14 Burst results for "Ben Lieberman"

"ben lieberman" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

Astronomy Cast

03:59 min | 6 d ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

"Support themselves is not planets. But you said a Jupyter like a gas giant that is ten times more massive than the earth. Could you have one that is two times more massive than the earth? 5 times? If you have a ball of hydrogen, you can turn it into a gas giant. If you have a disk of hydrogen and it's around a dwarf star, can you get a fairly low mass small gas planet? Yes, I don't know the lower limit on it. It would probably be order of multiples of an earth mass and the reason that I say that is because you need the rocks to come together to be able to draw all the hydrogen in because it doesn't take a whole lot of energy to send a hydrogen particle off it escape velocities. So you're going to have to build up all of the rocks and heavier materials first to hold onto the lighter mass atoms. So it's like a certain recipe that has to come together to get to get what you need, still. It's pretty pretty fascinating. Well, super cool, Pamela. We'll talk about gas trans again in another 600 episodes or so. That sounds good Fraser. I will be here for that. And hopefully we'll have more spacecraft with us. Yeah, we will. We will. All right. Thanks, mama. Thank you so much Fraser. And thank you to all of you who support us through Patreon. This week our episode is brought to us by Thomas septra berry gallin Stephen veldt Jordan young Kevin Lyle Jeanette wink, mountain goat, Andrew cholesterol, Brian Kegel, venkatesh chari David trog, the giant nothing of aurora leopard Joe hook David. Geralt Schweitzer Bill Hamilton, Jean Francois rosette, caucus of verif, coco serif. It looks like chocolate angel translated. Bill Hamilton, Laura kedleston, Joshua Pearson, Robert plasma, Les Howard Joe holstein, Jack mudd, Gordon dewes, Adam annis Brown, Sean Matt's helga Björk, Frank tippin, Alexis, Ben Lieberman, William backer, wanderer, M1 O one William Andrews just Collins, Travis Dell zell, Harold bargain, Hagen, Barton hoggin, Matthew horseman, David Gates, David, Philip walker, Niki lynch, Scott Bieber, Alex Cohen, Brian Cox, Justin proctor and Paul Hayden. Thank you all so very much. We are able to support Beth Nancy Richard Ali, everyone behind the scenes because of you and those humans really keep Fraser and I on the straight and narrow and we need that help. Thanks everyone. Goodbye. Astronomy cast is a joint product of universe today and the planetary science institute. Astronomy cast is released under a Creative Commons attribution license. So love it, share it and remix it, but please credit it to our hosts, Fraser Cain and doctor Pamela gay. You can get more information on today's show topic on our website astronomy cast dot com. This episode was brought to you thanks to our generous patrons on Patreon. If you want to help keep this show going, please consider joining our community at Patreon dot com slash astronomy cast. Not only do you help us pay our producers a fair wage. You will also get special access to content right in your inbox and invites to online events. We are so grateful to all of you who have joined our Patreon community already. Anyways, keep.

Bill Hamilton Fraser Patreon Thomas septra berry gallin Stephen veldt Kevin Lyle Jeanette Andrew cholesterol Brian Kegel venkatesh chari David trog Joe hook David Geralt Schweitzer Jean Francois rosette verif coco serif Laura kedleston Joshua Pearson Robert plasma Les Howard Joe holstein
"ben lieberman" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:40 min | 10 months ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"A 80 11 were joined by Ben Lieberman, senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. And I wanted to talk with Ben about the Biden attack on the Keystone Pipeline for the benefit of so called climate change, which we certainly can't do in any way, shape or form. Uh Biden is reversed President Trump's approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline, which means thousands and thousands of jobs lost. And an increase in the price of gasoline because we will no longer be energy dependent, right? I think you're you're absolutely right now. Granted, One project is gonna have that picket of it and the impact on the price we see at the pump, But the fact that President did it on the very first day at the message that there's going to be ah lot more of the same. But this one project is already having a significant impact on jobs already there are about 1000 workers. Doing preliminary work on sections of the pipeline. They've lost their jobs, and it would have been in excess of 10,000 jobs that would have been employed in construction of this pipeline, and those are the kind of union jobs That the union leaders to strongly supported Joe Biden for president. Yeah, I think they're going to regret that, as they see those jobs lost and on the whole thing is been it had have any impact on Climate. It's not going to change the climate one way or another. I mean, even if man did cause climate change, even if he did, and I don't believe that man had anything to do with it. I think it's Nature. Our little contribution to it would be nothing compared to China and India and the rest of the world. Absolutely. The Canadians have said that this is the pipeline that would have brought Canadian oil into the United States. The Canadians have made very clear they're going to produce that oil and bring it to market anyway. And to the extent that they don't Um and to the extent that maybe other projects are are stopped in the U. S, and I should also add that President Biden has also blocked new oil drilling on federal lands. Not just the transport of oil. But the production of oil in the U. S. Well every barrel that that we don't produces a barrel that OPEC on Russia and others can pick up the slack on. So it's not even clear that overall oil production will go down. And even if it did go down a little bit, it would be An extremely small impact, even assuming the worst of climate change. Oh, yeah, It's just crazy and again. Man cannot have an impact on climate change. That's something it's done by nature. I mean, we came out of the ice age when there were no men around no cars and all that kind of stuff, and somehow we Went to today's climate, and it's something that's controlled by mother nature, and certainly not man. And we're gonna pay for that, for sure as Jobs were lost and gas prices go up and all these other things, But, Ben, thank you for joining us this morning on a M Tampa Bay. Well, thank you. Ben is a senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. And of course, they're very much concerned about this. It is coming up on 8 15, and we Go to the newsroom now and Chris strengthen. No stimulus checks if you make more than $40,000 a year. That's the proposal from Republicans who want to cap those eligible for stimulus checks at 40,000 for individuals and 80,000 for couples. Democrats have proposed 75,000 year for individuals and 200,000 for couples. Top Republican in the Senate and a new, controversial GOP member of the House are exchanging heated words. Mitch McConnell called Georgia representative Marjorie Taylor Greene, a cancer on the Republican Party for her belief in a number of conspiracy theories. Green responded to the statement saying week Republicans are the real scourge of the party. Much of the East Coast is under a blanket of snow is a powerful winter storm smacks the region with no signs of slowing down. Snow is still falling from New Jersey up to Maine and some parts of Jersey recorded more than 2 FT yesterday while a foot.

