5 Episode results for "Benaroya Hall"

Live From The HIBT Summit: Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams

How I Built This

16:18 min | 6 months ago

Live From The HIBT Summit: Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams

"So before we start the show I wanna tell you about to live episodes. I'll be recording in just a few weeks and how you can come see them in person. If you are a fan of ninety s alternative music you will not want to miss my live conversation with the founders of sub pop the legendary recording label behind bands like Nirvana soundgarden. The Shins and many many others that show is happening on March twenty sixth in Seattle at Benaroya Hall. And then the very next night. March twenty seventh. I'll be in San Francisco interviewing. Ken Grossman founder of one of the biggest craft beer makers in America Sierra Nevada brewing company. That's happening at the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco. Now if you haven't been to a live recording of the show they are Super Fun. Come on down. Meet your fellow listeners. Be a part of the show. Laugh cry grab some how I built this swag and come say hi to me and the team so I really hope to see you in either or maybe both San Francisco and Seattle March Twenty sixth and twenty seventh for tickets visit. Npr PRESENTS DOT Org. Hey everyone so today. We've got another one of my conversations from the how I built this summit. That happened last October in San Francisco. Jedi Britain Bauer has spent the past eight years perfecting her signature line of ice cream flavors which include fluffer nutter pie goat cheese and Cherry and my personal favorites bramble very crisp and biscuits and peaches and these are just a few of the unusual flavors. You'll find Jenny. Splendid ice creams all began at a Columbus Ohio. Farmers Market Back in two thousand two today. Jenny's is a staple at whole foods and there are nearly forty scoop shops across the United States in my life conversation onstage. I asked Jenny about staying true to herself. And how her ice cream can be that amazingly good without any egg yolks. I WanNa talk to you about a word. That comes up a lot and I have really mixed feelings about this word and I and I hope some of you do too which is authenticity. We hear this word a lot. Be Authentic Bureau authentic self your true self and one of the really cool things about your story that are members that in the early days when you had your first version of. What would become Jenny? Splendid later on you used to wear like torn jeans and you had green and purple hair and at a certain point you realize that actually wasn't working that something about your look and the aesthetic of what you were selling wasn't right and you decided to change. You took the diet of your hair. You started wearing all white. You sort of looked like a like a pharmacist. And your ice cream shop here. It became kind of reflected that clean aesthetic. And I'm wondering I mean you know you could say well Jenny. You know you weren't being your authentic self at that time. But of course I absolutely was it absolutely was I realized that I was communicating through what I was wearing and it was it was. It was goof you restore outfits. I mean. They're really cute. I had pink hair for a long time but I wasn't conveying. That sort of who I think I felt like on the inside honestly and and what. I thought that I wanted from my ice cream maker. You know the other thing was that it scream my first day scream shop. I thought that I could be this ice cream artiste and like everybody would be so excited about whatever. I was doing today that they would. Just you know. Come down and figure and stand in line and you know what's the. Great Jenny have today and I was really thinking more like an artist or a wannabe artist. So I quit art school to make ice cream then and when I got to Jenny's in two thousand into when I open Jenny's I I took all emphasis off of me on purpose. I had learned the lesson that no one comes to a business for whatever I'm making today. I don't go to businesses for that. I go to a business for what I had the last time I was there. Not for some new thing. I might change my mind when I get there. And so once I learned that I knew that I had to create this signature line that everybody knew about. And that was like credible in the middle of the night and you had to have it the next day and then I could play around with other stuff and then those could move onto the signature list if they were good enough if people loved them enough and so that was part of that. Take the emphasis off me. Ron Customers still add my passion to this but not make it about me anymore. Make it about other people and I knew what people love because they knew what they loved it. Scream when Miami. I shop but I didn't always have that so that constant disappointment is not a very good way to run a business. Do you do sort of agree with me? This idea of authenticity is being complicated. Because you know we get is be your yourself your authentic self and not. All of us know how to do that or what that actually means. Yeah it is. It's a complex thing right now especially when you talk about companies and brands building authenticity and starting with into though. Because what does that actually mean? That's something that you can't make you have to do. And it takes a long time and I think that so many times for me anyway often to city. It's a trust for yourself. And it's not trusting that you'll never make mistakes as trusting that you will but you'll get yourself out of trouble and I think the authenticity almost from that place of trust for yourself. You know because the people in the company that we find the most authentic are the ones that are making mistakes sometimes or that are trying things that are pushing themselves so I want to own a sort of a shift gears. A little bit and ask you about perfectionism because for those who know about your company in about you. You're a perfectionist. I mean you obsess over ice cream. In a way that few people obsess over any products right. I mean we start with what the cows eat and that every year. Our ice cream recipes change. I mean right. Now we're talking about extended hold times for pasteurization and how that will impact stability. We don't use stabilizes modifiers corn Syrup high-fructose Corn Zip and a whole bunch of other ingredients. That are very typical and ice cream or even a yolks. But we figured out that that that there's various ways to make milk proteins. Act that way and it's really fun and it's extremely delicious but it's all still an experiment and it's a big challenge. I think it's one of the reasons that twenty four years in. I'm still extremely excited about what we can do this year. And what we're going to try this year is going to impact what we're GONNA DO. Next year started to interrupt. I can get like really excited about this. I know me too cheap because I've noticed that there are no egg yolks. Oh the sort of I guess unless you want it to be unless you want there to be lake an Eggnog or something like that but I mean even like the peaches you buy for the Peach Cobbler or the cherries you use for the goat cheese you source it in an obsessive way. The cows are raised on well. And we're patient so for me. I always serve the people and so it starts building a relationship with a with a grower or producer and then we can work out quality together because we know that that's the way I mean. That's how you get the best stuff so sometimes it can take years to figure out how you know which. Which kind of strawberries grow in Ohio? And how can we extend that season by a few weeks so we have time to process them all as they come in? There's all sorts of cool stuff that you can do. But you really have to have a good relationship with your farmers and growers and your producers like Whiskey. You know there's too much alcohol and the whiskey. We couldn't add enough to ice cream. You know and still abide by the law. So we work with our whiskey distiller to create a lower alcohol whisky so we can add a Lotta whiskey to those kinds of things. All are based on relationships. I mean but with that level of obsessive nece right. You're paying a premium for really high quality products. Also means that your ice cream's more expensive pine of Jennings's expensive compared to pine another brand right. It's a very dense. There's a lot of ice cream. It's packed in there. That's really high quality stuff I mean. Presumably you your company can make a lot more money. If the pints were two dollars cheaper Yeah but I think that for us. That passionate isn't growing as a community. That sort of community spirited business and making something truly beautiful that we're all really proud of I mean in our stores. We have thirty nine stores. And we have the Pete. The summer we had eighteen hundred team members in the stores. And I think it's because mostly because those people who work in our stores are so proud of what we do that over the counter. It's of a natural naturally. Good at Service. Because they're just proud of all of these back details that we will never probably be able to convey all of them over the counter but they know that like it's that detail and the and the intention behind it that everyone feels and it's this crazy magic I mean do you think that there is a an argument to be made that you should pursue perfection that you should pursue an uncompromising just absolutely no cutting corners at all. I mean or it's like having a garden I mean sometimes you're GonNa have a very lush beautiful area and these going to get a little bit Withered hopefully nothing dies. But that's what you're doing. You're moving your resources around me. Ultimately we only have a limited amount of resources that we get to do this with and so you're constantly shifting. Yeah I mean you are in an entered a crowded space lotte ice cream makers a lot of people here working on baby clothes and different products. Where there's you know. There's a lot of competition I mean. How do you really breakthrough in a in a crowded market time? I mean it's one person at a time. It's all on street level. It's time and that starts to build sort of mentality of business because you get to create. I didn't know how to make ice cream. I know now when we were younger. And let's say we have taken a whole bunch of money early and I don't think anybody would have given it to a but let's just say we have done that. I wouldn't have had the time to work out these details and the things that I now know about ice cream. I need it all this time. I spent at least eight years boots on the ground just making ice cream and serving it before ever started growing and that time is everything for me because I learned all of that the art. I didn't study Acecomm Chemistry and honestly I failed every class I took and Matt Ice Cream is math so I had to learn all that stuff and for us. That's that's what's worked and I think in ice cream when we look at what's happening in American ice cream for the last one hundred years there was like a new sort of great American ice cream concept every like ten years and then it kind of stopped at Ben and Jerry's I mean there's been a couple of other things that sort of were okay but not great and now we're in another ice cream moment and I think it's because we've really devoted this lake time to to building it into a real. I mean a community that means something and it doesn't just mean something on paper. It feels a certain way and I think that like Ben and Jerry's. I think that they did that it was. It was a moment in American history. Every industry and every business is so different. But I just don't think that you can just create an ice cream shop and just bounce under the market. It's just too complex of of an industry and we've seen so many come and go over the years. It's very hard. Dairy is a complex industry. Of course we always think everybody else's businesses are so much easier than ours. I'm like I'm not doing dairy again. It's been amazing and it's been a joy and I'm an absolute evangelist for dairy farmers. I'm curious to get your your take on growth right because we we sort of. Were Fed this mantra? That growth is good and growth is important but there are also consequences when it comes to growth and challenges so for a company like yours. It means you've got a source more stuff. It means you got to build more shops. It could mean that you lose control the quality as you have more stores and more shops I think most of your sales are still online and in stores right. Beat people buying pints at whole foods and other places rather than the scoop shops. But I mean. How important is explosive? Growth I mean. Do you want to be like Baskin Robbins? I mean I love growing so much. I like the challenge of of business and I love that. I don't think that my company would ever grow just because of growth. I don't think anyone in our company is motivated by that. I think it's been really fun to grow where people are buying our ice cream and then be able to offer them servicemen various service driven as a person. It's very personal to me. And so being able to open shops this really important to me in places even when we're selling a lot of ice cream in whole foods for instance to be able to open shop in that community where we know people know about us and loves them then. We can offer that sort of service in that moment and do that. Ice Cream is a really lovely moment. A place that you can get to know somebody else better and it's just a special thing. So Gosh I have so many thoughts on this because I think that you can get better as you grow and that's been my experience when we were really small and there's this sort of glow around the sort of mom and pop sort of thing. I think especially in ice cream but when we were small we were. We were really limited by what we could buy. I mean we had to do an ice cream makes you couldn't get a company to help us. We couldn't get the dairy that we wanted to. We couldn't get the milk that we we wanted and we knew we were surrounded by these farms. We couldn't get them outside of the system co mingled with other milk. Even our strawberry grower now gross fields for us. And he's got his brother involved in the other guy down the street you know it was like what flats at a time or whatever and so we really couldn't do much planning and then sometimes you wouldn't have enough or whatever so you actually like up to this point we've gotten so much better as we've grown in terms of ice cream quality indefinitely in terms of service and we have so much more to do and it takes resources to do it as you know. The theme of the summit this year is kindness and clever. I love that so much and I know that there's been many examples of that on your journey. Can you share just just one example of of somebody who is kind or collaborative or just? Who helped you when you started and how that enabled you to get here. I don't know how many of you are from smaller cities like me. I'm from Columbus Ohio Columbus Ohio. Yeah I love I love Columbus very much and my whole story is about asking for help my whole story. I mean I started with. I always say no research from nothing. We all have our brain baron buds and that's literally like how we started the company But that community came out. I think once I started to prove myself so it wasn't immediate but once I started to prove that I was in it and that I would care it and that I was going to do this and it was going to be for a long time. The community came out in a big way. And at that point you know it becomes this love fest like now. I'm super committed. I want to get back to the community. They're supporting me. And I in a way love these sort of smaller cities and other cities as well where the whole city can kind of rally around a few businesses and companies that they love whereas sometimes you get lost in a bigger size other advantages of being in a big city with a with a new company that that has been amazing. And I just put that credit back on Columbus and I love it to this day and we'll never leave for that reason. I mean I travel a lot but I always come back home because that's my place on. Earth Jeni Bauer founder of Ginny. Thank you thank you. That's Jenny. Britain Bauer founder of Jenny. Splendid Ice Creams Ginny. Join me live on stage at the how I built this summit which happened in October at Yearbook Buena Center for the Arts and San Francisco will have more of my conversations from the summit over the next few weeks. Keep CHECKING FOR UPDATES. Thanks TO CANDICE LAMB. Who Produce this episode and Ramtane Air Blue? Who wrote the Music Guy? Roz and listening to how I built this this is NPR.

Jenny San Francisco NPR founder Columbus Ohio Seattle soundgarden Benaroya Hall Shins Bauer Columbus Sydney Goldstein Theater Ken Grossman America Sierra Nevada brewing United States Cherry Ron Customers Britain Bauer Miami
Samin Nosrat, The Entire Menu at El Molino Central

