18 Burst results for "Ben Luke"

"ben luke" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"ben luke" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Four with me to a of godwin and it's time now to find out what's happening in the art world. With ben luke whose review editor at the art newspaper and host of its podcast. Good morning to. Ben do now. We've just been talking about the rainbow. Symbol and lgbt writes in football and this is something that the royal academy has now got caught up in. They are facing transphobia row. Tell us the detail on this. There's an author could gesture. Girls who is textile history is reading. Says she's not a royal academy she's not one of that group provocative run the academy. She just stopped in shop however she's no longer stopped in that show because a blog post that she votes in twenty nine team expressed views that are regarded as offensive and transphobic and the people contacted world academy about these vs on the role academy made the decision to remove work from the shop. 'em now one of the things crucial about this is the told the world about this. Through a an instrument story the economy can see that post of as he said they were made aware of the views of member moved to works from the shop and she has oversee reacted to sunday. In fact he's become very high profile. wrestlemainia decrying the royal academy's decision and an claiming that she was just the setting human right to free speech. Understand the point she was basically making was the sex is not as a social construct but but a biological fox. This exactly she was. She was expressing the immutability of biological sex. But the thing is is a fine answer weblog and i encourage people interested in these three to read the book because i think in by any stretch of the imagination. The idea that the blog is in some way balanced and respectful is not adolescent less accurate sedgley's quite confronting right from the start and i think i think could be regarded as offensive but i think in a in a way the issue here is will. The royal academy is made decisions identify. How far up the institution. This decision might whether it's just the commission person. Look this decision and the director role. You didn't know anything about it. But the fact is that there's been recent which has said that to express this view the biologic biological sex is immutable is protected by the equality act and therefore the autism just justifies threatening to sue the the candidate and an f. o. The royal academy's real dilemma. Here it's it's it's come. Athletes portal the lgbtq community. But it at this point so it is being threatened to sue to be sued by not is to sign the that human rights have been compromised. So it's a real done and motivates remaining very signs about yeah well luckily all the other abuses of human rights who also stuck in the in. The shop have died for instance. The picasso won't be taking any action. We'll say i'm this is the thing is overseeing this is. This is a very particular live living artists that we're in safe leaving issue but you're right to oversee deeply offensive fees that have been held diocese throughout the throughout history. Amherst you applied contemporary moral standards among softish in the postseason But is constantly debate. Let's turn to prizes now because this too is the thorny issue. The turner prize was given to artists in one thousand nine hundred and now another prize. is also going to collective. What does this say about art prizes. A really interesting point. Because if if you're going to have prize The julian effect has to make a decision. And what we keep saying is not making decisions. says the benefiting the evaristo when she showed the pricing Mugger at for the backward for the booker prize. But the but what we have with the operas yes say twenty nineteen china price will be too old for artists Is that because the elective and ask the jury to do it for them. In the case of autism mindy prices welsh price for international off has been awarded to artists on the show and this was. The decision was made by the jury. So what all prizes is it enough to actually just gather a group of officers together site. These rule out that we love and we to put them on an exhibition and decided to actually. What prices may maybe silly when we're to create new people and putting them into competition. Let's finish with a quick look at The science museum and a police moving in a on protested that if that's what is interesting situation in museums when it comes to protest so instance was a practice that tight moton a climate change protest in which the protesters were allowed to sleep on the in in titan overnight. The decision is made fundamentally whether to vote the police but a museum and in the case the science museum a group of students protesting against the sponsorship over exhibition. Just could off you to planet by shell and this is a very issue again. Something mrs being constantly Lost scientists withdrawing Science museum to cause a bit and in this case asleep. I've was planned but the police were involved and moved the protesters on eventually left the museum. Now this is the the key thing here is the different massachusetts museums taking to they all sponsors and the the director of museum has been very bullish. Said that even if the science museum was lavishly funded publicly with public money still see coils from. He's very very supportive. Deals lances and in this case the Does not suggest that the science museum he's committing much more to kind of aggressive approach to protest is of museums. And he's a fascinating point that these oils won't shit is own gun debates into in museum. Genuity can also she continue amid climate. Change absolutely ben league. Thank you very much. Indeed this is the globalist on.

Ben one thousand Four ben luke sedgley twenty nineteen three sunday lgbt lgbtq royal academy twenty nine team godwin nine hundred evaristo The royal academy one museum china julian
"ben luke" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:32 min | 3 months ago

"ben luke" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"News from the art world. With ben luke review editor at the newspaper and host of its podcasts. Welcome back went very well. Thank you have you with us. Let us begin with the latest news with this continuing debate as to how the united kingdom faces. It's nasi colonial past dj. So there's been a long-running saga of a particular statue at oriel college. In oxford of sexual roads the imperialist who by any standards we today would call him a white supremacist and so basically the most recent events were that last year in june the governing body of oil college decided that they wanted to remove. The commission was set up. That commission has said that it supports the removal of the statue but stopped short of actually calling for removal and now the governing body is said that they can't re remove it because of the lengthy planning process that we'll go through government and government will refuse it but thankfully and so the costs. This is created a huge outrage in the latest development is at three hundred and fifty oxford. Academics have now said that it's the that maintaining the statue in its place is not consistent with the vision of our university which is equality diversity and inclusion. It said that it grieves grievously damages the integrity of our attempts to confront racism. And this is sort of ongoing debate about obviously numerous statues but sexual roses are particularly sort of sharp focus. Because he's such a controversial figure and one of the things. I think that is really compelling about this new letter. This open letter is that it destroys the argument about the views of his time were reflective of lots of others and therefore we shouldn't judge them by contemporary standards in the letter. It says at ninety four oxford academics in one thousand nine hundred nine condemned the the award of an honorary doctorate to roads. So this isn't a matter of the contemporary politics looking back at the past judging and individual in the guardian a victory of roads it said. He said that he's views on civilization. Vulgar he was a man who was very very heavily criticized design time and regarded as a monster by many so. This is a really intriguing. Development is an extraordinarily nuanced argument. Of course all of this. But i think it really focuses that debate and of course the ongoing campaigners the roads must fall campaign which is driven by students at the university is up in arms about this decision. So i think we're going to hear lots more about it as as it develops the difficulty. Is that anything that is done with. These touches cannot be nuanced because it will revolve. It will involve doing something to them. Which will be provisionally quite dramatic. One of the ideas is antony gormley which is turn around. That's right yeah so ansi. Gormley suggests that to essentially acknowledged collective shame. We should turn him around. He of course is a niche which which allows that to happen of course if he was a statute in standing freely on clinton a square. That wouldn't that wouldn't make any difference because it would just reorientate the statute but but yes. Because he's in each goarmy says turning round keeping their keep the discussion going which i guess is sort of a radical taken retain explain which is the official government policy. You keep things and you explain these historical figures but that has met with a variety of responses. it's fair to say lots of dismissal. Lots of people saying. I love the way that we're treating you know. Historical figures has done others really supporting decision saying that's a great solution because it's somehow acknowledges the contemporary view of these these figures but but also lots of people saying look. It's just it's that does not confront the very real Situation which is that. We have to look at figures who are white supremacists in major centres of learning. That are trying to improve their approach to diversity and inclusion. Let's move onto a story which has Created crowds author uncomfortable visual pitcher for a long time off the last year or so venice has been able to take a breather from the thousands upon thousands of tourists to sort of wait down every year But the cruise ships back. There's enormous cities or mortar. Yes exactly and i think if you've ever been to venice. In ec one of these floating cities rear interview released a shocking development. Yes one thing standing in a port and seeing a cruise ship but seeing them in venice is somehow terrifying and of course there was a famous incident into a d nineteen where one of them bashed into one of the one of the harbors and i think they were actually really long term concerns about this. They hugely damaged the the ecosystem of the lagoon. Which is which is fundamental to. The survival event is facing real a real crisis. Everybody knows that the idea is that sinking but of course it sea level rises. Climate change is massively affecting venice. There are even predictions that unless we less more is done. Urgently about climate change venues could be under water by twenty one hundred so with venezia's east. The campaign is four are desperately trying to get crucial band. We were told in april. They would be banned. The culture minister of italy was singing singing the praises of a new ruling which would say they would they would they would dock in marghera industrial port but alas that's not happening because marghera is doesn't have the infrastructure to cope with it and so what happens is tomorrow. A cruise ship will sail into venice again. Very briefly been apparently mick jagger's way didn't yes signatory to a letter which she six ten point plan out for finished his future. Which of which one is the banning of cruise ships. But it's but it's actually acknowledging the fact that there are a whole raft of different problems. Venice facing a lot of the matter with political inadequacy political fudging. There's been this attempt to build these barriers that mos- barriers. They are in now. Going to be in place they will open soon and they'll be able to basically if effectively stop these flats which so ruinous to venice but but fundamentally there is a whole lot of things which need to happen to prevent that catastrophe of venice eventually being underwater ben. Luke thank you as ever for joining us on the globalist listening to multiple twenty four..

