26 Burst results for "Ben Horowitz"

"ben horowitz" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

08:37 min | 9 months ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"A really ugly fat short person in a high position you know that that person is just so much better than anybody else would have been spot right right because most people in that job. We're going to be tall and handsome or tall and beautiful because that good not that smart but you know it is an amazing thing. How we you just look around. It's like wow these tall men presidents of all these companies because we've decided something about them based on these subsequently. Yeah and IT'S A. It's a number one hiring mistake people make is look and feel alright. Joanne with this. But you gotta go further. This is also a really important about culture. What do you mean look and feel well today look like a head of sales forty two long white teeth? You know perfect care all that kind of thing. That's what a head of sales. President Zadie hires by the way for whatever that's worth that way. He you know somebody had a great line about that. Which is he hires like. He's casting for the apprentice which is exactly. It's true which is one of the things that drives me crazy of about one of the thousand things but so how do you avoid it though? Ben How do you avoid it? And how do you avoid it at your? You know you can't hire every single position every single company that you're so how do you train that out of people we all fall into it? So let me kind of talk about the General. And then you know more on the data city case so in general. It's all about preparation. And how do you prepare for the interview? Because if you don't know what you're looking for guess what you're going to hire the person Alexa part and so you have to get into it and so we have an and it's one of the most complex things. I think that I work with CEOS on is well. How do you hire a cfo if you never been a C. F. o? How do you hire Japanese interpreter? If you don't know Japanese like this is a very difficult thing to prepare for So you know what we're going to have you meet five. Cfo's we think are good. I want you to ask them very hard questions. What's the difference between a good? Cfo and a great CFO. Why do you think that? How do you test for an interview? All that kind of thing I want you. You gotta get deep with them on how to do that. And then of all those things. They say they're not all gonna say the same things which things are most important to your company and like hone in on how you test for that and just that and you just have to ignore the other things and then you're off. Your focus is off what they look like at that point what they sound like now on the diversity thing. I'll tell you the story on it so if you look at diversity in hiring. Here's the problem is any organization you walk into any organization. There's a woman manager. There's GonNa be a lot of women working there. You're Asian Manju Lata. Asians African American African people know how to hire themselves. I know what I'm good at value at highly and I contest for in an interview. And so that's the. That's the crux of the mechanism. That blows up diversity so we are the problem at entries. Horwitz early on you know Margaret She Ran Marketing. She had all women working for Franken. Had All Asians working for a whole thing. So I go to Margaret Margaret. What's in your criteria with where what's in your profile where no men can get a job working in marketing. Do they all fail on and she looks at me and she says helpfulness and I'm like Oh snap. I know very few helpful man but here is a really stupid thing for us. As an organization where venture capital Whereas Services Organization. That's our business helping like being helpful and that's a real skill like. Can I anticipate what you need before? You say anything like how many people can do that. That's a that's a high bar. Nobody else had their profile. So when you think about developing the preparation for the interview you have to think do I have perspectives from people who are not me. And what did they know? What would they hire for that position? Do I understand it? Can they teach me how to test for it and then if I do that? Then guess what you get. Diversity automatically like we have automatic diversity at entries and Horowitz. I don't have any quotas any program. And he headed diversity any anything. We just profile prepare in a diverse way. Hundred and eighty people were fifty two percent women in care but I do care that everybody came in on the same criteria and they all have the same opportunity once they get there and that's very different than going I need to have. Yeah Yeah 'cause then then then when you come in. Everybody looks at you and go. You went in through the side door and so they start treating you differently. You have to reprove yourself on things and all that stuff. It's an easier not easier easy problem but easier problem at a firm like yours. It's really hard problem in a massive company. Do you have to change the process? It's really hard problem to want to get to that size than it is really hard problem to you. Know I 'cause I'm pro affirmative action because it's really hard at this point. It's a really hard problem to solve if you if if an I understand the looking someone