4 Burst results for "Ben Mcfarland"

"ben mcfarland" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"ben mcfarland" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The seventy fifth anniversary of the invasion. This year. The British company that made those original day clicks on a search and rescue mission of its own of the seven thousand clicker manufactured by acme whistles during World War, Two less than a dozen have been recovered. Now. The company has launched a worldwide campaign to find loss clippers and learn the stories behind the brave troops, who carried them we spoke with Ben McFarland, the head of sales, and marketing at acme whistles, which still manufactures whistles in the same Birmingham England factory, that took direct hit from Nazi bombers during the war. He says that the few confirmed clippers in circulation are all held by museums and private collectors, acme whistles. Itself doesn't possess even one of the original clippers, although it sells an exact replica made with the original machine presses just because there have been so few recovered clippers. It doesn't mean that they're not more out there. Mcfarland said it just means the people don't know that they've got them, acme was has been business. Eighteen seventy and is responsible for a number of important with a I it's founder just Hudson invented the first police whistle used by the London. Metropolitan police prior to that the Bobby on the beat used a wooden rattle. Also invented the very first sports with the original acme under before that football referees. That's soccer to Americans in the UK waved, a white handkerchief to get the players. Attention, not quite as active. But back to the clippers since the clippers were exclusively supplied the US hundred first airborne McFarland, expects that many reside in America either handed down as heirlooms from generation to generation, or in the hands of antiques collectors, who may not know, the Herat providence of these humble looking boxes. The day. Clicker also known as the acme cricket was originally used by marching band leaders to click out the tempo of piece of music. They're made of brass and are half open rectangular boxes about the size of the top joint of thumb by path open. I mean that one short end in parts of two walls are missing from the design the remaining short end is labeled with the acme maiden England.

clippers Ben McFarland acme maiden England acme Birmingham England America football head of sales London founder UK Herat US Hudson seventy fifth
How Did Clickers Save Lives on D-Day?

BrainStuff

05:39 min | 3 years ago

How Did Clickers Save Lives on D-Day?

"Today's episode is brought to you by Oregon. You know, when something goes wrong at home, and you just freak out, I have definitely had my moments especially when it comes to pests ants in the mirror. Nara, cockroaches hanging out around your bubble bath and uninvited rat, a your daughter's birthday party. Don't let pests ruin the moment, get an architect out to your house tomorrow. Bill, protect your time and your temper. Visit organ dot com slash brain to save fifty dollars on your first general pest service with the promo code pod. Fifty that's peo- d five zero Oregon home is where the bugs aren't. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Vogel bomb here shortly after midnight in the early hours of June sixth, nineteen forty four nearly twenty thousand allied paratroopers dropped behind enemy lines to be the first soldiers on the ground on d day conditions were terrible that cloud, cover, and fog made it nearly impossible to spot their landing targets and the night sky was pierced with Nazi heavy anti aircraft rounds and Steiber fire for those paratroopers, who made it to the ground, many were separated from their units and unsure of their locations alone in enemy-held territory. They had to find their comrades in the fog, blanketed dark without tipping off the enemy good thing. They had their clicker. Hours earlier when boarding the transport aircraft back in England. Members of the United States one hundred and first division were each handed a small metal box that would serve as a low tech emergency communication device by pushing down on the list of the box with the thumb and releasing it made a sharp clicking sound their instructions were simple. If you're on the ground, and here's someone approaching click once two clicks reply means a friend. No, click could be in trouble. Twenty four hours after landing. The paratroopers were told to ditch or hide their clippers allied commanders were worried that the devices would fall into Nazi hands and be used trick allied soldiers into thinking that an approaching fo was friendly, the day clippers were only an action for twenty four hours, but who knows how many lives were saved by the simple, ingenuity. Inspired by the seventy fifth anniversary of the day invasion. This year, the British company that made those original day clicker is on a search and rescue mission of its own of the seven thousand clicker is manufactured by acme whistles during World War, Two less than a dozen have been recovered. Now. The company has launched a worldwide campaign to find the loss. Deta- clicker and learn the stories behind the brave troops, who carried them we spoke with Ben McFarland, the head of sales, and marketing at acme whistles, which still manufactures whistles in the same Birmingham England factory that took a direct hit from Nazi bombers during the war. He says that the few confirmed clippers in circulation are all held by museums and private collectors, acme whistles itself doesn't possess even one of the original clippers, although it sells an exact replica made with the original machine presses just because there have been so few recovered DJ clippers it doesn't mean that there are not more out there. Mcfarland, said it just means that people don't know that they've got them acme was those has been businesses. Eighteen seventy and is responsible for a number of important whistle. Firsts. It's founder Joseph Hudson. Invent? The first police whistle used by the London. Metropolitan police prior to that the Bobby on the beat used a wooden rattle. Hudson. Also invented the very first sports, whistle the original acme thunder before that football referees. That's soccer to Americans in the UK waved, a white handkerchief to get the players. Attention, not quite as effective. But back to the clippers since the clippers were exclusively supplied to the US, one hundred first airborne McFarland, expects that many reside in America either handed down as heirlooms from generation to generation, or in the hands of antiques collectors, who may not know the Geraldo providence of these humble looking boxes, the day, clicker, also known as the acne cricket was originally used by marching band leaders to click out the tempo of piece of music. They're made of brass and are half open rectangular boxes about the size of the top joint of thumb by half open. I mean that one short end in parts of two walls, are busy from the design the remaining short end is labeled with the acme made an England if you think you're in possession of an original day, clicker MacFarlane wants you to. Email him personally at Ben dot McFarland at acme whistles dot CO dot UK. He's already heard from at least one American woman who appears to have the real deal acne was those plans to invite all clicker owners to England take a tour of the factory receiving engraved, commemorative whistle and share the story of the brave paratrooper who carry the clicker into combat on the day. This episode was written by Dave rou and produced by Tyler Clegg, brainstorm is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more in this most of other topics designed to make a very specific ruckus. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcasts from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. This is Josh Clark, and I am taking my show, the end of the world. With Josh Clark on the road. Live to Minneapolis in DC this June on June nineteenth, I'll be at the Parkway theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota and on the following night June twentieth. I'll be at the miracle theatre in Washington DC, if you've heard the end of the world ten times already, or if you've never heard a second of it, it matters, not because this show, explores themes, covered in the end of the world and also chases down, new avenues, like, how good could things be if we managed to survive the next century or two. So come see me this June nineteenth and twentieth in Minneapolis in DC.