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

41:12 min | 1 year ago

Samin Nosrat, The Entire Menu at El Molino Central

"Your last meal is sponsored by heritage distilling company craft and small batch vodkas Jin's and whiskeys drink locally drink responsibly by Rosie Etel. I'm Rachel bell. And this is your last meal a show about famous people in the stories behind the foods. They love most today on the program, some mean, NAS rat. So means the author of the New York Times bestselling James beard award winning book, salt fat acid heat amp. She's a food columnist for the New York Times magazine, and those of us who have followed her writing and appearances on podcasts and online cooking videos were already very charmed. By some mean, she laughs a lot. She's hyper curious, she brings new life and light to the very saturated food and cooking media world but last year net flix released her four part food and travel show also called self acid, heat and the rest of the country fell in love and part of ability is how down to earth she is how reliable she is joking therapy about how never be the person who buys like ten thousand dollar pants. So mean, talks about growing up a Ron American her love of double carbs. Aka spaghetti sandwiches and her favorite Mexican restaurant. El Malino, central in California cinema county L Malino is owned by Karen Taylor. And I'm not people sort of can criticize this, but I wasn't born in Mexico, and I wasn't raised by Mexican there. So here, and I will talk about how she strives to honor Mexican cuisine and how she makes her homemade tortillas, so amazing. We're also going to talk about person food a cuisine. That's been getting a lot more attention in the United States these days, bona, Petit magazine, senior editor Andy bear Ghani grew up in Iranian household. But he spent his youth hiding his identity. It was an assignment at a food magazine that brought him back to his culture. It really forced me to kind of look at my upbringing, the food that I ate the food that I love so much but never wanted to learn how to cook. I wanted to learn foods from French chefs. It was that's what I thought. It was cool and hip and fancy and or gonna make toddy or rather rice with toddy something that I've been wanting to cook about a year with the Caspian chef OMI, drew stay a Persian cooking teacher in Seattle. So what role does rice play in Iranian culture, Rice's everything? I think it all started with rice. I my conversation with some mean NAS rat. The means cooking career started at one of the country's most famous restaurants shape. Unease in Berkeley, California. It was opened in nineteen seventy-one by Alice waters, who was the original Queen of the modern farm-to-table movement. So mean, I learned about shape knees at her freshman orientation in Berkeley, but she never really considered going. It was a fancy restaurant, and that wasn't the kind of place that her family would eat, and then myself more year, I fell in love and my boyfriend was from San Francisco, and he we really spent a lot of our time together eating, and he was showing me all of his favorite ice cream and pizza and his favorite stuff from his childhood. And he had really always wanted to go to shape any. So we decided to save up and we save two hundred twenty dollars over seven months to go eat there. And so we went for this dinner. That was really amazing and the dessert was chocolate souffle and the server brought it over, and we were like pretty obvious. Slee sticking out like a sore thumb, you know, I was nineteen. I was wearing a black tank top in a denim skirt. Like that was my fancy outfit and so. And so they, you know, they knew something was up with us. And so she said, oh have you ever had souffle before? And I said, no, she said would you like me to teach you how to eat him? I said sure, and she said, well, you poke a hole in it with your spoon, and then you pour the sauce in so every bite has cost. So I did that. And she asked how it was. And I said, oh, it's really good. But you know, what would be really good with us and make it even better is cold milk. And she said, you want milk, and I was like, yeah. So she brought me milk. And then she also brought us each a little sip of dessert wine to teach us like refined accompaniment, and it was just this really sweet interaction at you know, at the time. I had no idea like exactly how rooted is to tell somebody in a restaurant like how they could make the better. And also and also the fact that in finding it's considered like milk is only for babies, so it was sort of this like I mean, not that I had anything to hide, but it was a total giveaway that I was a total novice. And so I was so inspired by that meal that I wrote a letter asking for job, and when I brought it in they said, oh you have to give that to the floor manager. And so when they brought me over to the office, and she opened the door. It was the safely lady. And she she recognized me I recognized her and she pretty much right away hired me. And I started the next day and that was the beginning of her culinary career. She started as a BUSTER and worked her way up to a cook at shape unease sa- mean eventually moved on from restaurants, and she started teaching private cooking classes, counting author Michael pollen as one of her students he taught her how to write she taught him how to cook. And I will pretty much read. Listen, watch anything. That's the mean is connected to one of the things that I think people love about you. And what I love about you watching you and reading your book is that number one. You don't seem like a food snob. But you definitely embrace highs and lows you like food a shape unease, but you also like Oreos, and you've also managed to just really be yourself, or as far as what we all know seems like yourself what if it was all them is. Everyone kept telling me I was natural. And I didn't understand what that meant. I do have the strange capability to not change in front of a camera. And I didn't realize that's unique, you know. And apparently it is. I think a lot of people do get stiff the wonderful thing about Netflix is that they recognize that from the first minute we met everything that they did every comment that they had was about creating circumstances. That allowed me to be my true self. They never wanted me to be anything else. They never wanted me to dress fancy or you know there. It was all just being me, which I'm so grateful for because like in a world that has told me in my whole life that I'm not okay. As I am that I you know, that I don't measure up to standards of beauty or or whatever like to have this incredibly powerful sort of corporation coming in saying to me just be you. That's good enough. And not only is it good enough. But it's a great was really a powerful. Thing for me emotionally. Can you talk a little more about that? Did you feel those pressures growing up that you didn't totally fit in? Yes. Yeah. I mean, I grew up in San Diego which. Was at the time of very very segregated place. And the part that I ended up on was predominantly white. I was very much aware of limping different and being different than having a different name in eating different food. And I was also made to feel different like on a daily basis by the people around me. And it's funny because now, you know, I'm so much older. I sometimes wonder like am I narrative ising this? My creating a story am I remembering it wrong. And what's funny since the show came out like all these people from my past or coming out of the woodwork? And so people are like posting pictures online of childhood things that we did together. And it's always like me and a whole bunch of blonde girls. Okay. Did not remember. And so it's not, you know, there's of course, nothing wrong with being blonde or being white. And I've so many friends who are blonde and white and beautiful and wonderful. It's just that when an entire society an entire culture is like sending signals constantly to all of us that there's one standard of beauty or one standard of normalcy. For that one thing is the default and everything else is weird than like, of course, a little kid can't help but feel excluded and feel different. And so growing up eating your mom suit. He's eating Persian food. What was your school lunch? Like, what would she pack for you? While sometimes we had Persian leftovers or there are certain Persian dishes. Make a great sandwich. You know, there's something we have called let which is kind of like, a little mini Meatloaf or something a little, Patty. And so that would make a great sandwich with pickles man, as my mom would stick it in a pita pocket or Kusaba Z, which is sort of herb, herb and greens rich for Totta, and I'd get a Kuku sandwich. Or sometimes one of my favorites was like she would make Persian pasta, which all Persians make this one type of pasta. I think that that's they and it's called a mock out Oni. And so and so this is like a pasta grip eating was very specific flavor of beef. It was a beef and tomato sauce with mushrooms and a lot of oregano, and it was super good. But only like when I became a cook. And moved to Italy today realize like it has nothing to do with Italy. You'd never find a sauce like that in Italy. It's very very particularly Iranian. So my mom would make macaroni. And then she would give us this incredible double car blunt of pita pockets filled with muck aronie. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. What we we? Call them spaghetti sandwiches. They were so good. We'll what's interesting. I feel like you hear a lot of kids who have foreign parents, myself included, just wanting to fit in and like, oh, I just wish I could have a white bread sandwich with craft single in it. But it sounds like you really embraced the lunches at your mom was making you. I totally did don't get me wrong. But like, I had a friend. I remember like third or fourth grade, and we would walk to school together. Her mom, always made her like wonder, red PJ's. Also, she was like stick thin. I think her mom was trying to get her to gateway. So mom would put margarine and peanut butter and jelly on the sandwich. Also, get like a bag of cheese. It's a bag of Oreos. And for whatever reason she hated Oreos. And I just like I would have done anything for Oreo. So my friend would take her bag of Oreos and throw them in a Bush every day on the way to school. And I was like is it the same Bush like if I went in there were there'd be like a hundred bags? What were you? And I still have like an irrational irrational, sort of fascination with like things like Kraft singles or macaroni and cheese or sort of like all of the trashy things that that are probably like most American kids grow up with to me, they seem like exotic and fascinating. And I have like strange cravings for them. So I'll always be like give me the hidden valley ranch. You know? Me too. I am. So with you Wilson means less meal the craft single Oreo sandwich. Filipina Persian dish. She grew up eating around her family table. You only have to wait about a minute to find out. Check out the title. Spoiler alert. We'll be right back. It is till our here on your last meal, and if you've gotten into this whole, Marie condo craze. And you've pretty much given everything you own to the goodwill. You're not trying to bring more stuff into your house. So something cool to combat stuff is giving and receiving gifts of experience in heritage distilling company has really great experience called Cass club. This is where you are basically crafting your own custom age with e bourbon or rye, it's a one year membership and in the end, you're going to end up with ten liter barrel of whiskey or bourbon awry, so you get to guide the distillers into making exactly what she wants you get to help with the recipe, you can tell them. Hey, I want some coffee flavor here. I want dried peaches, I want a single months, you get a custom label, and you decide how long age your spirits for you can pull up bottles whenever you want. You can try your bourbon your whiskey at different stages in the aging process. It's called Cass club. You can find more information at heritage distilling dot com. Semi. What would your last meal be Mexican food? I sometimes say roast chicken, but I'm like, let's be real. I love Mexican food so much. You have to you grew up in San Diego. What? Specifically what Mexican food you had to always changing? But there is a restaurant in cinema. That's called El Molino centrale that is so delicious. It's a little tiny doesn't look anything special from the road side. But they do so many special things inside including the grind Nikolai their own cord, which is the process that like corn goes through to turn formed from corn. Kernels into the corn that we eat into tia's tortilla chips, they do that themselves. And so it means all of their corn items their tortillas tortilla chips in their tamales have the most sweet corny flavor. I would probably get really hungry before my last meal, and then go there an eat one of everything they have the most incredible fish tacos, they have the sweetest tamales. I really love there because there's not too much Masa on outside. They're not too dry. They're super tender in the fillings, really delicious. They have this incredible dip from the Yucatan that's called tequila pock that I kind of describe as like a pumpkin seed HAMAs or something it's made with pumpkin seeds and tomatoes garlic, and it's so creamy and that I love dipping chips in on. I would honestly one of everything elbowing owes my last meal. When I called Karen Taylor. The owner of El Molino central and told her that to mean wants her last meal at her restaurant Karen was beyond thrilled. She's a fan. Aren't we all L Malino central is in boys? Hot springs in sonoma's county in a predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. L Malino translates to the mill and L Malino central mills or grinds its own corn. Something Karen started doing more than twenty five years ago. When she started her Tamale company Primavera wanted to organic tortillas, and there wasn't any dehydrated cordon must Seca vailable that was her Ganic, and we wanted to be in the Berkeley farmers market. So I found a guy that was selling a fifteen horsepower grinder in Santa Rosa. And we bought it described the process a lot of people just by tortillas in the store, and they don't know that there's a special process that the corn goes through to turn the corn intimacy. So tuck about the the grinding and the Knicks. Nixed. How do you say nixed Amal today? Shen Nixon molestation. Well, it starts with dried corn like that looks like popcorn or or hominy. And then you soak it in water and call or line, which is calcium hydroxide, and he'd it for a little while half hour, whatever. And then let it so overnight and a line penetrates the the corn and makes it also more nutritional, but it inflates, and then you wash it and grind it in stone grinders with water. So it's always a wet grind like cookie. Dough this hard for me nixed. Mullah's Asian is an eight I did it mixed vision is an ancient process dating back to about fifteen hundred BC in Mesoamerica, and as you would imagine freshly grinding and nixed Himalayan your own corn is way tastier than buying package tortillas or Masa Karen is currently using. Mossy Enda corn, which is an heirloom variety from Oaxaca. And the best part is that the neighborhood people can come in by their MAs of from us in Mexico. All his village is have a sort of central Molina where they bring their corn in the Molyneaux grinds the corn, and they can ask them to grind it. Hell like it. They can always buy to retain his in Maza Sutts worked out that way too. And then it kind of became busier and busier and more of a restaurant created a community hub similar to what exists in Mexico. I think so as best we can everything's very reasonably priced the Mazas dirt cheap, the tortillas are as well. And I think people are excited to see the blue tortillas. It's all worked out Karen has a big staff of cooks mostly Mexican women who have stuck with her for more than twenty years. I see a couple of names on your menu. Like, the Rytas mothers will Hawkin red Molay, chicken, enchiladas and. I see where's the other and a Rufina 's pork tamales are these couple of the women who work for you. Yes. Uh-huh. Surata she's kind of a kitchen manager during the day, she and her sister Alfonsina and another sister that has since gone back to Mexico Katerina all three of those been really lucky to have Nate kind of. They really don't want anyone to help them make the moly at. Sometimes. I insist like I wanna do Patricia Tania's malay- because I like it has prunes in it and things like that. But they like to make their own Moulay, and they can make black Molay. They're so good at it. I don't need to get in the middle of that. That's for sure Karen is not Mexican. But she got her start cooking Mexican food in a restaurant in Mexico more than thirty years ago. And she spent a lot of time there she tries to honor the Oaxacan and Yucatan dishes Elmo Lino serves and she doesn't do her own spin on them. But of course, people still like to criticize how does it make you feel or does it bother you? When people do criticize you for making food from a country that you're not from you know, I it's it's funny that it's coming up a lot lately rather than along time ago at this late date. I've been doing it for so long. You have to be careful about your criticism. There's no criticism for someone that is buying L pasta sauce, and grilling Carney Asada, and there's a lot of Mexican restaurants around that I wouldn't say they necessarily honor the cuisine of Mexico. You know, a world class cuisine. Now. Luckily, people are interested in they wanna do it. So I don't claim to be an expert on Mexico Mexican cooking in a we've done a pretty good job. With a lot of sincere effort. There's people doing all kinds of cuisine in this country. We don't have an indigenous cuisine. I'm not claiming anything I'm just trying to do a good job by L centrale is in northern California. And if you're a member of the official society of California, burritos, nods and know, it alls like I am fun at parties, you'll know that there are different styles of Mexican food in different parts of California. So San Francisco's famous for the mission style burrito. San Diego has the California burrito, which is stuffed with cardia Sada and crinkle cut fries. My favorite Britos, come from my college town up and Chico and LA has its own thing going on to you live in the bay area. But you're from San Diego. What is your loyalty? I know. What do I do? It's so complicated. I mean, technically, I've spent more years of my life up here. But I recently realized that my favorite burrito up here is from a place called LA tuck rea- at they don't put rice in their burrito. They only have beans in me, unlike other toppings, which I realized is basically a southern California brio because southern Californians don't rice in the brio. So I think if like you cut me open the burrito, you would find in my heart is a southern Californian Brita. You're really going against your Iranian upbringing. The no rice, I know. Well, maybe the rest of me is all right. All persian. Also in San Diego, which they don't do up north. I find that the Britos always come in that yellow paper as opposed to foil. I have a whole I have a friend from San Diego who went to college up here. And he was really really angry about the foil. He was like if there's foil, it's not southern Californian. I really love the paper. I don't know. I mean, it's colorful, it's delightful really under the paper. Plus like anytime, if you accidents like unwrap your burrito, you don't get all the foil off. And then you like have a little piece of foil later teeth. Not pleasant. That I think that the northern California Britos are bigger. And so the foil contains them because you just not to hold them in you, unwrap it from the very important it is because it makes it so nice and dense and like the papers just there for decoration. I feel like it doesn't like hold it together. I I'm with you. I think the flour tortillas in the south or better though. And I think I am I I don't care how route it is like, I love flour tortilla. Even if it's not cool. They're just so delicious. They're so good likes me and said her heart is filled with Mexican food and the rest of her body is Persian rice, and we've already covered the Mexican food. So when we come back, we're going to talk about Persian rice, and the crispy coveted layer how tidied we'll be right back. It's cocktail hour here on your last meal. And I have a feeling there are a lot of people out there who select wine in the same enter as I pick out a bottle of wine, which is I look at all the bottles. I pick a pretty label with good design. That's in my price range in abaya. And if you feel the same way about spirits, like you don't know very much about them you naturally gravitate towards a big commercial brand just because it's too you. Let me tell you. What's so great about carrots distilling company because this might help you when you're looking at rows and rows of vodkas, whiskies engines and trying to figure out which one to get to selling company is a family business Justin as the owner used to be a lawyer he decided that he had a much bigger passion for spirits needed for law. So we quit, and he started this Cillari their base at a gig harbor, Washington. And they use as many Washington grown ingredients as possible. But like, lavar Burton went said, don't take my word for it. Take the American distilling institutes word for it. Silly company is the most awarded craft Assiri in North America by the American civilians to five years in a row there. SP Brown sugar bourbon just one best flavored whiskey in the world for the second year running. So basically, it's really cool. Nice down to earth people making really delicious spirits. They have a bunch of cocktail recipes up on their website, heritage distilling dot com and six tasting rooms between Oregon and Washington, you could also find their spirits in grocery stores around the country. Find a store at heritage distilling dot com. Oh, hi, guys before we back to the episode sa- mean, and I were talking earlier about nor Cal burritos versus so Cal burritos. And I wanna let you know that we have a whole episode focusing entirely on the history of the burrito. You gotta go way way back to a very early episode featuring the last meal of former child actor and current writer, Mara Wilson, San Francisco style mission burritos or something having to do with mothra all soup, some means favorite. San Francisco burrito is from LA Correa, which was declared the best burrito in the country. By a burrito bracket done by five thirty eight the reason, let Correa one to me is that it has the sort of miraculously, I bite it's incredibly juicy and delicious and packed with flavor and sort of food Piff une- the first time you have it. So if you love burritos as much as I do first of all go get yourself on and then scroll back and listen to the Mara Wilson episode. All right back to the show. It's a means parents are from Iran and growing up in San Diego, her family almost exclusively eight Persian food at home Persian food centers around rice. But there's a particular part of a rice dish that people actually fight over that is called the toddy. What is toddy literal? Translation of Tadic is bottom of the pot. That's a meat stay. He calls himself, the Caspian chef and he teaches Persian cooking classes in Seattle and Meade is going to teach me how to make a toddy toddy is the crispy crust that forms on the bottom of the pot of rice. Now, it is an irresistible ultra coveted treat. But it started as an accident. If you've ever scorched, the bottom of a pot of rice, you know, that it gets nice and crispy, but maybe not in a good way. But he run ins have since perfected it and the simplest way to make Persian rice is to put water buzz, muddy rice and fat like butter or oil into a pot and let it cook. The fat in the heat will create the toddy. But since we were going to be cooking in the studio. Omid brought in a special rice cooker you sit. This is a special Persian rice cooker. This is not just a rice cooker this vice cooker what's unique about this one. Is it has temperature dials where it actually cooks at a higher temperature to create the crispy bit on the bottom. I he measures out some water into the pot. The water in the pot put the lid on. So that I'll be little come to a boil faster. And then he rinses the rice get some of the natural starch off of the rice. And do you do it till it runs clear? Yeah. Just to three rinses, and I don't get to phonetic about it. But just couple of rinses you get some of that starch out a big chunk of butter to the pot. Keep in mind that the adequate fat is what's needed to make the teddy guess crispy as it is. So if you want it to be rich in crispy and reasonably fried, you need the fat in there. So the fat not only coats around the grain, and it prevents it from sticking together. But it also settles down to the bottom, and that is the crispy bit that we all love so much salt goes in saffron goes in and puts a thin dish towel under the lid of the pot to catch the condensation. He says, that's what's gonna create really fluffy rice and actually tried this a few weeks ago from another recipe. It was honestly the best. Lot of rice. I had ever made it eliminated kind of the extra starchy and any of the stickiness that I had experienced in the past. So any kind of rice, I would advise putting this towel under unless I guess you won't like really sticky tire is. But anyway, the rice then cooks for about forty five minutes. Okay. So we're going to take the top off. It's done really tell just looking at the top surface that how the rice is just light and fluffy and the aroma of the saffron that we put on top. And of course, a little bit of butter that went in helped quite a bit. If you're Rice's clumpy that is the curse of your family system. So if you planning on getting married, you can kiss that idea. Goodbye if you serve clumpy rice, you guessed. So let's flip the rice out and see what the Tadic looks like. Now the moment of truth. And I think every time I make rice you just going to get what you gotta get. And it's always good, but it will look different shade. So it was a metaphor for life. That's right. So here we go. Look at her. She looks good touch it. Yes, I'm gonna go. Get us some spoons the rice was intensely buttery super fluffy. There was not a single grain stuck together. And if you're like me, and you're used to eating a lot of Asian rice, like Thai rice, or Japanese rice sushi rice, this is a very different experience tells the story of when he first came to the US he was taken to a Chinese restaurant, and he was appalled by the rice because it was all stuck together, and it's supposed to, but in his culture sticky rice is a disgrace. You heard him you won't be able to get married if you're rice sticks together. Anyway, back to our ice. It was the first time that I got to try toddy, and it was crusty and crispy and tinged yellow orange by the Safran, so delicious when you're talking about people food the culture when you use Iranian and Wendy use Persian. That's a great question. I get asked that a lot. And I don't know if it's universally understood that way or not, but I think. Of my ancestry, my heritage as being Persian and my country of origin and citizenship being Iran. So I am Iranian as was born in Iran. And I am Persian as in my ancestry is Persian. So that's that's how I differentiate it. What about for the food? Would you say Persian food for the Persian food a have used it interchangeably? You know, some of the classes that I teach sometimes I call it flavors of Persia. Sometimes I call the flavors of Iran. Neither is culturally insulting not at all. Not at all not at all. Hugh. Good. Yeah. Oh meets parents sent him to the United States after the Iranian revolution. When he was just sixteen years old. He arrived by himself and was sent to boarding school. And he thought that he could speak English. He studied before he came to the US. But when a kid asked him what's up, he literally looked up at the sky people were constantly asking him. What they couldn't understand what he was saying they couldn't hear through his accent. And even though we hardly has an accent today. That is something that's still triggers him Omid is it their best. But he also teaches Persian cooking classes when you came in one of the first things, you said is that you're really trying to get people in this country to learn about Persian cuisine. Why's it so important to you? I think Iran and Iran ins or quite misunderstood these days. And I think food is a tremendous opportunity in a way where we get to connect and really bust. A lot of myths that we have about who those other people are for me personally. I was truly moved as I recognize how misunderstood we are as a nation couple years ago. I decided to come out of a pseudo retirement from my cooking, classes and reengage teaching cooking classes because it felt like I could tell people about Iran in a very loving and gentle and connecting ways. So and people are hungry for good food. And so the movement toward recognizing and appreciating different cultures through food. I think it is a brilliant move and bone up teats anti-bear Ghani are to Iranian Americans who have helped get Persian food into the minds and magazines of Americans. I love it. I couldn't be happier. I am actually going to go. See some mean myself when he comes to Seattle. Yes. I am such a fan as I was sharing with your Lear like the whole video of Andy flipping the teddy and rice over and showing it and there's such a pride in. In the care that we put into our food. And again, it's another way of re our normalizing and humanizing each other through the love of food, and what truly we have all in common. Ghani is a senior food editor for bone apetite magazine. And I must say the magazine has done an amazing job of using videos and their podcasts to present their writers and test kitchen cooks as a cast of vibrant knowledgeable characters to help readers make a connection and it worked I love Claire sophists. I love any bear Gandhi. Also. Hi, Adam Rappaport. I think you're cool to anyway, Andy is fairly softspoken he's detail oriented, and the recipes that I've cooked are all delicious and likes mean, he got his start working at shape unease. He grew up in Berkeley, she lives there. Now last year. Andy wrote a very poignant and beautifully written piece for the magazine, titled I hit who I was for so long until I became a cook. It's an article about how he didn't want to reveal his sexuality or his ethnicity to anybody. So mean, oh, meet an Andy have more than a love for cooking and food in common. They're all Iranian Americans who grew up feeling like outsiders. There's like some in Andy's lunches were packed with Persian food, but he wasn't excited to pull a Kuku sandwich from his lunch bag when you're at that age, he really just want to fit in as best. You can. So I think I just tried to kind of avoid conversation or really would eventually happened was I just stopped taking lunch to school. It was easier for just like not take lunch and avoid the kind of conversation or just remembered days, I wouldn't even eat just because I didn't wanna. Didn't wanna bring lunch from from home. Andy also didn't feel comfortable with his name by full name is Andy Shi'a and Chabal on him. And that is a hard to pronounce for most people. So I took the liberty of kind of shorten it two n d when I transferred school districts, and I didn't know anybody in. I don't want people to ask you about that name, and I was very quick to cut the teacher off when they were kind of reading the names from the from the roster, and I would just tell Andy and he's fine. My last name, the correct pronunciation, which is also very difficult to say is battle Hauni, the G H makes this sound which is actually very hard to pronounce if you don't speak Farsi. And I kind of just started saying bear Ghani so anti-bear gone. And so Barry Ghani kind of sounded talion to me. And so I kind of didn't sorted saying. I was a talion which is not true. And I know why. But I purchased a shirt as a teenager that said Italian style in which the same thing about just fitting in and sometimes you go to these great lengths these ridiculous links to fit in London. Eventually it gets to you. If if you're lying to others in your line to yourself. So I think it was consumed me in a way that just was it was not healthy. It was Persian food that brought him back around to loving his roots. So I was intern for survivor in twenty ten a food magazine. And I was working and test kitchen I had left, and then they contacted me. They said they were going to do a feature story on Ron. I thought that was ridiculous. Just because I never thought that would be happening and just with tensions between the US on Iran. It just didn't make a lot of sense. So. The story did end up happening and an ISA who report the story and originally the recipes were going to be coming from Iran and transcribed and then just tested in Tesco chin. But that changed and Todd and James asked me to adapt. The recipes from my mother that was something that I was kind of shocked by but open to and it was a lot more work than I think I I thought just because it's not like my mother has these recipes written down in. So it was a lot of hours and days of speaking to her and try transcribing her her pinches and handfuls intact measurements. It was about eight or ten of the final recipes were my mother's. And it was think a great feeling for everybody involved. And that kind of set you on the path of like, oh, this isn't something I have to be embarrassed about. Yes, I think once the story came out, and then I kind of. Realized there was definitely this interest in this food. That's when I started to just continue cooking that food and really have continued since then. Mentioned earlier mink grew up eating Persian food at home, but that is not her culinary area of expertise. She learned to make perfect hostile while living in a practicing in Italy. She cooked seasonal California cuisine at shape unease and the other day watch this video on munchies of her making the world's fanciest and most delicious looking tuna sandwich. Like, you think tuna sandwich? This is not that she starts with tuna steaks, and she uses olive oil and aromatics to make tuna con fee. She makes homemade mayonnaise makes an olive top nod that she mixed into the mayonnaise. She just pickled. Onions the whole thing looks insane. You said that your mom is an amazing cook wasn't amazing cook. When you grow up and now, you're famous for cooking. And being a cook. What's it like to be in the kitchen with your mom? What is her attitude like, how do you guys cook together to she look to you as still like a little girl or do you get to be an expert? No, no, no, no, no, I defer to her because also she's an expert in something that I'm not she's an expert in Persian food. And anytime I need to. Learn something about any particular dish. I call her. I learned a long time ago. I remember one of the first times after I started cooking. I went home to visit my family, and I was so excited to make something for everyone. And I think that's time. But I was really a chicken potpie, which was some American thing that I had never had before, you know. So I really wanted to make that and I learned how to make gravy, and I was really into making biscuits. And so I made this potpie with biscuits in it. And we invited my grandparents everyone came over. And like everyone was confused. You know? Know. I mean, it was I'm sure it really good chicken by. But it was just not what anyone in my family and considered to be dinner. And so. Eat it. Yeah. They totally ate it. I think they like pretended to be really polite about it. But it was sort of got enough subliminal messages that day to know that like my job when I go home is not to cook. It's to eat, which I'm happy to oblige, my mom. So I don't think the kitchen is going to be the place where we're going to like really find ourselves together. Fritz things that your mom cooks. She is a master of Persian rice. And I think one of my favorite dishes one that I'm really craving all excited to eat. The next time. I see her is called bobbly polo. And it's it's a springtime dish. It's like a Dili rice with Fava beans in it. A lot of times the some of the Fava beans will sort of sink to the bottom of the pot and embed themselves in the crispy Tadic, the crispy rice at the bottom. And that's usually served with with lamb with simmered with saffron and onions, and it's it's it's just such. Oh, it's so I think I'm really a double starches is what I'm coming to hear like being and rice burritos or just being Britos spaghetti sandwiches, Fava bean rice toddy taco. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And that was to mean NAS rats last meal Sabine will be in Seattle. If you happen to live here at ROY a hall on Sunday, March ten in conversation with the Seattle times food writer Bethany Jean Clement. I'll be there. Come say. Hello. She'll also be in Portland the next day March eleven pickup or book, which completely sold out around the holidays. You literally could not get it anywhere. But you can get it now or watcher Netflix special. It's so so good. I watched it all the way through twice both are called salt fat acid heat. Thanks to Karen Taylor, owner of El Molino central and Primavera tamales in cinema. Thanks so much to omit Reuss, stay this guy is one of the most genuine sweet interesting people, you will ever meet if you're at all interested in learning Persian cooking, which I definitely am. And you happen to be in the Seattle area. Take one of his cooking classes, you can find him at the Caspian chef dot com. A thank you to Andy bear Ghani, bona, petite, magazines, senior editor full. On Instagram checkout. The nearside she of apetite re Jess launched at channel on Roku or apple TV. So we have our own channel. Now. So you are able to watch videos and the comfort of your own lifting episode is produced by Aaron Mason, meet the music by prom. Queen follow me on Instagram at your last meal podcast and leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps to get the show out to new people, and it's good for our self esteem. I'm Rachel bell. And this is your last meal.

Persia Karen Taylor San Diego Andy bear Ghani Seattle California United States Mexico Berkeley San Francisco Rice Andy Tadic food magazine El Malino Rachel bell Netflix Italy Mara Wilson El Molino
Biden Pretends He's Not At Fossil Fuel Fundraiser