President Biden Ben Lieberman President Competitive Enterprise Institu Republican Party senior fellow Keystone XL New Jersey Mitch McConnell OPEC Trump Senate United States Russia Marjorie Taylor Greene East Coast
"ben lieberman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

09:20 min | 10 months ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"In from Mandy, Man, you'll be back on Friday, looking little gonna be coming in tomorrow on Thursday. Right. So Joe Biden in this raft of executive orders that he signed virtually minutes after taking over the presidency after the inauguration. 17 and all two of them. To take them one at a time. One was to stop construction of the border wall. This is in league with the Democrats notion, especially the radical Progressives of Open borders order. Security hasn't been mentioned at all. By Joe Biden. Given his inaugural address and anything, he said after that, because it's not only a low priority. It's something they don't really want Border security, So it's already encouraging another caravan from Honduras to head this way. Now it might be unconscious. Tutu Schimmel. This remains to be seen. But funds were specifically appropriated an authorized by Congress for that water border wall. And some of that money hasn't been spent yet, and it has to be spent on the border wall. The commitment was made. The Democrats will argue that this is discretionary and they can kill it if they want that will probably wind up in in court. The other thing, Joe Biden is done. Is called for at least the temporary and in his mind and the radical left view. Hopefully a permanent And to the construction of that Keystone XL pipeline coming from Alberta all the way down to the Gulf Coast. Ah! A lot of money has already been spent on that a lot of sun costs are involved. An awful lot of jobs are associated with finishing that. And I should note that the United States has pipelines all over the place there. Thousands of miles of pipelines in this in this country, This is one additional one. And it's one that contributes to the energy independence of both the United States on this this region, including including Canada, eh? So we'll see where that goes to now, Trump did reallocate or shift funds appropriated for the Department of Defense. Hey, regarded. This is an emergency, and that's where some of the money came from. But some others of those dollars that have been appropriated, were specifically designed and committed to finishing the border wall. Let's dwell, however, on the Keystone XL pipeline, which is why Ben Lieberman is joining us. He's a senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. Hey, favors completion of the Keystone XL pipeline, as do I, and we'll get Ben's Take on this, Ben. Thanks for joining us this afternoon. Thank you so much for having me. I'm a big fan of the competitive Enterprise Institute. You guys do wonderful stuff. What's the institute's position and yours by association on this? Well, we're free market think tanks. So any project that is paid for entirely by the private sector is to be encouraged with rare exceptions, And that's certainly true of energy projects that bring affordable and reliable 830,000 barrels per day of Canadian oil into the U. S. There's no reason to oppose this project it Zawinul win situation That's that's often used great cliche. But in this case, it's true. You know the job building the pipeline, And then there's the more affordable energy once the pipeline is built, which has, uh additional benefits across the economy, for jobs and for consumers. Are their contractual arrangements that are already in place between the United States are companies here in Canada and their companies there that would require completion of this project. Oh, yeah. And I would suspect that there'll be a lot of losses become over this rejection of the the pipeline. Not to mention, uh, starting out Biden administration with some bad blood between the U. S on our ally to the North. Of course, Trudeau, the younger who's now the prime minister of Canada, is certainly left leaning to be kind. And in that regard, he may hey may agree. With the motivation of killing this, which comes from the radical environmentalists, But at the same time he's trying to curry favor with the private sector elements of this that are involved in the construction. He and Biden apparently talked the other day. Any idea what they talked about I don't know what they talked about, but you go with that pretty solid in favor of the Keystone XL pipeline. So give him credit for for that, And you know it's a project that would that would devastate both countries and we'll see what goes from here in terms of legality. Of stopping the pipeline now to play out in the courts in the months ahead. The notion that this would mitigate climate change, of course, is preposterous, because if that pipeline isn't completed down to our Gulf Coast That oil will still come out of the ground and still be shipped by Canada to other places, including not via pipelines, but on oil tankers that create a more realistic and greater risk of environmental damage. Yeah, and matter of fact, the Obama administration did an extensive analysis of the Keystone XL pipeline and concluded that the environmentally superior option is to build it. When that by not building it that oil will get to market through other means, including trains, which required energy to move the oil and therefore more greenhouse gas emissions and more susceptible to tax it, And so the environmental threat is greater from the alternatives. To the Keystone XL pipeline that oil is going to make it to market anyway. The Canadian government is committed to, uh, making use of it of its oil sands in Alberta and telling off Keystone is actually not only bad for the economy, but it's also bad environment. Now the semi religious devotion to radical environmentalism, of course, is the motivating force for this. People on that side of the issue have been able to recruit Indians to claim that this would be violating their ceremonial ceremonial lug burial sites and Other people to come up with environmental concerns that don't strike me as all that legitimate giving the interlacing of pipelines we've already had in this country that do so very successfully. Is his pump Is Biden willing Tol incur the wrath of radical environmentalists and and back off on this No, no, he's doing their bidding. In fact, quite a few of them now have jobs in Washington, D C and they're already hard at work as we as we've seen, and it's it's worth noting you mentioned there are some opponents do the pipeline. But if you really look at the people who live in the states And the congressional districts and the counties and cities where the pipeline passes. State is overwhelming support for the project, For example, the three states that the northern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline, which is the one issue here, the free state they go through. It's going through is Montana, South Dakota. And in the last six U. S. Senators, all six of whom support the Keystone XL pipeline. So it zippity clear where the people who live In the vicinity. The pipeline are yes. Environmental groups can always find some activist oppose the pipeline. But for the most part, people want this pipeline. They understand the benefits that includes tax revenues to the local governments that the pipeline goes through the six senators. You did you say Earth, they all Republicans. I'll. A tester of Montana Democrats protest, he said. The right things about Keystone XL, which gives you a sense of just how strongly favor the public opinion and in Montana is, even though this is a state that the pipeline goes through. Is there any chance that we can get some Democrats in the Senate to go along with Republicans on this and override Biden or wouldn't matter because the House is more strongly in Democrat hands? I don't really see any realistic possibility of revising the project to, uh to legislation..

Keystone XL Joe Biden Canada United States Competitive Enterprise Institu Gulf Coast Keystone Montana Mandy Alberta Congress Tutu Schimmel Ben Lieberman executive Department of Defense Honduras Washington Senate
"ben lieberman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 11 months ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Several days of delay and a lot of back and forth, President Trump signed the $900 Billion Cove in 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartman is here to help explain a Mitchell I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law. And people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up Ernie to desk E, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could have meant nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose a week a benefits, after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore at the National Employment Law Project, says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. Very quickly before I let you go. Mitchell, What does that mean for this week? Well for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire, And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at Killing these benefits out, especially when they change, But everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants, known as hydrofluorocarbons, or HF sees the creates a global market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, the global market. For refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. They're over 100 other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure hits too sweet spots, the environment and jobs. Oh, Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. The losers in all of this will be home owner's car owners, as well as business owners like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look at what the past year has meant.