Clippers Ben Mcfarland Oregon England Iheartradio Ben Dot Mcfarland Josh Clark United States Minneapolis Joseph Hudson UK Bill Lauren Vogel London Mcfarland Football DC Washington
"ben mcfarland" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"ben mcfarland" Discussed on Science Friday

"We published an interactive flood map, through our web portal called a debt VA dot org. And this case people can access where the flood extent, you're supposed to be on that map, and this case, we think call for interested citizens scientists that are eager to map flooding near them to help us verify whether or not our flood model's predictions were accurate. Ultimately, this kind of affectively, engages stakeholders, and educational materials related to frequent coastal flood hazard, like king tides nuisance flooding, but also provides, you know, kind of a return back to us, an active title calibration for a very high resolution street, level, hydrodynamic model. The second step involves volunteer registration and this case, we really value volunteers time. And unfortunately when you ask people to go out and map, flooding everyone's very familiar with maybe the one or two places that they're very familiar belt. Like the tweet that you mentioned earlier this case, people here is typically, no from their personal experiences where flooding happens. And so the first year we did this many people flocked out to store cake, reach offic, where it's a flooded many times. In fact, we've got very old photographs in the hurricane of nineteen thirty three were indeed, the Hague us to primarily, flood due to these extra tropical, and tropical storm surge events. But now it's flooding on a very frequent basis due to tidal flooding. So we spread people out and dedicate their efforts in separate places throughout. Virginia in order to give us a broader perspective where flooding is happening in places. We're less familiar with. Let me just get in this break. I'm Plato this science Friday from WNYC studios. The app. with. Let me just get in this break. I'm Plato this science Friday from WNYC studios. The app. I want to hear about the app, final step certainly. Yeah. So Norfolk based companies wetlands watching cursive, developed this mobile application. It's really available and in this case of on tears, use it to take time stamped and location, logged pictures, that kind of gives a picture of exactly where flooding is happening, and volunteers will use the new map public spaces in this case, they'll also generate flood contours by repeatedly pressing a button to digitally document where the maximum flooding extent is in their communities and the last thing, I'll mention I guess, is that the we recently won. The Guinness world record for the most contributions to an environmental survey based on our 2017 augural, king Todd flooding event, and that was because seven hundred twenty two helpful volunteers directly serve it. Fifty nine thousand seven hundred and eighteen GPS reported high water marks along the US's coast of her six hour period during a king tide full. Event. I think we can get your few more volunteers. I'm going to give out the website if you wanna catch the king tied citizen science project. You want to join that we have linka for signing up on our website at science, Freddie dot com slash king tied that science Friday dot com slash king tied. want to join that we have linka for signing up on our website at science, Freddie dot com slash king tied that science Friday dot com slash king tied. It's a citizen science project with on that, and everything. I imagine other cities can take advantage of this as they watch. How you doing with it? Certainly. I mean, there are several individual groups that have been involved, but inevitably as this kind of segments all about, you know, water knows no political or municipal boundaries so success any Costa resiliency effort depends on -ffective communication collaboration execution. So in this effort, you know, lots of coastal communities can get involved as nastiest Virginia based, it's great to hear. I want to thank my guess this hour, Ben McFarland senior regional planner with the Hampton roads planning district commission. Derek office assistant research scientists with Virginia institute of marine scientists, and Christina doll senior climate scientists with the union of concerned scientists. And if you live in Virginia, and you want to participate in the catch the king tide this year, going to repeat how to do this, because we're going to send you a few listeners there, except times we, we break, some servers some places so we'll do that look to it. If you live in Virginia wanna participate in catch the king tide. These here, you can sign up at science Friday dot com slash king tide if you don't live in Virginia. That's okay. You can find a citizen science project for tracking

king tides Virginia WNYC studios Freddie dot king Todd US Virginia institute of marine offic Ben McFarland Norfolk Christina six hour
"ben mcfarland" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:50 min | 3 years ago

