6 Burst results for "Ben Weisner"

"ben weisner" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

08:43 min | 8 months ago

"ben weisner" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Too late The British court's ruling comes as the Biden administration's hosting a global summit for democracy where Secretary of State Antony Blinken announced U.S. efforts to support independent journalism and reporters targeted for their work We're asking governments to make concrete commitments to strengthen free independent media and help tackle the diverse challenges that they face We're increasing protection for the free press here at home In July the Department of Justice adopted a new policy to stop using subpoenas warrants and other investigative powers to obtain notes work products or other information from journalists engaged in news gathering activities For more we're joined by Gabriel shipton who is Julian Assange's brother and a filmmaker And Ben wisner director of the ACLU's speech privacy and technology project those are the legal adviser to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden We welcome you both back to democracy now Jeff let's begin Ben wisner Let's begin with you Your response to the ruling by the high court in Britain Well obviously anything that brings Julian Assange one step closer to a courtroom in the United States is a terrible step But it's important to note that only one issue was at stake in the appeal today And that was the judge's earlier ruling that Julian Assange should not be extradited because of the oppressive conditions of confinement that he would be exposed to that would present a suicide risk What was not a stake in this appeal is the much more significant legal issue for global press freedom And that is can charges under the U.S. espionage act result in the extradition of a foreign publisher for publishing truthful information And this is the issue that really journalists around the world should be watching more closely And journalists in the United States in particular should be a lot louder about Because whatever they may think about WikiLeaks and however they may want to choose to find themselves in contrast to wiki weeks This is a precedent that is going to affect every investigative journalist in the United States And let me get the response of Gabriel shrimpton You are Julian Assange's brother you're a filmmaker We've had you on before with your father talking about this case Your response to this breaking news that Julian Assange could be now sent to the United States There are still a few other legal steps that have to happen I don't think we can ignore any longer that we can rely on the British courts to stop this to stop this extradition The charges against Julian need to be need to be dropped by the Biden administration and the Merrick Garland DoJ here in the U.S. Julian he's been 11 years since he was first arrested in the UK this is going to be his third Christmas in belmarsh maximum security prison He's only been held in Belmont at the request of the U.S. DoJ He is not serving a sentence the DoJ has the requesting that bail is not given to Julian So really what needs to happen now is the Biden administration needs to drop these charges and let Julie and go Can you talk about the 5 appeal points that were heard in this case How Julian is right now in Britain And what you think would happen if you were brought to the United States Well I think the appeal the appeal was approved on based on the assurances given by the U.S. these assurances have been found Amnesty International has said they're not worth the paper they're printed on If he's extradited here I'm sure he can't guarantee his safety in the U.S. prison system He will likely die here If not beforehand So that's really we live in fear of that happening to Julian And as I said it's his Christmas in Bill much prison now The conditions there they're not good there either He should be at home with his family He's just he's being crushed basically And so it's hard to it's hard to it's hard to put into words really what we're seeing happening to Julian He's so strong and so resilient But this whole process has really taken taken its toll on him Oh go ahead So the next stage so Julian has now two weeks to appeal this decision The high court has ordered the magistrate's court to approve the extradition and send it to Patel to approve So Julian has two weeks to appeal his decision and we're going to keep fighting We're going to appeal And there is also across appeal in the works which will appeal all the substantive press freedom issues as well I mean I'm looking at the Amnesty statement I Gabriel and it says they say we guarantee that he won't be held in a maximum security facility and he will not be subjected to special administrative measures are called Sam's And he will get healthcare But if he does something we don't like we reserve the right to not guarantee him We reserve the right to put him in a maximum security facility Gabriel Yeah that's right And these are the person who makes these decisions is the director of the CIA And so in September we saw an expose by Yahoo news investigative journalists that found there were plots within the CIA to kidnap to murder Julian So really what he's been his health and well-being and his been putting the hands of these people who had plots to murder and kidnap him So these assurances like I said they're not worth the paper they're printed on They're not assurances at all And I think you can see what's happened with whistleblower Daniel Hale He's been put in what's called CMU Communication management unit which is almost worse than ADX Florence So there's all these options that they have that the prison system has at their disposal to restrict Julian's communication to restrict his ability to communicate with other people in the prison and just really to grind him down To dance basically Ben weisner we're about to play the Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech of Maria essa She and the Russian journalist Morocco got their awards today as the Nobel committee in Oslo talked about celebrating freedom of expression Your deeply concerned about this issue with Julian Assange is he the first publisher to face espionage charges like this in the United States And what are the plans ACLU has signed on to letters what are the campaigns planned right now as this process moves forward And if you could specifically address what Julian released this whole issue of the Afghan war logs the Iraq War logs and decades of State Department communiques and memos what this information has meant for journalism in the United States for the United States and the world talking about what happens on the ground in war So that's a lot but I'll do my best Amy first of all yes This is the first time in the 100 year ignominious history of the U.S. espionage act which was passed during an earlier red scare That someone has been prosecuted with felony charges for publishing truthful information We've never seen a case like this This was a Rubicon that we didn't want to see crossed The Obama administration considered making Julian Assange the first person charged can mean to criminal grand jury but at the end cooler heads prevailed And they realized that there was simply no way to distinguish the conduct that they would have to charge in this case from what investigative journalists at The New York Times The Washington Post The New Yorker due on a daily basis And let's remember this case involves disclosures from 2010 2011 that Chelsea Manning was convicted for providing to WikiLeaks This was not something that WikiLeaks published on its.