Mitchell Hartman president Mitchell Scott Tong Trump federal Labor Department Michelle Nevermore New Jersey Labor Department refrigeration Institute Ben Lieberman Ernie Competitive Enterprise Institu John Samantha Slater United States CEO U. S World Resource is Institute
"ben lieberman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:18 min | 11 months ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"28 good to have you with us. After several days of delay and a lot of back and forth, President Trump signed the $900 Billion Cove in 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartman is here to help explain Hey, Mitchell. I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law and people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up. Ernie Tudeski, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could've meant nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose a week a benefits, after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore at the National Employment Law Project, says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. Very quickly before I let you go, Mitchell. What does that mean for this week? Well for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire. And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at getting these benefits out, especially when they change, but everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants, known as hydrofluorocarbons, or HF sees the creates a global market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, The global market for refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. There are over 100, other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure hits too sweet spots, the environment and jobs, though Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. Losers in all of this will be home owner's car owners, as well as business owners like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look at what the past year has meant for women. In this economy. We got ahold of to belly Cara's Ana. She covers the economy for the 19th news to belly welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. How are women doing in this economy at the beginning of this year, pre pandemic in the before times Well, if we can pause and think back to the before times, which feel like several eons away from us. Right before this pandemic started in December of 2019 women surpassed men as the majority of the labor force for only the second time in history. The only other time I had happened was during the great recession when so many men lost their jobs, that women actually surpassed them. And so we had reached a point right before all this started where that happened again and that had happened naturally through So much growth that was taking place for women in the labor force where they got to that 50 50.4% just edging out men. And then what happened? Well, then what happened was the start of this country's first female recession. And what that meant was that the jobs that really went away this year the vast majority where jobs that were held by women, and that was unusual that had never happened. This year. We're looking at retail hospitality, the care fields. Those were the job's not went away. And so that in about three months what we lost, we're about 11 million jobs held by women in this economy. On DeSoto. It started what we have when are still enduring to this day is this recession that has hit women so much harder than men? And there has been an enduring peace of this, which is the second part of it is this childcare crisis that we're also living in? I want to come back to the childcare crisis in a moment, But a lot of your writing has highlighted the fact that In this first ever she session. It's hitting women of color particularly hard. Can you talk about what that trend has looked like Yeah, that has been, you know, one of the saddest parts of this entire experience. If we look at unemployment, for example, it's just one measure. But unemployment for women peaked around like 15 15.5%, But for Latinas, it hit 20.2% for black women. It hit 16.5%. So much of that goes back to this occupational segregation that we talk about, sometimes where it's what are the fields that these folks are pushed into. And ultimately those fields are a lot of caregiving fields nursing health care. I mean, we we wrote a story recently about the first people to get vaccines across the country. We looked at every single state and in the vast majority two thirds you were looking at a woman and in most cases, you were looking at a woman of color. And so that I think spoke eons about these are the people who are most at risk. Can you talk about just this astronomical number of women leaving the workforce. Yeah, I think the Shocking number came to us in September when 865,000 women left the labor force and it was just so clear what had happened, You know school was back and school was back virtually And so you had all of these women who were at home and looking at this new school year they were just making a decision. And it was a difficult decision for a lot of women who said, I'm just going to quit my job. And care for my kids, because there's not there's no safety net for me right now..

Mitchell Hartman president Trump Scott Tong federal Labor Department New Jersey Labor Department John Ernie Tudeski Michelle Nevermore Competitive Enterprise Institu refrigeration Institute United States U. S CEO Samantha Slater Ben Lieberman Cara Biden
"ben lieberman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:04 min | 11 months ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mid 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartman is here to help explain. Hey, Mitchell. I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law and people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up. Honey Tudeski, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could have been nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose the week a benefits after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore of the National Employment Law Project says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. Very quickly before I let you go, Mitchell, what does that mean for this week? Well for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire, And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at Kidding. These benefits out, especially when they change, but everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants, known as hydrofluorocarbons, or HF sees the Creator global Market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, the global market. For refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. They're over 100 other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure is too sweet spots, the environment and jobs, though Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. The losers in all of this will be homeowners, car owners as well as business owners, like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today, traders seemed to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look at what the past year has meant for women. In this economy. We got ahold of to belly Cara's Ana. She covers the economy for the 19th news to belly welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. How are women doing in this economy at the beginning of this year, pre pandemic in the before times Well, if we can pause and think back to the before times, which feel like several eons away from us right before this pandemic started in December of 2019 women surpassed men as the majority of the labor force for only the second time in history. The only other time I had happened was during the great recession when so many men lost their jobs that women actually surpassed them. And so we had reached a point right before all this started where that happened again, and that had happened naturally through so much growth that was taking place for women in the labor Force where they got to that 50 50.4% just edging out Men, and then what happened? Well, then what happened was the start of this country's first female recession. And what that meant was that the jobs that really went away this year the vast majority where jobs that were held by women, and that was unusual that had never happened. This year. We're looking at retail hospitality, the care fields. Those were the jobs that went away. And so that in about three months what we lost, we're about 11 million jobs held by women in this economy. On DeSoto. It started what we have when are still enduring to this day is this recession that has hit women so much harder than men? And there has been an enduring peace of this, which is the second part of it is this child care crisis that we are also living in? I want to come back to the childcare crisis in a moment, But a lot of your writing has highlighted the fact that In this first ever she session. It's hitting women of color particularly hard. Can you talk about what that trend has looked like, Yeah, that has been, you know, one of the saddest parts of this entire experience. If we look at unemployment, for example, it's just one measure. But unemployment for women peaked around like 15 15.5%, But for Latinas, it hit 20.2% for black women. It hits 16.5% so much of that goes back to this occupational segregation. We talk about some times where it's what are the fields that these folks are pushed into?.

Mitchell Hartman president Scott Tong federal Labor Department labor Force New Jersey Labor Department Honey Tudeski Michelle Nevermore Competitive Enterprise Institu refrigeration Institute John United States CEO U. S Samantha Slater Trump Ben Lieberman
"ben lieberman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:44 min | 11 months ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"December the 28th good to have you with us. After several days of delay and a lot of back and forth, President Trump signed the $900 billion Covert 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces Hit Mitchell Hartman is here to help me explain Hi, Mitchell. I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law and people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up. Ernie Tudeski, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could have been nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose the week a benefits after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore at the National Employment Law Project, says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. So marketplaces Mitchell Hartman. Thank you, but very quickly before I let you go, Mitchell, Um what does that mean for this week? Well for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire, And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at Kidding. These benefits out, especially when they change, but everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants known as hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs. The creates a global market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, the global market. For refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. There are over 100, other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure hits too sweet spots, the environment and jobs. Oh, Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. Losers in all of this will be home owner's car owners, as well as business owners like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look back at what the past year has meant for women In this economy. We got ahold of Cherry belly. Cara's Ana. She covers the economy for the 19th news job, Ellie. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. How are women doing in this economy at the beginning of this year, pre pandemic in the before times Well, if we can pause and think back to the before times, which feel like several eons away from us. Right before this pandemic started in December of 2019 women surpassed men as the majority of the labor force for only the second time in history. The only other time I had happened was during the great recession when so many men lost their jobs, that women actually surpassed them. And so we had reached a point right before all this started where that happened again and that had happened naturally through So much growth that was taking place for women in the labor force where they got to that 50 50.4% just edging out men. And then what happened? Well, then what happened was the start of this country's first female recession. And what that meant was that the jobs that really went away this year the vast majority where jobs that were held by women, and that was unusual that had never happened. But this year we're looking at retail hospitality, the care fields. Those were the jobs that went away. And so that in about three months what we lost, we're about 11 million jobs held by women in this economy. On DeSoto. It started what we have when are still enduring to this day is this recession that has hit women so much harder than men? And there has been an enduring peace of this, which is the second part of it is this child care crisis that we are also living in? I want to come back to the childcare crisis in a moment, But a lot of your writing has highlighted the fact that In this first ever she session. It's hitting women of color particularly hard. Can you talk about what that trend has looked like Yeah, that has been, you know, one of the saddest parts of this entire experience. If we look at unemployment, for example, it's just one measure. But unemployment for women peaked around like 15 15.5%, But for Latinas, it hit 20.2%. For black women. It hits 16.5%. So much of that goes back to this occupational segregation that we talk about, sometimes where it's what are the fields that these folks are pushed into. And ultimately those fields are a lot of caregiving fields nursing health care. I mean, we we wrote a story recently about the first people to get vaccines across the country. We looked at every single state and in the vast majority two thirds you were looking at a woman and in most cases, you were looking at a woman of color. And so that I think spoke eons about these are the people who are most at risk. Can you talk about just this astronomical number of women leaving the workforce? Yeah, I think the Shocking number came to us in September when 865,000 women left the labor force and it was just so clear what had happened, You know school was back and school was back virtually And so you had all of these women who were at home and looking at this new school year they were just making a decision. And it was a difficult decision for a lot of women who said, I'm just going to quit my job. And care for my kids, because there's not there's no safety net for me right now. And so that's what we've seen over and over is women who are making the decision to leave their jobs to leave the Labor force because all of these other safety nets were not there for them. How long do you think it's going to take women to gain back these jobs and the wages that they lost?.