Luke april Gormley last year tomorrow twenty one hundred marghera ben luke mick jagger antony gormley One thousands venezia thousands of tourists june Venice oriel college today oxford ninety four oxford
The Ariel School Alien Sighting

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

02:05 min | 5 months ago

The Ariel School Alien Sighting

"Today's story is so bizarre and so hard to rationalize the only way to make sense of it is to go through it piece by piece from the very beginning it centers around the aerial school a private primary school in the small farming community of rua about twenty miles outside of zimbabwe's capital of harare. The students range from as young as five the way up to age twelve. I don't know what the school is like. Nowadays but back in nineteen ninety four. The kids would run around the playground every morning for their recess break. Friday september sixteenth was no exception. It's almost the weekend. The kids are excited as they're running around the playground. Meanwhile inside the building teachers convene for a staff meeting while they're gone. It's basically understood that the older children will keep an eye on the younger ones and not far from the playground is a ticshop which is basically like this little deli or canteen that serves students mothers rotate through managing. And the momma duty. This morning is allison kirkman. Now allison's minding the shop when shortly after ten a m. A student named luke runs in. And he's looking like he has seen an actual ghost. He has this sort of wide eyed stunned expression on his face. Ben luke tells. Allison he's just seen a literal alien outside now. Alison here's this and brushes it off. I mean she basically tells loop scherf very funny. Quit pulling my leg. But luke keeps insisting that he saw quote a little man in a one piece suit with a band around his head end quote ultimately alison isn't convinced enough to leave the tuck shop investigate even though her own daughter. Fi fi is out on the playground to in fact fi fi and her friends or just as stunned as lucas. Apparently the students were out running around when they noticed this thing hovering in the distance beyond the edge of the playground.

RUA Allison Kirkman Harare Luke Runs Zimbabwe Ben Luke Loop Scherf Allison Alison Luke Lucas
"ben luke" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

02:04 min | 5 months ago

"ben luke" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

"Today's story is so bizarre and so hard to rationalize the only way to make sense of it is to go through it piece by piece from the very beginning it centers around the aerial school a private primary school in the small farming community of rua about twenty miles outside of zimbabwe's capital of harare. The students range from as young as five the way up to age twelve. I don't know what the school is like. Nowadays but back in nineteen ninety four. The kids would run around the playground every morning for their recess break. Friday september sixteenth was no exception. It's almost the weekend. The kids are excited as they're running around the playground. Meanwhile inside the building teachers convene for a staff meeting while they're gone. It's basically understood that the older children will keep an eye on the younger ones and not far from the playground is a ticshop which is basically like this little deli or canteen that serves students mothers rotate through managing. And the momma duty. This morning is allison kirkman. Now allison's minding the shop when shortly after ten a m. A student named luke runs in. And he's looking like he has seen an actual ghost. He has this sort of wide eyed stunned expression on his face. Ben luke tells. Allison he's just seen a literal alien outside now. Alison here's this and brushes it off. I mean she basically tells loop scherf very funny. Quit pulling my leg. But luke keeps insisting that he saw quote a little man in a one piece suit with a band around his head end quote ultimately alison isn't convinced enough to leave the tuck shop investigate even though her own daughter. Fi fi is out on the playground to in fact fi fi and her friends or just as stunned as lucas. Apparently the students were out running around when they noticed this thing hovering in the distance beyond the edge of the playground.

Allison luke allison cynthia hind Friday september sixteenth Heidi Isabelle allison kirkman isabel colin mackey alison Mackey Alison Today Maggie natalie wood Ben luke nineteen ninety four fiji more than fifteen minutes
"ben luke" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:10 min | 5 months ago

"ben luke" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Fresh haircut but a key part of life remains closed. You still can't go to a museum or an art gallery but the design museum in london has come up with rather clever trick to allow us to enjoy art. Close up without breaking any rules. I'm joined now by tim. Mullin direction chief executive of the design museum at good morning. Tim good to have you this morning. So the idea is called supermarkets. And for those of us who haven't pushed one of your pretty blue trolleys around the isles. Just tell us what happens. Like you're very much for that description that's trolleys. It's whether you approach the high street. Looks like a two dimensional work of art by the anglo-french design and his wonderful sort of poly chromatic patterning in all sorts of different colors and so on on the window and around the framing of what are usually are are shocked. As you get closer you see from scientists kona supermarket as you move into the space you realize you're in an art installation but it's also retail space. You can buy essential products Which is all been packaged by the design for the packaging is all been done. By emerging designers. Artists have all been paid for that and so everything from lou role to sausage ajar porridge. Oats the washing liquid bombay sapphire itself. Because actually the idea came from could convention sponsor. But i'm going to because they're more than sponsor the creative partners. It came from bombay sapper so they had this idea about what was essential and what was essentially non essential retail and of course museums are essential to create creative lives. But we're not allowed moment so we've opened a shop instead of supermarket as not work. It is a rather clever little leap that you found it wasn't it wasn't we didn't sit down at it. What's the loophole. How can we get through this. It just seemed like a good crazy by dan. Rea responded accordingly socially distance. We we understand the need for karen rolling things out carefully and sensibly but yeah in a sense. The idea that shops all manner of shops gyms and addresses can open but museums have to wait Well okay well. Let's bring creativity and let's focus on the idea that human creativity and imagination can be showcased in different ways. It's quite an interest sign of so designed everything anyway. Sorry it's quite an interesting. We just from ben luke from the newspaper. He was talking about the fact that london is open and yet we still can't go to an art gallery and it is true isn't it. you can go shoulder to shoulder department store you can even get your legs wax. But you can't go and look at a beautiful picture in a museum. What are your thoughts on that and be mad for museum directed to disagree with journalist about the principle of opening up. I think we have to just ca capital in the sensor. Yeah of course. I was amused as many of my colleagues across the museums. Were and we sell slightly irritated thinking well. Why can't we be open but there is a broader picture that we have to sort of acknowledge that maybe we don't like the priorities but we have to wait five weeks. You can't open everything at the same time. You make a social decision to be honest if i went to a public forum and stood on the platform and told the the good people of kensington and chelsea london that actually i believe that culture music must open. But they must there. Jim shouldn't be in. the headdresses. shouldn't be the primary a riot in other words. it's a kind of. It's it's just an unfortunate five week delay because that's the nature of of how the the rollout is. I do think it signals. Something that deums museums are considered the not as high priority. And the reason the the the the nonsense that commercial art galleries that i also support hugely as coach winters. They cannot open but museums con is mad but it's it's simply a broader issues brought a social and political issues. The moment one. Kate make sure what we do open. We can open with all guns blazing safely deal with with with with people and the pandemic hasn't spread because people behaving madly in department stores and in the meantime this this supermarket concept that you've got fuses art purely with with with retail. I mean how much do you think design plays an absolutely vital role in everything to do with retail but the joyful wrapping on your toilet paper and the beautiful tins of tea suggests that there is arguably more space for art in retail designs. The brokering of that design artist so confused design requires a creative input limitation of creativity often an action. We have to be careful because you go into supermarkets and you see a campbell soup tin all you see a heinz label and some people think of only warhol who obviously post dated the original graphic design of this great graphic design. This great art. Form us in a loss of branding in a lot of logos in lots of packaging. We are just throwing attention to and actually this is a space blank. Canvas iffy like on the side of a ten roger where we should and can encourage emerging talent to build on some of the opportunities that be taken in the past. But actually as you say a lot of it can be driving. Bland missed opportunity. So this is kind of this. There's a nuance response. They're not a sledgehammer one and finally. You mentioned collaboration that the commercial collaboration on this project. How important is it that big companies are going to have to dive right in as soon as the pandemic subsides in order to make sure that like yours have a long-term chance of survival. Well i hope that they feel able to do that. But what's interesting about. This project is that it is genuinely creative on. The initial idea came from bombay suffer. Then we developed together and and actually the creative agency is that they're part of their myself as agency. That's how a good museum ticket design. Museum should be working collaboratively collegiately. We'll we all drew up the list of the artists design museum. Sort of broken. The the the idea that allah would take on the entire installation. And i think that when you look at the business model of this bombay safra been generous in funding assume sponsoring the project then the all proceeds not just to cut but all proceeds from the sales go to an emerging artists designers at the design museum and the emerging designers have been paid a professional fee each designing product. That's pretty good. Actually i think that's that's one way that a museum of the design me in the future can start to explore different models of funding. But in it's going to be tough in the next few years for all museums and institutions. And what have to look at all sorts of ways of the funding our institutions but we should reiterate that the government's culture recovery fund has enabled the design museum to survive. And get to this point. So there's plenty to say it will be tough ten miler chief executive the design museum. Thank you so much for joining us on one hundred twenty four. that's all. We have time for today's program. Many thanks to our producers danube h page reynolds collartoo. Rabelo are set to charlie film likud and our studio manager neuro after the headlines. More music on the way and the briefing is live at mid-day in london the globe blister at the same time tomorrow but.

london Tim tim tomorrow five weeks five week Jim Kate today kensington ben luke Rea chelsea london heinz likud warhol allah this morning anglo-french Bland
"ben luke" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 9 months ago

"ben luke" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The beef cheeks that we had with the Sunset Ranch era. It was delicious. His film about indigenous cooking, titled Truly Texas Mexican will be released in March. He's got a cookbook out by the same name My dad used to make with my mother. This bottom aquatic poster but also is Additional its iconic to our culture, really the Mexican American culture of South Texas and northeastern Mexico. So it takes me back. You confined barbacoa on the menus of some serious Mexican restaurants, but the beef heads are cooked in big Kettle's on the stove top, not underground. Drano says the tradition is now being kept alive, mostly by backyard cooks. So long as there are people who are passionate about this, it will not end people in Houston and in San Antonio actually dig holes in their backyard to this day. And making this barbeque or the person because that's the way their parents and grandparents and great grandparents did It. John Burnett. NPR NEWS, Brownsville Many people in the arts worried and still do. Arts groups Enterprises, an artist will survive this year of the pandemic, with so many venue's closed But Ben Luke, the review editor and podcast, host of the Arts newspaper website, says that He's been heartened to see visual arts endure and in some respects even thrive. We reached him nails worth, England. Mr Luke. Thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me. Museums and galleries as a rule have been closed. How a visual arts survived. They're struggling. I think I think that you know, the most important thing to say about what's happened during the pandemic is it's revealed how Very precarious. The arts are.