The Young Turks

55:36 min | 1 year ago

Biden Pretends He's Not At Fossil Fuel Fundraiser

"Hey guys you've heard of the young turks podcast because you're listening to it right now but <hes> you subscribe and a five star rating if you like it thank you for listening. Drop it. Okay everybody it's friday. We've got something a little bit different jenkins gone. We throw them out of the studio and adrian is back in so you j._r. Is here here as well so it's going to be fun. It's really weird rundown by demands from agencies that it'd be going to have me in here. You have to get out of here exactly yeah. It continues you guys are gonna have to things up eventually by the way that started rumors it your tweets about for years. Oh sweet enjoy that now but not actually shooting but anyway. We got a lot that we're gonna talk about. <hes> we're gonna talk about <hes> fossil fuel donations to politicians or at least one of them anyway <hes>. Will there be a republican primary contest. We've got multiple candidates but will there actually any races between them. We'll find out about that. We're to talk about wall funding. We're gonna talk about kevin sorbo as we often do and <hes> also <hes> the workweek quique traditionally five days long but should it be. We're going to have a little debate here on the show and everything else that we need to touch on a pretty good it. Why don't we just launch right into it. Okay joe biden got some hard questions at the climate townhall including this. How can we trust you to hold these corporations and executives accountable for their crimes against humanity when we know that tomorrow you are holding high dollar. Fundraiser fundraiser hosted by andrew goldman fossil fuel executive not anti and the fact of the matter. Is that what we talk about is. What are we gonna do about those corporation. What have we done and a law everywhere along the way for example. I've argued that we've pushed for us. Suing those executives were engaged in pollution. What andrew's saying is if you're going to fundraiser. That's given in part by this guy who has accompanied. I need that is pulling up natural gas. Are you the right guy to go after this well. I didn't realize he does that. I was told if you look at the s._e._c. filings. He's not listed as one of those executives. That's what we look at the s._e._c. filings. Who are those executives. I've kept that pledge period so is that. Are you going to look at that fundraiser tomorrow night. Look at what you just told me and find out that's accurate. Yes okay. I think it's pretty accurate ernest cooper with a little bit of spice there yes it's pretty accurate and that was that was bernie sanders it would be described and headlines as <hes> bernie oddly combative after question that was him like dismissively saying yes. I'm keeping the pledge but not if you actually care about the content of the pledge because <hes> <hes> the individual that they talk about their andrew goldman yes. He is not technically by the strictest definition a c._e._o. Or an executive of fossil fuel company but he co rounded company that starts facilities that do natural gas production. That's a higher level that creates new executives for that field that that is spawning those corporations that we have a problem with so to say that we shouldn't be worried about him. Is that just dishonest but that's inverting reality in a way absolutely it it really kind of speaks to almost the things we've already been experiencing whip this current administration in terms of stretching the truth and sometimes even just giving us blatant lies and so if biden's platform is going to be something distinguishable in different from trump it would be great if he actually kind of you know put that forth as opposed to situations like this when he claims is that this gentleman who co-founded western l. g. and was also his adviser when he served in the senate is not at all involved in fossil fuels. Come on you have up to show that you have at least some kind of understanding of the reason why people wanted to do this so when people say the question was direct sales. How can we expect you to hold these types of companies accountable if you're gonna be going to their fundraisers you understand why people ask that question. You've been doing this for a while. So if you're going to continue to go and say technically it's not really on the board awardee more therefore i'm technically holding onto the pledge. That doesn't mean anything. Nobody's talking about technicalities and this is not a lawyer trying to get by on some kind of a scheme to get your your client off. You're trying to run for president so if you if you need to show constituents that you understand it. They're against u continuing to call out these top. Oh companies you need to say oh. I didn't know that i'm going to avoid that now. People may get mad and say how you gonna cut out a large section of voting block by oil all companies. They'll be okay in the past what we've done is we've ignored constituents that have a problem with what these companies do you avoid them this time. You've ignored them the whole time so if you wouldn't do that in those circumstances you know the way so he. I think you said there corrective wrong that he's been around for a while. He gets why i wonder under though if anderson cooper had falled question. Why don't they want you to take money from these executives. People who have a vested interest in fossil fuel extraction. Would he actually be able to answer it either. Could he or would he actually do because to answer that honestly a full answer because we the fear that those sorts of people will have an influence over the money that they give you now is an investment on affecting your policy directives when you get an office to admit that is to who admit that all of your campaign finance should be put under a magnifying glass and i don't know if he would actually do that or if he could do that really gets why we think it's a problem because is answer that he's not technically an executive implies that he doesn't get it that guy create he co co founded a company that creates facilities that exploit natural gas. If that sort of person is your adviser if he's raising money for you and you say you're going to do something about fracking no he's. I don't think he's one of the ones that says he's going to be in it but he says more regulations. Why would we believe that. Why would these people be pumping money into your campaign. If you're gonna shut them down that would be madness and i don't think that they're mad. I think that they're savvy with they. Donate only two and so for you to continue to accept that money implies to me that you don't take it seriously whatsoever and the vague promises you make about your potential climate platform should not be taken a face value alya absolutely it does convey that he is essentially disingenuous and we're able to see this largely by actions as opposed to his words and his words in terms of phoenix ignorance. We can see right through that to begin with you know claiming oh. I didn't know what this gentleman did our oh. I don't know selling his title. That's come on. You should know better especially when this man was your adviser when you were in the senate and so again actions versus words and it just it just makes me realize how much more we are going to get more trump by the way i i guess i've sort of baird the leader we're talking about stuff coming from the climate townhall and so time has come and gone. He did go to that fundraiser. He ended up doing it. He did the fact checking. He said he would anderson cooper and you know what he's okay. Stamp of approval biden is going to go there but he said this and this is just a great quote so he said at the fundraiser. I just want to be very clear to everyone here that i am committed to not raising money from fossil fuel executives and i'm not doing that here and all the people who are just taking every bit of energy out of the ground burning up and ruin our climate. They're like that's a great point joe. You're the best here's some more money. Well you miss the second half of that quote. He said because i'm taking all the money that was raised at this fund raiser and i'm giving it to clean up operations and <hes> and certain cities that cities and states all over the country that deal with with <hes> contaminated pipes and not just flint so pipes that are destroying people's lives and and pump through different kinds of contaminants into this system. He's giving that money to them. That's what he's raising money from fossil fuels for. I don't think that's what it is because he said he's not doing it as he's doing it so they must not really be doing it so so look. I obviously was not four. I'm not involved in the creation of this pledge. I've talked about it on my show is but <hes> so why don't we turn to the people who actually put together this pledge to see whether they're not. They accept his explanation well. We have a comment from david turnbull spokesman for oil change. This is one of the organizations that helped organize that pledge that he is. He's he swears. Where is he still abiding by that. Spokesman said while it may not technically violate the pledge it clearly goes against the spirit we define the pledges ruled and make it simple for candidates to commit two and follow not to provide loopholes to continue raising funds from fossil fuel adjacent sources and so we might all disagree on exactly where you should draw the line. Should they be going through every donation no matter how small the find out what industry person worked for like so if somebody makes fifty thousand dollars a year working at an oilfield. Should you accept money from them. We can sort of disagree about that but this isn't a donation. This isn't a single thing. This is a wealthy influential person that you have a past with that you definitely know about. Don't pretend you have no clue what business they're in. Who is organizing a fundraiser for you and maybe it's crazy but i have this sneaking suspicion edition that when he's choosing who to bring to this fundraiser for biden some of them might be in the oil game. Maybe perhaps anyway look. He got through this first townhall. I guess there's been some criticism so far. It hasn't really stuck in part because it was a climate townhall and so nobody watches because <hes> the potential death of our civilization isn't a big ratings <hes> booster <hes> but there are going to be other town halls and they're going to be debates where these questions are gonna be brought up and i hope that his continued noncompliance alliance with this if he keeps doing fundraisers becomes a problem for them because it's on issue we can afford to just let him escape by on okay. We're gonna take our first break. When we come back jack. We're gonna get into the republican primary. If there is one after this the monsanto corporation continues to sell it herbicides called roundup but you should know that that herbicides the a potential killer recent studies have linked roundup to significant increases in non hodgkin's lymphoma. That's a cancer that can be devastating to you and the people you love while roundup continues to cause cancer. Monsanto continues to make huge profits from the sale of roundup. They will not take it off the market. If you or a loved one are exposed to round up at work your home and then developed non-hodgkin's lymphoma. You may be entitled to financial compensation and it's important for you to take action now and hold monsanto accountable. Welcome back to the turks. Everybody we've got some both hashtag lives lives and also member comments before jumping that <hes> i just wanted to let you know one or two things coming up <hes> the first is i have a question for you. <hes> are you happy with your financial institution and if you're not you might wanna consider aspiration and if you are you might wanna think about it again because for many of you using the big well-known financial institutions your money is parked there are and they're making money off of it but they're also giving it to politicians many of whom probably are completely opposed every political value that you have and so giving them your money is giving your political opponents power against you but switching over to aspiration dot com doesn't just disarm your enemies. It also provides a lot of benefits to you. Including up to a two percent annual annual percentage yield a very important especially in a time where most financial institutions have a far lower number unlit cashback rewards on every purchase free access to every a._t._m. In literally the entire world <hes> deposits are all f._d._i._c. insured. No monthly service fees lots of great benefits. You've heard about many of them here before. If you're interested in taking a closer look you can go to aspiration dot com slash t t to get all of the personality mentioned you can also then go to t._y._p. Dot com slash free thirty to get a free thirty day to i._t. Membership if you've signed onto aspiration so just something to consider one more thing to consider. If you're in the new york area next monday at five thirty pm eastern time at bryant park jank eager and justice democrat jamal bowman are going to be there for two i._t. Meet up you can learn how to build up power in your community. I feel more information about that. Meet up how to meet jamal jank you can go to to i._t. Dot com slash rally to sign up and receive our email and text updates. There's also facebook group <hes> on that you can join to coordinate ridesharing for that event so just something to consider. If you're in the new york area <hes> a couple of comments jump back into <hes>. Let's see <hes> k._t. Nicole says how many more of these gaffes are. We going to get from biden before he drops out <hes> actually. I don't consider that want to get that was a lie dishonest or are maybe as maybe has no clue. That's best case scenario. He has has no clue he has a clue. There's this campaign handlers. Do this stuff and because you can't back out of this yet this you have to you have to this event. They'll get over be fine. You're the front runner. You'll be fine and he has to go with. They have listened to the campaign advisers. They don't have much of a thought for themselves so if he went against the proponents staff quit or something and like we used to have this money. We can't continue to run this campaign. Yeah that's so look his little dancing around the issue. Actually there was a key member comment from tommy too strong as works very well. <hes> can't wait for the zone washington post in fact checkers to come down hard and biden like they tried to do with bernie over medical debt or any of those recent post where it's like. They do this long thing and they're like well technically. He's one hundred resent right but that bernie the biden. He's not an executive thing. We'll see how that flies okay with that. Why don't we jump back into the news and jump over to the republican side. Donald trump actually does have potential challengers in this republican primary season. You probably heard of joe walsh and bill well. There are others potentially too but it's an open question at this point as to whether or not they're actually going to be any contested primaries or caucuses and the reason for that is that they're starting to be cancelled in three different states already primaries and caucuses there in the final steps of shutting them down. You will not if you're republican that area. You will not have another choice of donald trump. That's what you've got and the cancellation stem in part from months of behind the scenes maneuvering by the trump campaign aides were unsure total control the party machinery installing loyalists loyalists state parties while eliminating potential detractors <hes> apparently they want to make sure that there's no repeat of the nineteen ninety-two george h w bush reelection campaign pain they want it to be smooth sailing through the primaries because think about this. I actually think it's a little bit comical and that they are using the tricks that they used to stay in power by essentially keeping marginalized groups and other party members from competing with them using it against members of my own party and so i i i find it entertaining <hes> but unfortunately of course it means that the people even in general guardless a party are going to be were options and truly be able to speak on this option. They were pointing out. The groups are public in groups in these states point out how this isn't anything no. I don't know if you get to that but they point out how this has happened throughout the past reagan through <hes> well we'll h.w had a problem through w through clinton through obama certain states like we have our nominee bob. We're going to waste the time and they also point out how much that costs would be to those states to run those primaries when we already know who they can. It's going to be and we can all agree. We already know who the candidates going to be. I think they're right on that would win having having south. He's going to be the case going to be the nominee. <hes> it's gonna be. I mean with what mark sanford joe get their running but nobody's he's gonna take out trump from the republican hierarchy right now so there's that except for the fact you had that argument say this is nothing new until you get to the the pack where part where the aides are working to ensure total control of the machinery and stalling staunch loyalists state state parties limiting the detractors so again. It's one of those things things were. This administration does thing does things above and beyond normalcy so then when they say we're doing just like everyone else. You're not doing just like everyone else yes. There's been executive some other administrations and they say every administration does executors. Yes there was policies that would <hes> that was that was sitting migrants from other administrations sure yes there was posses about what you're doing with families when they come to the border except they do at extreme levels and climate. They're doing a normal levels yeah so when you do the normal thing and you give a normal reason like we don't want to waste money. 'cause we know who our nominee is going to be because we knew it was gonna run against obama in twenty twelve an intake over the nomination. We knew that so. They skipped it in some states. This is a different situation of vulnerable. Oh president who republicans don't like but as who framed to say so so when you try to make sure you get all of them out. You're doing a different level of normalcy and climate normal. We'd have to buy it yeah yeah. Yeah you look so south carolina like going back. A bunch of times hasn't had a primary. They did under obama i think did i think ninety six <hes> <hes> under clinton. They're just not fans of doing for whatever reason i get that but when sources inside of your administration are like yeah. We just worried about there being conflict or something but that's not quite the same thing. I agree with j._r. That it's effectively a foregone conclusion. I don't think that any of these people are necessarily gonna be able to break through. I think there are some some potential challengers who in one state maybe could like maybe if mitt romney ran stayed or you know mcmullan or something like one automations will candidates. I thought you meant just sanford and joe lawson weld. Maybe they catch on that. We we all kind of miss out on and i think think they're trying to prevent is essentially watching trump. Lose it and go crazy because if he's going to have to actually compete which are walsh this other gentleman then he is going to be tweeting like you know joe. Walsh is debra. Messing is going to be going under attacks and i think that the party would prefer he. I'm not asking you to the extent because they would continue to lose more republic. You'll get hyper focused on. I don't want to call them insignificant but a potentially insignificant rates and that's what you don't want as he got caught up with a hurricane drawing honestly i'm. I'm kind of surprised i mean it might not be that this trump's idea could just be his campaigns ideas aides or whatever why wouldn't he want to go round and crush these people like he wants to win easy fights. That's donald trump. He doesn't want an actual challenge wants to be he down have no chance of beating him and effectively. I think that most of these individuals are that sort of thing that he's gonna win. He's going to beat them. He likes doing rallies. Why not travel around you know uh-huh and fire up some of your base. It should bother his base that they're doing this especially when i feel like most trump supporters they don't like how the g._o._p. Tried very weakly to keep trump out early on they thought that like how dare you try to stop an outsider. Yes trump stop. Those outsiders like there's there's a bit hypocrisy there. They feel no shame and they don't care whether they're intellectually consistent so they'll be fine with that. I'm just surprised that he wants to shut down this race. I feel like he'd love to run against joe walsh. Now i just think he'd get caught in the nonsense serena and just you know embarrass himself in the party even more and that's not something that the party and -sarily wants and i don't want anything there was there was a point. They said they'll gonna face. <hes> intern position that hampered w right they don't want potentially harmful things to be said because joe walsh is a bit of a wild loose cannon as we already we know so then they don't potentially say something or do something or get engaged in a fight with trump will say or do something as you pointing out which trump will shoot himself in the foot because he's too busy yelling so they're trying to avoid that as well and also just in case someone goes. Ooh you mean we can do this. They don't want that opportunity even come to anyone well. Let let me give them just an opportunity to make their case. <hes> first of all <hes> former republican represented mark sanford has said that he's nearing a decision and you have joe walsh. She have <hes> former former massachusetts governor. Bill weld so joe. Walsh is said in response to this trump and his allies in r._n._c. or doing whatever they can to eliminate primaries in certain states and make it very difficult for primary primary challengers to get on the ballot in a number of states. It's wrong. The r._n._c. should be ashamed of itself and i think it does show that trump is afraid of a serious primary challenge because he knows his support port is very soft. I look nobody dislikes. Donald trump more than me. I think look almost everything about trump is incredibly soft but his support republican republican the republican they love him like he does have like an eighty eight percent approval rating so i don't think that that's the reason why necessarily but what if you're able to get candidate out there who can continue to uphold the status quo and do a bunch of racist and sexist things that covered back on so that we can deny that they're racist and sexist you know the true values that america's founded on washington do that and he can still you know have that etiquette and look good in present well and have other foreign leaders respect him. That's a threat to trump yeah. I think that their kids to potentially do. I don't know if joe walsh is the one he's like seventy n word on his radio show before. I think that <hes> you know a lot of elected. Republicans are probably like that but i think that the base they don't want the covering the racism and sexism who good covers mike pence but he's already the theoretical yeah <hes> and then finally bill weld says we don't elect presidents by acclamation in america. Donald trump is doing his best to make the republican party his own personal. Oh clubbed republicans deserve better and you know i'm just thinking like if we'd had hillary clinton had won twenty sixteen and we felt that she was doing a horrible job job. We probably want some contested. Primaries not not even necessarily because thought they'd chance of winning necessarily but we want to put pressure on her. Why shouldn't the republicans have the ability ability to at least do that even if it's only five or ten percent of the vote going against him and he's fairly immune to pressure it would be at least something it would look like a democracy at the very least sadly vast asked democratic party wouldn't go for that either yeah if she'd want sixteen and she had some things she has some questionable thing she did and said or whatever <hes> and then to launch they did they call these crazy millennial progressives that want to subvert the democratic party and it'd be significant portion of the country who would agree with that thought process so it's just what we do. It's it's unfairness bad and maybe we need to rethink our approach but it's the way we do yeah okay. Why don't we turn to <hes> something different. Talk about the wall for donald trump wants his wall and he needs money and so they've got a plan at least for part of it that is three point six billion dollars being stripped from one eight hundred twenty seven different projects from across the country affecting a number of different states and the politicians responsible for those states and apparently some republicans not necessarily happy about it. They're ten republican senators who are up for reelection next year voted in support of trump's emergency declaration which <hes> was sort of the impetus for this us but we'll have funding diverted from their state and you're seeing their cassidy corn gardner graham hyde smith in hof mcconnell mc sally dan sullivan thom tillis some of them devoted fans of the president some not necessarily quite so much and so some are frustrated but even in their frustration. It's kind kind of weak mitt romney his set to lose fifty four million dollars to military projects. He said he was disappointed by the decision but he noted that funding the border wall is an important priority so sure if you have to mug me and my stay for important here. I have a little bit more money. <hes> let's see we have mike lee said congress has been seeing far too much power so the executive branch for decades and it's far past time for congress to restore the proper balance of power between the three branches. That sounds great now. Do something buddy i. I don't see much action behind that necessarily <hes> do you see this as a potential the straw that broke the republican campbell's back. I sure hope so like the amount of money that they're taking away. It's wild what martha mcsally arizona originally saying. It'd be thirty thousand and it's it's really going to be about thirty million like come on these resources can be dedicated elsewhere especially since we know that there's not a threat along the border and just having just some kind the factual common sense here. It's just we really need constituents to step up and to hold these members of congress. Hold them accountable. This article talks about how they're <hes>. They have to make sure they keep things balanced so when you're in a state when you're supporting a madman who's doing everybody wants wants no matter what the policies are. It's not a conservative. He's ever done things so conservatively for the republican party so they have to support everything he does so there's a three prong systems have to support trump make sure they don't look bad to him. Russia's gonna cut your head off. <hes> you have to give back to your state or make sure your state is getting what they were already <hes> promised and then also get it done so you have to still work with the department of defense and work with democrats actually get something done because the money's going to get taken from me if to back fill it set to go through all of these hurdles to make sure they get their job done and instill and still not make the president look bad who's hypersensitive baby so he can't hear you want say. I don't like this who said on like this. You can't even speak your mind. You can't it'd be an adult. You can't be a representative of your state anymore. So you know what i i like. I like seeing the stress and the the confusion company folks who support a guy who they new is unfit to do what he's doing once the finally it's it's okay hitting other people now. There's hit me in my state well. This is crazy. I can't see it allow. I love it and i mean we saw that unless primary contests like the people who spoke out against trump. They're not politicians anymore. I wonder how many <hes> in in the house in the senate how many republican politicians are looking at his approval rating in just hoping it'll go down because look they want their president of our guests. They wanted to be reelected. They want republicans to to be in power but as long as he has a chokehold on republican voters across the country they mean nothing they have no autonomy. If they turn against him they will be thrown overboard like imagine being in that position. You've worked your whole life decades rising position a position to become a senator or congressman and nobody what he cares about you. If you turn against the former reality star the sharpie guy you're done. They'll replace you in the next sad. Is that for that party. <hes> you know this