Julian Assange U.S. Biden administration Julian Ben wisner DoJ British court Secretary of State Antony Blin Gabriel shipton Edward Snowden Jeff let Gabriel shrimpton Merrick Garland DoJ belmarsh ACLU Britain NSA high court WikiLeaks Gabriel
"ben weisner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"ben weisner" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR's Tom Goldman reports with 12 teams in action. The NFL dubbed what's normally called Wild Card Weekend Super Wild card weekend, and it was especially so for the long suffering Cleveland Browns Last night. They won their first playoff game since 1994. Another turnover by the Steelers veteran Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger threw four interceptions. Brown's piled on the points in a drought snapping 48 to 37 win, running off the field. Cradling the game ball. Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield couldn't resist this browses the boat The Browns is the Browns is how Pittsburgh receiver Juju Smith Shuster had dismissed the NFL's kick Me team before the game. But Cleveland is now the kick earn out the kicky. And a team proud of how it dealt with a number of positive coronavirus cases. Head coach Kevin's to Fan ski had to watch the game from his basement in Cleveland. The Browns had to use several replacement players last night, including an offensive lineman charged with protecting Mayfield, who may feel that never met before the resilience and the next minute mentality that we've been talking about the whole season, and for some of these guys that won't even hear what we were talking about it, it permeates the old team, notably absent from this year's Playoffs six times Super Bowl winning head coach Bill Belichick of the New England Patriots. The paths and Belichick missed the playoffs for the first time in 12 years, but he still made news late today, he announced he will not accept the presidential Medal of Freedom from Donald Trump and award that was scheduled for this week. Balance check has been a long time friend and supporter of Trump's, But he cited quote The tragic events of last week in making his decision, Belichick said in a statement. Above all, I am an American citizen with great reverence for our nation's values, Freedom and democracy. Tom Goldman NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. People talk a lot about Big Tech and certainly the past few days show just how powerful these companies are. First, Twitter and Facebook suspended President Trump's access to his biggest online megaphones. Then Apple, Google and Amazon cut off parlor, a social media site popular with Trump supporters and joining us now to unpack. All of this is NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. All right, so we should first know that Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are all among NPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon, what do you think He's pretty aggressive moves. Tell us about Silicon Valley right now. Also, you know when Facebook and Twitter cut off President Trump it really put the spotlight on something I think we've known for a long time. But I just seeing so starkly, Which is how much power these big tech companies wield because we conduct so much of our lives online. So there were the examples you mentioned but also others that go beyond the question of speech really, to the bottom line. Stripe in papal cut off the ability of the president's campaign and his supporters to raise money and take payments. The e commerce companies, Shopify shut down an online shop connected to Trump that sold merchandise like Make America Great again. Hats and another shop owned by the Trump Organization that sold things like golf accessories and So these decisions they're raising some really big questions. What are some of those questions? Maybe the biggest one is all about access. So Amazon Apple Google. They have a lot of power over kind of what we think of more of the infrastructure of the Internet. In Apple and Google's cases, they you know, they decide what APS can go into the APP stores. So They decided this weekend to block parlor, the alternative social media site that Trump supporters had flocked to And that means it's much harder to get parlor on your smartphone, which is, of course, where most people use Social media, and then even more significantly, Amazon kicked parlor off its Web hosting service, so it's gone dark. You can't access it all today. Parlor sued Amazon. Basically, you know, we're really realizing seeing very tangibly just how much power Big tech has to decide which companies which brands which businesses can effectively exist online, Okay, sure. That is a lot of power. But isn't all of this bound to put these companies even under more scrutiny going forward? Yeah, I think that's absolutely fair. And I spoke with Ben Weisner at the American Civil Liberties Union piece of the same thing. He's really concerned about these individual companies. Power. Here's what he told me. And it may be that by exercising their right their constitutional right to decide who can use their products right now they're going to bring a different kind of regulatory focus down on them about whether we should have let these companies get this big in the first place. So you know, this isn't gonna go away. Also. I mean, remember these companies they're already under a lot of scrutiny. Facebook and Google are facing any trust investigations. Now we have Congress promising new investigations here, so I think the spotlight just continues. Well, I mean, turning to President Trump. He got off. He got cut off from Twitter and Facebook now parlor. It was a momentary alternative, but that's gone. For now, Where will trump go? You think that is the big question? There are plenty of upstarts sites that want him. He might even start his own outlet. I think, Elsa, it's safe to assume he's not getting off of the Internet for good. I think that is safe. That's NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon..