Mitchell Hartman president Trump Scott Tong federal Labor Department New Jersey Labor Department John Ernie Tudeski Michelle Nevermore Competitive Enterprise Institu U. S refrigeration Institute Cherry belly United States CEO Samantha Slater Ben Lieberman Ellie
"ben lieberman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:27 min | 11 months ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on KCRW

"Kimberly Adams. It's Monday, December the 28th good to have you with us. After several days of delay and a lot of back and forth, President Trump signed the $900 billion Covert 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces Hit Mitchell Hartman is here to help me explain I'm Mitchell. I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law and people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up. Ernie Tudeski, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could have been nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose a week a benefits, after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore at the National Employment Law Project, says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. So marketplaces Mitchell Hartman. Thank you, but very quickly before I let you go, Mitchell, Um what does that mean for this week? Well, for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire. And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at getting these benefits out, especially when they change, but everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants known as hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs. The creates a global market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, The global market for refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. There are over 100, other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure hits too sweet spots, the environment and jobs. Oh, Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. Losers in all of this will be homeowners, car owners as well as business owners, like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look back at what the past year has meant for women In this economy. We got ahold of Cherry belly. Cara's Ana. She covers the economy for the 19th news job, Ellie. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. How are women doing in this economy at the beginning of this year, pre pandemic in the before times Well, if we can pause and think back to the before times, which feel like several eons away from us. Right before this pandemic started in December of 2019 women surpassed men as the majority of the labor force for only the second time in history. The only other time I had happened was during the great recession when so many men lost their jobs, that women actually surpassed them. And so we had reached a point right before all this started where that happened again and that had happened naturally through So much growth that was taking place for women in the labor force where they got to that 50 50.4% just edging out men. And then what happened? Well, then what happened was the start of this country's first female recession. And what that meant was that the jobs that really went away this year the vast majority where jobs that were held by women, and that was unusual that had never happened. But this year we're looking at retail hospitality, the care fields. Those were the jobs that went away. And so that in about three months what we lost, we're about 11 million jobs held by women in this economy. On DeSoto. It started what we have when are still enduring to this day is this recession that has hit women so much harder than men? And there has been an enduring peace of this, which is the second part of it is this child care crisis that we are also living in? I want to come back to the childcare crisis in a moment, But a lot of your writing has highlighted the fact that In this first ever she session. It's hitting women of color particularly hard. Can you talk about what that trend has looked like Yeah, that has been, you know, one of the saddest parts of this entire experience. If we look at unemployment, for example, it's just one measure. But unemployment for women peaked around like 15 15.5%, But for Latinas, it hit 20.2%. For black women. It hit 16.5%. So much of that goes back to this occupational segregation that we talk about, sometimes where it's what are the fields that these folks are pushed into. And ultimately those fields are a lot of caregiving fields nursing health care. I mean, we we wrote a story recently about the first people who need to get vaccines across the country. We looked at every single state and in the vast majority two thirds you were looking at a woman and in most cases, you were looking at a woman of color. And so that I think spoke eons about these are the people who are most at risk. Can you talk about just this astronomical number of women leaving the workforce. Yeah, I think the Shocking number came to us in September when 865,000 women left the labor force and it was just so clear what had happened, You know school was back and school was back virtually And so you had all of these women who were at home and looking at this new school year they were just making a decision. And it was a difficult decision for a lot of women who said, I'm just going to quit my job. And care for my kids, because there's not there's no safety net for me right now..