is an opportunity for democratic opponents though anybody honestly smile get primarily republicans on the woods. One of them are up for reelection but this opportunity to point out to your state locally. Hey this guy is supporting president that is taking money that has already been allocated for the state to cope with these types of things us guys. Put me in office. Because i'm tired of this uh-huh. It provides an avenue for someone who will speak for the people since we're talking about popular song. Everybody likes members of the armed forces and so the fact that you're taking this away from u._s. Basis assist like that's enough to give me pause and if you end up having these bases in need or you know these servicemembers in need. There's going to be significant outcry. There should be some problems there yeah you would think historically. That's generally one of the things you want to avoid happening. I personally in favour drastically slash the military budget but you have to make the case for why why that needs to be done. They're not making that case. They're taking the money while pretending that they support the soldiers so let's see if we do have someone who will speak for the people we have <hes> senator susan susan collins hopefully not long <hes> but she's still there now so she said each of these projects was recommended by the administration passed by both the senate and the house signed into law by the president and while there is some discretion that he has to move money around. I think that his executive order exceeds his discretion again the week i think stuff stuff and i think that you're not allowed to do that. I think and then you have to say he has the right. You have to preface everything you say couch criticism with he's right though but i understand n._y. And it's okay if but so that he won't read it directly because he won't repass the first phrase of your sentence like okay. I think my criticism was buried. Deep enough to the the democrat and read it and okay so we we do have someone who's fired up. They've all been really milquetoasts mitch mcconnell and he should be <hes> kentucky is going to be hit nearly sixty three million dollars and so he's fired up saying we wouldn't be in the situation of democrats for serious about protecting our homeland and and work with us to provide the funding needed to secure borders during appropriations providence who's trump. I don't know it's the democrats. The democrats did it. I mean sure it's trump is taking the money from it and sure i'm losing using sixty three million dollars to be probably democrat. Just be direct attack this guy and be like you lose a sixty three million dollars for projects and he's claiming that the republican president is the democratic problems. It's such an easy just say it yeah but he carries trump's water so hard and you know what all you want is for his constituents to see through it but unfortunately that doesn't seem to be happening so far even though it will clearly be to their detriment yeah come on so why don't we talk about <hes> what is going to be paying for this just an example so asher. Our producer put together just a few remember. It's a hundred and twenty seven different projects ed remember this comes not that long after they gave and billions of dollars already for this earlier this year. The democrats did so he needs more. They're taking four hundred million dollars. In puerto rico projects including funding for the recovery every effort after hurricane. Maria trump is going to be livid when he finds out the that's the one thing they they can be like oh. It's fine. It's about arcus teachers. Don't care c. Seventeen million dollars in florida for a fire crash rescue station that sounds important <hes> that's sixty three million dollars in kentucky fort campbell middle school <hes> mitch mcconnell so maryland but democrats democrats for that seven hundred and seventy million dollars in funding for military initiatives in europe intended to help deter russian aggression and the list goes on and on because we're talking about billions and billions uh-huh you're seeing their military construction project cyber operations facility navy ships maintenance hazardous materials warehouses. I'm going to guess that if you have requested and been granted forty one million dollars for the housing of hazardous materials. You need that money okay well. I guess i'll keep it in my house for a while until we get the funding we need <hes> it sounds significant all of these sound significant and the weird thing is that while this is where the money is going to come from. I'm old enough to remember back during the campaign when when he implied that someone else would be paying for it as you'll see mexico will pay for the wall. Mexico is going to pay ford and they'll be happy to pay for the wall is going to be paid for by mexico. They don't know it yet but they're gonna pay. We're gonna make them pay for that wall but they're going to pay for the wall. Trust me mexico will pay for it and i will have mexico pay for that wall mark. My words mexico's gonna pay for the wall hundred percent a hundred percent hundred percent booze going to pay for the wall. Who who's you pay for the law jokes on them so hundred percent he said mark my words jaren jackson did that's why we play this clip so many times. Unfortunately it doesn't matter adder. I mean that how is that not a you know like bring my lips no new taxes. Let's say you're you're range person. On the right this is that you can keep your doctor that was that was fifty percent of the words he said during the campaign were mexico's. Gonna pay for the wall your paying for the wall you and everyone around around you is paying for the wall as you know and it's weird because you think people would understand how business and different nations work in terms of funding things that benefit other nations just like even just if we took it on a smaller scale you know as an analogy. It's kind of like i don't expect j._r. To buy me the new mac lipstick joy paying for it. Yeah thanks walgreens so look. That's what he said now. A lot of time has passed. He has a slightly different explanation also just a couple of things <hes> chris. I know fake sues likes to say it. When during the campaign i would say mexico's going to pay for it. Obviously i never said this and never meant to write out a check. I said they're gonna pay for it they are they are paying for it with the incredible deal. We may so so let's let's ignore the fact that they don't have the deal and even if they got the deal. It's effectively nafta. Let's pretend that neither of those things is true. I wish that i had the time to go around the country and and interview literally every trump supporter and ask him when you're chanting mexico's gonna pay for the wall. Do you mean through complex. Long-term debt like import export differentials over new free trade deal. Is that what you were chanting about that. He was gonna someday have a deal in effect that we would benefit in some way or did you think they were gonna right. Attrac- please be honest. You can't be honest. I know that you're pretending right now that the sharp things not weird. I know that you can be honest about this. Please you chanted over and over well. I thought it i thought mexico is gonna pay for it intellectually navy something emotionally or psychologically and that's how i see this being compensated and paid hey poor. I think we're paying for emotionally that we're all paying for it to be fair. Simone that lasts also trump has never paid for anything that he said he's gonna pay so it all makes sense to him he goes. I didn't really say i was going to pay for that campaign. Stop in wherever ohio or wherever you stop you gonna pay for that of course now. I don't pay for anything like i know that like some trump. Supporters would be like oh you guys. You're getting triggered by this go. You're paying for it hot but like you're too. You're all being dragged down. I know that you can't see it. That's how normalization works but none of these people would have thought that and i hate to mention it again and we're not doing a clip on it or whatever but none of these people like two years ago thought that some day there president lined them by scharping a map is not the weirdest craziest thing ever and now they have to imply that like some won't say avoid the topic but they have to pretend that that's not sad juvenile pathetic pathetic addict like for the party of the alpha male to have this pathetic of a man eating you like you. You can't even see how far you've been dragged down. I maybe in hindsight the site maybe in a few years you can look back and you'll have a politician who is worthy of at least a little bit of respect. Someone who's not this pathetic creature but he has dragged you down like like i know that you think we are being triggered or he's trolling us because really trolling you. We are the distraction your the victim to speak to them in terms of understand trump walk into your house. He slapped a child. He robbed you and <hes> entitled you and your wife up and made you look like a holes and then left with all all of your money. You didn't have a gun ready. Your second amendment rights were birded does make given this visual of him robbing you for money that you didn't want to give to him because he lied lied to you and came in and violated your space and you didn't get to shoot him like he really wanted to the the way he is lowered the conversation patient to who mexico who that's a rat. It's a football game time because you're absolutely right. That's how sports goes. It's it's the uh us them sat up and that's what he's playing off of. Everyone's ignorance in terms of us and then and people are so busy thinking hey. This is a game in some way. They're not saying that they're getting robbed last night. The bears and packers played there was a pass interference call. You know who didn't think those pass interference call them the bears every fan yep. This wasn't passing. I just thought but it wasn't yeah everyone that engaged in those chance at the trump rallies. We're gonna pay for it. I hate identity politics uh-huh okay so we're gonna take another break. We come back rebelled debate about the future of the work week have the american class they earned another day off and then an upcoming movie targeted at right wing frustrations. We're gonna take a look at it and get your thoughts. We hope you're enjoying this free clip from the young turks if you wanna get the whole show and more exclusive content while supporting independent media become a member a. t. t. dot com slash join today in the meantime enjoy this free segment welcome back to the friday power panel with jaren adrian and myself <hes> there are debates coming up in houston and we're going to be there not any any of us but people are jake and <hes> dr hartson are going to be there. You can meet other. T._r._t.'s supporters talk about how you can build power in your community by going to our meet up and rally at houston is all happening next thursday september twelfth at two p._m. Central time you can meet outside of the hotel alexandra in downtown town houston for more info go to dot com slash rally a great place to go for information about all these different events at the same time or at least the same night <hes> here in l._a. And is going to be leading leading our post debate coverage. I'm going to be here. <hes> emma viglen is going to be in town. She's actually do a bunch of different to i._t. Shows episodes of the damage report sold for that and fill is going. It'd be here as well. I think jake is also going to be skyping and so we're gonna be breaking down the results from this most recent debate <hes> also totally separate this saturday a congresswoman. Julia paul is hosting impeachment teach in along with congressman jamie raskin. If you're in seattle you can show up in person at benaroya hall at two p._m. Pacific time <hes> you can see a little bit more details there <hes>. I don't know exactly what the content is going to be but that sounds awesome man. That'd be a lot of fun okay so couple. More comments commits herkules says is in reference to the <hes> in reference to the primary changes. This is ironically like what communist countries do you in china. There are elections even other parties but they have to be approved by the leadership of the c._p._t. Pacman says on hashtag to i._t. Live i always tune into the t._n._t. Live show early. The pre show is all about our progressive mascot. Mira guana watching him get pampered today brings a smile on my face and makes it easier to hear the bs coming from orange hitler's administration hasten the tweet. I didn't say so yes. We all love marijuana by there was one more doj toke. Four twenty says yesterday it was announced birthday. We were able to watch <hes> we were able to watch you guys live. Can you give her a be shadowed still you guys are a favourite show. Watch <hes> happy birthday. Mom of doj toke four twenty. I wonder what they were doing while they were watching the show anyway <hes> okay but anyway <hes> we do have to press on with the news because there is a lot more to talk talk about if you're lucky you as a member of the american working class assuming that's what you are you work a five day workweek two days off that is not true for a lot of people but that's the way it's been for the most part for something like eighty or ninety years depending on what part of the country you're in <hes> that five day workweek wasn't really standardized nationwide until i think one thousand nine hundred thirty eight and a piece of legislation that was oddly contested even though it seems very reasonable now so so my question is and i tweeted this earlier. Is it time for a four day. Workweek has the american worker toiled long and hard enough with ever increasing productivity liberty were now after almost an additional century after the weekend was developed that we finally have earned that extra day off disclosure. This is john's number one political stance. He's going to run for congress one day on this stance alone you think andrew yang has universal income become a proposals this. John lewis this extra day off it. Is the workers dividend okay. That's my vote for me for whatever <hes>. What do you guys think. I've got some stats and stuff. I'm going to go to that and i've got a really interesting bit of history. Someone endorsing the four day workweek and it is not who you think but anyway i <hes>. I don't think there are any politicians pushing for this. Even the most leftist politicians are not bringing this up and i've noticed that when i bring it up i get attacked and not just from conservatives. Oh oh absolutely well. The thing is our society on this whole capitalistic mentality that essentially rides the worker and maeve created this kind of four representation nation of an individual of an american as hard worker and so a lot of us have built our identities around how hard we can work and we have thirty two million u._s. Americans who are working more than one job and they're more likely to be women than men <hes> trying to fill up that pay gap and trying to make ends meet and so if they were going to have an extra day off and might translate it to lower wages it might translate to more time for you to realize that your identity isn't based on you know your profession and people might be happier but also the reality is that's not what corporate america that runs our society absolutely corporate america and we talked about in the first block about <hes> joe biden and having to go through these fossil fuel companies to make sure if it was like he can run and and have some kind of viability <hes> again the corporate america's ones who like give me because i'm sure plenty of people who work in those spaces once they get there can take it off when they want so it doesn't affect them. It affects the people who were the wade sleeves in a way <hes> also questions what today would it be would be monday would be friday day on wednesday line dancing and then we're going to change things like to say thank god. It's friday all these meetings with shane. That's too much. It's just too hard wizards. Hope day is no longer a thing no idea about in the middle anyway a ah couple of small seats was america's changing things <hes> we just had labor day and i liked the postal people talk about the things that the labor movement did for what you deal was tate's. Let's play people who still work seven days a week by the way i want to give us out those plenty of work seven days a week because they have to <hes> so the leibman brought you those things like doc labor day <hes> but also the weekend and things like that people will love talking about. I was at the store this morning and there was a couple of guys that were stocking from other companies and he said they have a good weekend. I was like man. That's a thing now but it has because of the labor movement. We're not good at things that change. If we had worked seven day week seven work days now seven days a week now and we propose things like weekends and a twelve year olds can't work in your factories people now would lose their minds not good at things. Is it a different. We've never done that before and that is how those ideas were received. There was a radical notion the idea that were should get two days off <hes> you know fourteen year olds janabi working in the mines and those sorts of things and i would say no offence to anyone individually but when i say i think that we've earned earned it and a lot of people in the working class. Some of them are like that's lazy. Why are you lazy. They're responding with corporate talking points. We don't even realize how how the control is thick around that we see it from their point of view very much so not that this is an opportunity for us to have more time with their families so all the family values workers they should like that or that you know after like earning all that money how about actually having some time to spend it that this could be a boost to the economy by having three days off to actually do things and spend spend money and all of that. I just think that we've earned it and i'm gonna show you some stats but one thing i've noticed it's very interesting in all the different articles talking about the growth of the four day workweek because it is a little bit more common than it used to be. Almost all of them are here reasons. Why corporations shouldn't be afraid of this and i get that that's a pragmatic doc way to try to get them over to our side but it's not really where i'm coming from. I'm not interested in convincing corporations that it's in their best interest. I'm interested in taking it. It's ours hours. We've earned it. We are far more productive than we were back when we finally earned the two days off. I think that we have earned it. We haven't gotten higher wages. I i think we're owed and i think that we should get in both money and time absolutely and i think that people don't recognize their power because they've been brainwashed for so long thinking that oh my identity is built around my job and what i do when i lived to work and this is part of the american dream. No this is life. You get one shot at this. You get to do it and do it well. There are employers everywhere everywhere. You will be fine. If you need to get up. Quit do what you need to do but you have to take you because they are not going to take care of you. Take care of them and like i said no. Nobody's pushing for no politicians that i know of anyway. I apologize if i'm missing one but if they did like let's say bernie sanders came out and said i'm for a four day workweek. He would be mocked on fox news sean hannity. It'd be talking to how lazy he is and you know. Millions of americans watching sean hannity many of them poor almost universally white americans will again again. He's lazy. I should be worked to the bone. I should be worked till i drop because they don't get just swimming in their veins is the idea that corporations are better than us and they know what we should do now. I just want to quickly mention this. I thought this is so weird back. In nineteen fifty-six new york times william blair reported nixon for sees this four day workweek. That's an actual this way. Before president nixon richard nixon was quoted as saying these are not dreams or both they are simply projections rejections of the gains. We've made in the last four years. Our hope is the double everyone standard of living in ten years. That was nineteen fifty-six. I checked in. It's been longer than ten years. We've earned it because those gains have continued. The issue is who is getting the gains and it's not us. It hasn't been for very long time so yeah so yeah. I'm down. We've obviously we should have brought back the supreme court to supreme court. We've been done then forever anyway anyway. <hes> we've found what we mix it up with something a little bit different with those other show. It's something like i guess okay new movie coming out the reliance starring starring kevin sorbo. It's being pitched and advertise to <hes> christian and right wing americans <hes> it's being sort of advertised as a fight against against and tika isn't necessarily true but take a look at this trail and you'll get an idea guard sponsor overwhelmed metropolitan areas. Maybe we're reacting acting. Just that was an neighborhood. Everyone in the car snap a whole towns of treaty. We have prepared for this. We will survive. The world has china part. You don't know what it's like a family tree three meals a day. It's oh so you probably get nothing for leg arm bar yeah. It's the people were chanting. Someone got on the top. Sir ronald k kevin's store <hes> so <hes> economic collapse things start to fall apart in one family trying to get food for their family has to fight off these <hes> vigilantes who in the movie looks like are actually armed. It seems like they wanna pitch. Just the good guys have guns but the bad guys have guns to <hes> and so <hes> kevin sorbo and his family have to survive survive in this world. It is only going to be available one night. This is october twenty fourth in select theaters. I'm actu- i'm look i'm interested in seeing because i want to understand where the side is coming from my issue. Though is one the ad is trying to make it seem like it's like you fight back against t for the movie was made three years ago <hes> it's just been in post production for they weren't thinking about in and so it bothers me that it's being advertised as a sort of wish fulfilment thing where you get to shoot antifa. I don't like that because is into real people fighting against the rise of fascism in america <hes> but there's a little bit more in the video. I think we all want to talk about south. Role more wilson. I got their scales. The weapons news say now. I love dopey and the guy who was responsible. Who's responsible. Absolutely i just saw the lower verd- oh my thank god okay so look <hes> to the extent that the movie is like the book. It's about you know why would god allow these terrible things happen. That's fine theme. It's something that all religious people deal with. It got no problem with that. The the main issue that i have is why is every atheist portrayed as being angry. God perhaps to the point where they tried to gun gone aw down. I'm atheist. I'm not mad at god because i'm not anything that doesn't exist. I have no feelings whatsoever towards it but every every tv show every movie and not just you know ones made by right wing right wingers like hollywood presents it as atheists are broken people who hate god. That's just just not the way it is. I don't think i've ever met nathan to god in the thing that really kind of caught my attention that whole charade and it's just like an episode of friends iran's not a person of color. Insight dislike really guys if this is going to be kind of this end of the world thing. Let's not a racer. There's a whole different community out there. That may exist anti present so <hes> i'm good i can't say for sure but if they had included a diverse characters. I'm not sure that it would've gone well. You would have been used in this context by. I don't know i wonder where they did. This movie goes because all i've seen is gun scenes from beginning meaning to end. Maybe but you know so the one night released. I'm not sure there's a normal day. How does that work. <hes> put in one night orderly expensive yeah. That's the crowd funded movie on indigo and look so when you're watching the trailer. They didn't have a ton of money. I'm not progressing like if if somebody raises money to make their own movie that's very difficult. I got no problem with that or whatever but yeah getting it and a lot of theories a super expensive super super expensive. Now i want to <hes> one other issue that i have with this and and really it's it's the issue i have with a lot of really explicit right wing propaganda in book or movie form and they the never seem to understand why it doesn't break through. It's not to say that no right wing messages get into movies. Lots of movies have really conservative missed a lot of the marvel movies pretty fundamentally conservative actually in their message and pro patriotism and all that it's that it sort of cuts sometimes so the author of the book that's based on said this on the second mini gogo campaign for the movie. We're one terrorist attack away from giving up our right to keep and bear arms with our government corporately. I think that's completely. It's supposed to be willing to spurn earned the constitution in so many ways. The segment is practically meaningless to our leaders. We need to reach the culture with this important message of the moral foundation for natural right to defend ourselves. It's like dude. We're not paying attention. Who was it that was taking advantage of terror attacks on a nearly weekly basis a monthly basis who was was it that took your rights when the terrorists were striking. It wasn't some antigun lib. That's not how it went and they didn't. They didn't come for your guns. That's true george h.w uh-huh george w bush's. I should say he wasn't taking your guns. He was taking all of the other rights that you say. The guns are meant to protect but you didn't protect them. You just clutch the gun tighter and and made sure that they didn't take that and so that's why it's it like what could just be like. You know something. That's obviously i made for me. It's on designed for me religiously or politically or whatever it just seems seems like i don't know who your target is that people really don't get what's going on in this country feel like which terrorist attack is he saying is next is going to happen. It's going to take guns away. Is it the domestic ones because every time it happens. There's a larger. I hope a larger percentage of americans. Why do we keep recycling these guns to our society. These types of gunstone society is tech. You afraid of triggering enough people to finally be over this. We're talking about the kind of with the muslim terrorists because if everyone in nine eleven was sitting in their office buildings with a._k._47.'s they might have shot the plane out of the sky from their window which kind of terrorist attack and we're talking about and if you have your gun stop those terrorist attacks how you gonna pull that off. It's a cartoonish approach to life sitting bugs bunny. You're not elmer fudd when you tie the end of the gun. The bad guys gun is not gonna blow up in his face. Who's who's gonna be. The natural question has to be asked. I don't remember this guy's name. The world the book how how how does that work how how it works all they want to do. Louis continue to promote the us them narrative and the fact of i really it gets annoying is a lawyer seeing the second amendment thrown into this so that was really something that kinda came up around the time the n._r._a. Array became super big and really wanted to find a divisive way to separate everybody and you know they were able to stack supreme court and get the decisions that they wanted but in reality it's just it's like. This isn't what the second amendment is four and also as we see with this domestic terrorism. It's killing us just pragmatically like i get frustration with you. Feel like <hes> your movies and your books like the popular culture doesn't accept them or whatever that's fine. You need to understand why though if i wrote a version of that manifesto that i just read for you but from my point of view about how the secondments terrible and like the whole movie was just hammering into your head that guns are the worst thing ever. Would you wanna see it like would you would you approve of of that nakedly partisan of cause for a movie and yet you feel like it should be finding coming from the right. Maybe that's why it's not being picked up by hollywood okay <hes>. I wish that we had more time. Unfortunately we don't we didn't even get into the fact that kevin sorbo had some credible allegations of sexual harassment against it but he seems to be doing just fine and his career that was actress haley webb. She's tweeted weeded about previously on movie but in the movie itself thank you so much adrian. Thank you are going to have you here that you're watching. We do have a second hour coming up right after this.