like I understand that argument so I've read the books people you and I both know of sent me the books. I understand the whole thing but I don't know what's come up with a better solve. Yeah so look I think the real solve is you have to be committed to getting the best talent and you know what big companies this is a problem with big companies in general speaking of the guy who likes starts little companies. Is You get a certain size and the businesses so good that you can get away with doing stupid stuff and that includes hiring like sub par people in you end up with no diversity. Because you don't really have to get the best and all that kind of thing if you have to get the best then. It's worth investing in a hiring process that can see all the talent that's process outcome. It's a great outcome. That happens that you get diversity. But you're not going into it purely for that. Now we're going into to get the best absolute it turns out that if you genuinely go try to get the best you end up with a diverse group one hundred percent. Well yeah no question no question. And so that's a that's a great place to Yeah aspirational yes. What were you gonNA say? Yeah we'll go on for too long. Yeah no you're not. You know one of the guys We hired we. Were looking for somebody who is great at relationships because it was a relationship job now most venture capital firms would never even value that as thing but because we were looking for that we ended up with a African American kid who used to work for Jermaine Dupree as a sound engineer. So we will talk to me about hype line. I'm like why are you looking there? And he's that literally the best relationship guy in Silicon Valley and we just knew I knew for that criteria because I knew relationships was a real thing. But if you don't know that you miss that guy and you miss like a competitive advantage. So Benz two books. The hard thing about hard things in the new on what you do is who you are are filled with him being willing to put out difficult problems and express Solutions that you haven't thought of before and that aren't typical and the new book is modeling. A bunch of disparate and diverse leaders. And how they looked at these problems than bed draws lessons from what they did and so I would highly recommend these books then manure your life fascinating to me and I I. I'm I'm endlessly fascinated by what you and mark do together and by your partnership and thanks for taking the time and sharing your wisdom. Yes now appreciate it. It's a great great fun. Where can people find you on social media? So I'm a be Horowitz on twitter and Be Her with zero on instagram. And Ben Horowitz on facebook. I don't think I knew the instrument piece I do my talking to grandma. Good take a Lotta pictures please. You're not good looking a an outmoded conventional standard conventional standard. Everybody thanks you find me at. Brian Koppelman on twitter. You can email me at the moment. Pk CHIEL DOT COM. I'll see you.

Ben Horowitz cfo head of sales twitter President Zadie Joanne Alexa Margaret Margaret Brian Koppelman Margaret She facebook Whereas Services Organization Franken CFO Horwitz Silicon Valley Jermaine Dupree
"ben horowitz" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

11:16 min | 9 months ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Hey is the moment Brian Koppelman. Thanks for listening. I'm thrilled the smartest guys I know is here today. Ben Horowitz who is normally it'd be it'd be enough if someone was a bestselling author but then Then he is of two bucks the hard thing about hard things and what you do is who you are. Which is the new book. Came out in October But Ben is really famous for being one of the most successful. Vc's and company Ceo Founders In in the business world and His partners with marketing treason. Who's one of the most popular guests on this podcast? His episode is must listening. And I'm so excited to have his Injuries and Horowitz partner. Ben Horowitz. Here thanks for doing this Ben. Thanks BRIAN THAT'S A. That's a great introduction and very hard to live up to so thank you. It'd be fine. You're going to be fine. So here's what I want. I want to start and I'll say what you do is who you ours and amazing book about Culture Culture. Such an overused word. Nobody knows it means and you have defined defined defined as important on. We'RE GONNA get to it but I'm always fascinated by starting at a more granular level with people and especially someone as successful as you. What what gets you out of bed in the morning have. That's a good question and not even when that I expected. So that's good. Look at this point. You know I'm kind of you know this. I mean a lot of my life most of my life. I was just trying to feed the family. Make money and so forth. Then you get to this question of. That's all taken care of now. What and You know for me and a lot of the reason why we started the firm and so forth comes down to you know what kind of life do people have and And a lot of that comes down to you. Know what's the environment that they're in like? And so when we thought of starting the firm my whole concept was can we make these places a better place to work and be and spend that much of your life and that's that whole journey is a little bit what led me to this culture idea because culture is how