Mitchell Hartman president Trump Scott Tong federal Labor Department Kimberly Adams New Jersey Labor Department John Ernie Tudeski Michelle Nevermore Competitive Enterprise Institu refrigeration Institute U. S Cherry belly United States CEO Samantha Slater Ben Lieberman
"ben lieberman" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The electric grid even capable of supplying the electricity necessary for a fleet of vehicles that would be totally dependent on electricity in the country. Well, California certainly become the land of environmental ironies. You state state that's making a push for more electric vehicles and therefore more demand for electricity. He's having trouble keeping the lights on. So yes, there's a lot to be concerned about. You think one of the one of the questions we asked is all these California policy is going to be imposed on the rest of the country, and if those policies involved more electric vehicles while at the same time, making it impossible to produce electricity from coal or natural gas or nuclear On to rely on renewables like wind and solar that are unreliable. That's that's the real recipe for disaster. Absolutely. We have been talking with Ben Lieberman of the Competitive Enterprise Institute, where he is a senior fellow and author of the new paper. Would Maura Leche Trick vehicles Be good for the environment? Ben tell us a bit about the Competitive Enterprise Institute. And where can folks go on the Web to read your paper? Well, the short of it is, we're a free market where public policy organization just like the To read more. Well, you could go to see EI Doctor working. Get more than your level One bad Lieberman of the Competitive Enterprise Institute, Ben Thank you for taking time to be with us. Well, thank you. Scott Parkinson at the club for growth has been keeping an eye for us on all the legal maneuverings relative to the presidential race. Also keeping close watch on what is happening in the state of Georgia, where control of the United States Senate will be decided. Scott. Good to have you with us. Thanks for having me Lohmann, the General Services Administration. A few days ago, Scott did give the official go ahead for the presidential transition to begin. But the president's not throwing in the towel yet, is he? He's not throwing in the towel, but this is certainly a big step forward if you're on the Biden team and looking to have legitimacy In your own election. And I do think that the G s a taking steps toe bring in the Biden Administration, Tonto Official transition and Again the classified briefings and bringing the transition staffers up to speed on a number of issues. Is sort of the recent breakthroughs that brings a little bit more insensitive to what's been happening. But I do think that President Trump is right to continue to fight this legally. I think that counting every single legal vote Is what the American people expect in making sure there's integrity in our voting system, and right now there's still questions about whether there were illegal votes counted. In the swing states where maybe somebody Didn't fill out the absentee ballot correctly. Or they didn't actually fell out the absentee ballot, but it was submitted on their behalf. Maybe there's anecdote where you've got voters that are no longer alive and these are obviously very few and far between. Perhaps they're not enough to swing the election. But let's remember that Al Gore fought his race in 2000 against George W. Bush for 36 days, and it's only been a few weeks since we've had The presidential election here in 2020, so I think President Trump is right. The ensure that these votes are counted accurately and that the 72 73 million people that did support his candidacy. Have their voice heard when it comes to picking a winner. As we look at this process unfolding, Scott, I think a lot of people don't understand that What you get on election night is an unofficial returns. And that there then becomes an official counting process leading up to certification and that there are various steps along the way, which, normally nobody pays attention to after the election is over, people go about their business. It's done. How much of this is Aside from the fact that there's intensive scrutiny on it, how much of this is just the process playing itself out? I think that certainly there's more scrutiny in the process in a tight election, then there would be otherwise in a landslide. Obviously on Election night, we often see with 1% or 0% reporting, right when the polls closed some of these states that air projected To go a certain way get called for a candidate because we know it's going to be a landslide in that state. I guess the example could be Vermont, right? We knew that Joe Biden was gonna win for months. But that doesn't mean that for months stops the electoral process on election night. They certainly have to certify votes through the county Board of canvassers, and they also have toe Go forward and certify things with their electors that officially cast votes in the electoral college toe. Get over that magic number of 270 electoral votes. President Trump if he is not successful, and he's turned out of office has been dangling the idea out there that he might run again in 2024. Now Grover Cleveland President Grover Cleveland is the only president to serve two nonconsecutive terms. Iran one ran lost and brand one. Is it likely that President Trump's going to continue to keep his toe in the waters here. Even if he comes up short in this scaled, I think President Trump is undoubtedly the leader of the Republican Party going forward. And if he decides to freeze the presidential field for 2024, it is frozen like the thickest ice in the Arctic Teaching. Imagine on Lee people that would take on President Trump are the never trump brand. Republicans that you know, I would call the rhinos that never believed in the America first agenda. The President Trump and the forgotten voter really supported toe make him president of the United States. In 2016. There's a ways to go before President Trump needs to make a final decision. But I think his posturing right now has basically put everybody on notice that he intends to be relevant going forward, and he's not going to go away quietly and speaking of not going away quietly control of the United States said it was not decided on election Day. Although Republicans have 50 seats, Democrats have 48 or the Democrats, along with the two independents that caucus with him at 48. We have two seats up in Georgia. I would imagine Scott the intensity of the campaign in Georgia is already and going to be something that we really haven't ever seen before. When you're talking about the potential for unified government. I think that the Democrats are Very enthusiastic about ensuring that voters show up and cast a ballot for either Rafael War Mac or Jon Ossoff's. On the other hand, many Republicans in Georgia, I think that over three quarters of Republicans Believe the election was stolen from them, and they have questions about the validity of The election in Georgia, so they're kind of questioning..

President Trump president Scott Parkinson Competitive Enterprise Institu Georgia Ben Lieberman Joe Biden California official United States Senate United States Grover Cleveland Maura Leche Biden Administration
"ben lieberman" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Of electric vehicles Would create an entire new set of environmental challenges. Ben Lieberman is a senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. He has written a new policy paper on the subject and is here to discuss the issue. Ben, Welcome to American radio Journal Ben There has been a move among those in the environmentalist movement, too. Trying to move America to all electric vehicles. It's included in the Green New Deal. Tell us a bit about electric vehicles. Are they in common Use right now. What is the status of that industry? Well, we hear a lot about electric vehicle maker Tendler setting record quarterly sales, which they did, and that's pretty remarkable given that we're in the middle of a pandemic. But even given those records were starting from low numbers, electric vehicles are still just a few percent off America 17 million new vehicle market each year so they would have a long way to go before they would be a substantial share of the vehicles on the road today. These electric vehicles, of course, depend on batteries, if in order to provide the fuel that operates them. I think that most Americans, they're probably not familiar. Ben with what goes into actually Producing one of these batteries tell us a bit about the type of materials, the type of minerals that are needed for that. Well, you want to learn about electric vehicles. You better find their high school or college chemistry book and look at the periodic table because electric batteries require a lot of minerals. There's cobalt lithium. We're glass site number of others to make an electric vehicle battery. And much of this stuff is mind around the world in places with very few environmental safeguards, so there are a number of concerns regarding the binding impacts. Example of cobalt mining and Congo lithium production in South America, where Earth production in China and if we're gonna stay left electric vehicles so that there's a lot more on the roads we're gonna have to scale up. The mining impact as well. Now, one piece of potential good news is that a number of these compounds exists meaning American so that we can we can produce more of the minerals that it takes to make an electric vehicle battery, but someone hypocritically some of the same environmental forces you want. More electric vehicles are also opposed to mining in the US, So we're going to be stuck. In a situation where if we're going to make more electric vehicles, we're gonna have to step from very, very dangerous and environmentally questionable Mining practices happening on a much larger scale. Are we not then just replacing one environmental impact with another one. We probably are doing just that The benefits of an electric vehicle are as obvious as lack of a tailpipe doing out in mission that we have from our turkey internal combustion engine vehicles. The downside is not as obvious. You don't see the mining impacts that have happened in thousands of miles away. You don't see some other negative impact, associating with Electric vehicle. Something I should also mention is that it takes more energy to produce an electric vehicle. And as you know, the whole goal here or most of the goal is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide emissions as a result of also fuel combustion, and now it is true than electric vehicle will use electricity, which Depending on where it comes from, maybe less carbon intensive as they say that ghastly but it's most important to note that it took a lot more fossil fuels to make that electric vehicle in the first place. And this is the kind of things that we need to take into account before we Through all the conclusion that electric vehicles clearly are greener. They may be, but it's a closer calls and a lot of people think. Let's talk for a minute, then about the fuel for these electric vehicles. Obviously, in order to power up the batteries to recharge the batteries, you have to have electricity. In order to have electricity it has to be generated. Will this not have an impact on the environment in terms of the fossil fuels needed to generate the electricity to power? The electric cars? Yeah, that's the reality of electricity. Some people think that electricity comes from a plus. But now it comes from coal or natural gas, Lower renewables or hydro electric or or nuclear. And if we're gonna have a lot more electric vehicles, we're gonna have to produce a lot more electricity, and that has environmental impact of its own. If Some of the electricity is produced from coal or natural gas, then the reduction in the fossil fuel emissions. The greenhouse gas emissions may not be that great now is Which to renewables were that ad issues of its own? For example, one estimate that if we're gonna have all electric vehicles and we were gonna get to collect extra electricity from wind, it would require enough windmills to cover the entire state of self. Carolina don't massive amount of land would have to be used to produce the electricity don't no matter where the electricity comes from, there's gonna have to be more of it and there's gonna be more environmental impacts. As a result of that added electricity demand. So can the two sides of the equation when it comes to comparing electric vehicles to conventional internal combustion, gasoline powered Vehicles interesting. You would mention the fact that there would be additional demand, obviously, because we would be replacing America's current demand for fossil fuel generated gasoline to electricity in the state of California, which Ben if I recall from your paper has roughly half the electric cars in the country. They've had a lot of rolling blackouts in California this past summer because Not having enough of electricity in the electric grid is the electric grid even capable of supplying the electricity necessary for a fleet of vehicles that would be totally dependent on electricity in the country..