trump Donald trump executive joe biden president senate mexico bernie sanders joe walsh america mark sanford joe Bill weld mitt romney washington adrian hillary clinton kevin sorbo congress
SHOCKER: YouTube is Evil, OJ is on Twitter?? 6.18.19

The Daily Zeitgeist

1:12:57 hr | 1 year ago

SHOCKER: YouTube is Evil, OJ is on Twitter?? 6.18.19

"Hey guys, it's Jack from the podcast. You're listening to I'm gonna level with you guys. I spent a big chunk of my life addicted to nicotine, and it's. I had to use various like nicotine pellets, and like a book to get off of it. But one way that people quit nicotine products and quit smoking is by using vape products. And we're you say they've sued dude, you're, you know what it is, who is this your boy, vape crusader, dude hailing from the planet of apes born in a puff of smoke from mouth. Veve Suva's, dude. It's the one cloud stepper hailing from the best been cloud city. Okay. Look, I get it. Dave's aren't for everyone, you know, because not everyone is as sick as me. Okay, got it. If you're gonna go get your vape products dude, get your pods, your module juice. You gotta visit vape while dot com. All right. They've got over one hundred flavors of you liquid. They got introductory sample pack for just one dollar including shipping, and in-house, customer service team that will answer any of your questions. Man. Wait to see you in a photo of the White House HR. No, it was still White House. Presidential personnel office, dude, you probably saw me vaping. And then I. The deputy director, sir. Anyways guys, go to vape wild dot com slash daily warning on Mike. Cloud, dude. I can't see anything realism the missed, bro. We're it's not weird. It's what we do. Anyway, warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive substance. Yeah. Clearly. Oh. The whole room is filled with smoke. I smoked front of my face vape. Oh my fellow the internet and welcome to season. Eighty seven episode two dailies. I guy a production of iheart radio. This is a podcast retake deep dive into America's share consciousness and say officially off the top coke industries, and book, pox news. It's Tuesday, June eighteenth two thousand nineteen names. Jack O'Brien AK wake me up before you go go don't leave me hanging on, like a yoyo Brian Percy Hannah. Sultan, and on thrilled to be joined by today's guest co host Mr.. Billy Wayne David J good day. Good day to you, sir co kid. Yeah. Look through. My right, Myra. Thank you. Right. Well, we are thrilled to be joined in air thirds five, the hilarious and talented Mano, a gap and high. Hey, it is you what's, what's up man thrilled had you hear those people. Yeah. Fucking cool name. Oh, manoa. Great. Yeah, it is filled the way he would thinking. It sounds the way you would. That is good to hear. Them. I'm partially Greek in my. My Greek left if Greek I kind of always wanted a stupidly Greek last night long when. Yeah. Book life thing like that Gallison Akkas is even pretty easy to pronounce as far as the Greek name once you get once you get there, you're like oh, that's easy. Yes, but you, it's like it's like reading Hebrew though, when you get your I don't know what any of that. My gosh, I used to know a Greek man, whose name was football apples. But in Greek. Greek. I just I just head tilted turn. So his last name was bulldozed photo polos, which is insane. I've always God. I want that I want that for me, so polish last names and Matthew mcconaughey milling of his last name or the hardest for me to spell for whatever I know people give a lot of smack to other languages. But English is, is the true heir of international grammar world may will is the worst just it's my. It's my favorite language. Because if you use a word incorrectly long enough, it becomes the correct way to use it not other languages. Right. No, my, my grandmother, used to be mad at the word. Get like truly mad at the English word get because we use it. We use it so crazy think about how us get like get up. Get me that drink. Did you get the bags like? Yeah, haven't even gotten to the GRET. Oh my God. Right. Yeah. Yet, get yell at raccoons when they come close to your trash cans, gets the hillbillies only law right about how insane that where it is. Yeah. Just it just went in your life. How choose a English as a second language learning English. And she was like this. This words bullshit. Then you're right. You're right. Yeah. Do you knew English Bobby you speaking? All right. We're going to get to know you a little bit better. And I we're gonna tell our listeners just a few of the things we're talking about today. We now have confirmation that YouTube is bad for you that we needed it. We are going to talk about. I in case you're feeling like the faintest glimmer of hope about the democratic party's chances in twenty twenty we will extinguish that with a vengeance ice has stopped updating their list of people who died in custody, which is troubling. We're talking about is going to be easier to tell you who didn't die. Exactly right. At this point. And then we're gonna talk about kind of a wide roaming subject that starts with OJ Simpson. And Bill Cosby's tweets from on Father's Day over the week. Oh, that's good. This is two thousand nineteen. Yeah. We are two thousand nineteen and. It makes me want Casey, Anthony to pipe up on mother's day. Still live in LA. Dolce. Vita. Then we're gonna talk about Taylor SWIFT's doing the pride stuff in her new video and to puck would've turned forty eight over the weekend. So we're gonna know Kim with him. He wouldn't have he wouldn't have. I just don't see it making it seem drill up and down. Yeah, like unstability. Yeah. I don't think he wanted to last that long. I feel like he Jason something. Yeah. He also loved Machiavelli so much. And he was obsessed with, you know, like it's Machiavelli is whole thing was like I fear fear is better than power. Right. Or like that. That complicated relationship between, like respect if you're yeah. Yeah. That whole thing, so you get more done with fear than you do respect. It's true. I mean, that's adding June fortunate reality of our life. Yeah. Some people think the prince the whole like Machiavellian thing was written as a satire of, basically he had. He was writing under a. Really terrible leader. Who like did all the things that he was writing about? So he was like, yeah. No. This is how you should rule. Bunch of people just took it. No one. He just kept leaning into the sarcastic bait. And he's like, no, I really. No. He's watching them read it and he's like, right. And everybody's like no. This is good. She's our rules for living, this a manual. Became ally, the bit became ally, wink, I should. I should've. All in parentheses or put it all on, I tell. All right. But first, we like to ask our guest. What is something from your search history? That's revealing about who you are. I would say the most revealing thing that isn't like porn, because at point, it would be like I read a lot of food review, blogs, okay, because there's like certain foods, I won't allow myself to purchase but I want to experience by carry Asli intra like on, like, there's one's brand eating the impulsive by Syria. List's -ly dot com on second school to food that you don't want to buy, but you like host like like seasonal hostess cakes like it's like hostess now house a summer lineup of banana split cupcakes. And I'm like, I can't in good reason buy a box of what it takes. Can't it tastes like the chemical version? All this flavor. It turned it tastes like colored red and yellow. Bus sugar. Yes. So I love reading those because I'm I can like read someone's like way too explicit take on those things. But I'm like, oh, but I would never allow myself to buy it. And do they when they're reviewing hostess cupcakes how like flowery? Do they get lows? There's parents. At the fact that there's more than one paragraph is shocking. They get pretty flowery notes of amaranth and vanilla you'd be. If heroin users were at themselves enough, they would be like they would describe it's the same thing in your brain. That's lighting up. Yeah. Yeah. It's just and I was because I that will made me realize that was that was, like, I'll, I'll watch all those National Geographic documentaries or like drugs and Cooper, like, it's probably why I watch that too, because I'm my we'll, I'm never going to do Mathur heroin, right? Let's check this out and address I've gotten in the game now. And I have a serial tasting Instagram account. Nice. So I'm now I'm in their deep. What does the cereal that based on reviews, you wanna try that you haven't given yourself the opportunity, okay? Yeah. There's some new exciting ones. There's cotton candy crunch Cap'n. Crunch has released a cotton candy, okay? Now that is a can't just say, here's some cocaine on. Here's cocaine for your child. What it does is the captain crunch like the top of your roof. And in the cocaine just gets in there. Skull method of narcotic delivery, straight to the dome got a free base that red number five right? Yeah, I want to try that. And then drumstick general mills releasing a as in drugs. Dirty ice cream. Okay. Because Rum's much better. The ice cream is now releasing a serial. Okay, which I could get on that. I wonder if what I think let's take a swing. And I think I think Cyril inspired ice. Cream is always going to be tastier than ice cream inspired cereal. Yeah. That is a truism. That's a fact. But I wanna try it. Yeah. Well, I need to dig into this world of junk food based sort of the what naked lunches to heroin. These are to the junk food, industry fascinating. What is something that you think is underrated say, teeny tiny underwear teeny tiny, underwear interesting? Do you think that's a rated enough? Do you think do you think that's underrated across the board. I think all people all people or is this what it is. I say like wearing tiny underwear. I think we as before, like, yeah, we, we as people like love will looking at other people in tiny underwear road. I think we don't let ourselves feel the freedom of wearing tiny underwear. Well, I think there's a thin line between comfortable, tiny underwear, and terribly uncomfortable a gray in thin line. Use it is thin. That goes right up here. I didn't mean it like that. But, you know, we'll go in line is my favorite Speedo line. It is. No. But like, I don't know. I guess it's also project, like part of my journey to be more comfortable naked. Right. I want to be comfortable naked. I'm going to Greece this summer, and I'm like going to try to force myself to go to a nude beach because here's why. Being scared of being naked is like one of the most irrational fears. Okay. And a lot of naked wear lake in public on. On. I think it's me. Like very vulnerable thing in public to be naked. 'cause you're like people who fuck me up real bad right now bright. Have you seen eastern promises? Yes. Because that movie. It's a it's jaws of nudity. It, it will terrify you of nudey, because there is a prolonged and really just violent knife fight that happens in a locker room with both of the men are naked. And just, you know, Dick's flying all over the place and. Did a hand gesture of Dick's flying on sexual I. It's not. It's just. Yeah, what Gertrude it is your or ability. That does not sound eastern. It's. It's made by what's his name body horror guy ally off. No body horror, that sounds like those David Cronenberg. Yeah. Okay. Right. Okay. Okay. Okay. But what I'm saying is, I agree. I want to see this movie with Donner's flying, just right. Right. It's a good film. Art. Yes. And if it was filled in eastern Europe. I bet those very same actors truck their way over to the Bellamy porn studio right after feel-good movie, I believe you. I believe, you know, but what I want to say it think about it. It is a rational to be scared of being naked, when there's things like guns and knives and bombs in the world, and we're sometimes we're more scared of just not wearing clothes. The in your house. I don't know anywhere because I think think about it. We are to be naked. And sure, but I'm saying, like, are you scared? I mean I've sound like your therapist. But like to me, like, there are certain places I have no fear of being negative at all. And then other places like in, like in the football locker room in high school. I didn't like being naked because everyone's fucking with everybody at all store. It wasn't like I don't want see people see my dick or anything. It was just more like I'm very vulnerable in this position. And because I just watched it happen like being at the gym now, which I don't really necessarily go to the gym because I don't like the gym being naked. There doesn't bother me. I'm still uncomfortable. Getting naked in the gym, you should you should like I feel like I break the sound barrier with how quickly I take. Quickly. I'd take off on this shorts and then put a towel on top. I'm with you. This is so stupid. We all have bodies. Everybody is stupid. Yeah. Well, there is an in-between. There's the dude that's real comfortable. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yes. It's like the stage people are way too comfortable on stage. Some people can't do it at all. The people that are usually good at it or somewhere in between, like that, that's interesting way to what, what is somebody who's way too comfortable on stage. I'm trying to have you ever seen like a quote unquote comedian, who's just being self indulgent. Yeah. Later in their career type or or like maybe after they get into in ten minutes. Decent material. Then there I want to do some stretching. Yeah. Yeah. What is something you think is overrated over rate hid? Okay. Where is this? Okay. Is this? My is this my unpopular opinion moment. It can be. Yeah. Anything, I think theme parks are overrated. Okay. I think fame parks are overrated. I can't believe how tricked everyone is into thinking that they're the most fun thing. Okay. To me. There's so much more trouble than they're worth. They're so damn expensive. They're they're prohibitive. You are trapped. They're, they're designed to keep it at all day. The water is six dollars. The lines are inevitable. The children are awful. Did you go to child now? So, yeah, I think that's what it missed it. Yes, yet as my parents. No way they act in a theme park. Yeah. My son is totally different than, you know, the other people. So it's like I have to remember that sometimes that he's nine experiencing things that I haven't been, I've already experienced a bunch because. Yeah. You go to the portion. This is a fucking scam. But then you look down. And he's like, whoa. Oh, yeah. I remember like going to like one of those places where it could hit with is. Yeah. And you're like it is real. They do exist that guy's an alcoholic. And then there's. Yeah. Yeah. I think that's what I when I was fifteen that was too late. First time to horny too fucking horny. I just kept seeing goofy and just make an is. Yes to horny. You're like who can I fuck in this? My parents aren't watching me at all times. I still play that game when I'm in too busy of a place like an airport. You play his game like every ten people never do. Oh, I would never ever boyfriend of four years. I would never every ten people that pass you, you have to pick one of them to zone. And I played that game especially when I'm in an air pomono Mary. Yeah. Yeah. So you would never you never walk on a blind your her. Her make him a friend of is. My boyfriend's. I guess I don't know my boyfriend's a real monster. And we talk about that kind of thing all the time. That's great. Yeah. And finally, what does a myth? What's something people take is true? You know, to be false that I know to be false hand jobs are hand jobs jobs, or a myth, Hanjin exist. No, no. And I'll tell you because women that would be mad to diff. To because a hand job should always be part of a package. Not a standalone project. A good hand job leads to a blowjob right baby sex, too, but, like a hand job. That's just a hand. Job is okay. That's crazy. Now I disagree. Okay. At a certain, I think, for my twelve to fifteen a hand job as a hand job and be the exchange shore. But that speaks to how much they suck. Right. Well, I think at first, they don't stop adult burn just touching it. Yeah. No hand jobs. What do you do it? That's right. Yes. But I, I think it's, it's important that children should did you get a hand job at twelve I was trying to think it was like Theonest probably the first hand job. I got was like an came. Painter fifteen right? I like that. Yeah. Wow. Good for you. I dry humped, I would say between twelve and fifteen but get a hint job to later. No, you drive home because there's no physical contact privates for a while. And that's the first step, I and I just think I'm just thinking like natural. I mean I'm talking like gay or straight here. Right. You know what I mean? Where it's like, yeah, that's the you need to learn how to handle someone else's with your hand. Right. But that in your mouth or inside you. Yeah. Pry good rule to live by I had a friend for the children's home. My god. The joke was just sitting story. One time in college, I had a lesbian friend. And we were like, hey, we don't get each other's stuff. Right. So like when we were slammed so we're like, let's, let's get drunk drunk, we're drunk, so let's like hook up and like kind of give each other a masterclass on what we're supposed to do with each other stuff and her. I move with my dick was to treat it like a light switch. Just go. I'm not hitting. She was like is like, is this good. I was like, yeah, but it's not nearly as good as this. Right. Like like, like off, and on off and on, like, just kind of. Like it's hard and like, boy, like going up one way and touching down the light. Switch. Right. Right. And I was like, okay. Yeah, that's good. But that's not where our bread is buttered, right? Interesting. It's like the paint motion from karate kid. Oh, yes. Up paint down. Yeah. Wax on wax off work Euler. So, yeah. Hand jobs are a math. Yeah. I'm sure you know, or counter intuitive to people who aren't who, don't have them or to us for a while. Right. That's true penises are soci- really ridiculous ridiculous. I'm so embarrassed. Yeah. Embarrassed that I like them. Yeah. Remember that conversation with my friends is thank God. Women are attracted to us. Whatever that is inside. Because we look dick euless. Yeah. I think the flaccid penis is a real, it's God's way of checking our ego. Yeah. It seemed like you think you're cool. Okay, cool. Yeah, this album grows. It grows. It grows. Yeah. Exactly. Just hold on. Let me just let me just kind of give it up. Wait. Let me let me throw in everyone knows. That's the funniest thing about flaccid penises everyone knows that they change shapes right? In time to perform. But we still judge each other. Alright shit. Yeah, I'm growers Razi, someone who seemed to many penises growers and showers are real because I have also been gentlemen rim like ooh. This is gonna be a good time and then their penis really does just get as harder. But the same size chance up, which was like, oh, let down. Just sit down. He was a little bit of a letdown, because you because I'm used to the grower panics where it's like, oh, this is gonna get. Okay. Still going. Are. We're gonna take a quick break. We'll be right back. It's me Jack from work. Oh, dailies. I gather anyways, have you been checking out the economist, course you're talking about the weekly magazine that offers insight opinion in international news, and US news and many other time. That's right. Don't domes helps leaders prepare for what's going on in the world around them. A trusted source of intelligence for over one hundred seventy years, you come system, the noise in hand picks the central nation that tells the real story falls, it up into a fist punches it in your brain Haywood, if you've been reading in the economist lately, Jack about how American voter don't care a foul yet. Conomy brother. Well, I've been reading about how the tree war would shine us changing global business. Guess what we still got I on China, all this learnings making me, so mad for your free copy of the economist, just text I to ninety nine thousand. That's right texts site guys to nine nine zero zero zero and get your free copy of the economy. Economist get some learning. Indoor back. And so an article in, I think it was Bloomberg yet revealed that Google leagues X have given us the answer to what, what I think of as sort of the lunch Ables test, because I, I heard about it when I was reading up on the invention of lunch Ables, and how executives who invented lunch Ables and designed them would never dream of feeding them to their kids. And so it turns out in this in this article, I like, yeah, no. They're good. They're just designed to addict children. Pink disks of meat to don't call it. Hey, y'all get them after show? Sometimes when I'm on the road, they're fun because I was just like this isn't terrible. It is. It is Hamid. Yeah. It's really bad. It's still make homemade ones with just a block of cheese, and like a pretzel or something so we're saying the same is true for YouTube. The same is true for YouTube. Thank you for getting me back on trick. Yes. So four employees that Google told a journalist writing about the journalist was doing a report on just how difficult it is proving for Google to get YouTube under control and to wrestle their algorithm. Back into a shape where it does not promote hatred and white supremacy. And, you know, some some people in Google are, like, hoping that they will just spend YouTube off into a separate company because they think it's really bad. For Google's brand. Yeah. It's, it's turning out to be one of the more problematic social networks. Even though Facebook kind of was the one that came out of the gate hut after twenty sixteen turns up YouTube is really a fucking mess. So anyways, this reporter was talking to a bunch of Google exacts. And, you know, the fourth hit he asked said they quote privately admitted that they don't let their kids watch YouTube unsupervised and said the sentiment was widespread at the company so just in just something to keep in mind. I mean, I haven't that my son watches YouTube, sometimes in like one day I walked in. He was legit and he put it down real quick. And it was just like cartoons. He was watching, but they get like a little they start. Yeah. He's watching where they started kissing. Oh. And I made like he knew, you know, it made him feel funny Brett. Uh-huh. And then he felt like he was like he was worried. He was in trouble when I was like, no this. Isn't it your fault? Right. Watching it thing. I was like this is you have to be careful on this on the internet. It's not all fun read you. And like he just didn't go on YouTube your long time at all. And I was like, that's fine. But now because it it was harmless what he was doing right. And the way he failed inside his normal, too. So they're taking advantage of that stuff, too. Yeah. I didn't realize it was such so much such a right. A radical presence on YouTube. Yeah. I don't know for, for whatever like any vast community, online seems to, like find a way to start, you know, the authoritarian come in. And Thawra Teheran's always tend to, like bend things toward the right and authoritarian have a, a way of dominating online communities, especially when they get really, really big because I watch embarrassing things on YouTube. But like it's not that, like I fell down a worm hall of like videos that talk about how fast food chains failed in foreign countries. I and I was like super in barest, but it was like, why KFC didn't work in the Philippines actress, and that was this episode is about. Tell us why. It turns out that in the Philippines street food, culture really vital to how people interact and the pride internet Konomi, right? And the way that like the prices that are street food person can offer, like even fast food chain can't compete with. Yeah. And the quality of the taste and stuff too. Right. You're probably came to YouTube with probably a little bit more knowledge than the typical child comes to use your and they're more of a blank slate shore. If you're only thing is you're going in, and you're like, well, I wanna know about nine eleven what happened on nine eleven like that's the people carrying about a lot and three levels deep. You're going to get to nine eleven truth IRS Elliott eleven troopers Alabama Jones, Alex Jones leads to, you know, white supremacists so it's. Yeah. Whites premise leads to fear, right? And fear. Of course leads to the dark side. We'll read these are just companies that started out as a cool idea to bring people together. And then they realize like we have to make money, right? And the owners of the company, I think are we're all like cover making money we're making. Yes, we how did this happen? I don't know. And then they're like fuck, yeah. Then three years later. Oh, it's because we're funding terrorist idol some shit, you know. Yeah. The algorithm takes into account basically, how long you stay on video. And you know, there's a way to edit reality together into some really misleading shit, and that tends to be the more interesting angle is conspiracy theories over what, what actually happens so scary. Yeah, it's just I don't know the answer. Yeah, because I mean I, I just think it's important to keep in mind that these people know better than us. Energy executives. Knew about global warming before anybody else, they knew about climate change in the eighties, because they were doing the research. It was imperative for their company to continue to make money that they know the truth about climate change. I think a similar thing happens with every company, and they know the downsides of their. Product before anybody else does. Yes. That's why Shane Smith. So. Right. Fok's. For everybody found out, it was kind of hollow. Yeah. Yeah. I okay, I have to problem. Okay. I have two points. Well, I can't fix. I'm trying to think how to fix the bigger problem as for children who are watching this. I think children like we'll be fine. If a parent is doing their job already, then the kid will be able to watch something like that, or, or the have a conversation with the parent. He's like, okay. Yeah, that's weird. Those people are idiots. I guess what I'm saying is, there's no one YouTube video. That's gonna solidarity corrupt a child. If the parent is already doing their job, raising them with the proper influences outside of YouTube, bright. If your kid is only getting influenced by YouTube you failed as a parent. Obviously, you can't control everything. They see. But I mean I know myself like growing up. I saw stupid shit on TV or whatever, and over accumulated over, you know, a number of experiences, I was able to, like, okay. Yeah. That was bullshit, dad like Beavis and Butthead in that let me know that it wasn't evil in bad for Ryan the way you also hear everything to do you know what I mean? Yes show in my dad is Susan, my mom would welcome watch this. It's so funny. He's a high school football coach teacher, who he's like, I know these kids. Yeah. All right, guys. Let's move onto the twenty twenty election explicitly since that last story might affect it in many different ways hopefully not. But I just wanted to talk about a single tweet that came from the Twitter account, the Democrats, which is the official account of the DNC. It's my favorite band. Yes. The democrat Democrats, they rock. So it was pretty good. Yeah. Not really. So let's so the tweet is the official count of the Democratic National Committee. And the tweet is, this is a whole mood, text boy by two four three, three, six seven to get this exclusive wallpaper. And it's just a, a wallpaper with Trump's image in the background and it just says boy by twenty twenty in large letters. And that just made me want to move to a different country shore. That is very it is mega church. Yeah. Grabbing secular culture. The young life. The young light version of politics. Yes. Like the Lord rocks. Everyone. Joe? Yeah. It's lame. It's just an and it higher actual gay people to ride it for you. Boy by. Yeah. It's performance. Cool or hip or woke, it sucks. Yeah. There's, there's a lot of culture vultures right now we were watching videos before this, and there's a lot to get to that a little later. There's a lot. We'll talk about that later. But, like there's a lot of people picking at the carry on of the queer legacy. And this is just the latest example of like how do we engage the children? Drake say this. I know. Right. How's it feel to have everything you like appropriated? But while also still not receiving jobs, credit or money for it, right? Yeah. It's terrible. I get it. They're trying to engage kids. I get it. But I mean, also I think you made the point earlier of like they're really simplifying systematic oppression. Yes. Well, what you could do if you want to get the use vote is fucking listen to them. Yeah. And say, hey, what are they actually complaining about runner, their issues, instead of just pandering to what you think they wanna hear in how you think they talk read? Listen to this is just shut up. Listen to this is a group that will inevitably endorse Biden, you know, just a very mainstream center, left democratic right now. It's like an odds game. Right. It's like why rent twenty left? I don't think that's even accurate. Really very center. Yeah. Super sent down the WalMart supercenter. We don't need WalMart's. Yes. Yes, truly, and they want the naughty show. It's not. Now. That would be my target. We tried target in two thousand sixteen and they said, no, yes, has better deals on wheat. Yes, but the people so they're trying to use a not even skin deep appropriation or cultural nod, and just the idea that totally, we're at a place where we should be approaching the Trump presidency. Like a fun thing that we can just