President Trump Facebook Amazon Cleveland Browns Google NPR Shannon Bond Trump Bill Belichick Twitter Apple Trump Organization NFL president Tom Goldman Steelers Cleveland Ben Roethlisberger
"ben weisner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"ben weisner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR's Tom Goldman reports with 12 teams in action, the NFL dubbed what's normally called Wild Card Weekend Super Wild Card weekend. It was especially so for the long suffering Cleveland Browns last night. They won their first playoff game since 1994. Another turnover by the Steelers veteran Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger threw four interceptions. Brown's piled on the points in a drought snapping 48 to 37 win running off the field. Cradling the game ball. Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield couldn't resist this house is the boat The Browns is the Browns is how Pittsburgh receiver Juju Smith Shuster had dismissed the NFL's kick Me team before the game. But Cleveland is now the kick urn of the kicky and a team proud of how it dealt with a number of positive coronavirus cases. Head coach Kevin Stefanski had to watch the game from his basement in Cleveland. Brown's had to use several replacement players last night, including an offensive lineman charged with protecting Mayfield, who may feel that never met before the resilience and the next minute mentality that we've been talking about the whole season and for some of these guys that or even hear what we were talking about it, it permeates the whole team, notably absent from this year's playoffs, six times Super Bowl winning head coach Bill Belichick of the New England Patriots. Paths, and Belichick missed the playoffs for the first time in 12 years, but he still made news late today, he announced he will not accept the presidential Medal of Freedom from Donald Trump and award that was scheduled for this week. Balance check has been a long time friend and supporter of Trump's, But he cited quote the tragic events of last week in making his decision, Belichick said in a statement. Above all, I am an American citizen with great reverence for our nation's values, Freedom and democracy. Tom Goldman NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. People talk a lot about Big Tech and certainly the past few days show just how powerful these companies are. First, Twitter and Facebook suspended President Trump's access to his biggest online megaphones. Then Apple, Google and Amazon cut off parlor, a social media site popular with Trump supporters. And joining us now to unpack. All of this is NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. All right, so we should first know that Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are all among NPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon, what do you think He's pretty aggressive moves. Tell us about Silicon Valley right now. Also, you know when Facebook and Twitter cut off President Trump it really put the spotlight on something I think we've known for a long time. But I just seeing so starkly, Which is how much power these big tech companies build because we conduct so much of our lives online. So there were the examples you mentioned. But also others that go beyond the question of speech really, to the bottom line stripe and papal cut off the ability of the president's campaign and his supporters to raise money and take payments. The e commerce companies, Shopify shut down an online shop connected to Trump that sold merchandise like Make America Great again. Hats in another shop, owned by the Trump Organization that sold things like golf accessories and These decisions. They're raising some really big questions. What are some of those questions? Maybe the biggest one is all about access. So Amazon Apple Google. They have a lot of power over kind of what we think of more of the infrastructure of the Internet. In Apple and Google's cases, they you know, they decide what APS can go into the APP stores. So They decided this weekend to block parlor, the alternative social media site that Trump supporters have flocked to and that means it's much harder to get parlor on your smartphone, which is, of course, where most people use Social media, and then even more significantly, Amazon kicks parlor off its Web hosting service, so it's gone dark. You can't access it all today. Parlor sued Amazon. And basically, you know, we're really realizing seeing very tangibly Just how much power Big tech has to decide which companies which brands which businesses can effectively exist online, Okay, sure. That is a lot of power. But isn't all of this bound to But these companies even under more scrutiny going forward, Yeah, I think that's absolutely fair, and I spoke with Ben Weisner at the American Civil Liberties Union piece of the same thing. He's really concerned about these individual companies. Power. Here's what he told me. And it may be that by exercising their right their constitutional right to decide who can use their products right now they're going to bring a different kind of regulatory focus down on now about whether we should have let these companies get this big in the first place. So you know, this isn't gonna go away else. I mean, remember these companies they're already under a lot of scrutiny. Facebook and Google are facing any trust investigations. Now we have Congress promising new investigations here, so I think the spotlight just continues. Well, I mean, turning to President Trump. He got off. He got cut off from Twitter and Facebook now parlor. It was a momentary alternative, but that's gone. For now, Where will trump go? You think that is the big question? There are plenty of upstarts sites that want him. He might even start his own outlet. I think, Elsa, it's safe to assume he's not getting off of the Internet for good. I think that is safe. That's NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon. Thanks.