Ben Luke big Kettle South Texas NPR John Burnett Brownsville Mexico Drano San Antonio Houston editor England
"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:05 min | 9 months ago

"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"To look at the year's biggest stories. I was joined by three of the newspapers correspondence on the front line. Reporting the huge events of this year and their effects on the art world and a brady is our market editor. He's a buck is our contemporary correspondent and gareth harris is our chief contributing editor inevitably as we tackle the year's event to major global stories dominated the discussions the coronavirus pandemic and the death of george floyd and the fight for racial justice. I'd like to begin by talking about the effective of covid on the market. And and obviously this is your area of expertise. And i want to begin by talking about the fares. Because in a way they've been the marker of this exponential rise in the market over the last decade but they fail just as suddenly this year. I told me about fares on the covid back in march and sort of early mart taper off maastricht happened and it was kind of happened a week beforehand. It might have been okay and had happened week. Afterwards i think it definitely would have been cancelled and myself a lot of other journalists. Went out again. See the fat and it had very strange kind of atmosphere. He sort of jokingly foot tapping and elba bumping. But i think people sort of thought that something viruses affecting the outside world won't penetrate walls in the champagne and kind of that elite nature is. Shut down an exhibitor had got tested positive covid and after that so many people attend to call the virus at the fair and some of them were really radio and in intensive care and i think that was just a for me. That was kind of big wake-up cool overseas in the uk went into lockdown the us. After that the armory we happen to have the same sort of time but it was. It definitely was a kind of think. Reality shock that this is going to be something that really was can affect all of us. It didn't matter our were or whether you were off a this forest and have any kind of respect for face of mesa foundries and it's just as one said to me. Everything kind of fell off a cliff in late off training. And then you just saw this sort of chain of cancellations volvo fairs. I mean it's fair to say that the the big fairs have had a terrible year right. Yes they even had an awful. Yeah i was thinking back to when we speak russia beginning of the doing a year ahead. Podcasts i remember when i was leaving afterwards sending i think maggie a message saying we didn't mention carina. Virus and thousand mistake is at that point. We were recording sort of sauce january and we of it very much. They'll as an asian problem and a lot of the talk then was about whether autism hong kong was going to be cancelled and it was at the end of january but i think people still thought that it was going to be quite contained a there but after that east be the fence being canceled was knees. Now fast. Going ahead is news. Just the just hasn't really been anything since about much aside from these fares in in shanghai in november which did manage to go ahead that is a different world to rest of the world maidment. And i think we're really going to see any until about late. May next year by the looks of aside from say ought to buy which is saying that it will go ahead and march but whether actually will not very much master of debate gareth. That's why isn't it all. The fares are sort of basically postponing. And then there's going to be this glut of that happened in the middle of twenty twenty one. I mean i think the all world is beginning to think about a return to some kind of post virus malady but that's difficult is just said because the twenty twenty one calendar is looking quite crunchy. Really got balls. The hong kong is the first honor scheduled kickoff next. Mary and yams new york is next summer. So think there's about six or seven major phase in a row so within a few weeks within night mates at that tape off maastricht delayed <hes>. Home call up. Awesome hong kong freeze. Neil and then our puzzle as well and then freeze. La in july. But we've been here before. Yeah i mean but we saw. The september was going to be back to back this year with fairs. That were delayed for the spring valley summer. They weren't they never actually happened. So i sort of we could be faced with the crunch or we could be faced with nothing at all this weird september. It's really hot today. It's difficult isn't because dealers and clubs helps to prioritize where they're going to go next spring some depending on all sorts of things like a vaccine and all other source of corona sort of things. I mean i just wonder how dealers will where to go. I mean i spoke to dominique levy a few weeks ago. And she said she's going to have to prioritize not would be quite difficult to do but i suppose collectors just itchen allow curator's itching to get back to in real life

ben luke gareth harris george floyd uk mesa us volvo russia
"ben luke" Discussed on H3 Podcast

H3 Podcast

04:00 min | 11 months ago

"ben luke" Discussed on H3 Podcast

"House, we had a lot of scary issues and I installed like rings like all over the House and I really generally. Could finally like sleep easier knowing that I had an idea what was going on around the House I. Love It. BRING DOT com slash h three. All right. A lot of. Donations. Go ahead. Ben Luke hold on a second. Let me There we go. Did we want a be nice debt? It'd be nice that to help with those. I can read them if you want. Yeah. Just keep an eye on them so that like if you something interesting or good comes up, then you can just. took it out. We got a few hundred dollar ones. Go ahead. What did they say? So van Luke Seven said your episode Trish Dr Drew Made Me. Cry and maybe you want to be friends with Trish is something I never thought I'd say. Relationship Much Love Y'all thank you gotTa admit that I cry to when I watched it really I. It was very emotional. Yeah I thought I. Thought it was really productive. You know I thought it was a really good because. 'cause I'm not here when their recorded so I have no idea what. What to expect when I put on now I think it's great because Look Trish is not she's not what everyone thinks she is. And I think the. Doctor Jew, was great by the way. I. Can't wait to have. Did you email him? Did you talk to them about getting back on? Okay Great. I think sack is going to fill a personality test. Because we have failed if we give a narcissist a sociopath, not fail but. I was trying to think who in the crew would score high. On like a personality disorder test. From associated not associated path but I think you may I was just trying to get I just think who would score highpoints. I don't know. I'd be interested in knowing that. I. Don't think you're sociopath. No No. I just talked to my coffee. You might win a couple of points in a certain categories fair enough. Right. Yeah. Crazy but I don't know enough about Ab. Frankly either he could be full blown psycho. Though is the quiet ones. You eat anybody. Have you eaten anybody? No No. No very convincing you past what do you mean by eating? Sexually kind of threw me off a little bit. Have you eaten Human Flab? You eaten a human being yes or no? Yeah. Do you have body parts fridge? What's your freezer right now? Is there several? Shit little water bottles. You like the frozen water good. I can verify he don't have shit in his Fridge Ryan. Thank you for the donation anything else. We'll read them. Or one hundred dollars Beavis said the homing just got out of jail. Yesterday we would love to call in. We're going through so much and make our day and gave the names on dischord just got out of jail and gave us I'm. Just, got out of jail. Oh, his home he just got out of jail. homey. Yeah. Okay. It's about what that's like sure to anybody. Okay can message Muzak right now and discourse the poor were let's talk about prison dude fuck it. We have racks Roxanne Arc, A. R., A. X. Four, hundred dollars. Thank you for asking the real questions on the Bell Delphine episode. Guess. Thanks. I love using Zach as a proxy for all my perverted. That's my favorite. Wondering. I.

Trish Dr Drew Ben Luke van Luke Seven Bell Delphine Doctor Jew Roxanne Arc Zach Beavis A. R.
"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:59 min | 11 months ago

"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Hello, it's the weekend I'm Ben Luke this week like the rest of the art world. Has Been painted by the pandemic but has the term forced to be any more transparent? Do you know any more about the actual price of old? Joined by Georgina, Adam to discuss transparency in the market and following on from last week's de Accession podcast to react to the news that the Baltimore Museum of art withdrew the three works he was planning to sell this week at Sotheby's at the last moment. Also, this week I talked to David Blaney Brown, the curator of Turner's modern world a new show at Tate. Britain. In London, and in this episode is work of the week the artist John Desert about Laghrissi painting but Peter Brogel the elder currently at the National Gallery in London. Before that a reminder that we've launched a book club, the art newspaper with news excerpts, interviews, live events, and more. You can sign up to the monthly Book Club newsletter and indeed all of our newsletters at the newspaper. Dot Com Click on the knees link at the top right of the page. Now as we've discussed on this podcast before the art market has moved increasingly online doing the pandemic and one advantage about the online viewing rooms or. Is, the prices at the works are often visible. So here's the pandemic force, the art market to become more transparent, Jilting, Adam and editor at large of the newspaper gave us her thoughts but I we couldn't ignore some dramatic events in Yorkshire Rim. This week. Georgina. We're going to talk about the broader issue of transparency in the market in a bit but first, we have to address the news that's come overnight. We're talking on Thursday morning in the UK. and. Last night, there was supposed to be an auction which featured the Baltimore Museum of art works that we discussed at length on week's podcast. Now I I'm going to start by filling in some of the stuff that because a lots actually happens is this week. So first off to former board chairman from the Baltimore Museum of Art, have. said that they were withdrawing pledges to to effectively fifty million dollars to the institution. The BMA slightly disputed that claim that the these were pledges that were on the books as it were but still that's a significant development, and then probably even more significant news was the two artists at Pendleton and Amy Gerald resigned from the board of trustees, and that's a particular blow I think because Chris. Bedford on last week's podcast mentioned, amy shareholders are kind of key supporter in his aims that would have been really significant knock to that sort of consistent vision he had this was for this progressive aim..