insult away, is just let the like she did in the two thousand sixteen election. It really reminds me of the two thousand sixteen like it's, it's really learning like these guys, right? Yes. I wonder if it's like an I don't think this makes it right. But I think it's like everyone is so bummed out by the news. I wonder if they're trying to engage people in a way that makes them not want to die. You know what I mean? That doesn't make it right. But maybe that's where it's coming from of like everyone knows we're suffering, and people are systematically oppressed. And people are in detention centers. Yes. How can we engage young people? Maybe it's by being flippant and stupid. Yeah. They're just not the ones that they, they need to know themselves well enough to realize that we don't want snarky cute culture from them. We want policy and right understanding and engagement with what people are actually concerned. That, that's a good new tweet new policy. Oak. Good. The problem with any of the, the people that are politicians for career. They they just want that position. They want the power. And that's what they're truly fighting for for most of their career. Right. And so when they get in the position of like being in the DNC you're being the social media person. They're they're not trained that they're just trying to up their position in this if so they get in this position. And they're not good at their job because they've been playing politics inside this thing. Right. So it's God. I mean, we're fucked is what I'm saying. You can say what you want about the right. But those dudes are killers. Yeah. Right. And they're coming in, and they're no, they're not just like, hey, mom. I'm the head of social media for the right to know they're like. Hey, we're going to take the heads off a gays now because I'm charge a Twitter for the RNC. Right. That's the who it's that fear thing. So Machiavelli thing now the Dow to do. Yeah. Win with fear like like fears greater than respect all that goods. Conquer to do. They're the right is very good at up have many causes to divide them. It's just like we won't money and power. Yeah. Wage issue in the left is like can everyone be happy? Right. Right. Yeah. But not as much as me reproductive rights. Mama. Honey? What other buzzwords I honestly, hire me? I'll all right. Your tweets. Freedom the house down boots. You know this I can solve. Okay. Yeah, that's unfortunate. Yeah. I I don't they probably won't like retract it. They'll just be like oops, hopefully hopefully they're not just like nailed it. But I, I think this is getting enough backlash that they'll just on some other poorly thought out strategy truly Biden's, the man, we want to grab our ass. Right. Pullback pullback fullback. Oh man. He's, he's going to be our nominee. Right. I feel like that's what's going to happen. Yeah. I think it's like a family. It's like when you when you want us to have a real choice. No, no, no. And when you you in the family, or like going to, like to like, eat, food, you're like I should we eat she eats, this super specific cuisine, or should we go to this sandwich, American salads place? If we go to sandwich, American salads, everyone's going to be able to eat something right? Yeah. Not like any of it. Oh, yeah. It's terrible quality. Yes. The lactose intolerant. People are severe misery and their health might be endangered. But right. But that's I don't even agree with. I think the problem with that metaphor is like it's not a specific restaurant. It is like no, we're the other candidates like Biden. Is that like bland everything, and then you've got Warren and Bernie Sanders, who were like, we have health food? Yeah. Yeah. Have what will make you better and it tastes attached. Great. It tastes better, and everyone will like it. Right. And people are like. No, he, he friend with Obama. Friend, my friend, pointing out the other day. He's like, isn't it odd that there's a health food section in the grocery store? Yeah. That's a good point amazing. Yeah. Other stuff is more death. Food sickness food. This causes chronic illnesses fun food. Yeah. Exactly. All right. We're going to take another quick break. We'll be right back. Am I it's me Jack from work? Oh, dailies. I gather anyways, have you been checking out the economist, course you're talking about the weekly magazine that offers insight opinion in international news, and US news and many other times, that's right. Don't domes helps leaders prepare for what's going on in the world around them. It has been a trusted source of intelligence for over one hundred seventy years, you come system, the noise in hand picks the central nation that tells the real story balls, it up into a fist punches it in here. Great Haywood, if you've been reading in the economist lately, Jack about how American voter don't care, a family yet, Konomi, brother. We'll, I've been reading about how the tree war would shied us change global business. Guess what we still got on your side. All this learnings making me so mad for your free copy of the economist just Texan. So I to ninety nine thousand. That's right. Texts site to nine nine zero zero zero at get your free copy of the economy. Get some learning. Indoor back and OJ Simpson head one of the strangest coming out parties on social media, since Garth Brooks is Facebook fan page. I don't know if you guys are familiar with that video, where I'll just wanna have a conversation. Yeah. I think we have a clip of what that sounded like, I guess it's official, we're now on Facebook. I really wasn't sure about this start. But then a friend of mine, said something, they'd just made all kinds of sense. She said think of it more as a conversation. I like that. I'm already finding out on my own said. It's wiping the walls out between you and me. And I really liked that it allows us into each other's worlds, or, I guess, in my case, the hotel room. I think about things I wanna post, I wanna post cool stuff slick stuff, meet stuff. But most of stuff, I'm gonna post going to be Ross stuff like this. So. So if this is truly a conversation. That makes him stutter. That literally made me nauseous, and I'm not kidding. It's so weird. You have to watch it because his delivery is also among the more effected like he, he gives a performance that suggests that he is like trying to imitate a pickup artists trying to fuck. The camera is, like it's a false sincerity on the level of what it is. So next level I bad youth. Pastor dress sleep with, like a seventeen yes. Yes. To fish? Well, I remember when he came out, I was like I just cry laughing, that's always been my suspicion is he's trying to fuck everybody's aunt and all time. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. That's what he's trying to do, just like a little overweight. He's a you know, I think you're special stunning women have thrown themselves at hair, and he's like, not what bones. Oklahoma. I think you're special was far more convincing than anything in that video. He's capable of sincerity. Like, I think you were too attached you emotionally available. He's trying to make an arena fill space, right? I'm trying to make disconnected. He hasn't been around somebody who said an honest word to him in a decade. And so it's just that's what that looks like it's really worth watching. I think it's going to be a museums than the future. People should watch a Garth Brooks is first Facebook fan page video, because that's what you should show to your handlers. Right. They're hiring. If I ever looked like this. You're not fired. I'm going to have someone murder. And just so, you know, you signed a contract that says that's okay. That's okay. All right. Today belongs to OJ guys, so J. Join Twitter, Tropicana. Ads. My God, you're like you're an average. So OJ. Join Twitter, literally days a couple days after the twenty fifth anniversary of the murders of Nicole Brown. Simpson and Ron Goldman. And he, he announced that the account will be a lot of fun. And that he's got. He also said he's got some things to straighten out. And then when somebody asked him about the account like a media outlet was like is that really you? He was like, yeah. I've got some things to get off my chest or something like that. So this man who got away with murder in the most public way possible has revenge in his heart. What would seem on the surface to be the luckiest anyone has ever got ever. He. He's pissed off cost him a lot. Yeah. That's true. That's true. He was like it, cost him a lot of money. Anything? Get to be OJ the way he was J. Yeah. You just think that having that reality of murdering people in the back of his mind. Like how that looked like it hurt. Like, I don't I o a debt to? I don't think university. I think that guy if you I watched that video, because I'm human person. And I was very interested book. I, he just there's no. And it may be very, very deepen their like right before he falls asleep every night, and he's only just crazy, right? Yeah. But every other instance you see him it is not it just feels like he feels like I didn't do this. He's convinced himself over time he owed related is the inside of his brain looks like the turnover control room. You guys that. Yeah. The papers flying every tax law is like it's fine. The court has not exploded and everyone else is like guys the core exploded, but we can all acknowledge but DeAnne love those, the lights, blinking everywhere the. Well, and he still not wrong about certain stuff like he's crazy famous in the consequences for his actions weren't that severe fame ones. Yeah. Right. But he's still in Florida mixing, it up every day. We don't hear about it. And I think that is his revenge on now is like he's going to just start tweeting how fun his life is bread. So his lawyer came out and said that OJ will be using Twitter to try to control his own narrative, countering rumors and misleading statements like President Trump. And this is the first time that it's been explicitly connected. But this is the thing that kind of media, theorists have been calling out a lot is that, you know, back in two thousand sixteen. We got all this OJ material. We got a American crime store. Or the people vs. OJ simpson. We got that incredible documentary on ESPN about OJ and his trial in the aftermath in his gay dad, right? And. Neither here nor there. But, but people have pointed out that the trial is kind of a precursor to the Trump presidency, not just like the media circus aspects of both, but also the exploitation of communities that were oppressed or bleed themselves to be oppressed in order to further their own self interest, and then I also think there's just something about both where there was this twenty four hour media, feeding frenzy, where they were able to create an alternate reality. If you were just paying attention to that, and just hang attention to this one version of reality. Like you're seeing these supposedly outwardly, saying, people just saying a thing that isn't true. But you're not the human brain isn't used to that. And so it creates a separate like version of truth, I guess, and took a fiction book versus a nonfiction book, right? But it's brought to you with all the trappings of nonfiction, right? Yeah. He has. He just has, like, mega CT, right? He's just like his brains all scrambled up. Well set I think American not even Americans human beings throughout here street. We are fascinated with people that don't admit fault. And if in yet in if you're doing it at that level, I'm going to tune in every time, right because we do want to see when they break because all humans all of us our whole life. We see where that line is. And then we're or moral compass falls is usually where we're like all right. You got me. I did this. I'm not gonna I'm tired of this. But this these are two men who were decided. No didn't do it. Brett and like no, but we call you do in this, this, and this not didn't do it. And they're doing it on television for all his watching the right. This is the biggest this is like. Not just your mom or the principal. The world is trying to catch you Brett and you're going nad do. And everybody's like I kinda like this. I think, yeah, I do think in this, I think is similar like, like we're obsessed with people who are like disasters and then rehab themselves more than people who were just good the whole time. Right. Like we're like oh, can you believe it? Chris Brown is sorry. That was a piece of fucking shit. Yeah. And it's like no, no, no, no. But wait. But what about this artist? This artist is very talented and Hamilton. Yeah. It's been amazing. Or in be singers. They were just and I don't even know his name. Exactly. So there you go, right? Just like we're not interested in people who are just good. We're interested in like journeys, and like people learning or not learning from their mistakes, which is so fucking, it sucks. Well, there needs to be a comic book with the talent. And I think that's where the victim hook. And I don't know if this is just a weird theory. I have words it's like. Where there's a currency in victimhood now never was. And I think a lot of that had to do has to do with the talent contest where the American idol was the first real one where it was like there's eight amazing singer. Sue should have their own careers. But we only get to pick one. Let's find out whose life was the saddest right? A win. Yeah. And then we give credit to whatever that is. And so now everyone's like, yeah I'm good at this. But my dad beat the fuck out of me, but you're not even good at the thing, right? No. But my dad was mean. Yeah. Yeah. So I get to be a singer now. Can't sing. Your dad, dad. Yeah. And I mean, the this huff post article pointed out like that, when you don't have much to lose like that, that seems to be the point that both OJ and Trump were at where they felt like they didn't have much to lose. And so they were able to just like break free from what they call the shackles of objective truth, and your own passed and set it used to call objected. Truth truth. Yeah, right. Yeah. Yeah. Another reason that he might be coming to Twitter. Now is that Ron Goldman sister? Kim just launched a podcast where she talks about. Hell Jay killed her brother. Hint. She never names him. She just calls him the killer. Yeah. That's called them the killer, though time. That's amazing. Yeah. But she has she was on a our favorite show on the dailies like FOX and friends, where she wondered aloud if, if her podcast would cause, like some sort of break in him because the last time somebody did a like there was a book that was the Goldman's version of things was, if I did it in two thousand seven where they changed it so that it just said, I did it in big letters, whatever, and that book was published the day before Simpson committed armed robbery and Las Vegas that caused them to spend nine years in jail. So she's wondering if like her releasing a podcast is going to cause him to lose his shit in some in some way, the heart. Yeah. Yeah. Can't believe he's five. It's really weird. I truly heard multiple people say that, that it's just weird that OJ Simpson is alive. He's just out there and he murdered people got away with it. And yeah. Basically everybody knows it everyone. Knows it. Yeah. It's all say it again. It's just like Casey Anthony like we'd know she did it right? Yeah. The, the evidence is insurmountable, but they just they, they fucked up and they like they may take took too big of a swing right? Like they're like, we wanna, you know, they, they prosecuted there who also had that crazy sickness. We're talking about. We're have you heard story about her saying, she worked at this place, and then taking the detectives to Zanny? Yes, she said, Zanny the nanny steady named a lady named Zanny was Hernandez, and then, but this that one made more sense. The one that was the craziest, which, by the way, it doesn't sound like a big hit in. Yeah. We'll zanex. Any person riots? And then she took him to like a studio of she'd, she told people that she worked at Universal Studios. Yes. Yes. Student and went there and said, hey, I work with like a detective and somebody else, and walk through, and like people were looking at her weird like in chooses, like waving at people like while she's walking through like you know, the cubicles and got to the end of the walkway. Yeah. Of a hall that was just a dead dead in, and she turned around, I don't actually wear care. I just made that. Yeah. Wait. What is that disease? That is, that's it narcissism. Like, you're like I will just lie to grad of whatever and I'll find a reason that's at nursing. I'll break with reality. Yes. I'll find a reason while I'm walking them through and come up with a new line of why great who I am. Because the world doesn't revolve around you. And at a certain point, you either have to come to terms with that fact, we're just be like, I don't believe that when you did. Yeah, I'm gonna I'm gonna just continue to exist in a world where I create my own reality love to thank you. She just keeps like, oh, they build a wall here that wasn't here. Yeah. The ability of the human mind case terrorists, I get the guy who knocks down walls. I don't know you. That's my sister. Wall or. Anyways. OJ's appearance on Twitter didn't have anything to do with Father's Day, even though it coincided with Father's Day, although his second his son was like. Gift. He could've given unreal. His second tweet was he was like, oh, well, it's Father's Day, just want to call out that I am not coordinate kardashian's father. I never had sex with her mom. I wasn't the like that. With anyone saying that Jenner said that she had sex with him. Yeah. I think she did. She's. And they know jersey not in. Yeah. Nope. Anyways, another tweet that happened on Father's Day came from Bill Cosby, and I could just see the texts that Kim sent her right after she said, I had to actually or anyone centers like why. Why mom, why onlin fine mon- shut the fuck up mom's? Okay, sorry. You were going to say sorry, I wanted to just note that another suffer of this disease. Bill Cosby, I think fame is really good. At exacerbating this disease. He is in prison, obviously. But he was able to get his lure to tweet forum. It's America's dead. I know it's late, but to all of the dead's, it's an honor to be called a father, so let's make today a renewed oath to fulfilling our purpose, strengthening, our families and communities. So, you know, more of the sort of lecturing that caused Hannibal breweries in the first place to be like, you're, you're a rapist, dude. GM out. Yeah. I mean I saw him this. I mean he's always been like this is him in Seattle, probably eight or nine ten years ago, probably longer than that. Now, if I think about, but I was like three rows back in he does a bit. He's wearing department store. Sweatpants crocs in a t shirt tucked in we paid a hundred and fifty dollars. I that I notice that is very nice Benaroya hall. It's very nice in Seattle and. And then if ten minutes into his act, he goes into the bid about kids today, don't dress. Right. They need to wear a suit and tiny pull their pants up. And I just I was so hard for me, not to be like, motherfucker. You got sweat pants on FOX, not pay two hundred fifty dollars to see you. Yeah, the bummer. Yeah, but that's the disconnect of where you're like, dude. Yeah. Do that bit. Also when you're the that damage of a narcissist. I'm sure it's just very easy for you to be like, okay. People people were mad at me. But now they're cool with me friend. No, we're mad. We're going to stay mad. Yeah. I thought like a father's date. It's it is insane like, like a someone who was so widely loved unlike who's television show was, like integral to a lot of people's development is young people is now deleted and cancelled, by the way that post ended with the telltale sign of brick from reality, just a cl- a flurry of hashtags, hashtag far from finished, and hashtag favorite dead four from Finn ship that so again, just like, oh, Jay was like I got some things to straighten out far from finished, very easy to read, as a threat also disturbing detail from the story, Cosby reportedly has been decorating his cell with. Posters of Megan FOX, Megan, Markle beyond say and Kris Jenner. I really wanted to all. A why I wanted it to be all mega. Once you start with Meghan Markle, and Megan FOX. Mccain. No, he's been Meghan. I can't think of another mega. He's been trading snacks for the pictures of the women. So, you know, they say in true, yeah, hopefully, he's pulling Shawshank and tunneling his way out because the only other option is that he's jerking off to it. And I don't want that to the study was blind. Yeah. I think he's mostly blind like legally blind like not like opaque, complete darkness. Boy, they just told him that was who the pictures Charles gently now which J, lo and. He's really loves Charles Barkley now. He's. Thank God is he told that was beyond say. Bill Cosby came out as queer. Yeah. Oh, didn't Roseanne come out as queer and no one cared. Well, she's always came out is like she has schizophrenia multiple personality. So when she comes out as queer, like which one. Yeah, who? Yeah, which one of you and she's like Rosie not an new year new year, who it is. By the way, schizophrenia, multiple personality are not the same thing. Well, but that is you might have won one of her personalities might have schizophrenia. That's true. Bill Cosby sucks. All right. We did want to check in with the Taylor swift video. That is setting the internet a buzz. I don't know what it's doing to the internet. But fire a flame. Yeah a flame. It's you know, I listen to the song and immediately both liked it. And thought it was overtly borrowing from a this knife. Song, heartbeat Saja, and DJ, Dan, all of thought it was borrowing from the sun, flat that sunflower song by post Malone and Swaley. And he actually put the post Mansue Lee sung overtop the Taylor swift song. And it sounds great sounds like it sounds like basically, they're different parts of the same song. So we're gonna play a little bit of that. Oh. Don't know. It's just like. And he didn't. Don't what you say this beat is. Exactly Vitas dope. But it's not like a remix of fence along. It's not an echo. They. And he didn't like pitch it up or you know, nothing has been manipulated. He just took one song and put it landed up with the other song. So it's, it's not the most original song. It is kind of the first song where we're seeing sort of an activist streak from Taylor swift and is very pride themed yes, there's a lot of queer eye content. Got I can't wait till I'm like, part of the queer luminosity. Wait till I'm just like the N P H where they're just like they just call you when they're doing something gay. And they're like, do you wanna come began thing and you're like, yeah. I'm sure it pays too much. But yeah, there's a lot of people in it. There's drag queens recall. Okay, here's here's here's my whole thing on this. It's kind of, it's kind of, like kind of ties back into my opinion on trash Sierra and stuff like that. It's like we could fight it or we could sit back and let it happen. This is going to happen. This is going to happen this summer. You could fight it or you could let it happens. Let it ride. Let it do the good. It's going to do and just ignore the bad, that because I think someone is my I think, someone who came to Taylor was, like you turn do Madonna shit like. You know that she real cool with the gays right? Right. And in Taylor reside. Yeah, I'm gonna my new elm will look like Lisa. Frank did too much cocaine. Dilly waiting and Anna this morning. Both came in and separately said the same thing that they think Taylor swift is an AI program, which I think there's actually like her parents, Billy wing, you were pointing out we're hedge fund people like, and the like head wondering millionaires. Yeah. And those people saying entire processes to create algorithm, learning to figure out how to game and beat complex systems. So I don't know. I mean, they were like this trialed investment. We made money. I like music in the excellent. Yeah. Nashville, we will corrupt this system. But I think the thing you guys are responding to what I was kind of getting there is like a even the pride stuff is completely devoid like it's a bunch of signifier 's and cultural touch points. But there's not a lot of humanity like that is involved like you don't get the humanity of the people that she's bringing into co-starring video napkins all the time. Right. Drag queens. They also just got ripped into a Madonna video that, of course, did poorly put a lot of gay people. Get dragged into these things because Madonna's turning into the wicked witch of the west. I enjoy I've never been a fan. I just feel like she's just she keeps writing. She's at the crap table, and she refuses to cash, cash out girls me dip lows cock. That's dry. Okay. I'm gonna go hip hop. Again. Okay. So anyway, what was I gonna say it was like, I guess, the thing that bothers me out, as a queer person is like, there's a lot of people are constantly competing for table scraps. And like we're constantly being invited to these big parties as excessive fees. And of course, we say yes to it, because how many jobs do drag queens offered very few especially entertainment. It's like you're either a drag Queen or you're not like, so I guess it bugs me out that, like, we will be excess raise and then she'll move onto something in a couple in a year or two. We'll move on. Those drag queens will still be like holding onto their day rate check. They got that. Of course, it's gone gone. I was sagged for a year. Yeah. I don't I guess that's a calm conversation. So it is fucked up. This is going to keep happening as for the immediate future. I think you should just let the song happen, because it's, it's decently fun. And I don't know beats great. Who cares? It's a summer pop zone. All pop music can mean whatever you want it to if it's good enough. Exactly. Yeah. Exactly. That's why music is better when you're young, you're having a better time music weird Tillis to the words. And you don't doesn't bother you that this has happened before I even know her and Katy Perry had a feud. Oh, yeah. That's the real headline guys. Is that? Her Taylor, swift and Katy Perry of made up. And none of us know the knew that they had a few. It's big news. Mono leisure having you. Where can people find? Oh. You can find me online at my name at mono, a gap, Ian. You can follow any of my stupid, Instagram accounts. I do a serial tasting thing now because that's the future called spoon me, and I have a patriot with Betsy Sadahro called we love trash, and I do a drag race podcast over at head gum. That is currently changing names. But a follow me you'll, you'll get to know all about how our, our drag chatting journey. Is evolving, right? Yeah. All that stuff, drag queens, because they're fun. And they can fight. It's like all the pomp and circumstance. It's like really fun. And then there's like, oh, they can also fistfight you. Yeah. They get. They get they get Kentucky's where learned all about the drugs do as good a lot of pageant, queens there. So. Yes. Yeah, it was a partier doing comedy and this gay comedians uniform tonight. I do and we did in James Tina Turner brought us home. Sweet. Where can people find you bay w detour dot com is where all my dates arm in Springfield, Missouri this week at the blue room comedy club. And then I will be in the comedy connection in Providence Rhode Island in July. But just Google billion Davis. All that shit comes up mono forgot to ask you is there tweet. You've been enjoying. There is just recently, Nicole buyer tweeted about breaking toilet. Okay. She broke a toilet and Chicago and she tweeted about it, and she's just, of course had the best of humor about it. J- apparently got covered in toilet water because it like broken tipped over. So she got like covered in toilet water and still perform that night while at the head gum podcast festival daily. And it's I love Nicole so much so deeply and. The best person to have that happen, too. 'cause I don't I no no no one else would would take such an interesting life moment with share stride and share it make it awesome. Make it human in just laugh at how silly this whole thing is. Tweet. You've enjoy. Yes, this very Honey comic. Alex felt cone, he lives in Portland. He's funny. Dude. He tweeted, when you die people's memories of you will live on forever. The lady, I saw walk into a coffee shop less water glasses cream and injuring the whole thing. She's probably dead now. But I can't stop thinking. Perfect. And tweet. I've been enjoying Paul Tompkins every time you don't see a rainbow guys considering Browning entire world again and Elvis, Presley tweeted, me, and I got a Big Mac, employees, sir. This is Burger King me, sorry. Can I get a Big Mac? You're managing. Find me on Twitter. Jack underscore O'Brien. You find us on Twitter at Daly's ice read daily on this tramway Facebook fan page and a website. Dot com, with host episodes, that are put notes where we talked to him as episode will as the song we right out on our on hosing. What song are we going to ride out on today? We're gonna ride out on runs the road by senti gold because I'm keeping my since he role in, in the great song the tour song rise around listens to, and I guess she also. Also for you joggers out there. The dailies I my heart radio for more podcasts from my heart radio busy iheartradio app. Apple Pucca wherever your favorite shows up and do it for today. We will be back tomorrow, because his daily podcast we'll talk to you then. All of us. All the. The. Hey, what's up man? You've been checking out that economists, you know, I love the economist weekly magazine gives us good insight and opinions on international news and many other topics. 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Video Artist: Casey Neistat