Ben Lieberman America Competitive Enterprise Institu California senior fellow Tendler Congo South America US China Carolina
"ben lieberman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You know what direction high flyers go after they peak. Let's just say you meet the same people going up the ladder as you do. Going down Walter Winchell. The power of gossip premieres tomorrow night at nine PM on PBS, and I'm happy to welcome its director, Ben Lieberman took all of it, Ben, welcome. Thank you. Let's start with Walter Winchell's upbringing Right here in New York City in Harlem, the child of Jewish Russian Jewish immigrants. What was his family like? Well. His father was a near the well. He ran several businesses on went bankrupt several times. He went from job to job moved the family from apartment to apartment on and when she learned from that, that he wasn't going to be like his father, he wasn't going to be homeless and he wasn't going to be hungry and he wasn't going to be nameless. He started out being a performer. Age 12. We got a start in vaudeville. What led him to become performer. Ah, he was trying to help the family taken some money. So he and a friend started singing ditties in between movie short at the cinema across the street from where he lived. And then he graduated toe vaudeville and realized that he wasn't that good at it. But what he was really good at was collecting the gossip of who was with who and who wasn't with who and who was getting what in what was going down, and he would post that on the bulletin boards backstage, and everybody in the troupe loved it, and pretty soon They were telling other people about it. When you think about his big break in media, What was it? Well, winter. Lis is a man of several big breaks. His first big break was one of those notes that he penned up backstage being noticed. But the volatile news, which was the Paper. Ah, that was part of the industry and then he gambled and told the editor Of the evening Graphic that he'd liketo work for half pay that winter would pay himself $25, which was half the going rate for a full time reporter and the paper would pay him the other half and he said, just to see if I have any Business in this racket, and he did, and pretty soon they double the salary. I guess Ben Liederman. We're talking about his new film. Walter Winchell. The power of gossip, which will be on PBS Tuesday night at 9 P.m.. So he's sort of adult grownup career started at a spill it scandalous tabloid, The New York Evening Graphic. The name is even great. You're in the film, she learned about the creation of tabloids as this genre and its appeal to a whole new audience. Who were these tabloids for? Of the tablet accomplish two things. First they they served immigrants who are new to New York, who didn't have English, the first language or sometimes any language. So they were filled with pictures, and they were a different size than regular broad sheets so that People and women in immigrants and new people into the workforce could read them on the subways and buses of of New York. So that was the audience. They served with pictures. And what little did was kind of Trim those tabloid pictures into words. Was he someone who saw the saw distinction between entertainment and news Or was he just It's one big piece of information you can throw out there. No. He saw journalism as I mean. He saw journalism as entertainment. I mean, he Hey, was as we said about a kid born into vaudeville. I mean, he was a song and dance man, and he had no qualm. Printing. Things before they were made public. That is who was divorcing? Who who was in court who was suing who? Who was who was seeing who So he took all that rumor. And I thought that was a good father for journalism. So what he had to do to avoid being sued all the time was he had to invent a new language for it, And he did all kinds of euphemisms and slang and middle, Aisling it for people who were about to get married. And ah, whole set of words to just be ableto have that plausible deniability and say whatever he wanted in the paper, so he's sort of the grandfather of canoodling which we hear in the age six. A lot doesn't really mean anything. But you get the idea. You get the idea and and you got it with wind chill and people did, And I mean winters big break. Came when he went over to Ah Hearst paper in New York. The daily near and, um he Got that job right right before the Depression hit, and people at that time were just so down on their luck that they wanted. Somebody like Witchel. Toe rag on people and go after them, and that's what they were feeling. So in a sense, he embodies what what a lot of people during the Depression were feeling but didn't feel they have the power. To say so Winchell becomes the voice of the little man and woman. He became a big radio star, and we have an archival clip of what of Walter Winchell's broadcast from 1949. And you get a sense of his style on the flange you talked about as well as the sound effects mixed in Let's take a little bit of a listen to Walter Winchell. Evening, Mr Mr North and South American all the ships at sea. Let's go to press in San Francisco. The weather Bureau has just issued a warning that 85.

Walter Winchell New York City Lis The New York Evening Graphic Ben Lieberman Ah Hearst Ben weather Bureau Ben Liederman Depression director Mr Mr North Harlem San Francisco editor reporter
"ben lieberman" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