Baltimore Museum of art the art newspaper Adam Amy Gerald Ben Luke London David Blaney Brown Georgina Sotheby BMA chairman Britain Bedford Turner Peter Brogel National Gallery Yorkshire Rim John Desert Laghrissi Pendleton
"ben luke" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

09:27 min | 1 year ago

"ben luke" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"We've gone a lot of positive and constructive criticism about it and we're going to take that all in the same way that we do with affair. We're GONNA sit down after this is all over and just say okay. What worked. What do we need to double down on? And what didn't work. And what do we need to add to make this even better on and so forth? But it's very much new territory for us that was mark speedway global director of Basel telling us about the online viewing rooms. But we go to. Jane Morrison Ben Luke Now to talk about the opportunities to look at other things with online or outside Ben..

Ben Luke Jane Morrison mark speedway global director Basel
"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

15:03 min | 2 years ago

"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"I'm Ben Luke later in the past, we have the latest in our occasional series of interviews with the Turner prize nominees. I spoke to Helen Kamat at the white chapel gallery, where her project for this is max Mara price has just been unveiled, but I this week for Vermeer in may. It was revealed that the composition of one of the most famous paintings, go reading a letter as an open window was not, as for me, had originally intended a painting of cupid on the wool has resurfaced on the canvas after two and a half centuries behind a layer of paint, during restoration work conservatives discovered to their surprise that the cupid, which dominates the upper right section of the picture was overpainted long after the artist's death and not by me himself, I spoke to tonight hurt. The senior conservative addressed melda Galleria about this extraordinary discovery I began by asking when it was realized that it wasn't. In fact, the Dutch master that had covered up the cupid when we started the restriction process in two thousand. And seventeen. We where in the opinion that the `overpainting was made by himself by himself, and we started to clean the painting. We didn't expect something else. We wanted to make it clean. We want to take off all the old one issues and, and. Retouching and all these things like which lie on the service like a sandwich, and during the cleaning process when our restore Dr shirts. Came close to this overpainted part and the war, he mentioned that there was a difference in the solubility of this part in comparison with the other parts, for instance, at the actions of the painting. Well also we've found a lot of oath retouching one ish. And so on. So that punt he's stopped, and then we together with our experts commission, which we had been installed sometime before we started a big discussion, and we decided to make some polls pencils and these ten Semple where the first key for, or I idea to think about it, too painful not. Done by him themselves as Penzone showed that between the original paint of the coupe and the over pending. There was a layer vanish end layer of dirt, and the Secondly or fun. And then still then the overpay came so that meant that there were time between the surface, or each paint layer of security done better MIR. We're open or to be seen worse to service and the time overpaid came on. And we found some reasons for thinking that this was the right idea later when some other points. Kurt one of the other points was when the restore started to remove a little part of this overpaying he found a wonderful outworked untouched surface, visit note crackly. So even the original Tenley affair mayor had been correct. And there was also a little scratch, we found that were happened, not by restorer by accident by that hadn't some two hundred and fifty years ago when she would still walls to resume. Let's go back to the third because this, of course, the keys is that this layer. Which means essentially that the, the painting was exposed to the air when the keep it was. So tell tell us about that. So you could you could tell it was dust. Yeah. That's very clear. If pending is exposed to humidity too air to. Yeah. Wherever tanks, I would say about two years or so, then you've found you can get a lot of dust endurance service. It's better normally happens today and the nice thing that we found that's between the two hundred layers and that meant a lot. Yes. So you can tell that. I mean, would the first layer varnish of been done by Mia for instance? I don't know. Was that a common technique that he would use? Yes. That, that is our assumption. We think that this first layer was done by himself. And there is. Tohru war, and still is able to serve parts of these or each varnish because he is removing the overpayment by the help of unskillful under the microscope. And so he is able to divide these different layers. And there's still some traces of the regional vanish on top of the regional. We are very proud about that's amazing, isn't it? Yeah. Because I suppose one is used to these things is the vanishes corrupted. It becomes discolored. And it's the first thing that you remove when you're restoring, isn't it? Yeah, yeah. But there was not enough time I think to to remove it. So if covered after some decay, it's by the over paint. Do you have any is there any providence, which tells you who may have done the overpainted Huma have painted over the cupid? That's worth also one of the most. Important questions we asked all self or I off myself. Yes. There are some interesting facts. The painting came to rest in seventeen forty two as a present to the collection of the elector, August, the sort that was father of August the strong the same as Oga strong from six. And when the painting restaurants, there were little description, and that's where we've found, we'll snow word about acute it or, or a little boy, or a siegler in Beck around on the wall. There was only the description of the girl, reading and window and room. That's, that's all we could found in this letter. So, and depending got a new frame basically, when it entered the dressing collection that happened to all of the paintings, when's it came to dress and they immediately called the new frame. So maybe you know this famous wrist and Rachael framing system. So from that we, we knew that the change had been done before. So we think that, that happened in the first part in the first half of the eighteenth century somewhere in, in one of the former collections with painting was, we have to ideas or to information about former positions. They want is the collection of the prince Karen young. He had wonderful big collection of paintings in Dutch and Flemish ones. And from his collection. The itunes off the sex and touch choose twenty nine tenting to acquire them for the six extra. And in the course of this acquisition, they got this thirties last as a present out of the deal, they called it in source and that's our familiar, but at the time when the painting, rife dress, and they called it Rembrandt. They didn't know anything about him. Yeah. They only saw that was wonderful. Very good painting. And they gave them the name Rembrandt the didn't it didn't occur to them. The style was entirely after keeping with with Rembrandt. Yeah. Yeah. And that's one idea when they decided to give the sex editor, wonderful present and important, president with big name, then they choose Rembrandt and say, maybe change the painting to be a bit more Rembrandt like before this is one that year so they feet by covering up acuity. It gave the navy. We, we know for sure that there was no conservational, or restauration reasons that as the surface of cupid pending is perfect, they're on no damages or big losses. Or what is that's, that's not the reason to do this over pending. It's must've been aesthetic reason within extraordinary. And, and of course, you know, ever since then since va me has come back to being a famous artist. Not forgotten anymore. This is this is been one of his most famous paintings. And I have to say, I love this painting in it's in the state that I've known it in such a beautiful painting because of that spannis extraordinary so to vividness the figure by the window has. What do you feel about how, how the revelation of the of the keep it changes the nature of the pitcher, of course it changed a lot? And there are. Lots of, of people who really gret about that. But having dealt with. Already a couple of years, I very soon started to compare this new discovery with all the other paintings in his over. And we of course, found soon that twisted cupid as a picture within picture. He did say what he's did several times in his over. So that was very common subject to include painting into his pending on the back side of wall of in intimate room. So that's not a surprise this fries was only that we found out that it was not him. Who did this change this overpayment it was another hand from a later time as we know from his over in other cases in other paintings, for instance, the Berlin young women with Bernie Klis, he trains, the walls and the back himself? And he also did a lot of corrections in some of his paintings, he corrected some persons of foreground, and some details someone where reform that in all in almost every of his paintings, also an hour dressed in girl with this letter. And so that was not surprised to me that he wanted to compose picture with in an intimate space with a girl into same way. Holy decorated. A lot of other rooms. Do you think in a way, the, the pitchers becomes somewhat less enigmatic now in the sense that because keep it is there hovering over her shoulder the, the letter, she's reading must be a love letter isn't it? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's right. Yeah, I myself I have to change my for my ideas I until last year. I always just cost depending that I said, wanted to hide the content of this letter he wants to hide the expression of painting. We don't know about this letter. Maybe it's it's a shopping list. Else. You know, and maybe you know that he himself, also changed some parts into foreground in real version. He edited, a big rumor wine glass, and the full ground of painting. And then he overpainted it by the green curtain, and he as I change the position of the girl, and he did a lot of things. And in this course I always thought you also wanted to cover the cupid on the back. He wanted to, to make the painting, a bit more hair hidden to have a secret and the painting as you, you told. But now we know we were wrong. He wanted to be open, what he also wanted to be in some of the other paintings. Now we know it's, it's a love letter. It's very clear. And tell me, I know that the half restored painting. You've already shown to the public, but it's it right. That it's now gone back into restoration, and it may well still be in restoration for another year or so, yeah, that's right. We had to close this little show just last Sunday, as we are closing the hook for a big resource -ment, and hanging. And depending goes back to store studio that happens tomorrow. And then the you restore will need some more time, we think about one year to finalize this history. This is not only to take off this over Penn. They are also YouTube parts on the actions on all just he has to continue and it's, it's big. So, in other words, you've got to attend to the sort of more rudimentary elements of your restoration, that you were intending to do in the first place before you made the big discovery about the cupid. Yes. Of course we in the first face we thought to be ready with painting this year. We are going to open the whole gallery this December and but it changed a lot. And with this discovery and all these investigation research, we have to do on which follows this curry, it takes much more time, of course. And now it's a huge project of two and a half or three years. Okay. Well, I wait with bated breath. And I'm sure lots of other for me. Love is will be to thank you so much for talking to us. It was a pleasure..