How I Built This

1:34:20 hr | 5 months ago

Video Artist: Casey Neistat

"So before we start the show I wanna tell you about to live episodes. I'll be recording in just a few weeks and how you can come see them in person. If you are a fan of ninety s alternative music you will not want to miss my live conversation with the founders of sub pop the legendary recording label behind bands like Nirvana soundgarden. The Shins and many many others that show is happening on March. Twenty six in Seattle at Benaroya Hall and then the very next night. March twenty seventh. I'll be in San Francisco interviewing. Ken Grossman founder of one of the biggest craft beer makers in America Sierra Nevada brewing company. That's happening at the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco. Now if you haven't been to a live recording of the show they are Super Fun. Come on down. Meet your fellow listeners. Be a part of the show. Laugh cry grab some how I built this swag and come say hi to me in the team so I really hope to see you in either or maybe both San Francisco and Seattle on March twenty. Sixth and twenty seventh for tickets visit. Npr PRESENTS DOT. Org Van our spending every waking moment together making videos and we ended up calling it the night stepbrothers and calling it a TV show and crabs you you end up selling to hbo just a short time later for like two million dollars which which has been life changing for you. Yes it was. It was incomprehensible to us was it. We shot this video on a tutor. Dr Camera we bought at Walmart. We ended this movie. You know this is this is when HBO was sex in the city. Sopranos six feet under the wire and the nice stat brothers from NPR. It's how I built this show about. Innovators entrepreneurs idealists and the stories behind the movements. They built on the show today. How Casey Nice stats scrape together? Twelve hundred dollars to buy an Iraq started making home movies and turn video blogging into a multi million dollar business. So in almost every episode of this show your here story about a person or people who built a company around a thing pita chips or yoga pants or cell phone cases or coffee a tangible product. That's become a well known brand something. Lots of people using their daily lives but today's guest is a little bit different. Yes he's got a pretty well known brand and yes. Lots of people consume it and yes. It's become a profitable business except Casey Nice debts business. Is Casey Nice that he is the brand? Casey is a filmmaker but he's best known as a Youtube personality with almost twelve million subscribers to his channel. He's posted hundreds of videos on youtube like snowboarding through the streets of New York after a blizzard. He's documented some of the most personal and intimate moments of his life. Yeah what we say. And his signature style of filmmaking and candid first-person delivery we just the steady cam shower on carrying the Jimbo. On my skateboard actually influenced a whole generation of youtubers cases. A legend he deserves to get his own memorial legend and more than a decade ago. He recognized the potential of youtube as a way to build at a media company. But even though Casey Nice that is one of the most successful self taught filmmaker to come out of Youtube. It's an unlikely success story at sixteen. He was a high school dropout at seventeen. He was a father and for a while. Casey wash dishes and restaurants and lived in a trailer. Just keep his head above water. Casey grew up in a mainly working class neighborhood in the industrial town of Groton Connecticut. His Dad was a salesman for a restaurant supply company and his mom stayed at home to look after. Casey and his three siblings. There's an omnipresent financial stress that was in my household that was never not there the majority of my parents fights. I remember being about money and You know this was the eighties where there was a lot of tumult in the economy and I just remember my dad's business being so tied to that That economy and I remember him coming home later and later. I remember his stress. I remember hearing my parents have to discuss. How my dad was GONNA have to ask his mother my grandmother for some sort of loan to help him keep his his company from going bankrupt But how that you know. How that manifest in the household was we. You know we didn't. We didn't have much but I don't remember I don't remember us wanting much either. There's always enough food in the House. Whenever anything fancy. We got that serial that came in a big bag and was called like tasty owes instead of cheerios. But my parents financial burdens. I think were largely shielded from us but it was by no means sort of an affluent childhood who is not We were not a household of means. Were you a pretty well. Behaved kid over you. I don't know a troublemaker knows awful. I was awful I look back at it and I do spend a lot of time reflecting on it. I think that I would describe my parents. Parenting style as one of like absence around and I always felt like we're on our own. It was very lord of the flies mentality in in our household. And because of that I I remember like being really little and my older brother and accidentally burning down the tree. Ford I remember like my parents. throwing the Christmas tree sort of over a cliff in the backyard After Christmas is easier than trying to throw it away and my my big brother Van. I thought it'd be hysterical. Set it up on the train tracks so the train would have to crash into a vertical perfectly mounted six foot tall Christmas tree You know I remember getting made him been suspended but I think it was attention in school because I was scared in the hallways so it was that sort of thing and I think that I was absolutely problematic. Kit I mean when you have that self image as a kid you kind of You become if that's what you're told you are then you You know for better worse you then. That's that's who you are. That's your identity. You look you know. I spent so much time. Now Guy Thinking about this because I my parents and my teachers and all of that it it affected me the thing that stands out the most now when I look back on. The parents of my friends I remember them. You know calling me a loser like literally using that word remember. I remember my friends from Seventh Grade. Like asking his mom if you're on a ski trip with them and her explaining why couldn't and I could hear her a give that explanation. I remember those things vividly and that affected me It struck me if I came across you as a fifteen year old right and Casey like. Let's talk like I wanted to find out what's going on with your life like would you been sort of sarcastic and And jokey or would you have been willing to kind of sit down and have an earnest conversation about what was going on in your life cannot. That's that's tough unafraid. He's ever asked me that before guy but I think that I know that the I was almost only spoke in the most. Sardonic of ways. I was always joking. Never serious but I think that that Shell that superficial shells very fragile and I think it could have been broken very easily I remember vividly Lou Bourne. He was by tenth grade English teacher. I remember causing so much trouble in the class. I'm the whole class laughing and all his expensive couldn't teach and he pulled me out into the into the hallway instead of throwing the class. He pulled me into the hallway and he just like you know he looked at me. Degnan I said what's wrong and I dislike burst into tears. burst into tears very earnest conversation with him about my parents splitting up and all this sort of tumult in my life and You Know He. He was able to the reason. Maybe I remember his name among teachers as he was able to break through that shell very very easily and I mean what you are sure like fifteen when your parents split up and I mean it sounds like you took that really hard. I took it really hard. I don't think I don't criticize them for this. I can only imagine what it was like for my parents but you know my mother whether it was on purpose or not. It really made felt like it was our fault and then my father was just so caught off guard by it that he sort of pulled back he withdrew and that left us sort of confused and it was not a it was not a it. Just wasn't a very happy household at that time you were clashing with your with your mom a lot fighting. Yeah you know. I don't I don't know if this is fair or not but I think all four of us kids directed the blame at my mother. I was always the most vocal about that so throughout the divorce. I really vilified here for you know for bringing a slap place and then ultimately you know I brought that frustration to school and ultimately I was. I was suspended from school for using my pager in detention at a beeper back then nobody had cell phones and my friend texted me and I wanted to call him back so I walked out of detention as a huge deal. My mother that night she screamed at me and she said you know. Give me that peoper. Get Out of this house and and I didn't want to be seen week in her eyes. I DIDN'T WANNA back down relent to that so I left I. I was fifteen years old. It was Tuesday night and a school night and it was cold and I left. I walk type. I took a backpack and I left parents house and never went back. Where did you go? You'll have that first night? I stayed at the one friend's house that I could walk to and I say slept in his basement and then I spent the next couple of days and various friends houses until their parents would be like that kid. Casey's actually sleeping here. Why is he here and then move on and ultimately There are these two kind of cool girls and they live not too far from high school in this apartment complex and they were cool 'cause they had just graduated and they had their own apartment. They both had jobs and they paid rent. And I just got a real job washing dishes And I was making one hundred bucks a week washing dishes on Saturdays and the cool girls invited me to move in with them as long as it chipped in on rent and I was like sweet side a permanent place to stay on their couch. And I think I'd chip in like two hundred bucks a month or something like that. See you see. You're basically crashing at their house and and and they're a couple years older than you and I guess soon you certainly dating one of them says this is Robin. One thing. Leads to another guy And yeah she and I started dating and it was a you know it's a fun couple of weeks Ultimately school finished up and Her lease was up and she didn't know where to go next and she and I decided to leave Connecticut altogether and moved to Virginia. Where my big brother? Van Was was in college at the College William and Mary and he just figured wolf figured out get their like we'll go see him and then maybe get a job there. Something Yeah I think. We're just so naive. And she was a waitress at a couple of really good waitressing jobs. Shed no trouble at all finding a job. Waiting tables and You know anywhere there's restaurants there's a somebody willing to hire a kid for eight or ten bucks under the table to wash dishes and I knew that would happen. And that's exactly what we did our race. You're living in Bloomsburg you know. Both of you are so young and and not quite sure how. This is going to end but You find out that Robin has pregnant at a certain point. Yeah you know I I think she and I both knew that she pregnant but really didn't were not willing to confront that Like we knew something was happening. Her body was changing. She was feeling different. we'd been wildly irresponsible with sacks as teenagers tend to be and We went back to Connecticut for a visit and it was on that trip. That like her her cousin. Who was this older woman who looked after us? I remember pulling Robin aside and being like you're pregnant and she just glance you're pregnant and that was the first time somebody else acknowledged what we knew. And it was less of a Gotcha moment in more of a moment where she and I both were forced to confront this reality. And I remember driving. You know ten hour drive back to Virginia and for the first time like she and I were talking about like okay. We're GONNA have a baby. You know we pack our things and we said goodbye to this really like fun life that we built for ourselves in Williamsburg Virginia and we moved back to Connecticut. And into the basement of that cousin who was You know almost like a mother figure to her at this point right you can react in a million different ways and I and I obviously. I think it's natural for us to put ourselves in that situation. I think what would I have thought and I think? I think I would have been terrified. I mean you did you. Did you feel that way at all? I didn't and I remember not feeling that way. I remember. It was nothing but excitement for me and enthusiasm from me and I remember Robin freaking out She was stable as Iraq that I remember late in the pregnancy her having a really tough time and a tough time with emotionally. Just what's going to happen in life with you know with the fact that she's you know she's with this sixteen year old who's supposed to be her caretaker of her and her unborn child and I was washing dishes? And you know she had a very natural freak out and I remember my reaction to that is like one of total kind of bewilderment. I couldn't understand why she was freaking out Well and this is not something that I acknowledge. In retrospect this is something that I was. I was how I felt then and how I felt then was. This is great. Finally I have a reason to be responsible and finally ever reason to get life started. Wow and the minute she got pregnant. I was like okay great now. It's it's about proving to this little baby proven to this Kiddo. That I made that you know that. His Dad's not a loser and that he can have the life that I wished acted pat. Him and my mission was to accomplish that. All I had to do was do it. The odds of that happening were really slim. The odds of you having of that. You know this whole thing falling apart and your life falling apart and you not becoming financially secure and always like that that that was a much greater possibility. Right like the statistics. Were not on your side. Well I think we can both say right now. That is objectively true. But at the time that was non-computer wasn't even in your mind right. No because look I I. My parents didn't step in with money or anything. Not that they had anything to step in with Robin didn't really have any parents so we didn't have anyone to turn to. We're all on our own and you know I was making eight dollars an hour and it felt like we were at the bottom rung of a gigantic ladder. And then it really felt like okay. Great are the only place we have to go is up. And that's really exciting. Because I didn't think you could go down any further like you. You literally couldn't be paid less in the state of Connecticut and I just didn't see things getting worse. I only saw things getting better. So ONA's born I think in nineteen ninety eight. And you're seventy Newell Dad and do you and Robin at this point. Say All right well. We should probably talk about like you know getting married. It's probably the right thing to do. Is that a conversation you guys had? It may have come up but I think that you know she was pregnant within weeks of US meeting one another and she's a tremendous person but I I don't think that the the way I don't think that what drove our relationship was that she and I had particularly extraordinary feelings for one another. I think what drove our relationship with was a shared desire to give this little boy the best life we could give him. I was not much of a boyfriend. All have at. It definitely didn't give her much attention And she was patient with that. Where did you guys live? And the first year and a half of his life I bought A trailer Like a mobile home and we lived in a trailer park which was amazing. I remember being so proud of that. There was such a defining moment in my life because the trailer was twelve dollars. And I put I think eight or nine hundred dollars down and then got a mortgage for the rest that my grandmother cosigned for and then we had to rent a little piece of land that we parted on and we lived there and to me that was like an unbelievable source of pride. I remember like getting in arguments with Owens mother because I would have to have carpet Vacuum in a certain pattern and if the pattern wasn't there'd be upset saws vacuum like three times a day so proud of this home that That I had for my family and I guess issue mentioned this Point Casey that you had dropped out of high school like you were. I guess you're making minimum wage at the restaurant but it sounds like you were even with all those other things. You're pretty optimistic about your life and your future. Yeah I was optimistic and I was. You know I think because I had nowhere else to go. I was home every day with my kid. His mother worked as I work nights which men every day from seven am till four PM was just the two of us and we were wild close. You know he was my little boy and In his first word was daddy and I was there for his first word. This first step and it was wonderful. I loved every second of it at this stage in your life. Did you have any ambitions for what you thought you wanted to be? Calmer was just collect putting one for the other I always had this Vision of the future You know I always always used to say. Moore's very young to my sister I was when I grow up to be rich and I remember You know when own was born. I was working in a restaurant. Remember sort of hatching these plans and you know spending forty fifty hours a week in the bottom of a chowder pot. Scrubbing you sort of spend a lot of time in your own head and I remember then just like obsessively identifying the weaknesses in the way that the restaurant the business was run me like okay so I when I started restaurant. Here's exactly how I'M GONNA run. Here's how can be profitable. Here's how it's GonNa work. That's the plan into your brother. Van Moved to New York after he finished college And what what was he? Was He doing there so he actually? He didn't finish he didn't he? Didn't graduate from William and Mary he My parents couldn't afford tuition any longer so he had to drop out And he dropped out of college and moved to Brooklyn and he had series of kind of entrusting gigs And throughout that He bought a an Imac computer which was the first Kind of the first consumer market computer that you can edit video on. Was it like one of those blue or purple ones. It was it was first year is only bring. Purple is the next year and That's what he was doing in New York and I remember when he bought that computer. Call me to tell me about it. And that sounded like the coolest thing I'd ever heard and that year Owen was wasn't quite to yet but that year we drove into the city and we stayed in his apartment his one bedroom apartment in Brooklyn and while we were there. All we did was play with my brother's computer Because he had a computer but he didn't have a video camera and I had a video camera but no computer so we had all this footage of my son running around the central Park Zoo and he and I just tried to figure out how to edit it and That moment higher I mean I can. I can tell you how the room smelled. I can tell you exactly the late. I can tell you where his computer was in relationship to his bed. Like that moment which was almost exactly twenty years ago was so crystal foreigners because it was such a big deal. I'd never sort of had my breath taken away so much I'd never seen such a tool of empowerment way to express yourself. I I imagine it was like when you put a pianist in front of a piano for the first time or you handle writer a pencil. For the first time I just remember having my breath taken away by this machine and when we ran out of footage to edit there was came with like a dog being bathed in a Kiddie pool that came to fault on the computers. He could have some. We edited that. 'cause I just wanted to manipulate video is just so exciting. Gallic dot moment and after that vacation you know came to an end. We got back to Connecticut and applied for credit card. So I could buy that machine and I was only able to get credit card the four hundred dollar limit so I got another credit card that also had a four hundred dollar limit. Update HER BUCKS. After keeping track and that in combination with my tax return from that year gave me enough money to buy a computer of my own well and my life immediately changed Because all my days were Oh and my two year old time almost two years old he and I making videos. And that's all we did all day every day and you would mostly video him. He was had you know. I was the sole caretaker so he was my partner in crime but he was also my muse in the subject of all of my videos. And that's all we did and he would just go back and plug your camcorder into the computer and de in sort of capture all that film and you had to do that in real time. Then he couldn't it wasn't like a digital capture right. It's like yes it was shooting to take you and moreover the machine only had a ten gigabyte hard drive which held about twelve minutes of video so Out At at one video at a time and I remember our backup by footage to VHS tapes. Who's VHS tapes? Were pretty cheap. I remember then every video every video then guy opened with like the title screen and the title screen was trailer Park Productions and there was a picture of my trailer because we had one car in owns. Mom would take that car to work in the morning so everything was shot within the confines of the Trailer Park. And this was being done. Really just for your own like family archives right like you take videos of your son. And you're Kinda just editing them and then putting them in our guy fell guy. I've I considered these like Academy Award. Winning movies The version of sharing them then or the version of vitality then is I would then take those vhs tapes On my nights off and I would drive to my friend's house to my relatives. House had made them all sit on the couch. Had put the tape in and make sure everybody was quiet and click play and make them watch videos there take VHS. Tapes House now drives the next house That was that was how I found my audience. We're the videos like to describe. I mean because I'm thinking it's like Owen walking next to a duck pond or I mean there's literally a video of Owen next to a duck running in mystic village which was across the street from where we live. There's a duck pond next. Were shot one video. I remember like one of my first big movies. Like the when I was mentally proud of was Owns mom's birthday and like went and filmed the birthday and all this and then like at the end of the video. I jumped off the garage into the swimming pool at her cousin's house in like that was like the grand finale. I made every family member. I had watched that stupid movie and over and over but no I never considered these to be home videos. I consider these to be like these were movies immediately. Then when I would show up by At the restaurant I worked in all I talk about everybody. I worked with us how I am now. A filmmaker that's what I do for a living and washing dishes. What I'm doing now but I'm a filmmaker and I guess it was around that time where I guess you and Robin decide to Split I'm assuming the relationship what wasn't working and and you decide. It was time for change when she and I split. You know it's pretty. I was upset about it and ultimately I just kind of made our Arash decision because I was going into New York to visit my brother then with some degree of frequency in he and his girlfriend. Kinda had this cockamamie plan to like start a movie production a video production company. Great great all be the CEO. And they're like of course. Of course you'll be and the minute that happened. It was not. I'm going to stay in the orchestras. I moving to New York City in a remember during a smoke break in the back like having this conversation with the cooks at the restaurant in the weeks preceding my leaving and I remember them saying them. You know like the great thing about this restaurant is that if you ever want to combat KC can just come right back and pick up wherever you left off. And I looked him in the eye and I was just like I'm never coming back. I'm never coming back. So why don't you just like pack up your life and moved to New York? I'd say that it was probably like two duffle bags and I remember vans girlfriend whose name was Melissa. She was like Casey. Have this sublet like this friend of mine is looking for somebody to live in their couch to help subsidize the rent for the summer. Do you want to do it alone? You the money and house like really and she put up the like fifteen hundred dollars for three months to be on this couch and it was like two hundred Fifty Square Foot. Studio apartment in these village that had been Walls had been put up to make it a two bedroom. And and what did you do for Work So I did temp work at first And ultimately got a job as sort of an artist assistant getting ten dollars an hour but it was exciting second to be around artists who is using his creativity to sort of make a living in a career which something those fascinating to be close to. I'd never seen that before in my life and there was consistency there because he had a lot of work to be done as many hours. I could work. You'd pay me for and I needed. It needed the job because I was taking the train every four days back to Connecticut Where I was staying in my dad's Building of his. He had a an attic that was unused which was used for storage. That's where I would stay with with Owen because I go a week without seeing him was just start to implode so really fear. I like I guess two years in New York. It was whatever you needed to do to go back to Connecticut every few days to spend time with your son. Yeah I mean the first three months in New York City were really separate from the other seventeen and a half years. I spent ended up spending New York City the first three months where a unique Because those first three months were June through September of two thousand one and My sublet was up August. Thirty one two thousand one in. I think I think it was September one. I moved into another friend's house who they're living there for a month and they're like sure he can flop here if you give us a couple hundred bucks. Were moving out. And they lived on Rector Street in the financial district and I moved in with them and I like bought myself another month And then you know. Eleven days later was September eleventh two thousand one and we were hundreds of feet from the base of the World Trade Centers so much so that when the first plane hit I was knocked off the couch and I remember being like just thinking. It was a Canon Lighter whatever reason I remember the scene in Mary poppins the family. That's the subject of the midday. Live down the street from old Ship captain and he fires the cannon every outright in the whole house shape in like in that moment like half asleep half awake. I assumed someone had fired a cannon and I looked out the window and saw paper falling and I thought it was like maybe a promotion where they're like shooting a cannon full of flyers for Free Tacos or something absurd like that and I looked up and saw building on fire and Ultimately I you know I laughed. I ran I got on my bike and was biking away biking north of my brother's apartment and the second plane hit and I you know I remember feeling the heat from the second plane and far off my bike and stuff was falling around me and just kind of terror that Yeah that will never forget. I have had my video camera. My Devi camera in my hand and there's one shower I'm trying to doesn't biking away film. The towers and it crosses over in that crossing over you can see my face. I'm just white But that's really like for me. That's the that's the book mark. Where like my life in New York City began because if ever there's a reason to kind of give up or thrown the towel it's a terrorist attack of such severity that changes the daily life for. I think all Americans but to be so literally so close to it you know I remember my dad called and he just said like a time to come home and I remember Speaking to Owens Mom's friends who puts out when we had nowhere else to stay and they gave me the same sort of line. That's like you'd be crazy to stay there like you. Don't even have a place to stay right now. You don't really have a job what are you. GonNa do And ironically like it was making that decision like I'm not going anywhere that's when things started to turn around for me. That's when I started to find a footing in New York City that had eluded me in the previous three months. What was that footing So it started with finding a place Sort of a mass exodus of of I think people like me that were sort of on that that precipice of surviving or or not in New York City and they a lot of them left and one of those people was a friend of a friend and he had lived in this something called an SRO. Single room occupancy. And it's where you sort of get a room but you don't get a bathroom or kitchen and wasn't much of an apartment but it was a room had a door with a lock on it. That was mine and no matter what I couldn't be kicked out of there. It was mine and that was you know the ground from underneath me going from a liquid to a solid. In the meantime you are still working as an assistant for the artists. But like you had your Amac set up in that little room and you were just taking videos of stuff like around New York all day. Every day Nonstop quarter going out and just shooting stuff anything anything. Every time I'd see something interesting I'd make a video about it and not only that but my proximity to my brother Van for the first time wasn't a hundred miles or three hundred miles but he lived right down the street. So van and spending every waking moment together making videos and We're kind of all over the place and ultimately we landed a real big like a high paying high profile video job to make a birthday video for someone for who so The artist we worked for liked the little videos we made and Wanted his art collectors. Guy Named Tom Healy went to the artist was like you need to make a video for my husband. Fred's Fiftieth Birthday Party. How do I do that? He's a guy that you need to talk to the brothers talk to the brothers and you know. I remember being so nervous speaking to to Mr Healy because he's this like fancy art collector and we were like retarded one hundred dollars or five hundred dollars and and ultimately we landed on five thousand dollars. I've worked for the fences here. Who's the biggest number we can think of? And he didn't bat an eye on it. He was like sharp. Let's do it. It was a huge deal and it was a video and it was a video that you would make his life. You know effectively just wanted a funny video of people saying Happy Birthday Fred. A play on a screen. Atlas Cirque for Fred's fiftieth birthday for five thousand bucks for five thousand bucks. Now that I know what would it cost to have a meal at Lewis Surf? I understand why he didn't bat an eye at the five thousand dollar bill for the videos is probably what he spent on Martinez that night but then he endless a list of people to interview and it was like you know people like President Bill Clinton and the current governor of New York and it was these two high profile individuals. Yeah I mean I remember interviewing Guy Showing up for the interview with President Clinton and this is just a few years after he left office and You know we had a really funny gag. We wanted to do for the video. We had a funny joke. Wanted the president to deliver and we showed up. And we told his handlers. We had this joke absolutely not. We've got a pre approved script. And that's all he'll be reading and we were intimidated. Their secret service men there with guns relations. No problem we understand but then they left us alone in the conference room and we jumped on the On the teleprompter and kind of like reset it turned it off and then when the president came in and sat down. He's out there and I remember him looking left looking right. Kind of looking his handlers. Like being guys. What are we doing here and I turned to him and I was like Mr President. I have a funny idea and he smiled and I was like. Here's what I wanted to say. And he was like sure that sounds hysterical and we hit record and he delivered the joke and it was the standout highlight of the video. That we played at Fred Hochberg Fiftieth Ju- remember what boom had him say? Vividly Guy So Fred Hochberg whose birthday it was. Who was a prominent businessman? His mother is Lillian Vernon of the Lillian Vernon Catalog. Who Sort of the catalog queen of the sixties seventies and eighties So we made the president a t shirt that said Fred. Hochberg turned fifty. And all I got was this lousy t shirt from Lillian Vernon Which is funny because she was a huge campaign contributor of his and when he saw the t shirt in the president just started laughing and he did the joke just as we asked he held up the t shirt and the entire room full of Room full of people there to celebrate burst into laughter and it was a big hit and that was the first that was the first real paid. Gig We ever had but your first GIG was like during a video with Bill Clinton. I mean you must have. You must have thought your minds like Oh my God. I hope he doesn't find out that we're kind of you know amateurs. No that never ever occurred to ever it. Didn't I mean that? Just like the dishwasher. Who was just like doing that as a holdover till they figured out his career we were. We were Oscar Award. Winning world famous filmmakers. The world had never heard confident. You just walk in and you're like okay. This is what you do. Listen to us. No no hesitation at all No I in in the zoom. In in the micro we were just too terrified. Individuals put to zoom out from there. We had this sort of. I could say it was confidence but I think it was far more just arrogance. We were just these arrogant. You know I was twenty. One at the time van was twenty six at the time. Were arrogant kids. Who Thought we knew something that nobody else did when we come back in just a moment how Casey and his brother Van took them momentum turned into a TV show and what happened when that show did not exactly go as planned. Stay with this Guy Rise and you're listening to how I built this from. Npr Hey everyone just quick thanks to two of our sponsors who help make this podcast possible. I two e-trade investing. Your money shouldn't require moving mountains no matter how much or how little experience you have. E-trade makes investing simpler and for a limited time. Get One hundred dollars when you open a new account with just five thousand dollars. It's all about helping your money work hard for you. For more information visit EATRIGHT DOT com slash learn more e-trade securities. Llc member SIPC. Thanks also to better help. Better help is an online counselling service dedicated to connecting you with a licensed counselor to help you overcome whatever stands in the way of your happiness. Fill out a questionnaire and get matched with a professional tailored to your needs. And if you aren't satisfied with your counselor you can request a new one at any time. Free of charge visit better help dot com slash built to get ten percent off your first month. Get the help you deserve with better help. Hi I'm a new summary and I am the new host of NPR's Ted Radio Hour. I am so excited because we are working on. A bunch of new amazing episodes were exploring big ideas about reinvention making amends and the psychological effects of climate change our first show drops March thirteenth. Please join me a welcome back to how I built this Guy Roz. So it's the early two thousands and Casey is starting to make a name for himself in New York after that birthday video with a cameo from Bill Clinton Casey and his brother Van would build a pretty successful business producing videos for art galleries and other clients. The real breakthrough happened. When Casey realized he had an important story to tell about all things he's ipod. This is two thousand and three so the first generation ipod been around for a little while but it was still like the talk of the town. Who was the hottest check there was and I had one? It was giving me as a gift and it costs four hundred dollars so as something way outside of my my price outside of anything I could afford But I had one and the battery died in. It wouldn't hold a charge so I called apple computers. They had like at eight hundred number. That a human answer back in two thousand and three and the person on the other end of the phone explained to me. That apple has a policy does not replace the batteries in their ipods. And I was so offended. I was so upset. I love my ipod Guy. I was so upset that I again thought like that. Fifteen year old kid with a parent saying don't do this or teacher saying not me. Then I was like I need to. I need to vent this so I called them back. My Name's Ryan Maverick. I namely chasing. I said different different operator. Different Tech Support Person. Who said Yeah No? We don't replace the batteries. But you can just buy a new apple visuals in the video are I'd rather van and I running around Manhattan. And this is when they had that ubiquitous ad campaign of the silhouettes dancing brightly colored. They were everywhere and much like you would see a disclaimer. At the bottom of a pack of Marlboro Reds says the cigarettes could be cancer. We spray painted Using a Stencil a disclaimer on the bottom of every one of those posters. That said IPODS replaceable. Battery lasts only eighteen months. And we made a video of just that and This is three years before Youtube. We put it on a splash page. We bought IPODS DIRTY SECRET DOT COM. And we put it on that splash page bottom domino. You budget may name. Yeah right you and then I remember just like very angrily like emailing every single journalist. I could find his email saying like hey take this movie. We made a pretending to be someone else being like. Hey Look at this movie. I found in just trying to get somebody to publish it somewhere. And you know within twenty four hours. It was everywhere to the point where the site was crashing But it did millions and millions of us in the days when to go viral required. Actually emailing somebody. The video are so this gets traction and What happens like? Are you contacted by the media like what? What kind of attention did you get for this? It was a kind of attention that I had never experienced before it was. I remember the Washington Post wrote a huge Article News. The first time I've ever read the word viral video but it was everywhere. It was viral in the in the most literal sense of the word viral everywhere it went to sort of multiplied I remember being back in Connecticut with Little Owen. We were walking around and somebody came up to us and you say hey I I work in energy and I just got back from Saudi Arabia and I saw your face in your video on the news there. You made something about apple and I was like yeah. That's that's me so it was kind of a it was something that I don't think we could've in our wildest dreams ever anticipated at this point by the way what was your primary source of income like were you. Will you still working with with that artist? I was still an assistant I was getting paid very well though. Says running the entire shop running the whole career of this prolific artists and I felt like all of a sudden I was figuring out New York and After ipod thirty secret exploded so many people came to my brother. Van In me saying what else have you don? And we're like are you kidding me. Here's a hundred other movies we've done and that happens enough where people are like. Okay these these guys have something and the opportunities. We got then started to be more and more interesting. I remember one time getting an An offer to direct TV commercial and that sounds. Glamorous Literally was Candy Bar Company. Wanted to test Their Candy Bar Marketing in a very tiny market and they had ten thousand dollars as an all in budget and the minute they green lit that in we got the money I quit my job but like okay. We're we're professional filmmakers now and what was left of the money we spent to get our first studio and it was a tiny sports studio in Chinatown and I remember. We had enough money for one month. And at the end of that month we wouldn't be able to pay anything unless we can figure out how to make money in the next twenty days. So I'm it was the first thing you did to to make that happen. It was a it was a kind of hustling debt. Was able to be furthered by the fact that we didn't. We no longer had day jobs right so van and I just ran at making movies like nothing else. We just one after another after another. We've you know somebody. Gigs were hundreds of dollars in. Some of the gigs were more. But we didn't say no to anything then involved showing up with a camera and the opportunities were all over the place. Everything from like wedding videos to You know being introduced senator. I don't know who the conduit was for this but being introduced so guy named Andy Spade. I interviewed Andy and and his his late wife On Hi bill this Kate You know to very very dear friends of mine and To people I love very very much but at the time I didn't know they weren't invited by and I knew that Kate spade was a handbag company went and saw the CEO. And he's like I like the little videos you guys do. Who like Yes sir? Thank you sir. And he was like you know we're going out to Arizona next week to film To take some photos for our our spring line or whatever it was and he's like if I give you guys a couple box you'd be some money you think you can come with us and make videos and we're like you. Yes we can. Sir of we can serve and We went mid some fashion videos for him and he was he he remains one of the most sort of brilliant marketers In the game and with under his direction I think we made really powerful really smart videos for Kate. Spade handbags and that was kind of validation. That obviously went way further for us than making kind of terrible candy bar commercial and ultimately we were introduced to a guy named Tom. Scott through Andy Spade. Tom Scott was just genius. Entrepreneur founder are anti connectors right. He turned that into a wildly valuable company that he sold and became very wealthy. Because of that and then he built a media company and we went in with him and I remember him being very stoic and sitting in the corner sort of nodding his head advantage is doing our dog and pony show and then he looked at us and he said I want to do something. Big With you guys What would you like to do and cocaine grade and we went away? Something big mean in. I think to this day that what he was he wanted to make a big move with us but we didn't understand that dance. We came back to him. We said look all we really not to make these little videos. We struggle to make them because