"ben mcfarland" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Says science Friday replay. Oh. Less than a hundred miles of the coast from the help, Amara pem, Licko peninsula. The cities of Hampton roads Virginia along the Chesapeake Bay are facing some of the worst flooding due to sea level rise in the country, and Norfolk home of the United States navy tied have increased as much as eight inches since the nineteen seventies and rose that lead from the community directly to the naval. Installations are especially vulnerable to flooding. But in the last ten years Hampton roads has begun to adapt. Guess our Ben McFarland senior regional planner with the Hampton roads planning district commission there. This associate research scientist with the Virginia institute of marine, scientists Christina dolls senior climate scientists with the union of concerned. Scientists welcome all of you to the program. Thanks for having us. Ban for about the geography of Hampton roads. We're they located their their five cities. Right. Making other. We actually have a ten city roads where the whole the southeastern corner of Virginia. So everything from Williamsburg, all the way down Virginia Beach. And so why are they so vulnerable to the effect? Ac- little right? We'll two reasons. One we're right on the coast. We have a number of title creeks and rivers that we've their way in and out of many of our cities. And then for the eastern half of the region were very, very flat and very, very low, and so the combination the waters here, it has lots of places that wants to go and Derek, explain why nuisance flooding such a problem in this area. Well enough tidal flooding is a particular problem for us in Hampton roads for the reasons Bendix plane, it's very flat, and it's very easy for the compound influences of storm surge and a high tide to further amplify the conditions of flood event. So just the king tides by themselves are problem. But then when you come pound storm surge on top of that, Peru. This is a long lasting disaster will feel the effect for a very long time Christie Norfolk is home of the world's largest naval base the US naval base there. How is this flooding problem impacting military preparedness, according to your research? At the base itself, there have been reports of on the undersides of peers, getting inundated with salt water during high tides once or twice a month. And we also hear reports of seawater bubbling up through through storm drains and causing road closures so that has the potential to affect the ability of troops to get to and from different places on the base. So it's not just it's not just a problem of living on the base. The problem of living off the base, and getting back and forth to debase when the roads may be flooded. That's right. Military bases. Don't exist in isolation. They exist within broader communities and are often dependent on the infrastructure within that community for their operations van you're, you're working on a joint land. You study with the navy to address some of these concerns, what needs to happen from the community perspective to make the naval base more resilient to flooding. So I think it's more than just the community there really needs to be a conversation between the installations and their host communities for a long time. The base was focused inward on, what's inside the fence line in the cities. We're focused on what was going outside the fence line. But there wasn't a lot of discussion going on between them and through this, the study that we're just finishing with Norfolk and Virginia Beach. We've been able to have conversations and they've started to identify projects that are located in the community that would have a direct benefit for the navy's mission readiness. What kinds of things do you discuss? So a big thing, a big part of it is the, the access issue. That's the. The number one concern that the navy house for sailors for its for the family members and whatnot. The need to actually make make it to the base, and many of our communities at the roads, flooding is becoming more and more frequent and some of those major roadways that provide direct access to the base are becoming flooded more, and more frequently and so the, the biggest issue that we find is that we need to figure out how we can fix the flooding issue on those major corridors, and that's a combination of things like raising the road and some places, but also installing better and more efficient stormwater management systems to address that flooding make sure it doesn't happen as frequently Christie, I know you worked on a report that looked at the vulnerability of military installations all along the coast. Are there many of them already aware of the risks of sea level rise to to their bases? They are. We did a study of eighteen installations on the eastern Gulf Coast, the so it wasn't comprehensive, but a decent size set in the course of that research. We reached out to planners on each of those bases to hear about what they knew about sea level rise. And what their plans were to cope with it in the future. Well, we weren't able to connect with every Representative from every single base those that we did talk to were very aware of the issue of sea-level rise and being very proactive about addressing it because the, the Pentagon, the navy particular has called climate change and sea level rise, a man, a matter of net national security hasn't not. They have. And in fact, the navy's first report on climate change changes almost thirty years ago in nineteen ninety there are people like the director of intelligence in coats coming out and testifying in front of the Senate that climate change is a national security threat. So the military's paying very close attention to this issue, and Ben win. Do people begin to take notice?.

navy Hampton Hampton roads Virginia Christie Norfolk Norfolk Virginia Beach Ben McFarland US Virginia Amara pem Licko peninsula Chesapeake Bay king tides Virginia institute of marine associate research scientist Ac Williamsburg Derek Gulf Coast