people experience how your employees experience you how your customers experience you and people right? They they don't even know what it is can't define it. But what is your actual drive like? What is the driver now for you personally? You know. I often wonder what it is. You know I spent a lot of my life on trying to understand ambition and how it shifts and a lot of guys women Non Gender People. Your age of had. Your success would kind of be walking off into the sunset. Now that's always what we all imagined doing isn't it? What are you what is it. Do you think that keeps you fired up how well you know. I'm in such A. I hate this word because it's used in this weird racial way now but I'm such and such a privileged position in that. I can work with anybody who I want to work with. And the you know. That's so exciting to me to be able to end. You know anybody. I mean it's great to be here with you it's You know I get to meet people. I got to spoke to Jay Z. The other day like that was super exciting for me. I get to work with people like Mark Zuckerberg. It's so it's still very exciting for me. I guess is what I would say and I never thought I'd be in this position so now that I'm here I'm happy and in it's hard. I can't think of something that I'd rather do like I'd rather talk to mark Zuckerberg than be at the beach. Yeah Okay I love this because this is a part of what I think about. Why even this podcast? Which I don't do it for the money despite you may think. Do the hunt Chaz because it is a way to connect with people who I admire mostly who I think I can learn something from and for me. Curiosities always been such a giant driver. Like I have I. It's one of the things that success doesn't quench for for me. Anyway for this sort of curiosity about how people think and the distinctions they make makes me feel really alive and I've always thought of VC's such a great position to prosecute that curiosity. Yeah no absolutely because we see I mean. That's the one of the greatest things about the job is just being able to see all the new ideas and you know it's one of the things it's actually a really important part of the culture of the firm is all new. Ideas are good in some way. Even if you don't like them as a business even if you know the entrepreneur didn't do the work or whatever just anybody coming with a new idea that they want to build an organization. Business around is an amazing thing. And if you lose that then you become cynical then you just take the joy out of the job. Yeah that was always the thing when I did you. We both have this experience in music. It's one of the reasons. Yes kindergarten first and doing an are which. I did artist repertoire. You're constantly trying to put yourself in a position to be open to the next one being great. Even though the last two hundred have been horrible. Yes right right now. It's very much like that and you must have to reset and you have to love the artist because if you hate the artist then you're you're done we have to love the whole idea of these artists and you have to be ready and it's like the same thing when David and go in to auditions and we're watching people come in. Even if the last forty people who've read the part have not worked. You have to reset yes. So do you practice that? Do practice trying to create an open. Mind you know. I don't know that like what I did. Do as sophisticated as practice but it is. I talked to myself about it and go okay. You know it's kind of my morning. Like how do I get ready? It's like okay. I'M GONNA get to see some people bringing the new stuff this is. This is amazing. One of them might be the thing that changes the world or are you able to keep listening throughout like I would think a challenge I would have is if three minutes into the pitch. I get that feeling. It's not gonNA work. How do you get through? How do you find a way to get some extract some value out of that? So here's generally How I do that. And it's interesting so one of the things that early on the mark and I are I would say both fans and then there's a bit of a curiosity with Nissim lab who's grin for like a Bra Eric. Guess five brilliant. But I've got a few hours at that guy in my life and it's whether you know he he can be ready. People have very extreme. Reactions personality is wild. But he's thinking isn't credible. He's he's a brilliant thinker. So God and I I value any time to spend with that and one of the things that you know he talks about is this idea of the narrative fallacy and where he you know you you find the narrowed explain explain the NFL's. Yeah so you know people love stories as you know and so somebody tells a story about something and you like the story. The facts kind of fall to the side. Your ability to analyze. It isn't so good so one of the things that we started early on that helps with the thing that you're talking about is how do you get people off the narrative so you can get into the real thing because the narrative the narrative isn't the real thing it's the story like what's the what's the reality behind it and so we start pitches and this is something that I really like doing. I always ask entrepreneurs you know. Tell me your story and they go okay. Well you know I graduate 'cause now where'd you grow up like how'd that go was your mom? Like what did she do for a