Rembrandt melda Galleria Ben Luke Helen Kamat YouTube Kurt white chapel gallery Turner va max Mara Vermeer Semple Penzone Tenley Mia Oga Karen young Penn siegler Beck
"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:42 min | 2 years ago

"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"And welcome to the newspaper podcast. I'm Ben Luke. Thanks for joining us this week. We talked to artists of different generations with new exhibitions in London later. I'll talk to Oskar Maria. The Colombian bone artist based in London who's just been shortlisted for the Turner prize. He has a new show paintings David's Verner gallery, but I how a Dina pin del her first ever sale, awakes mission in London is on now at the Victoria, Miro gallery, in Mayfair, a remarkable fact, given that pin Dell's Selo exhibition in New York was nineteen Seventy-three dealt was born in Philadelphia in one thousand nine hundred three and studied at Boston University. She then took the yell university. Art, course which was still influenced by the teaching style of its form. Of course leader, the great bath house artist Josef Albers, she quickly developed a parallel career as an artist and curator and writer, she was a curator in the department of Princeton straighted books at the museum of modern art in New York for twelve years between nineteen sixty seven and nineteen seventy nine and then moved to the state university of New York. Stony Brook where she is now a full professor as an artist in nineteen seventy two she co founded the air gallery in New York alongside nineteen other women artists including Nancy Spero and Judith Bernstein. It was the first not for profit artist run space for women artists in the US in those early years. She featured in now seminal exhibitions including contemporary, black artists in America in nineteen seventy one at the Whitney museum of American art. More recently, she featured in wack art, and the feminist revolution in two thousand seven at the museum of contemporary art Los Angeles and one in New York, and she's currently in soul of a nation. The show that began at Tate modern in two thousand seventeen and finishes its tour at the bowed in Los Angeles on the first of September, Pendle show, Victoria Miro features several of the pieces for which is best known her nineteen seventies abstract paintings. I went to the gallery earlier this week to speak to her. Howard Dean, we're in the Victoria bureau gallery and I was stunned to see how many words from the nineteen seventies here. Tell me about those works in the process that used to create them. Well, basically, it was a process that came by using play as an inspiration. And I don't know how God hole of a hole puncher in those days, there was a standard quarter-inch couldn't get now you can get them, the size of them, you know of the microphone here. But I just started playing with file folders on the states, we have Manila folders, and I cook them in strips, and then I started punching out homes, and then I glued, the strips together, and then I put, like a, a screw Maura curtain around, so it wouldn't have a hard edge, and I have no idea what got me started. I what I did was took on prime campus. So it's all sprayed into the fabric am I started on just layering and it shows in the in the pitch on the cattle layering had an eight foot ladder. I could get up then forget it now. And I just again, repeating the process I has studied color theory of with a protege off our Josef Albers. So very aware of how to manipulate color I had gone to Yale University school of architecture and we took. The color. Course Albers course. But top I his protege with both architects, and graphic designers, you had people, you know, from different points of view trying to understand his Siri. It's meant that I then had a collection of dots and I didn't I don't throw anything out. You can tell when comes to my place. They know I don't though anything I have storage bases all over the place. And I kept this radicals and that grew into another body of work. But before you made the circle based works you were actually a figurative artist when he yes, I agree, Philadelphia, which would be the school of Achim of the Pennsylvania Kadam headed attend the academy honors in Saudi our classes for children from eight years old on because of teacher is simply brought by parents, the school and said, this was in third grade, your doors talented in art in to take to museums art, galleries into meet artists, and they, they arranged that. But my train ferry figured if I went to Boston University for my BFA, and we kind of tease, the faculty bit, we would call the Brown. I saw school because they weren't interested in color you're interested in realism, and then I got into Yale. That's when we started moving away from figuration, but my teachers were angry at me, Boston, because they felt that I would be changed, but exposure to abstraction a, which indeed is what happened and my word just went through awkward periods. You know, on wall is a two year program. And when I graduated in sixty seven I work was more like figuring abstraction him this planet, and then I became aware, well while I was a graduate student. There was a student named Nazi Murata, who was plan with the circle, and all of a sudden fight catalysts, that became very interested in this Ropel ministered looking at Lori Poon's and all the museum you'll had ad Reinhardt. So I like the close value callers, and I. Just started fooling around with the kind of templates you might buy at architecture store and graph paper and I was sprang on graph paper, but using crayon to draw, so it would resist the water and I, I use a might of colored pencils on. But then that drifted into might not using a ready made template, but my punching holes, which led to the paintings, and then that led to the joins with the whole that were punched numbered as what so you have these sort of the circle was a sort of dominant motif, but you had in a way to different strands that you had the negative shake schools by the punching. And then you had the actual punch holes which used in a much scope. True. Yes. All the circle though, I think was a source of acts child because during segregation are silverware glassware and so forth was was marked with a red circle. And although Philadelphia was not odd it does your. Segregate it was defacto on. But my father mother, and I went to visit my mother's mother and while she was having a day with her mother and sisters, we drove into northern Kentucky on my grandmother's in southern Ohio's on the border and my father light root beer. So we stop by root beer. Stan EMMY, we're given you know, nice frosted y'all cold glasses of ruby on the bottom was a giant red circle. And I remember saying to my father, what is that? And he said, well, because we're not white, we have to use utensils. And so I think that stayed with me and it's like I'm hooked trying to make a circle of pleasant experience and I started looking around, you know, became interested in the strong me see, you know, the sun, the moon, whatever. How many forms in nature are actually circles and even kind of humorous because. As a child. My father was a mathematician, and whose degree included math and science. My mother was historian and geography which no longer is necessarily taught. And one of the first presence, I taught was a microscope. So I spent a lot of time looking at round things and weekly things swimming in Philadelphia drinking water. So I was exposed to the circle in a different way just as the more organic circles just in motion. So one of the things that are from three reading about your work was. You experienced some sort of level of criticism because you were abstraction somehow wasn't dealing with social issues. Give him the light to that. They're talking about the root. Okay. There was tension within the black community artistic community on between the people that were figured it and the people that were obstruct. I remember going to the studio museum Harlem, I met with the director, and he said, you have to go downtown shows, the white boys and another person actually been at Yale with me was in the next class. Bill Williams had the same experience. He was told to go somewhere else. And then on top of that, I guess, I had the nerve to be our he'll curatorial staff, the modder, which made some people really mad because they felt a why would open the doors wide was all I could do to get to work every day and deal with racism within the institution. So I would run into funny things. I remember I was showing with just above midtown. That was part of the Tate. Show and David Hammons was showing with them, or is it alternative space? And I remember Linda Bryant, and her on assistant, AC Hudgens, who ironically is now a trustee at the modern, but they went to a meeting of black artists, and they came by and said, oh, my God. They really hate you. I think part of the problem, too, was, I was not in New York person. And so most movement people were all your based, there was an African American women's group of where we at. But there was within the black movement animosity Eben, the director to this day is angry at me for what he thinks is my only form of work, which is abstract Shen. But what change my world was a first of all just being in a position to modern I could see a whole. Sort of Milonga things going on. Within the inside of the funding agencies and so forth. And what I found was that the on vigorous Touche's, and some of the alternative institutions were given line item money so that they would know every year, they would be getting a certain flat amount. And maybe they'll get more than that. But any institution that was African American or Asian. Indigenous, whatever they had to go through hoops every year to get through to get funding. So that was kind of may and all, but I could see it from the inside. So I mean I felt it was my duty to kind of expose what was going on, on then the turning point for me because that's what I left the museum on purpose. I said, on off, there was an exhibition at a alternative space. Call artists face and faster director. I think can't release you the Haywood I can't remember years ago. And the show was Oblak abstract joins in charcoal and one of the women who was doing, oh, she was observing institutions that receive money she was African American and. The postcard had gone out and the name on the postcard with nigger drawings. And it turns out, it was a white artist name was Donald Newman. And the receptionist one answering the phone when you several why does it have that title why? And the receptionist said, well on the jaw joint charcoal truffles black and black nigger while that set off a whole pot of worms because I mean, the group that protested it, we were a multiracial group Lucille, apart, myself Lowry SIMS of Camille Billips, even had a teach in on all the first time he went in David hems, as well. In fact, he came to my lawf- to, to make banners protests and the police shut us out. They when we showed up the locked the door and call the police. So then we went back again, and I remember we were sitting on the floor and one of the directors. Friends. I assume artists said, what he how dare you come down here until what to do. This is a white neighborhood. Now they had been given money for expansion arts means to reach into communities of color, and the used to bring artists from Scotland. So it became it, it was a mess, and the attitude at that point was because at that point, not that many white women more, even showing. The point was can explain it. If if, if a white male artist shows, and you have a negative opinion that is considered censorship, even if women are showing people of color, aren't showing that's not censorship. And then what they would do a straw, the quality well their workers in good enough. But then they don't with the was about because they never looked at it. So I got really angry. And one thing that came out of it was on a see the protests in March, seventy nine I was in bed car accident and seventy nine in October change jobs, a went to Stony Brook university. I've been there for years, and I did the tape free white and twenty one because it was a reaction to the white women's movement..