President Trump Facebook Amazon Google NPR Shannon Bond Browns Trump Twitter Apple Cleveland Trump Organization president Bill Belichick NFL Tom Goldman Brown Steelers
"ben weisner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"ben weisner" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news And you're listening to all things considered from NPR news. People talk a lot about Big Tech and certainly the past few days show just how powerful these companies are. First, Twitter and Facebook suspended President Trump's access to his biggest online megaphones. Then Apple, Google and Amazon cut off parlor, a social media site popular with Trump supporters and joining us now to unpack. All of this is NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. All right, so we should first know that Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are all among NPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon, what do you think He's pretty aggressive moves. Tell us about Silicon Valley right now. Also, you know when Facebook and Twitter cut off President Trump it really put the spotlight on something. I think we've known for a long time but are just seeing so starkly, Which is how much power these big tech companies wheeled because we conduct so much of our lives online. So there were the examples you mentioned but also others that go beyond the question of speech really, to the bottom line. Stripe and papal cut off the ability of the president's campaign and his supporters to raise money and take payments. The e commerce companies, Shopify shut down an online shop connected to the Trump that sold merchandise like Make America Great Again. Hats in another shop, owned by the Trump Organization that sold things like golf accessories and These decisions. They're raising some really big questions. What are some of those questions? Maybe the biggest one is all about access. So Amazon Apple Google. They have a lot of power over kind of what we think of more of the infrastructure of the Internet. In Apple and Google's cases, they you know, they decide what APS can go into the APP stores. So they decided this weekend to block parlor, the alternative social media site that Trump supporters had flocked to And that means it's much harder to get parlor on your smartphone, which is, of course, where most people use Social media, and then even more significantly, Amazon kicked parlor off its Web hosting service, so it's gone dark. You can't access it all today. Parlor sued Amazon. And basically, you know, we're really realizing seeing very tangibly Just how much power Big tech has to decide which companies which brands which businesses can effectively exist online, Okay, sure. That is a lot of power. But isn't all of this bound to But these companies even under more scrutiny going forward, Yeah, I think that's absolutely fair, and I spoke with Ben Weisner at the American Civil Liberties Union piece of the same thing. He's really concerned about these individual companies. Power. Here's what he told me. And it may be that by exercising their right their constitutional right to decide who can use their products right now they're going to bring a different kind of regulatory focus down. Not now, about whether we should have let these companies get this big in the first place. So you know, this isn't gonna go away else. I mean, remember these companies they're already under a lot of scrutiny. Facebook and Google are facing any trust investigations. Now we have Congress promising new investigations here, so I think the spotlight just continues. Well, I mean, turning to President Trump. He got off. He got cut off from Twitter and Facebook now parlor. It was a momentary alternative, but that's gone. Now, where will trump go? You think that is the big question? There are plenty of upstarts sites that want him. He might even start his own outlet. I think Elsa, it's safe to assume he's not getting off of the Internet for good. I think that is safe. That's NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon. Thanks for having me. Support for all Tech considered comes from c three c three dot ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot ai And from it, Lassie in makers of collaboration software like Kira and Trail.