08:20 min | 2 years ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on WDRC

"Talk radio is what you're saying about my voice is loud and strong and it's good and I appreciate the support honestly provocative this is a very big deal with so does this is worse and welcome back to the Lars Larsen show it's a pleasure to be with you and I'm glad to take your phone calls and emails and I'll get right back to those shortly but there is an issue that I know that people care about a lot and that is the environment so a lot is being made about the fact that the trump administration has said we are going to start lifting some of the crazy environmental rules that were put in place by the previous administration and one of those involves the pebble mine which is a project in Alaska to better very controversial project but the governor of that state is said we want to see some of these EPA rules lifted because they're gonna make it impossible to run these mining operations and think what these would produce a molybdenum gold other precious metals other rare earth metals that could be minded but cannot now because of the rules that are in place they simply make it economically unrealistic so president trump says well will lift some of those restrictions that make it impossible to mine in the Bristol bay area and I know that every time trump does something everybody says well he's trying to wreck the environment I thought to get the straight story on this by talking to Ben Lieberman who is the senior fellow at the competitive enterprise institute Ben welcome back to the program thanks for having I think last time I was on we were talking about four dollars a gallon gas but that was a wireless it was a while ago it is not amazing I know everybody would like to pay less for gas but you know frankly it with the growth in the economy I'm kind of amazing gases has stayed relatively moderate prices the the increases of not been dramatic but let me ask about Bristol bay in the pebble mine so when the president says we want to lift some of these rules were slapped into place by the Obama administration is this going to lay waste to the environment in Alaska if if mining is allowed under the under a new set of rules or or baby basically the rules that were in place before Obama became president absolutely not and what the trump administration is doing here is taking a very common sense that and that's reverse the what the Obama administration did which was pre emptively rejecting this mine before the mind our company had even submitted an application and before the usual review process that done by the army corps of engineers for these type of process for these type of projects Hey even begun so essentially this with the Obama administration thing we don't like the idea of the mind so before they even much evidence on what's this mine would be like we're going to reject it ahead of time which one percent is no that that that that that preemptive rejection is null and void we're going to continue to review this process the right way so the project still has to undergo a very extensive process under a statute called the national environmental policy act nepa that process is under way and that's as it should be but this premature a preemptive strike by the Obama administration is no longer the case no longer law and that's a good thing so when they slap these rules in place I mean since the mind hadn't even started working yet they were simply saying we're going to make the rules so tough that nobody will be able to make this a financially in a sustainable operation that it well even worse they were saying we're we're we're legally blocking the mine so is it not only would have been prohibitively expensive it could and could not of of been undertaken under under any circumstances and this was before the mining company had even submitted an application for review now that application is being looked at under the nepa process it's being scrutinized every interested person including the state of Alaska including ETA including the department of interior can weigh in on this proposed mining application but that's the process dead dead dead dead she would be not to a preemptive strike from the Obama administration it sounds like the folks in Alaska like this idea the governor likes and others like it I'm sure they're probably some environmentalists types that don't like in Alaska but as Alaska generally on board that they want is mine to happen well the other just there's a real split of opinion there are some tried involved that are opposed to this hello a lot of people involved with the salmon fishing industry there are some very serious concerns on the other hand there there are those who would benefit from the the job this would bring from the other revenues this would bring and one of the things I would say is important here is that the state of Alaska complained about what the Obama E. P. A. dot and did they they they felt that Alaska was thrown out of that process with this new process Alaska will have a voice and that so the so the people of Alaska through their their their governor in the state legislature can weigh in on this process I don't know what the the end result will will will be but at least it's the process the way it's supposed to happen but if the mind is allowed to operate in a state that only has three quarters of a million population this would literally create thousands of jobs this would be one of the biggest new minus in decades there hasn't been too much are in the US in terms of new mines in in recent years because of a a number of environmental restrictions this would be absolutely huge thousands of jobs in the construction phase hundreds of jobs are in a more permanent basis a tremendous amount of tax revenues for the states and and localities there this is this is this is very helpful and I would argue that the salmon fishery will be completely safeguarded there are number of protections that can be put in place okay will be put in place so been tell me this each day has anybody made the case from the other side that you know the naysayers as I call them that if you do any mining at all that it will do damage does anybody have a good case for that or they simply saying we don't want the mind it happened at all been weather does damage or not because you think of their arguing this is a bad idea and say why well because it'll cause damage do they have anything to hang their hat on when it comes to making that argument well they do have some some speculation that the that that that some of the heavy metal from the mind will make it into the water ways and attacked the famine others say that very far fetched the thing about allowed because we're talking about the vast spaces so why so the mine isn't really all that close to to the to the famine and the another safeguard people can be put in place but yeah there's there's a number of of the concerns being raised for example the department of the interior has raised some some some as found them very critical comments with this product and thunder going right now so there's a lot to be worked out and there are some criticisms raised but that they'll be a draft it's mine is to move forward all right so at least to get the process and the pro the national environmental policy act says they got to go through it and show that is it's not going to do damage the last issue is rare earths because I know there's golden there's molybdenum and other things I can pull out of his mind but they're also Raras and right now I think about ninety percent over a few people here the term reference pick up your cell phone the thing that makes it work the chips into the make it work only work because of rare occurrence that are in those chips that allow your cell phone your computer your laptop your iPad all that stuff only works because a rare earth and ninety percent of it now comes from China developing a source in the United States under our control would certainly be an advantage for our country wouldn't absolutely and I would add to that list wind turbines electric batteries so a lot of politically correct technologies also need these rare earth so we ought to be looking very seriously at domestic sources of rare earth given our dependence on China and the fact that China has actually openly threatened to to to to cut off those those those supplies to this is this is one more reason for looking very seriously.

Lars Larsen ninety percent three quarters four dollars one percent
"ben lieberman" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

09:05 min | 2 years ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on WDRC

"Welcome to our Lars Larsen dot com welcome back to the Lars Larsen show it's a pleasure to be with you and I'm glad to take your phone calls and emails and I'll get right back to those shortly but there is an issue that I know that people care about a lot and that is the environment so a lot is being made about the fact that the trump administration has said we are going to start lifting some of the crazy environmental rules that were put in place by the previous administration and one of those involves the pebble mine which is a project in Alaska to better very controversial project but the governor of that state is said we want to see some of these EPA rules lifted because they're gonna make it impossible to run these mining operations and think what these would produce a molybdenum gold other precious metals other rare earth metals that could be minded but cannot now because of the rules that are in place they simply make it economically unrealistic so president trump says well will lift some of those restrictions that make it impossible to mine in the Bristol bay area and I know that every time trump does something everybody says well he's trying to wreck the environment about a get the straight story on this by talking to Ben Lieberman who is the senior fellow at the competitive enterprise institute Ben welcome back to the program thanks for having I think last time I was on we were talking about four dollars a gallon gas but that was the wireless it was a while ago it is not amazing I know everybody would like to pay less for gas but you know frankly it with the growth of the economy I'm kind of amazing gases has stayed relatively moderate prices the the increases of not been dramatic but let me ask about Bristol bay in the pebble mine so when the president says we want to lift some of these rules were slapped into place by the Obama administration is this going to lay waste to the environment in Alaska if if mining is allowed under the under a new set of rules or or baby basically the rules that were in place before Obama became president absolutely not and what the trump administration is doing here is taking a very common sense that and that's reversing what the Obama administration did which was pre emptively rejecting this mine before the mind a company had even submitted an application and before the usual review process that's done by the army corps of engineers for these type of process for this type of project Hey even begun so essentially this was the Obama administration thing we don't like the idea of the mind so before they even much evidence on what this mine would be like we're going to reject it ahead of time which I understand is no that that that that that preemptive rejection is null and void we're going to continue to review this process the right way so the project still has to undergo a very extensive process under a statute called the national environmental policy act nepa that process is under way and that's as it should be but this premature on a preemptive strike by the Obama administration is no longer the case no longer law and that's a good thing so when they slap these rules in place I mean since the mind hadn't even started working yet they were simply saying we're going to make the rules so tough that nobody will be able to make this a financially in a sustainable operation that it well even worse they were saying we're we're we're legally blocking the mind so is it not only would have been prohibitively expensive it could and could not of of been undertaken under under any circumstances and this was before the mining company had even submitted an application for review now that application is being looked at under the legal process it's being scrutinized every interested person including the state of Alaska and colluding ETA including the department of interior can weigh in on this proposed a mining application but that's the process dad dad dad that she would be not this a preemptive strike from the Obama administration it sounds like the folks in Alaska like this idea the governor likes and others like it I'm sure they're probably some environmentalists types that don't like in Alaska but as Alaska generally on board that they want is mine to happen well the other just there's a real split of opinion there are some tried involved that are opposed to this hello a lot of people involved with the salmon fishing industry there are some very serious concerns on the other hand there there are those who would benefit from the the job this would bring from the other revenues this would bring and one of the things I would say is important here is that the state of Alaska complained about what the Obama E. P. A. dot and they they they they felt that Alaska was thrown out of that process with this new process Alaska will have a voice and that so the so the people of Alaska through their their their governor in the state legislature can weigh in on this process I don't know what the end result will will will be but at least it's the process the way it's supposed to happen but if the mind is allowed to operate in a state that only has three quarters of a million population this would literally create thousands of jobs would be one of the biggest new mines in decades there hasn't been too much are in the US in terms of new mines in every years because of a a number of environmental restrictions this would be absolutely huge thousands of jobs in the construction phase hundreds of jobs are in a more permanent basis a tremendous amount of tax revenues for the states and and localities there though this is the that this is very helpful and I would argue that the salmon fishery will be completely safeguarded there are number of protections that can be put in place okay will be put in place so been tell me this he Dan has anybody made the case from the other side that you know the naysayers as I call them that if you do any mining at all that it will do damage does anybody have a good case for that or they simply saying we don't want the money happened at all been weather does damage or not because you think of their arguing this is a bad idea and say why well because it'll cause damage did they have anything to hang our hat on when it comes to making that argument well they do have some some speculation that the that that that some of the heavy metals from the mind will make it into the water ways in effect the famine others say that very far fetched the thing about allowed because we're talking about the vast spaces so while the mine isn't really all that close to to the to the famine and the another safeguard people can be put in place but yeah there's but there's a number of of the concerns being raised for example the department of the interior has raised some from some and found them very critical comments with this product and thunder going right now to leave a lot to be worked out and there are some criticisms raised but that they'll be a draft it's mine is to move forward all right so at least to get the process and Dnipro the national environmental policy act says they gotta go through it and show that is it's not going to do damage the last issue is rare or it's because I know there's golden there's molybdenum and other things I can pull out of his mind but they're also reference and right now I think about ninety percent of our if if people hear the term reference pick up your cell phone the thing that makes it work the chips into the make it work only work because of rare currents that are in those chips that allow your cell phone your computer your laptop your iPad all that stuff only works because a rare earth and ninety percent of it now comes from China developing a source in the United States under our control would certainly be an advantage for our country wouldn't absolutely and I would add to that list wind turbines electric batteries so a lot of politically correct technologies also need these rare earth so we ought to be looking very seriously at domestic sources of rare earth given our dependence on China and the fact that China has actually openly threatened to to to to cut off those those those supplies to this is this is one more reason for looking very seriously out that the pebble mine I mean they threaten the United States to cut out but they're actually done a cut off of Japan at various times when they get into a dispute with Japan and Japan makes a lot of electronics and they've actually cut the country off so you can buy it or you can buy as much or gonna raise terrace and things like that so so China has played hard ball was something that it has the majority control of I would love to see us develop our own supply here and be able to tell the Chinese we don't need your errors it's exactly what happened with pack and domestic fracking were now producing enough that although we're still importing well we're not importing nearly as much as we once did and OPEC's leverage over the United States is less than it was when the same could happen to to rare earth if we develop these the domestic sources Ben it's a pleasure to have you on thank you for having me about that Sir Ben Lieberman who is the senior fellow at the competitive enterprise institute glad to get your phone calls and your.