New York Philadelphia director Josef Albers Boston University London museum of modern art museum of contemporary art Los Whitney museum of American art US Yale University school of arch Stony Brook Oskar Maria Ben Luke Howard Dean Los Angeles Boston Nancy Spero Princeton straighted David
"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

10:57 min | 2 years ago

"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Puck cursed. I'm Ben Luke regulus Muno that last year's most visited exhibition anywhere in the world was heavenly bodies fashion, and the Catholic imagination at the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York. Well in this podcast we focus on the fashion. Extravaganza for this year camp notes on fashion. We'll talk to Valerie Steele, the director and chief curator of the museum at the fashion institute of technology to get her take on the show. But first, this week to the latest exhibition at the British Museum, the largest exhibition of Mangga Japanese comic books and graphic novels ever, staged outside Japan is now open. It's a vast show which introduces us to manga style, and I can know goofy is Oregon's historic Japanese prints and theatre design and its path from four panel cartoons in newspapers to a global graphic novel animation phenomenon. The league curator of manga is Nicole Coolidge, roost, many. Yeah, accuser the museum and professor, the university of East Anglia and she joins me now Bacau, the definition. That you give in the catalog for the characters form the word Mangga pictures, run riot and pitches unbound. Tell us something about that. Well, what's interesting is the characters their Chinese characters, and they came about they started to be used. I think probably one of the earliest uses was by subtle killed in who was man-about-town nadeau period, TNT century. He was a fashion designer he was QA artist. He did incredible wonderful things, but it didn't mean what manga means today. It meant just really loose sketches. And so he used it. And then hoax, I famously used it for his sketchbook now hoax, I in his Yoma Hong in his books of, of, of illustrated books in tales actually approach is something that could be it's not manga, but it could be said to be closer to what manga is. But his hoax, I manga are not Munger and, and so the picture. So the translation made by Tim Clark is pictures, run riot, which I think gets to the heart of it, but. It literally means more loose, sketchy pictures. We've decided with this exhibition because manga isn't used in the same way. Now as it was in the period, where using the phonetic on the Kateyana manga to express him what we believe is the expression manga today, so you took about hook side there. And, and, and what's interesting about show is that you do go back into the history of image making, which which is kind of brought us to where we are. Now, why was it important to do that? And how far back can you go? What's really interesting that you mentioned that. And thank you, in Japan in, general, this doesn't happen when you have manga shows you have Ginga these wonderful drawings, and they line them up, or they're in-depth about one story, and they have a lot of visuals, but they don't tend to embrace the history, and that's perhaps, because it's problematic. A lot of people have different opinions. But you can see and being in the British Museum which has the largest Japanese print collection outside of. Pan. Really pretty impressive printed culture, not just woodblock prints. You can really see that formats persevere and formats without the pass form months wouldn't have the present. So we wouldn't have manga in the way that we have day, if we didn't have the past and, and visual storytelling, in Japan, it depends on what you want to take it, but I mentioned this in the catalog, but I my specialty is our archaeologist is material culture and, and three DR objects and you look at your we, so that's three hundred to three hundred AD. You look at these metal dole taco their metal bells, and they have frames, and they have images in them, and they have storytelling. I mean much like the train tiles, you know, you know, you, you get that in England as well fourteenth century thirteen fourteen fifteen century, so that's not unusual to have frames and storytelling in that in Japan, you have this very rich history of storytelling, but it only becomes manga much later and we wanted to show this rich history a little bit not. Too much a little bit. But we also wanted to provocatively we put three examples of QA I'm a hoax. I a Cuneo Sheena yoshitoshi with contemporary manga and one married with Cohen, Kyosai painting. And we did this because the contemporary artists are specifically looking back. So auto Mukasey hero. When I met him, you know, he's famous for his accuser, but he did many other things he did some wonderland and he did cyanide only pond. Goodbye, Japan and he said that he was influenced by that print by Kunio. She the British Museum has fantastic collection of canoe sheep, but not that print so we had to borrow it from Scotland. But that's why we did it. So we're not in that section saying that goes from QA to manga were saying that contemporary artists look back in their past, and draw from it, and draw inspiration from it one thing I just want to point out, though, that most people don't know is we have yoshitoshi. It's called a hunch day, which is a under drawing for a woodblock print. And with put. That with in way. Takahiko bugaboo on and what's fascinating. And, and Tim Clark actually showed me this when we brought our no key a few years ago to the British Museum collections to look out. And he said, wow, this looks like manga, I draw this, and, and there is something very gruff about it. These, these drawings were hand-drawn by the artists, and they would be pasted on the woodblock print and carb through, so they're normally destroyed. So they're not meant to ever be shown. But this one was never made. So we have it. What's interesting is if you look at the exact size of it, it's the exact size is, again, Joe as Japanese drawing and also would buck prince and I hadn't realized this new this with Ginga, but drew Japanese Gengo drawings for manga are, are kind of shortened, or cut to eighty one percent. So the their trimmed and it's exactly the same woodblock prints to eighty one percent that's not random. There is a format that continues and manga takes the previous format. We're not talking about content. We're talking about the form. As interesting and Naito so that you taking great care in the show to introduce people to the kind of the grammar, the conventions the formats that you encounter in, in maga-, one of the kind of key aspects of this is that it is a very image lead kind of storytelling in the sense that in British or American COMEX on up on a mat appear exam, for instance will be written out, and we'll say splat, but in manga, there was a whole language of visual terminology for this till tells more about that. Well, what's best knitting, I think, and I think this has a lot to do with Japanese. I mean I could be being reductionist. I don't know. But Japan, had a very rich language. Very Mitch on a on poetic language, before there was writing. And, and so you have this whole rich language. And then you get writing introduced in the fifth century and the writing the Chinese writing through Korea China for Buddhism for state formation for state and documents doesn't really fit. The language. So there's always this kind of in Japanese as you do. There's always this kind of mismatch between between that's two phonetic systems, you have a character system. You have a number of different things, and in Japan, it's often what's not said, then what said insane with mum and the action. What's not shown as opposed to what shown. And so, I think all of this involves the imagination specifically onomatopoeia involves the imagination the sound of something plopping in, but it's not just the sound it's the way that the on Amman p is drawn on the pages. And that's why really object to the translation of it. Splat splat on the page instead of having the Japanese graphic there, we created this professor Mona cut his British Museum adventure book in two thousand eleven was done by Hachinoe Yukinobu serialized big comic in Japanese than we translated in published in British Museum press, and we specifically left all the on a Pia in there in the regional Japanese. And then we made a coded system in the back so that people could know what the. Sounds were splat and then to know what the sounds were in Japanese. I think it's very much part of the culture, and I think it's what makes makes their poetry, so strong and also adds to why their pictures are so resonant. Tell us about when mango became the form, that it is now in the sense that it seems to me that there was this yesterday existed in vogue in nineteenth century coming into the twentieth century. But this is really important moment in the postwar period, where Japan is by the US and, and American comic books come over, and they sort of fusion of languages, American comic books on European comic books, abundance name, the number of things actually becoming over before the war, you know, so there was a build up. It didn't just happen boom that, you know, at the war, you know. And that's why you know, George McManus billionth father you know, enough a number of these were introduced and in, in fact, we have show, John, this really early comic that was based on pip when freedom. Squeak you know so so that was from the early twentieth century. So you so you have this tradition, but you're completely right? Because what happens in right in the postwar period. Really from, you know, the media occupation by American forces in Japan. They bring in Disney, they bring in not just the comics. I think what's more important is the enemy Shen, and they and they bring in this, and that and for people who have been starved who've been under censorship. They're still under censorship under the occupation, by the way. But, but different type. And, and so, I think people were really it was pretty dire. And in that period, I think that they were really in need of something, and this gave it to them and, and really deeply influenced them. No more so than Texaco summa, you know, a young man studying to be a doctor at this point. And so in nineteen forty seven when he created his new Treasure Island I mean, he was just seventeen and this is two years after the war and sold four hundred. Thousand copies. This this, this work that we examined in the exhibition we put next to it because Ryan homework. Fantastic scholar Tokyo University has shown very carefully where he borrowed the imagery from from, you know, Mickey Mouse from Donald Duck. But as Ron Hct says I'm we showed the comics. But it's really the animated took it from and what's more important than the actual imagery that he took is the way that the imagery starts to move. It's an animated form. It fundamentally changes the way that the pictures on the on the page and this changes everything. So when we look mango, all always looking at different kind of storytelling across the panels to western I mean, oh, yes, there's the reading from right to left. But you're saying that there's also a different kind of movement across those panels which happens from western Khimik. Yes, there definitely is a different movement. And I think it's influenced by western western, but, but it's fundamentally there is a, a Japanese style of reading..