living that kind of thing and all of a sudden they're off the narrative and so that gives me an anchor later they get into the business of okay. Why don't you do it that way? And so it's always interesting to me. How a person's life caused them to get to that point and And you can tell you know if they were. The best entrepreneurs are always working on something hard they have some weird discovery about it and then that's like nobody knows this. I need to build a business behind it. As opposed to Okay I thought people would think this was a good idea which usually is not a good idea. I'm always amazed when people I used to think it was impossible to calculate a spot in the market. Like Dave every good idea we've had has just literally come from fascination and curiosity this fucking amazing we. No one's made this or you know I walk into a poker club why nobody told the story but I don't understand. These people have amazing but then I have met and so. That's the only way I know how to create work that anyone's going to care about bright but then I don't you find the casually meet somebody who's just like looked at a situation disembedding rated and gone. There's a gap I can do this. Yes so people do that. I I can say it doesn't. Yeah the hit rate on those just low because we always say. There's this thing that a lot of Hollywood people will pitch. It's this meets that or you know and those always seem like terrible ideas in business and in movies. Yes they do. You know like it. No you gotta come up with. This is not this meets that until the thought in just to go back to sort of get because I to knock people off the narrative but I want to get their Part of it gets you out of bed in the morning. Is the the possibility that you're going to bump into some? I'm alive. Something new somebody new? Who's got way of thinking about something? Yeah and it's still get you amped up when that happens. Oh Yeah Yeah No. It's it's always Super Exciting and a lot of the ideas in the book are things that hit me so hard when I heard them. I was just because it was a perspective that I have before. So that's some eating your as you get older. It's harder to find that gets harder well but sometimes the other thing happens. I find which is something that I thought I. I kind of understood all suddenly understand in new way. Yes yes and I'll it'll unlock something right. I will send me down a totally new path. And that's the best thing when you get this thing we see painting you've seen a million times and suddenly you see the painting yes you haven't and then suddenly or piece for me. It happens of pieces of music. Sometimes where definitely? I'll suddenly here piece..

Ben Horowitz Brian Koppelman Mark Zuckerberg Vc Ceo partner Chaz Jay NFL Nissim David Hollywood Dave
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:14 min | 11 months ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Officers from like the French and Spanish armies into his army and it was because he needed that culture that military culture. He needed into transplant. It over And he did it and it moved which is you know just I would say like super spectacular? Well then it makes me think that you who are unique in that you live and work and operate in a world of hyper growth. which is something that did not exist even at the beginning of my career certainly not at the scale L. Does and and in fact you live in the the epicenter of these companies that that might hire hundreds and even thousands of people in the space of a few months in that case? What do you do about culture? Well I think that that is really hard and I think that it means things that on boarding orientation and like how hard you push and move. The culture has to be much more intense. Because you're exactly onto the right thing. which is when people come into company? They bring whatever culture they have with them. And if you don't systematically medically assimilate them into your culture you're going to simulate into their culture and the higher and the organization. They are the more kind of pronounce that is. I think inky and this is why I'll tell you when I work. CEO's I say like stopped talking to me about your hiring pipeline and like how many resumes you have and like Mike. How many interviews? I don't care I want to know about your on boarding integration pipeline. Like what is that like. Like how do people get trained when they get the job. Do you have a plan to to train them. Before you put out that wreck like these things that ended up mattering much more culturally and then like how. Are you communicating your culture and like what is their first day. Look like You know I think people don't think about it through that Lens enough but that's that's the right lines what is it what does it mean to come into your company. And how did they. How does a new play a believe after depth themselves into so getting very prescriptive and pragmatic for a second before we end here? What sort sort of three or four tips do you give your portfolio? CEO's and other many people who ask your advice as they set forth in in higher. I won't let somebody sign their offer letter unless they've read our culture document and signed it and said I agree that I'm going to follow this culture. Then when they come come in I new employee orientation. It's me and I'm