Lars Larsen ninety percent three quarters four dollars
"ben lieberman" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"ben lieberman" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"This person has drawn. Having a stroke. At texting and driving. She's gonna kill somebody. Texting and driving. This. Why why? Also crash real. Yeah. Maybe shouldn't crash was real. Yeah. Because that's what I was gonna say. What's he filming too? So wait, he's he's tech shaming while. He's filming. Yes. Yeah. Karma. Let's say about that something about instant karma amount in their car. You put your phone in your mouth, you can record while you're driving or like video calls and stuff like that. A lot of people do that that obviously is a distraction anyway, but it's it's no more of a distraction of you actually looking at some sort of content on your phone, but it's it's kind of like up here just kind of in the corner. But. Yeah. Maybe don't. So the state of Nevada they have a measure if it passes it would allow police to use the device known as a text the laser. So that connects to your phone, and it looks for activities such as opening a Facebook messenger. Call the screen, and it's come from folks who they're not laughing at that video because he gentleman named Ben Lieberman lost his nineteen year old son to a crash were driver had been texting. So he's pushing for this device. Obviously there's concerns about the fourth amendment this give the government the ability to or the right to look through your stuff whenever they want 'cause your digital can be considered your stuff. In fact, I think there's courts have viewed it that way. But if you've been pulled over they have probable cause it you were distracted. They could look for a hamburger wrapper other things. Right. Is it is it that different from that? No. I mean, you have to the way it works right now. Sort of broadly speaking is you have to content consent to a search, even when it's your phone, your laptop. That's the that's the protection that we're sort of generally afforded by the courts, I cannot imagine voting for something like this. I mean, this is just seems like such an overreach by lawn by bond. I I get it. If you're law enforcement, you would love to have this too. And I get it that that texting while driving. I'm a motorcycle rider every day bicycle rider on many days. I see this all the time. It's a massive hazard. I get it. But I do not think you should be able to pull up for something like this, especially when it's a noncriminal violation and be able to search someone's phone for their text messages. It's not the subject messages, it's all of their activity over the course of whatever period of time. It wasn't even well-defined. Yeah. And I've heard talk of doing this at airports as well. Hey before we get on the plane monoply take. Look through your phone just like to take a look and see if you've been saying anything we're concerned about I wouldn't sign up for that either. The presumption of guilt, reverse the older. The pre check or clear or anything like that. They do scan you and check you don't do social media. I've done pretty check and clear, and they do not do that. They scan you. They do a hand scan find that justifiably find that offensive didn't bother me much, but they're not actually taking your phone. They're not searching your stuff your any more than the TSA. Generally, the wait time in line. I find more offensive than you taking my fingerprint. There's this bet they're pushing these and it's not a it's not a physical chokepoint. But it's you know, it's a traveling show point that I need to get on that plane. So I'm probably willing to give up things that I wouldn't otherwise give up I'm willing to throw away lotion or a soda pop. And I think they just keep ratcheting up. So like the checkpoints that they have in some states most people like I afraid, and I just want to get through this. So yeah, I'll let you look through my car. I'll let you check my driver's license and check my breath. I think if this thing takes hold you'll have a lot of people in, you know, Mike, we're talking about the presumption of innocence. I kind of liked that idea that we're not considered guilty. I think that's a pretty good thing for society. But if this passes, I bet you'll have a whole lot of people they pulled to the side road. They think they're going to be brave and say, no, I don't give your permission to look at my texts. And I bet you get a whole bunch of people on the other side of this. Yeah. You know, what I'm afraid? I don't know. These are my rights or I want to get to work. Well, I mean, the nice thing. What's going to happen? If this is approved by the Nevada legislature. And if it becomes law, Nevada, and if someone is arrested or pulled over in and asked to search, I hope that somebody sues, and I hope this March its way to the supreme court had locks this thing down because they they're only doing this because they think that it's wobbly enough but the protections against unreasonable. Search are wobbly enough to do something like this. And I'm really hoping that this is the type, of course, that might lock that down. We got pulled over once by an officer. I realized he wasn't in his jurisdiction. This is a few years ago with my I was taking my daughter back from a skating thing. And I talked with officer pulled me over I said massive question, you're not you're not just here. This isn't your jurisdiction because what's that have to do it with all due respect this the law, and I'd like it if you call state patrolman, and I'm happy to give you the keys. I'll also rendered the keys. I just would rather have call stip Trump, and he sat there for a second. He said, you know, what? I should really call the state patrol, but you're actually right. This isn't my jurisdiction. I want you to slow down. Right. And I did nestled down. So I guess I'm a good neighbor. But there's bad neighbors. Right. There's bad neighbors. Like this a ninety year old woman in Tennessee was arrested last week. Gate. She pulled a gun and a neighbor not not because the news breaking in. He was blowing leaves into her yard. Never.

Nevada texting while driving officer Facebook Ben Lieberman TSA stip Trump Tennessee skating Mike supreme court nineteen year ninety year