Japan British Museum Metropolitan Museum of art Tim Clark Oregon fashion institute of technolog professor Ginga university of East Anglia Valerie Steele Ben Luke regulus Muno Nicole Coolidge Puck Bacau Yoma Hong England Sheena yoshitoshi New York Texaco Munger
"ben luke" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"ben luke" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"The best daybreak Middle East trade tensions weighed heavily markets once again this week on Tuesday, the US was ready new tariffs against China. Even as President Trump said he will may g Jinping the next month's g twenty summit, the trade representative's office has released list of about three hundred billion dollars in products to be taxed, we got more on the trade dispute with Jenny Lennox, and Ben, Luke senior multi asset strategist at State Street global markets definitely contain some items that you wouldn't think -ssarily come from China because it's all the remaining goods, but on the other hand, they also will capture smartphones and laptops, and things that will really impact the consumer, I think what surprised me a little bit. Is that the US is going from maximum pain here. But it is excluding Farmaceutica and medical goods. So that was surprising to me and surprising, on the Chinese side was that they actually honored their promise to not increase the, the tariff on autos and auto parts as they have pledged to do a couple months ago. So that was the pricing to me. Jenny. Visit great debate by the strategy from the Chinese. I mean there's a lovely line from Donald Trump saying, you know, trying to have some retaliation, but they can't be very sustainable. It's ironic kind of use of rhetoric and boomberg opinion, the number of pieces that could be Boeing, which act says one of the real king lines of defense for China. Do you think that we could see the Chinese ratchet to that level of counseling may even some bullying orders? I think at this point anything is possible to be honest. I think Trump's rhetoric, of course, is shifting day by day, multiple times a day when he was actually warning the Chinese against ratcheting up, escalation retaliating, and now we see that the Chinese, I actually ready to do something without saying what it really is. I think anything's possible, the US is going through its domestic processes of export controls and investment restrictions. So that's something that the US still has an it's back pocket and. You know that could all become a little more hawkish than it is going right now. So I think if they actually do go after Boeing Trump has some, some things in his back pocket for sure, so Jenny the G twenty summit is going to feel a long way off for a lot of investors in today's market. Are there any sort of ways of de escalating tension before that? What are we expect a, I think, at this point it probably takes a presidential meeting, because as you have seen through Trump's Twitter engagement. He's making this became a lot more political in the last week, he often cites Biden, which I think he believes his, his opponent and the twenty twenty presidential election. And you know, Biden is weak on China. So I think at this point it either takes an intervention of Trump's own party. We feel a lot of GOP senators in the US, really, really worried about Agra retaliation against soybeans, and other things. But also, you know, a presidential visit because Xi Jinping has on multiple occasions, actually, succeeded in talking Trump down from hawkish actions. Like the sanctions, for example, or in December when they last met the tariff increase was was halted for a couple of months. So I think deescalation really takes talk between the two leaders. All right. Bloomberg's trade reporter, Jenny Lener. Thanks so much details on that let's bring in Ben Luke, as global macro strategist at State Street club markets. I'm curious, we seem to have equity market sort of take the brunt of a lot of this action. Why aren't we seeing more volatility show up in something like currency markets? Well, I think the majority was the biggest reason to this with definitely be the fact that global central banks are playing very accommodative stance right now. And it's not really just the fed. It's really what we've seen from, from the which became the first central Bank this year, too. To reduce rates RV possibly being the next or Bank of Canada being one. But what we're seeing is that many of these central banks are now having a very clear trajectory in the near future, that they're not going to basically raise rates. So liquidity is I would say very much other fluid story now. And then more importantly, you'll have that much surprise anymore from that side of the soil. So which is why you're seeing volatility being well, compressed and that's really the reason why I think both the bond market and the market is being, I would say much more shadow from, from the trade war, because a trade war is still at the end of affecting more earnings story. Whereas the bond Mark, maybe that's more geared towards the inflation stories and that's really not a nonconcern right now, I think for from symbols economies right now. Yeah. Ben get day. That's the point that Morgan Stanley actually made one, one of the esscalation could wipe out some of the profit, margins I wanna talk to you about what's going on in McCarthy. Mark the Euan. Everybody's fascinated by that we break seven if we ratchet higher on the ten minutes. This is hi, this is a friend of the market. I think this is a signal from the POC, sending the live blog is saying this morning. We're looking at high up five hundred twenty basis points again, this is reflective of what happened back in two thousand sixteen. What message do you take from the high cobble? Well, I think a couple of things when I when I looked at the overall funding currency or funding market, right now, you're seeing the sense that the Chinese are not really an urge to really pull through with the writer monitor stimulus in the short term. If if that's the case would actually see a lot of the high voice, or you're gonna shy onshore market, being or steadily falling. But what you are seeing is that they're still taking a measured approach, and the over monitor stimulus package, you're still seeing basically, the credit crackdown in the off-balance shadow banking side of the story on the other hand, what you're seeing is the Bank loans, the corporate bond issue, that's still getting bit of attraction, which is obviously providing a lot of fundings to the seventies in the private enterprises. So what I am seeing that the Chinese are not really that concerned and given that I think the retaliation so far has been measurable, and I would say, minimal at the very least so we are still seeing the base case scenario may come down in terms of the ability, but we're still sticking with the base case that there will be a trade deal coming. Through between the US.

President Trump US China Trump Jenny Boeing Trump Ben Luke Biden Middle East Jenny Lennox Boeing Farmaceutica GOP Xi Jinping Bank of Canada Jenny Lener representative
"ben luke" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"ben luke" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So much about. Let's get back to our top story. The US is ready new tariffs against China. Even as President Trump says he'll meet Chichan ping at next month's g twenty summit. The trade representative's office has released a list of about three hundred billion dollars worth of products to be caq, Bloomberg trade reporter Jenny Leonard joins us now, Jenny. So we have this list of tariffs from Trump. And we have the first inklings of what China's retaliation might be talk to me about that list where there any surprises because I got to say I'm pretty surprised that anyone in the US imported walrus meat from China, but that was one of the items listed. Yeah. I think the list definitely contain some items that you wouldn't think necessarily come from China because it's all the remaining goods, but on the other hand, they also will capture smartphones, and laptops, and things that will really impact the US consumer. I think what surprised me a little bit is that the US is gone. Maximum pain here, but it is excluding pharmaceutical and medical goods. So that was surprising to me and surprising on the Chinese side. Was that they actually honored their promise to not increase the the tariff on autos and auto parts as they have pledged to do a couple months ago. So that was surprising to me. Jenny is a great deal of debate about the strategy from the Chinese. I mean, there's lovely line from Donald Trump himself saying, you know, China can have some retaliation. But they count be very sustainable. It's ironic kind of use of rhetoric and Bloomberg opinion. Right. A number of pieces that it could be Boeing which acts as one of the real key lines of defense for China g think that we could see the Chinese ratchet to that level of counseling, maybe even some Boeing orders. I think at this point anything is possible to be honest. I think Trump's rhetoric, of course, it's shifting day by day or multiple times a day. So when he was actually warning the Chinese against ratcheting up escalation retaliating, and now we see that the Chinese are actually ready to do something without saying what it really is. I think anything's possible. The US is going through its domestic processes of export controls and investment restrictions. So that's something that the US still has an it's back pocket and. That kicked all become a little more hawkish than it is going right now. So so I think if they actually do go after Boeing Trump has some some things in his back pocket for sure so Jenny the G twenty summit is going to feel a long way off for a lot of investors in today's market. Are there any sort of ways of de escalating the tension before that what are we expecting? I think at this point it probably takes a presidential meeting because as you have seen through Trump's Twitter engagements. He's making this became a lot more political in the last week. He often cites Biden, which I think he believes will be his his opponent in the two thousand twenty presidential election and hope Biden is is weak on China. So I think at this point it either takes an intervention of Trump's own party. We see a lot of GOP senators in the US really really worried about Agra retaliation against soybeans. Another thing. But also a presidential visit because Xi Jinping has on multiple occasions actually, succeeded in talking Trump down from hawkish actions like the sanctions, for example, or in December. When they last met the tariff increase was was halted for a couple of months. So I think a de-escalation really takes a talk between the two leaders. All right. Bloomberg's trade reporter Jenny Leonard. Thanks so much for bringing us the latest details on that. Let's bring in Ben Luke as global macro strategist at State Street closed markets. We got to start with the cross asset market reaction to what we've seen this morning. And in recent days, I'm curious we seem to have had the equity market sort of take the brunt of a lot of this action. Why aren't we seeing more volatility show up in something like currency markets will a think to the majority of it's the biggest reason to this? With definitely be the fact that global central banks are playing a very calm. Addictive stance right now. And it's not really just the fed. It's really what we've seen from from the Rb ENZA, which became the first central Bank this year to reduce rates are possibly being the next length or Bank of Canada being the other one. But what we're seeing is that many of these central banks are now having a very clear trajectory in the near future that they're not going to basically raise rates, so liquidity is I would say very much a very fluid story now. And then more importantly, you'll have them a surprise anymore from from that side of the soil. So which is why you're seeing volatility being well, compressed? And that's really the reason why I think both the bond market and the market is being I would say much more shadow from from the trade war because the trade war is still at the end of the day affecting more of the earning story, whereas the bond market of the effects, maybe that's more geared towards inflation story, and that's really not a nonconcern right now. I think for for most economies right now. Yeah. Ben good day, gen that's the point that Morgan Stanley actually made one of the one of the esscalation could wipe out some of the profit margins. I wanna talk to you about what's going on in the currency market, the Euan. Everybody's fascinated by that we break seven if we ratchet higher on the ten this this is high boy, this is a friend to the market. I think this is the signal from the PB of C at sending about the t live blog is saying this morning. We're looking at high three month high both up five hundred twenty basis points again. This is reflective of what happened back in two thousand sixteen. What message do you take from the hike of high bowl? Well, I think a couple of things when I when I look at the overall funding currency refunding market right now, you're seeing the sense that the Chinese are not really an urge to really pull through with greater monitor stimulus in the short term. If that's the case, you would actually see a lot of the high boys or even the shy boys in the onshore market being or steadily falling. But what you are seeing is that they're still taking a measure approach and the overall monitor stimulus package. You're still seeing basically the credit crackdown in the off-balance shadow banking side of the story on the other hand, what you're seeing is at the Bank loans, the corporate bond issue that's still getting bit of attraction, which is obviously providing a lot of the funding to the assemblies and the private enterprises. So what what I am seeing is that the Chinese are not really that concern and given that I think the retaliation so far has been measurable, and I would say minimal at the very least. So we are still seeing the base case scenario may come down in terms of the probability, but we're still sticking with the base case that there will be a trade deal coming. Through between the US and China on that. No, what do you think it would take for the market too? Because I think most people agree with you is that there will be some sort of trade deal. It's just a question of what shape that deal might come in. And when what would it take for the market to stop pricing that in and what the market look like if there was absolutely no possibility of a trade deal. Right. So the first thing I will look at is the may eighteenth deal or the deadline between the auto tears of the section to thirty two. I think that could be the first signal of whether or not this Trump or the President Trump's issuance of this overall auto terrorist will actually be escalated further. So that will be the first thing. I would look at the second thing is on if you actually look at the the remaining of the actual tariff list, right? There's still the three hundred. So odds billion tariff lists that is still not really being position into this overall tariff plan, if President Trump or basically, the US aside suit within the next week possibly issue. Full blown trade war. The full blown deal with twenty five percent that could be more of a signal. I guess to me that we could actually here until it's no deal and in the last week, basically for the China China again, they can only use sixty billion because that's the the the number that they have right? But if we actually see them selling US treasuries or actually indicating to the market that we're going to let go of the per se that will be more of a no deal for me. But so far not so much of a case. All right. Ben hold that thought you're staying with us. Still ahead. Why Morgan Stanley.