President Trump Shannon Bond Facebook Ben Weisner Google Amazon NPR Trump Organization Twitter Apple Trump president Silicon Valley Elsa American Civil Liberties Union Stripe Kira
"ben weisner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"ben weisner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pandemic was part of the narrative, too. NPR's Tom Goldman reports with 12 teams in action. The NFL dubbed what's normally called Wild Card Weekend Super Wild card weekend, and it was especially so for the long suffering Cleveland Browns Last night. They won their first playoff game since 1994. Another turnover by the Steelers veteran Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger threw four interceptions. Brown's piled on the points in a drought snapping 48 to 37 win running off the field. Cradling the game ball. Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield couldn't resist this house is the boat The Browns is the Browns is how Pittsburgh receiver Juju Smith Shuster had dismissed the NFL's kick Me team before the game. But Cleveland is now the kick urn of the kicky and a team proud of how it dealt with a number of positive coronavirus cases. Head coach Kevin Stefanski had to watch the game from his basement in Cleveland. The Browns had to use several replacement players last night, including an offensive lineman charged with protecting Mayfield, who may feel that never met before the Brazilians and the next minute mentality that we've been talking about the whole season and for some of these guys that or even hear what we were Talking about it. It permeates the gold team. Elsewhere. New Orleans BEACH, Chicago, setting up a match up next weekend of senior Citizen Hall of Fame bound quarterbacks. The Saints drew Brees, who turns 42 this week against Tampa Bay's 43 year old Tom Brady. Brady, the former New England superstar lead Tampa to a win over Washington, his first playoff victory without his longtime Patriots head coach Bill Belichick on the sideline. Not sure how much solace it is. But Bella check who missed the playoffs for the first time in 12 years reportedly will receive the presidential Medal of Freedom this week from Donald Trump. Tom Goldman. NPR news And you're listening to all things considered from NPR news. People talk a lot about Big Tech and certainly the past few days show just how powerful these companies are. First, Twitter and Facebook suspended President Trump's access to his biggest online megaphones. Then Apple, Google and Amazon cut off parlor, a social media site popular with Trump supporters and joining us now to unpack. All of this is NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. All right, so we should first know that Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are all among NPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon, what do you think He's pretty aggressive moves. Tell us about Silicon Valley right now. Also, you know when Facebook and Twitter cut off President Trump it really put the spotlight on something I think we've known for a long time. But I just seeing so starkly, Which is how much power these big tech companies wield because we conduct so much of our lives online. So there were the examples you mentioned. But also others that go beyond the question of speech really, to the bottom line stripe and papal cut off the ability of the president's campaign and his supporters to raise money and take payments. The e commerce companies, Shopify shut down an online shop connected to Trump that sold merchandise like Make America Great again. Hats and another shop owned by the Trump Organization that sold things like golf accessories and So these decisions they're raising some really big questions. What are some of those questions? Well, maybe the biggest one is all about access. So Amazon Apple Google. They have a lot of power over kind of what we think of more of the infrastructure of the Internet. In Apple and Google's cases, they you know, they decide what APS can go into the APP stores. So They decided this weekend to block parlor, the alternative social media site that Trump supporters had flocked to And that means it's much harder to get parlor on your smartphone, which is, of course, where most people use Social media, and then even more significantly, Amazon kicks parlor off its Web hosting service, so it's gone dark. You can't access it all today. Parlor sued Amazon. And basically, you know, we're really realizing seeing very tangibly Just how much power Big tech has to decide which companies which brands which businesses can effectively exist online, Okay, sure. That is a lot of power. But isn't all of this bound to But these companies even under more scrutiny going forward, Yeah, I think that's absolutely fair, and I spoke with Ben Weisner at the American Civil Liberties Union piece of the same thing. He's really concerned about these individual companies. Power. Here's what he told me. And it may be that by exercising their right their constitutional right to decide who can use their products right now they're going to bring a different kind of regulatory focus down on them about whether we should have let these companies get this big in the first place. So you know, this isn't gonna go away else. I mean, remember these companies they're already under a lot of scrutiny. Facebook and Google are facing any trust investigations. Now we have Congress promising new investigations here, so I think the spotlight just continues. Well, I mean, turning to President Trump. He got off. He got cut off from Twitter and Facebook now parlor. It was a momentary alternative, but that's gone. Now, where will trump go? You think that is the big question? There are plenty of upstart sites that want him. He might even start his own outlet. I think, Elsa, it's safe to assume he's not getting off of the Internet for good. I think that is safe. That's NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon. Thanks for having me.