teaching. Why we have a culture and what it means and exactly how it's defined and why care about it and so like setting the tone like day one is really really really important And then it also helps me see when people are off culture and enforce is it So that that kind of went but like it's very one of the reasons I wrote the book and they the reason I wrote the book in the way I did is there's not ABC's of culture like like there's not like here's the three things to have a good corporate culture that doesn't work you have to understand the gestalt of what culture is and how it works how moves and How it backfires backfires on you and bites you and gets weaponized and all these things And then you can start to say okay. How can I apply some techniques to my situation so that I can move culture in the right direction it makes me think about you? Know I've been here ban about a year and my first day of my first week I went into a leadership should meeting sat down. I did what I do when leadership meetings my past employer and afterwards you know my boss pulled me aside and he said Hey. You're on your cell phone in that meeting. We don't do that here. It was one sentence that he said to me. It humiliated me but he did. It privately never pulled out my cellphone again also understood immediately the culture it has it has it was the on ramp to how to work here. That's amazing and you know I 'cause everybody wants to work working in violent. Where like when I'm with you like your president? I'm present but like one person isn't present and then like that's contagious. And so it's a great thing. Well thank you so much. This is really great suggestion. That was ben Horowitz a founder. The firm and recent Horowitz and I keep thinking about the distinction. He drew between being honest and being liked how we say. We want to be honest but maybe what we want even more to be liked. What do you think? Drop us a line at Hello Monday at Lincoln Dot Com or post on linked in using the HASHTAG. Hello Monday if you enjoyed listening. Subscribe and rate US Apple. podcasts sts it helps me listeners find the show Hello Mondays. The production of linked in the show was produced by Laura Sin. Joe degeorge mixed our show Forensic Rhonda was head of original audio and video. Dave is technical director. Miami Jeanie and Victoria Taylor wrap everything up in a neat bow. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious break brake master cylinder and you also heard me from putting mayor Dan. Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln. JESSI hempel CENEX Monday. Thanks for listening missing as well so with. What's the next book a like? I don't know if I have any more ideas like. This is my kind of longest. I had a chapter in this book on Hip Hop. I had so many good things in it but I kind I couldn't quite get it to work work You know in the book and I was like I'm not GonNa do it wrong so I just pulled it out not only is it. Would it be a great story. It's a great cultural story because it's the poorest kids with nothing and not even the support of the R&B is like so nobody would play it on the radio MTV when planning the videos. It's nothing just like Ralph. mcdaniels story is so unbelievable how he decided to start video music box and then once you had video music box like yet all the videos goes on and like he's running around. He's going into parties the most dangerous neighborhoods in like the world like in the party Super Hot and he's sweating and he's got his Mike and his video guy and he's like I'm GonNa give a shout out to like and that was the term shout just invented thank..

CEO Mike ben Horowitz JESSI hempel CENEX Lincoln Dot Com MTV Ralph. mcdaniels Miami ABC Laura Sin president Joe degeorge Dan Dave Roth Rhonda founder Victoria Taylor Lincoln editor in chief
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

09:47 min | 11 months ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Truth or what you they really need to know and so forth and so it's work get why so. Many people don't give feedback because they they struggle with being honest. They don't want to be honest because they don't want that person to go. Well I don't like you. I don't like the fact that you even told me that. About myself and eh takes great skill to do it and so forth so you know I wanted to people to at least acknowledge like how hard it was to be honest because people will go. Yeah like were high integrity. Were honest where this where it's like. Those things are really hard and nobody actually is one hundred percent like they're never they never are so let's deal with it as a hard problem and see how we can kind of build up those skills of telling the truth right so in your book you looked at cultures that have been built over long periods of time and I was wondering how you can really make the comparison wind. Today's tech companies are often young still new like facebook. It's what fifteen years old yup absolutely right. Well but facebook has the advantage that has a hierarchy like a strict hierarchy So so you have a lot of things you can do in a company that are much harder to do in a society our country even though kind of gang back to the earlier point like you do have to move the culture you can't dictate the culture That's a that's a real issue and challenge but as supreme