US President Trump China Trump Jenny Leonard Bloomberg Boeing Trump China China Ben Luke Morgan Stanley reporter Boeing GOP Chichan representative Xi Jinping Biden Bank of Canada
"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Put cursed. I'm Ben Luke in our last podcast, we discussed in debt, the huge retrospect to Andy Warhol's work at the Whitney New York in this book cursed we continue to explore Warhol's, life and aunt we'll hear about another New York exhibition these vast works shadows. But first up is the artist Jeremy della as young man, he was invited by Warhol to the factory in New York. And he's continued to blue some of the key elements of Warhol's work in his own practice. Jeremy is with me. Now, Jeremy if we could begin with your first experiences of Andy Warhol, we use a teenager looking at his work somewhere. It would definitely been probably through the Maryland through maybe seeing that Tate. Yeah. As it was then. And just being aware of him through the velvet underground photographs of him. Just threw him being quite a dominant character, really and. Hearing stories about him and being treat by dressed. I was a bit the Gulf so as of sixteen year old so he had quite Goth look at she the head wasn't black obviously, just the whole look and Moines black, but he you know, he did wear black, but he was just a very appealing character. We use of re because I certainly my first experiences of Warhol was reading about him by musical artists. Talking about him in music, magazines and stuff like that. Do you sort of art conscious as a young man, I was conscious in that respect? Yes. And so I did I knew about him. I think I probably really photographs of him which were more intriguing him the lease funny. Looking people and doing stuff looking very bland can with the way and in these situations sewn? So I think he's very painting. Vissel dressing up aspect of him was very painting. And his identity, creating this identity from self if you're not less than you quite interested in that aspect of people when they do that. And the fact that he looked like was really good time. Even though you'd never didn't really small that much. But it just looked like he was misbehaving in public when he was out everything he did was form of rebellion vide- and his whole life was was essentially rebellion against no matter. And I think that I think is something that we have to really that's a really important part of him ready. And so when you were studying history, the cool told we you already very contemporary art focused that stage. I wasn't. I mean has the court old was not contemporary are absolutely. It was the app so upset so is an interest. I had anyway. Right. So of where contemporary art, and I was really wherever characters like Goodwin, George and Warhol, and you know, these. People men mainly they were intriguing characters and in a way Goodwin. George took a lot from Mojo. I would argue temps that personas fell most not exactly robotic demean of the this of blank demeanor and just start watching and so on and so just the work. Looks will hold in dog, you know, the colors and the techniques. So yes, I was interested in artists who characters as well. And so you went to the Anthony exhibition in nineteen Ninety-six and that she met we'll ho there while he saw he was doing sign. He was signing things on rushed to the table. And go thing sign, and I did go so few things. And then afterwards one of his own Saracho said, oh, come come. Come out tell on Thursday night on the cheese day and just hang out concoc- replaced it. Well, I will do that. I'm just going to go and do that. I took a friend with me, and we'd had this funny. Couple of hours with Warhol when his own sororities people sitting around can you set the scene? It's in the Ritz, right? It's in the rich. It's a we dressed up a little bit may make Chris in suits. And of funny. Hats took bag of props with us like hat's weeks, those sorts of things we didn't know what to expect. The both of it nervous. And we went to the sweet the ritzy hat, and we won't ten and they'll just a bunch of middle aged men sing around watching Benny hill with the sound turned down and Roxy music greatest hits type playing in blouse to which is think about is pretty good. So of installation in its own, right?.

Andy Warhol Jeremy della Vissel Tate New York Maryland Ben Luke George Moines Goodwin Gulf Benny hill Chris Saracho sixteen year
"ben luke" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"ben luke" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"I'm laurin hanson producer on studio three sixty the music of luke cage a mix of original score reported songs and live performances that sound comes from composers adrian young and ali shaheed muhammad the dj from tribe called quest they take their cues from the show's breeder cheo coker a former music journalist show run it just permeates every decision that we make on the show because we're not just making decisions about plot the whole thing to feel a certain way it's it's a very nineties new york hip hop vibe luke cage's story in the marvel universe is that he's a man who feels no pain the backstory on how he got this superpower is that he had been in prison and was subjected to an experiment that made a skin impenetrable to weapons like knives and guns in season one he wrestled with the responsibility of this new found strength while still grieving the loss of his wife a connors who had died violently season two is a lou cage where he's different he's different from the standpoint that he's accepted being a hero he's also now a local celebrity and he shaina find that balance between being a loc celebrity but at the same time fighting crime and using his reputation by name to stamp out crime and so where we open and this first sequence is really kind of the start of that the opened with a black screen the only sound is shook ones by mob deep the nineties rap group from queens as soon as you hear this click don't immediately parkway offense same on man's mob is about ben luke play by mike colter appears it's night and lucas in shadow facing away from us he pulls his hoodie over his head camera cuts to his open palm which holds a small plastic bag that has his name printed on one side enforced notice that it's it's the yellow packet would you know his name in black because lacking yellow is kind of signature colors the camera pulls us into this dingy dimly lit room and we see about a dozen women they're wearing hairnets protective face masks and no shirts just bras they're standing around a table and we can see they're making and filling those yellow luke cage package we're a drug lab where a very potent heroin mistreating a call cage we see has the sauna bills that coming to walk from the room so we get out running out and loot at this everybody knows that we is steps out of the shadows really goes hey you gotta know we try boom hits the music again so you understand that the music you're hearing from his pov and so he's basically is kind of fighting his rhythm and this is kind of his workout.

producer connors lou cage mike colter lucas heroin laurin hanson adrian young new york shaina
"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"ben luke" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"To the art newspaper podcast i'm ben luke later in the podcast to john a comfort the british artist about his show opening this week in new york but first football or soccer to our us friends is not a wasting natural bedfellow with visual arts but in fact there's a rich seam of art that relates to the beach game eddie franco the art critic for time out london has recently launched a magazine which explores this rich territory and now with the world cup in full swing he's co curated exhibition in london dedicated to contemporary works on this theme who'd collective failure the exhibition is set in a mockup of british pub with free beer for visitors and live world cup games on view alongside the works by various contemporary artists i went to the gallery just in hammond projects to any before we actually took about the specifics of the addition it seems to me the connecting football is kind of become your life's work the moment can you tell me about that boy is doing it it really has taken over my entire life which is nice it's nice to have a passion that somehow ends up becoming something bigger than just a hobie started because i wanted to start a magazine about on football which is and it was about two years ago that idea came about and it wasn't until about a year ago that i met justin hammond who is my business partner and he was the one who pushed me to actually start making the magazine and there was there was just so much in the subjects and i think people can be quite dismissive of football people can think that football is low culture that the amount of snooty reactions you get when you tell people you you have to leave the gallery opening to go what's your team the mounts reactions you get from people who think is better than football is staggering and i think it's an incredibly patronizing thing because football is global it's everyone it's got a lot to it that should appeal to everyone and i'm not saying everyone has to like football but i think you should have respect for football because it appeals to so many people and what's being such an amazing experiences digging through the various kinds of art that have dealt with football and seeing how much they pull out and how much they can use to express incredible ideas and i always say that i don't really care about lowry's painting football because i didn't think actually tell you very much i think quite straightforward i much more interested in the classic example that his perino and doug's gordon's did dan at twentieth century portray which uses one footballer during one game to express a huge amount of aesthetic ideas a huge amount of consent concepts about the way we interact about how we make stars out.

perino hammond london eddie franco soccer john dan gordon doug art newspaper lowry partner justin hammond british pub football new york ben luke two years