it goes all the way that I think people in twin families know that they have the gene and that they are likely to have this delightful. Freakish thing happen to them. It would seem that they would know, but they're all four other people would know. What I'm saying is in the event of a pregnancy. They might be steeled for the possibility. They might know. Hey, most people the twin? What are the odds of a twin live birth in the United States with no fertility monkeying around you? Now, I do and we think of twins. We can fleet identical twins and fraternal twins. I don't please don't include me in that. We okay. But but in asking the question, what is the frequency of twins? It is very different. Can you ask me? What's the frequency of twins kind of? What's the? You really pandering to the to the Facebook community because every time we make any kind of frequency reference. Somebody is mad that I didn't say what's the frequency Ken. I didn't do it in the last winter where you're you're the one who when you said you were going to be talking about -benin. You started singing the best REM song about the Knin did. Again. The. The insurgency began you missed it. Can I did miss it? But identical twins are a mutation in a sense of birth defect. And so the rate of identical twins worldwide is steady that three and a half or four live births per thousand. It's very low. It is there are not that many identical twins but for ternal twins. I just wanna say that I had set of identical twins in my elementary school. And of course, they were celebrities because they were identical twins. And then one summer I was in the states and turned on the TV, and they were doing our Snickers commercial really the twins for the freckled twins from elementary school were like on a hot day. I like to eat us knickers fresh out of the ice box. And I realized these girls must have been the most red headed freckle raggedy Anne twins in America. And they got the Snickers commercial. Wow. How awesome think how the world is delivered to you on a platter? If you're identical twin, you know, my best friends in elementary school. Cool were twins Thomas and Peter. They're identical identical twins their parents were from Germany father was a doctor and they were fascinating to me. Not I've they weren't really fascinating as twins because I could tell them apart. They didn't look anything alike to me. Yeah. I remember that about the twins in my classes that kids are not actually hoodwinked. Yeah. No. I mean, you could tell Thomas and Peter apart at a distance, but they were fascinating because in their home. They spoke a complete pastiche of German and English. I thought you're gonna say am some awful twin language that? Which they didn't really speak twin language. No. But they would come in and out of German talking to their parents. They never really did it with each other. But when we were in their house, they be chattering along German, and switchover and English and back five times in a conversation. And for me that was just like so fascinating. So without the root of your later treks across central Europe, you're captured that feelings trying to get get back to the Kluger household their father also had he was an early adopter of the I.

United States Thomas Facebook Peter Europe Germany Ken Anne America
Canadian PM on being accused of groping

01:55 min | 4 years ago

Canadian PM on being accused of groping

"It's the biggest trade war and economic history i'm dave anthony fox news that's what china is saying about new us tariffs as the american trade deficit with china surge nearly nineteen percent in may respect china and i respect president she but they've been killing us president trump told a rally last night in montana we will win fox's simon owen monitoring live from london dave china confirming retaliatory tariffs on american goods took effect to mmediately benin creased us gt's reimposed at midnight no details but china has previously said it would match the study for a billion dollars worth of goods targeted by the us the chinese tariffs expected to hate american products ranging from soybeans to electric cars chinese prime minister li chang what's so we don't sank trade war is never a solution an official newspaper writing to the trump administration is behaving like a gang of hoodlums dave simon more americans were higher than expected last month that breaks down to two hundred and two thousand jobs in the private sector and eleven thousand jobs in the public sector at the same time fox business network's edward lawrence reports the unemployment rate rose the increase to the four percent largely because the labor force participation rate increase six hundred one thousand people there reentered the workforce or restarted job searches in june on wall street the dow's up fifty two points dwindling oxygen and the threat of more flooding rain means time maybe running out to get the twelve boys in their soccer coach out of that thailand cave on it we originally thought the boys can stay safe inside the cave for quite some time but circumstances have changed tiny commander an ex seal volunteer diver drowned delivering air canisters and alabama woman's released from jail early this morning after being charged with animal cruelty after the dog sheila left in a hot car died in a walmart parking logic told police you lost track of time the dog was in the car for about seven hours was still breathing when.

China President Trump Donald Trump Montana Edward Lawrence Commander Sheila Dave Anthony Fox Simon Owen Prime Minister Official Dave Simon Thailand Alabama Nineteen Percent Billion Dollars Four Percent Seven Hours