President Trump Facebook NPR Amazon Shannon Bond Cleveland Browns Google Trump president Twitter Apple Trump Organization Tom Goldman NFL Steelers Cleveland Tom Brady
Trump Has Been Silenced On Social Media

The Takeaway

03:14 min | 1 year ago

Trump Has Been Silenced On Social Media

"A lot about Big Tech and certainly the past few days show just how powerful these companies are. First, Twitter and Facebook suspended President Trump's access to his biggest online megaphones. Then Apple, Google and Amazon cut off parlor, a social media site popular with Trump supporters and joining us now to unpack. All of this is NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. All right, so we should first know that Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are all among NPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon, what do you think He's pretty aggressive moves. Tell us about Silicon Valley right now. Also, you know when Facebook and Twitter cut off President Trump it really put the spotlight on something I think we've known for a long time. But I just seeing so starkly, Which is how much power these big tech companies wield because we conduct so much of our lives online. So there were the examples you mentioned. But also others that go beyond the question of speech really, to the bottom line stripe and papal cut off the ability of the president's campaign and his supporters to raise money and take payments. The e commerce companies, Shopify shut down an online shop connected to Trump that sold merchandise like Make America Great again. Hats and another shop owned by the Trump Organization that sold things like golf accessories and So these decisions they're raising some really big questions. What are some of those questions? Well, maybe the biggest one is all about access. So Amazon Apple Google. They have a lot of power over kind of what we think of more of the infrastructure of the Internet. In Apple and Google's cases, they you know, they decide what APS can go into the APP stores. So They decided this weekend to block parlor, the alternative social media site that Trump supporters had flocked to And that means it's much harder to get parlor on your smartphone, which is, of course, where most people use Social media, and then even more significantly, Amazon kicks parlor off its Web hosting service, so it's gone dark. You can't access it all today. Parlor sued Amazon. And basically, you know, we're really realizing seeing very tangibly Just how much power Big tech has to decide which companies which brands which businesses can effectively exist online, Okay, sure. That is a lot of power. But isn't all of this bound to But these companies even under more scrutiny going forward, Yeah, I think that's absolutely fair, and I spoke with Ben Weisner at the American Civil Liberties Union piece of the same thing. He's really concerned about these individual companies. Power. Here's what he told me. And it may be that by exercising their right their constitutional right to decide who can use their products right now they're going to bring a different kind of regulatory focus down on them about whether we should have let these companies get this big in the first place. So you know, this isn't gonna go away else. I mean, remember these companies they're already under a lot of scrutiny. Facebook and Google are facing any trust investigations. Now we have Congress promising new investigations here, so I think the spotlight just continues. Well, I mean, turning to President Trump. He got off. He got cut off from Twitter and Facebook now parlor. It was a momentary alternative, but that's gone. Now, where will trump go? You think that is the big question? There are plenty of upstart sites that want him. He might even start his own outlet. I think, Elsa, it's safe to assume he's not getting off of the Internet for good. I

President Trump Amazon Donald Trump Apple Shannon Bond Google Facebook NPR Shannon Twitter App Stores Elsa Trump Organization Shopify Silicon Valley Ben Weisner Golf America American Civil Liberties Union Congress