we spent so much time. Trying to keep the lights on so if you can agree to turn a pair overhead for the next year in that time we will make a mountain of videos and we'll figure out to do with it and our pitch guy m are pitch was no more complicated than that. Well that's all it. We said we'll make videos. Just just pay like basically a retainer that will help us keep keep our company. We never said we'll make videos. We said we'll make videos right talking about it now. He was just like I saw in youtube or kind of spark that you know that identified with and I knew that you were just sort of being held back by lack of resources so if I were to free that up I knew it would take us places and we shook hands and he agreed to finance us and we walked out of there. It was the hugest deal we could have ever imagined and with that support now. What kinds of like. What were you able to do? Did you need money to travel? Did you need money to buy better cameras? Did you didn't spend it on year. I don't know that we would have known what to buy. We're still using movie but basically it was like what's an awesome video. We WanNa make today ran You know like I think a good example of that is I wanted to make a movie with Owen like a real movie with Owen. I was like Oh and let's make a movie together. And he's like okay. Great can you write it and you know? He's eight years old nine years old at the time and he's like yes. I can go. Okay so you WanNa make a movie about a cruise ship wherein gigantic blue monster crushes the ship in kills all the people on board. That sounds totally awesome. And he wrote a movie called the Blue Monster and I went to the beach and I covered myself and blue paint and Seaweed and she had donald that monster and the movie was like a story of my kidding me wanting to make a movie out of the water and he's going to attack the we're going to make the bow outscored board. I remember guy. One of the videos was my girlfriend at the time. Now my wife My girlfriend had time. We're having just wild problems in our relationship and I made a movie that took prior month to make it was called love versus ego. It was my love for her versus like the EGO. That is the fighting that we're the two of us. Were having and how to reconcile that this canvas by future ex girlfriend in the source of all the material. I needed to make this. That was a movie that I was able to make. Because able to sort of indulge. Because we didn't have to worry about payment so billy. Bragg said love is like being on a ride at the fun fair the sort you WanNa get off because it's scary and then as soon as you're off you want to get right back on again. That seemed certainty the exciting get by embracing. Ego John Lennon compared love to a flower. This is still before he had a youtube channel. And just and we're GONNA get there in a bit but I'm just wondering I mean. Were lots of people watching videos in two thousand seven and and no no no no watching it. Well there's no way to watch videos then you know. We had videos on our website that we updated is best we could and there was definitely a little cult following because we put our videos into little film festivals. We made a lot of bicycling videos. They were in the bike film festival in New York City. And at that time certainly still the Pie in the sky was to make feature film. They got into a sundance or something like that. I was still the ultimate destination as a filmmaker right so in that time period. I mean a Masumi. Yoon van are making a bunch of videos and and I guess two thousand eight you you do a deal with. Hbo To like a Big D. Two million dollar deal to pick up. Yeah I mean you're you're jumping ahead a little but let's So Tom Scott are financier He would come visit us every six weeks to see what we had been doing to check in on his investment and I remember the first time he came. We had forty three minutes of little videos. All play at once just back to back to back to back and he looked at it and he was like. I don't know what this is but keep going. And he said the same thing the next month and he said the same thing. The next month in the fourth month he showed up with this woman and he introduced her name was. Christine. Sean and he pulled aside. And he's like look she's a big time movie producer. And that's when it occurred. Was that maybe we had created something that was actually package people and we ended up calling it the night. Step brothers and calling it a TV. Show each episode. We'll show what's going on in our lives through a series of short films but this is not a reality show. I mean it was effectively a youtube blog seven. It was a youtube fog before the words YouTube log existed was sort of accessing. Someone's life in a way that I don't think people had seen overall theme to tie everything together. This is two thousand seven two thousand eight when reality? Tv was the real world was survivor. And was these were these highly produced. Very Glossy Shows that were were calling themselves reality and all the sudden we were making a show. That was our reality but instead of it being told by our producer has been told by us. And that's what that's what. This was an incredible as you. You end up selling it to HBO just a short time later for like two million dollars which which must have been life changing for you. Yeah it was. It was incomprehensible to us. It was You know this is this is when HBO was you know sex in the city. Sopranos six feet under the wire and the nice dot brothers like it. We shot this video on a two hundred dollars. Camera bought at Walmart We edited this an eye movie and it was. It was the most validating feeling. It was so overwhelming and it was a a celebratory time in our tenure as professionals and as brothers That was extraordinary. I think it's about tears for HBO to eventually air and it aired like late at night right. It was sort of like eleven twelve midnight. Something like that. Yes so that That celebratory moment faded very quickly For reasons outside of our control the head of programming at HBO left the company in the days after she bought our show well and they brought new head of programming who understandably had her own mission and that mission did not include our show So they sort of swept under the rug which was really frustrating You know we spent two years Waiting in this is two years after telling everyone on planet earth that we had achieved the impossible and there was no follow up. There was no there was no validating that that Hollywood reporter story that says. Hbo Buys the Nice Stepbrothers. And it was a very humbling but more so frustrating time for us and it was in those two years that van and I made a decision to kind of core separate ways and no longer work together and just just pause for sake by Amin. You guys had this great thing going. I think the most kind of reductive way I can explain. It is like when you have a partner. You have someone to blame all of the failures on someone to attribute all of the successes too and when you are when you combine that understanding with having nothing it it works. 'cause you're in this together but when you combine that with success becomes a far far harder equation to navigate and. I think that we did a very poor job of navigating it. There was tension between the two of you. Oh Yeah I mean. All of a sudden we were these big hotshots. We had money. We had a show that HBO just bought. We do whatever we wanted. And I think that that all of those factors combined yields a very explosive relationship and it just kind of came to a head and we couldn't come to terms with what we wanted to do next her directionally where we wanted to go and ultimately than just kind of made a decision that he wanted to move out west and that's what he did. I stayed in New York and You know he continued to pursue his career as a as a fine artist and filmmaker and I pursued mine. This was around the time. When like coincidentally Youtube started become a thing like a really big thing and I guess it was around two thousand ten or something like that where you like you decide to build your own youtube channel. I I needed a way to identify myself outside of the Nice step brothers. So yeah the the first thing I did was was found. Llc called Casey Istat LLC. And I remember getting a checkbook back said my name on it and then I started a youtube channel and I remember like the first video I put up on the Youtube Channel. Said Casey Nice down at the end of it instead of Nice stepbrothers and it was a very foreign feeling but whether it was the checkbook an LLC or that video the goal was the same which is to again start a career over from what felt like scratch when we come back how Casey reignited his career by crashing his bicycle into every obstacle he could find and later taking a plane to just about every country he could think of. Stay with US guys. And you're listening to how I built this from. Npr Nicole from his very raunchy animated show a net flicks. Big Mouth you the puberty ferry very. I'm the hormone monster. I'm not a fairy. Well now. He's starring as a romantic lead in a movie set at the Olympics actor. Comedian Nick Kroll. Next time on it's been a minute from NPR. Hey welcome back to how I built this. I'm guy rise. So after parting ways with his brother Van Casey Nice. Dat decided to start his own youtube channel to share content. That was kind of similar to what he'd made for the HBO show and his first few videos did okay. They have small following nothing major but pretty much. Everything changed on one day when Casey got a fifty dollar ticket from the NYPD for not riding his bike in the bike lane. Look I wasn't exactly the safest cyclists ticket me for running a red light which I certainly did and was guilty of and ticket me for a myriad offenses but to give a ticket for riding not in the bike lane just felt so Ridiculous and I filmed the eye on the officer on my iphone log on to favor ride. My bike is actually pretty guilty. Oh he'll he didn't care that you're filming him. He was he was thought. It was kind of fun. I think he knew exactly what he was. He was giving me a hard time. It was torrential rain right. He didn't get out of his call out of his patrol car so he stayed dry yell at me through the window and I'm standing there in the very nice very nice very courteous and there's there's even a postscript that is I maintained a friendship with that officer free years after that years. He loved the video so I took that video and my anger once again. Fueled an idea which is why. It's not safe to only riding the bike lanes and I wrote by bicycle so I got a ticket for riding the bike lane but often there obstruction in the most slapstick of ways. I crashed into every obstacle that was blocking the path of the bike lanes. And I mean like you know whether it was a garbage can or a New York City occupied taxicab. I would ride my bike into it at full speed without even blinking and take these huge falls and by the way these were real like you were really doing stuff. Yeah yeah I mean really hard falls? We made that little video. I pull my personal youtube channel and called it Kanai. Sadness started me and not since the ipod movie had I seen kind of reaction. It was everywhere in the difference. Now is that social media was just really starting to pick up And I I shared it as best I could but it didn't need that I don't know who picked it up but it just exploded with a kind of a loss ity that I hadn't seen before because of the maturity of Youtube the maturity of social media the maturity of just kind of online communication versus two thousand three and This time I was prepared this time. I knew exactly what to do that kind of attention which was which was in people get to my youtube challenge. It would also guide done so I worked aggressively to put new fresh content up there. That felt smart and on top of that now brands would see that and they'd be like this is clever stuff that clearly people you know People WanNa see more of and Out of that I built sort of what was my first business post. Nice two brothers post working with my brother and what that business was was making videos on youtube that would garner enough attention enough in interest from the industry. They're within offer me jobs and I'll get a GIG directed and I would take that revenue. That money and reinvest in myself making fun passion videos videos that I made just for mean populate my Youtube Channel with them that would yield more commercials and that worked. You would basically make what you want to make an advertisers would pay up you pay the bills and you could make some money and then you could make whatever you wanted for fun and not worry about having to monetize that. That's right because the advertisers would be excited about the videos that I was making. Wow We'd like how you make videos make those videos for us and I said no to nothing and I was great. Let's do this in It was a lot of kind of jobs that I wasn't necessarily interested in but paid the bills toll. I got a phone call from Nike and there were like we love your videos. Would you come out here and talk to us about a big project? We're thinking of with you now like free trip to Oregon Hell. Yeah I'll come out there then I got to a hotel and hotel and there's a pair of new nikes on the bed and I was like holy smokes. I have made it free sneakers. This is it and they brought me in they had me sign an NDA and they showed me this new product which is essentially like a Nike branded. Fitbit with something called a fuel band and they're like we WANNA push this And we want you to make some videos for it and I came back and I wrote three scripts and they were like great green light. Let's do it. Just send us a budget and it was going to be like athletes and and people doing you know active stuff e- exactly exactly so it was three videos. Were the the first one is going to be like an announcement video and it was just going to be really rough in dark and kind of like bleak aggressive New York City and people running in the cold and it just say like coming soon and we did all that by having the titles be written cra feet around New York City. They loved it and the second video was working with three huge athletes and Nike Athletes Million Dollar Athletes. Kind of thing. And we'd make a video about them like getting after them making it count by using these fitbit's and make it count was the was. The tag was the campaign slogan. Yeah and then it came time to make the third video and third video is meant to show how people around the world make it count This little girl and Peres makes it count every day by walking to school instead of taking the bus This woman makes it count by taking the stairs instead of the elevator in office. That was the pitch and Nike. Liked it but this was about three months into the relationship in. I just decided I didn't WanNa do it. I was exhausted. And there's too much back and forth at Raleigh edits with the previous videos. I had kind of a crazy idea and I called my editor and I said look. We've got the budget Which I've never really disclosed before but this seems like a great place to say guy think our budget was around eighty thousand dollars to make this commercial just as one or all three just this one. This one is were big budget yet and I was called my editor and I said I said. Hey Max you know instead of spending this money on this commercial instead of the CRAN making this commercial. Here's this idea. Let's take all of it and let's go to the airport and let's fly on whatever the next flight out is to whatever destination is is we can find and let's go to that place and soak it up and then go to that airport and fly out from there and let's do this and travel all around the planet everywhere. We've ever wanted to go until we run out of money and will somehow make some sort of video out of that and I did call them it sort of the night our and I said To the executive whose name is Alex. Lopez said Alex. I want to do something really different here. And he said Yeah. I know you're scripts great. Now's ignore wanted to some even different from that and I remember him. Just sort of pausing and then saying look. You just can't screw me over here Casey. I went out on a limb to make this happen and that scared me but I said I understand and he said okay. Just make make it great But please please don't compromise this and I was like I get it and that was it. I didn't tell them what we were doing. Or how doing yet. And maximum jumped on a plane and we just started flying around the world despite or close so far. The trip is also very irresponsible star. I mean that that video I mean I. I've read a lot about it and and read a lot of the way you described it but from what I understand like the idea was. You're gonNA spend about six hours in each country film stuff run back to the airport and catch the next flight to wherever else in degrees outside like whatever the next logical place was to go to. Yeah I mean it was. It was both figuratively literally like wanted to dip our tone the water of all these locations and I remember things like going to Internet cafes searching like biggest waterfall and then sending an email to Mary Beth who has like assistant back in New York City was helping US figure this out very bad. There's a waterfall called. Victoria Falls and it's an Africa and her being like I can get you there but it's GonNa require six flights as being like right over into Hannah's Turkey South Africa right now and each of those six locations. We'd be like okay. We have forty minutes here. We've an hour here. We have three hours here. I remember seeing like at the time. This hotel that opened in Singapore there was a singing swimming pool seemingly floating in the sky and I took a picture of the computer screen in the Internet cafe on my blackberry and I sent that picture to Mary Beth and I said get us here and that's how we did it. It was just sort of this fantasy of where do we want to go next and Needless to say this video became I think the last time I checked had like a thirty million views on YouTube. This is huge and I have to match. That Nike was pretty happy. I mean yeah. I think that that video was so successful online within the advertising community Because it touched piece people in kind of emotional way. Yeah no I remember. Mark Parker was a CEO of Nike at. The time had never met him saying to me that his assistant was playing that video on her computers his receptionist and he walked over wash it over his shoulder when the videos over. He said he shook his head and said. I need to get out more And that every job I had for the next. Several years was companies from all walks of life coming to be being like. Hey can you do for us? What you did for Nike and I mean and that define my career until about two thousand fourteen thousand fifty. It was the only every job I had started with that conversation. Casey you know it's interesting because people who don't know you well but have seen your videos You know they've seen you in your sunglasses like with the mirror lenses and you know They're terrific but somebody could interpret that as like. Oh this guy's such a Broa- writer and I think anyone listening this might think. Is that the same guy and I just wonder what how you think about that like teeth. Are you a different person in those videos? No not necessarily. I think that I'm just very comfortable with picking a part of me in making the video about that part of me so if you take the bike lanes video that part of me there is the wise ass and you take their you know if you take the make it count. That part of me is a curious adventure and if you take him like that seen love love versus ego from my TV show any movies. I made about my now wife for my kids. I'm just sort of a family man. You have like a a a romantic and I think that You know not everybody likes all of my videos and when someone dismisses me based on a perspective that they see that is isolated silent in one video at it's challenging and I think a big part of what I do is not taking any of that personally but understanding that you know if you meet somebody at at a holiday party and maybe you've had one too many drinks going to dismiss you as a maybe a loud mouth and not know that's who you really are and a certain point case you really once you kind of a split within and your way and start to produce videos and then kind of really became known and somebody who sought after by companies and brands To to do stuff with them naturally I mean I imagine that you. Would you start to think about like okay? What's the next step right? Like a really create something a scale sure. So in the years that succeeded the Nike Video. was when my like production company. Casey is to L. C. Where I made videos for brands that really took off and it was exciting but the circular nature of every client as to make them the Nike video caught to a really frustrating place. And you couldn't scale yourself right. I mean it's just you know it was. It was limiting but it was also guys making real money then making making hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. This was more money than I made. Even Post H. B. O. It was legitimate business. I had employees. It was exciting but it. It fizzled out for me very quickly. Because it was I felt like a one trick pony bright and I was seeking. What's next in life and I got a random email to my website and it was from the Sundance Institute which is sort of the nonprofit wing of the Sundance Film Festival. And they said we're doing a program with Mit Media Labs where we pick individuals and give them fellowships at MIT. And we think you'd be a prime candidate for this and I've never jumped at something so much in my life because I never finished high school and while. I think that I've done well enough in my career to to excuse that I've always been insecure. My lack of education so I jumped at it and I said let's do it so I i read that while you were on fellowship at mit you came up this idea for a new social media platform that you called being what what was it. Yes so I mean literally was at this point in time this is when Google glass the eyewear that was a wearable computer was at its peak and I got a pair and I love the fact that capture everything. I was seeing in real time so I wanted to create an APP that effectively. Did that a captured what people we're seeing in tiny little nuggets and then they could share it. This is at a time when instagram filters were exploding. This idea of curing. How you want the world to see you was very new but felt very uncomfortable for me so that was in the other direction where it was purely about exactly what the reality of your of your perspective is and I sat down with my professor A gentleman named subcamp far. Who is a tenured professor at Mit? And I was so nervous the idea and he looked at me and he goes Kissy. Is this a as a project or is this a business? And I don't know why. But WITH ABSOLUTE UNWAVERING CONFIDENCE. I said this is a business. He said okay. Great so you're need some investors. He's are angel investors. You WanNa go to your friends and family anybody you think. Write you a check. And he's like he want to raise a couple hundred thousand dollars here in this alleged. Get Your company started and I was like okay okay. Okay and I'm writing this down word for word. And then He. He looks at me and he goes and Casey and I looked up from the paper and look in the ideas. I'd like to be your first investor. You can put me down for a hundred thousand dollars. It stopped me cold. Wow I'd never really had anybody believe in me like that before. It brings me back to maybe Tom. In two thousand one. Yeah this was what felt stupid idea and this man was willing to write a check. That was more money than my parents had made in any year of their entire life. Not just an idea. It was nothing so I went then to friends and family. Which is what you call. It didn't actually ask any friends or family. I asked all the rich people I knew. I didn't want to ask anybody who have to later in life answer to because I lost their money and ultimately I raised just under half a million bucks so at the same time around the same time raises money and presumably. You're you've got the money. Now you've got to create the company and you've got to find the talent and build this thing but at the same time like from what. I understand in around like March of two thousand fifteen You decide to put a video of every single day under youtube channel. You're going to do daily WLAC. Which sounds kind of insane like an insane amount of work. Yeah yeah I left. Mit All I had was my idea and this money and I thought about it and I thought you know I need to really go hard on youtube to get my audience engaged so I tell them about this product that they'll they'll be there for me and I came up with this idea then to make a video every day and every day share sort of a m a story from my life and I thought I would do it for a week or two weeks and that's exactly what I did but two weeks came up and I had one more idea and three weeks came up and I had one more idea and all the while my audience going from one hundred thousand views to two hundred thousand views to five hundred thousand views to eight hundred thousand views and my youtube channel. That took me six years seven years at the time to get from zero subscribers to four hundred thousand subscribers All the sudden every night. Wake up and there'd be ten thousand twenty thousand new subscribers and I had never seen anything like it and I remember about two weeks into that I walked outside of my office and there are three girls standing there saying. Can we get a Selfie with you and no one in my life had ever asked herself you before I never heard those words just kept going and kept going and kept going and by the time we were ready to launch the APP. That summer The audience I headed mass was huge. And it's a parallel. We did didn't interview with Emily. Weiss who started a glossier and She started as a blogger and when and overtime just gained so many followers and readers who were sort of saying. Where's your like we? We want something from you. It was sort of a sort of made sense. You know for her to an when she released her her line of products she had all these devoted loyal readers and again that wasn't her plan. But it's similar story like you had spent all of this time working on content that people liked and you amassed this massive following so it only made sense at least the way I see it for you to build a product to to create something that people could could use or could you could turn into a business. Yeah that's right and I. I think that sort of the the critics were quick to say that you know the the Mas doing this daily show attention market. But what would be wrong with that? I don't get even if you were doing that. Like that's called marketing. Like what would have been wrong with that. Yeah I mean. I don't think you're wrong but I I my response that it's like yeah. The totally the reason why I started this daily show is to talk about my my tech company. Like that's totally the truth but got boring fast. I made it about me because that's something much more comfortable talking about it on a life of its own but the symbiosis between my Tech Company in my daily Youtube show was totally apparent and end totally deliberate. That's something I'm very very proud of that. You know my I I still to this day written a line code and I was very insecure within my own company You Know Matt My my business partner is so wildly talented not just writing code and building products but managing teams and things like that his confidence in his skill set. Which is just to this day. All own never stopped being impressed with what he's capable of It made me feel insecure. Because to me it highlighted. Just how little I had to offer to my own company until it came time to communicate the company and then I was able to lean into what felt like my unique skill set for the betterment of of this company but it sounds like you still felt a little bit. I don't know I say this very gently because I feel this way even after twenty three years of doing what I do but like Like an imposter. A little bit guy. I literally walked out of my Therapist this morning in came to the NPR studio to record this with you. And I that's talking about is just this idea of of the impostor syndrome and that's something. I still feel like this day brown but I also am very quick to acknowledge that I think that is by far my greatest asset If I knew then what I know now about what it means to start a tech company. I wouldn't not only not done it. I would have run as far away from that idea. I possibly could've right. It was not knowing and this has been true my entire career. You know what my entire life professionally and personally. If I had known the right way to do things I would have never done them. Yeah so you you launch this APP in Twenty fifteen and this thing was gonna. It was going to allow people to kind of shoot little snippet videos of things they saw in the world. I'm had it had had the launch go launched the APP and it was. It was a very successful launch in terms of downloads. And it went gangbusters. People were very excited about the APP And I have to say it was really fun. It was a really fun product to us but he struggled. I think that the idea and the marketing or always better than the product that we're able to build and at the time snapchat stories had just kind of come out to be honest with you. I was a huge fan of snapchat stories in the more I use it. The more I realized They did what I want to do but they just did it. Way Patter and You know they were being really successful. And we're sort of stagnating and we built a number of different versions of our APP and there were moments of really like spikes in growth and downloads and engagement. And then moments were sort of trickle off and right that went up and down for a long time and There was just a tremendous amount of uncertainty. And I got very very scared. What were you scared over you? Scared of nausea was. It was only one thing was only one thing and that was Letting down the people who I felt invested in me right and then I was terrified for my employees We never missed payroll but I remember. We got to a point where a runway was getting shorter. I felt like we were just sort of getting our butts kicked. I think within a short period time right like many months you so you you guys sold it you sold it to CNN. What what was the reason you did that? I mean reportedly for twenty million dollars which is a lot but presumably could kept it going and scale that more and maybe sold for a Billion I. I don't know who knows what was I thinking at that time When I met with Jeff Zucker and I met with the folks at CNN and they expressed to me how they wanted to leverage the technology that we had built in how they wanted to further the ideas that we had incubated and Some of their intentions. It was such an ex wildly exciting opportunity. I mean you could. You could essentially imagine not only pay back your investors with a bit of a return Pay You could make a little bit of money yourself and And then you also have the backing of one of the biggest news organizations in the world and endless resources presumably and and and they're influencing could really scale the so so that was it was. It was all those things it was to me it. Was You know I obviously excited about the financial opportunities of building a company like this? But I wasn't. That was not a a a real motivating factor. Because like I said in years prior I was making real money directing videos and the funny thing about money at least for me is that like I always wanted to be really rich and have private planes and drive fancy cars and things like that but the reality is the moment in my career that I got to a place where I didn't have to worry about paying for food or covering rent. I stopped really being motivated by money. minute. I knew that I could pay for college for Owen. Was the minute that I just. You know it's it's like what a stupid thing to focus on his money and I didn't want to be an executive was the ITA Shen that was exciting for me Set My mit professor. He characterize it as I'm really good at being the second man in a bobsled team which means I get really excited and I can push really really really hard. But the second launch is out of the gates. I just sort of jump in and I'm like okay. What now and that's what it felt like in the idea that a CNN with all their myriad resources could help us fl. Zoom down that and win. The BOB sled race was felt fantastic. I you know in reading about the story. it's what's interesting is that the CNN shuts down. You know not not too long after they acquired him and But I think the quotes that read from you're like you know. Hey they left us alone. They let us do whatever we wanted. They've been great and even the CNN quotes. Were like listen? We took a risk really. We took this risk. It was a smart risk to take. It didn't work out and we're all friends like it. I mean it sounds almost two to be true that everybody was sort of. I kind of walked away from that. Saying all right you know we tried. It didn't work and it's fine. I look I to this day. It's still kind of Strikes me like I remember vividly Meeting with Jeff Zucker the day before it's announced publicly and going into his office in him like giving me the same sort of. Hello Casey that he'd always given me and we shook hands and chatting bet and he's like look if I could do it over again. I'd do the same thing. Did you know by the way going into his office that he was going to be shut down? I did if you look at a company like that and this is my understanding if you look at a company like that. They need to see real growth. They need to see a real trajectory for success. Many to see a fast and I think that I don't think we'd grabble to deliver on that did you. Did you walk away from that relationship financially? Set for life? Could you stop working probably? Yeah I think that if we didn't live in New York City or Los Angeles that would probably be the case I can tell you that in the terms that I think of which is can I can. I now give my children the lifestyle that I've always wanted to give them the answer. Yes and When I look kit the things that I have. It's not like such a cool car the the necklace making my wife or anything like that but the idea that you know my my kids are like graduate college this year with no debt. Right that to me. Is You know that's the train. I mean a kid who was born when his dad was seventeen years old right. I mean it's kind of amazing that you were able to do that. Yeah I mean I. Don't I think how I think it said it's amazing suit? He was able to do that. Yeah I mean as I said to you earlier in this interview all the odds were against you like that. The statistics were against you when he was born. Yeah but you know like then even now I I i. I don't know that I've ever looked at any aspect of my own life within those terms. There's like a great steve jobs quote that's like realize the life the world around you was created by people that are no smarter than yourself and and he has something sort of poetic about challenging. That and I think that my frustration than life is a very very very young kid. I only ever interpreted those as these people around me. They don't understand things the way that I understand things. They don't see things the way that I see things. And therefore they're what they're saying their criticisms of of my my values are invalid because of that so to say. Statistically that a teenager shouldn't be able to raise a child who that is a contributing member of society in a positive way. I think that that is I. Don't subscribe to that. I I call bs on that and I say that. No that's not true You just got it you just do it and I think that you say you can't start. Tech Company to You. Have a tenth Grade Education. Is You know and if you say you can't go to mit because you you know you get a D. minus In your last semester of school at age fifteen say no. That's not that's not true and you know I I guess I apply that to every facet of my wife keeps you when you when you think about. You know the trajectory of your life right and all. That's happened right in between like from you know dropping high school and having a kid seventeen you know washing dishes and struggling and yell in in your twenties and then building this incredible career having twelve million people follow you on on Youtube and and you know become financially successful. You know as a filmmaker. How much of that do you tribute to? How hard you worked. And how much just because you're lucky? It's ninety nine percent lock and beyond just being wildly fortunate. I'm wildly privileged. I may not have done well in school but I had. I was offered in education at a young age. My parents didn't have much but I was never hungry. That did not come from an abusive household. I I'm wildly privileged individual. I always say that like I. Wa- I was born with a winning lotto ticket in my hand. All I had do cash it in and that cashing it in is hard work like. That's what that meant to cash. 'em was hard work and I did my part but I could never done my part without first winning the Lotto on life. I'm not naive to any of that. I didn't ask to be born in the United States of America. I didn't ask to be as lucky as I am. But I'm not ever lost on me every day. Remind myself of that and I I have a debt in that debt can only be paid the. Oh hard work. That's Casey Nice debt. Since leaving Beam Casey has gone back to making videos for fun and some brands in fact just days before he taped this interview. Casey made a video for Eddie. Hod Airlines called the most expensive plane ticket in the world. And if you remember that video he made about his girlfriend candice love versus Ego. Well Kenniston Casey are now married. They have two daughters together and they also have a podcast. It's called couples therapy with Kansas. Casey please do stick around because in just a moment. We're going to hear from you about the things your building but first a quick message from our sponsor flow space a logistics platform for startups and fortune. Five hundred companies to store manage and fulfill their inventory all on a network of over eight thousand warehouses and fulfillment centers visit flow dot space slash NPR by this Felix contreras from NPR. Musics or Latino podcast as part of our black history month coverage we take a look at the Afro Latin roots of reggae tone and its rise over the last decade to become one of the most listened to musical genres planet to check it out. Download Latino from wherever you get your podcast. Hey thanks so much for sticking around because it's time now for how you built that and they story starts with PAT early and PAT lives way out in the countryside on a four acre homestead read outside of Cleland Washington. We live in between cleal and ELLENSBURG. This is a place. O- off the grid that it's got its own well and septic thing so you have to be careful with what you put down into a septic system because if you put the wrong materials down there then it has troubled decomposing anyway on his homestead out in the country. Pat does not have the luxury of garbage disposal which means all the food from his family meals. All those little pieces of rice and Spaghetti. They started get piled up in the little stranger in the sink when the basket filled up then the the whole sink would clog up right and you would have to be fishing through murky water getting stabbed by knives things like that and it was just kind of. Iraq. Brinkley who among us has not been there right. You know try to pull the muck out of the sink trainer just to the water will drain anyway. One day PAT just put his foot down and I vowed never to have to do that again. And just fifteen minutes later. Pat started to come up with a design for a sinks trainer. That would not clog so I wanted to make the design such that water could still drain around the sides of it. Also we could make a stem. That's taller than the basket is deep so when the baskets totally full of cried the water is still draining through the stem. That's actually a pretty handy guy. So he went on Youtube to teach himself how to use design software so he can make his first prototypes but when it came to calling around to get it made. He realized he didn't know any of the industry lingo. I definitely had to almost practice saying these words because if you WANNA manufacturer to take you seriously. You can't sound like a total idiot and PAT had to learn a lot of newer eighty-three polishing over mold. Step file about one month and one totally failed. Prototypes later grooming. That was a weird one had had finally designed trainer that set snugly in the thing and allow water to drain through the sides and through a hollow stem in the middle and then last March. It was like Christmas Day. I was waiting for it to come and took it out of the packaging. Plopped it into the sink and it just fit perfectly. I spent probably three hours trying to clog it. He's not kidding to test. The new trainer patches started throwing food into it so I go rifling through our pantry and I'd find some oats smells like Oh yeah that was definitely clogged drains. And I would don't as much as I could in there until everything was full except for the stem in it would still drain and I'd say great now would dump it out and then I found old mason jar of soup and the fridge in dump that down and no matter what patch put into trainer. It did not clock and I just looked at my wife and I said this is it. This is GonNa work. After making a few more tweaks pat found a partner to help with business end of things and the order. Ten thousand trainers from manufacturer in New Jersey and they've already sold six thousand of them on Amazon and other websites they call the products drips. It's the little things that we use every day that we don't think about that really affect our lives you know so. It's not necessarily that you have to you know. Take the first man to the moon or build rocket ships. Sometimes it's just building something that works better than anything else. That's already out there. If you want to find out more about drippy or hear previous episodes head to our podcast page how I built this that. Npr DOT ORG. Of course if you WANNA tell us your story go to build dot NPR dot org and thanks so much for listening to this show. This week you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. And while you're there please do give us a review you can also write to us at H. I. B. T. at NPR DOT org. And if you WANNA send a tweet. It'S AT COW. I built this or at Cairo's our show is produced this week by Rachel. Faulkner and Sequoia Carrillo with music composed by routine Arab. Louis thanks also to Candice Limb Julia Carney Neva Grant Jeff. Rodgers our intern. It's rainy toll guy rise and you've been listening to how I built this This is NPR.

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