leader. You are much much more powerful than the culture than Any Given Samurai might have been or that kind of thing so I think a lot of these things are very very possible in the business context and you know people have done them to third grade effect in your earlier book you wrote about the wartime in the peacetime CEO. And in I'll tell you as a reporter in Silicon Valley in the years after or that book any CEO any startup. I interviewed Morton began by rolling out a philosophy of leadership underneath which was that philosophy sophy a so first of all. I WANNA spend a moment for our listeners. Aren't familiar with it. Sort of explaining what the philosophy is so if you look at any of the Business Literature Church certainly up to that time you had kind of a set of rules that everybody agreed on like you know you delegate and empower you. You don't publicly berate somebody you know you know an on and on and on and and like that was kind of the academic mkx of how you ran anything but then you had like the top leaders in the technology business. Paid a lot of attention to like Andy Grove and Steve Jobs and so forth and I was like all the stories about them are many of them. Were about like publicly humiliating people in these kinds of things and then getting way into the details. Like crazy crazy into the details and you. How do you reconcile those two things and The more time I spend I realized there's this kind you've not like there's a peacetime company and I think like Google under Eric. Schmidt was like really classical peacetime company ascension that they had this like invincible invincible money. Printing machine called search and so they really wanted to empower everybody. You know like almost like A. I think they a US like a university as as a metaphor To come up with ideas to be innovative and so forth And so it was kind of a peacetime peacetime kind of culture. As opposed to Steve Jobs who always felt he was under seige And he's like you know has that wartime thing. The big difference is like okay. How do you make a decision And decision in wartime is like the whole thing is it's gotta be right and fast and so that means the leaders often going to have to drop down. They're going to be able to tolerate too much. You know get gac about it and these kinds of things things and we're just GONNA go and move and the person who knows. The most was going to make that decision. We're going to keep you know we're gonNA keep it moving. You know as opposed to in peace time when it is about more like Developing your developing kind of innovation from all over the company. Let a thousand flowers bloom all that kind of thing. And and so that was just my attempt to kind of lay out that difference difference so against that backdrop. I WanNa talk about how culture shifts in each situation and how you should attach to culture in each situation situation. I mean there's wartime an invitation to forget culture No I don't think it's a it's just a different kind of decision. Making framework a lot of the the cultural things might remain but is a different mode and it is. It's not forget culture. It's shifted a different kind of culture which is referred to as like a more military culture more command and control more More about how do we get to the right spot but a lot of the little things in the culture. Stay the same you know like. Do we care about reality. Do we care about timeliness. Do we care about you know like what are is you know how do we view quality versus features all these kinds of elements and up still being relevant whether you're peacetime wartime but it's a pretty you know it's a difficult transition transition. I would say for other leaders to make so like. It was very interesting to me when you went from kind of Eric Schmidt to Larry Page and Larry was very focused on a very specific wartime thing which was facebook and this is not fair. Yeah Google yes Google and he did get like a very powerful result out of that which is he he got a unified profile for Google users. which is still like a massive asset for Google today? But if you look at the executive staff that Eric had other than David David Drummond like they. All were gone. Pretty fast and It was a complete new executive team. And I think some of that is if you're used to working in peacetime and then all of a sudden you're in war like a lot of emotion just doesn't like the whole place doesn't feel the same all right. We're taking a quick pause here coming up after the break Ben gets into toxic cultures this episode of Hello Monday is brought to you by Delta Delta flies to three hundred cities around the world. That's three hundred cities cities where everyone does the same things you do. That's three hundred cities where the people in those three hundred cities think. They're the only ones who know about that. One really great place three hundred cities where on the way there. You can listen to hello Monday on the inflate entertainment system for Real Delta isn't flying to three hundred cities merely to bring us us together but to show us that we're not that far apart in the first place Delta keep climbing I wanNA stop for a minute and ask you to fill out our listener. Survey Hello Monday we WANNA make episodes about the topics that you care about. So let us know what you want more of at Lincoln Dot com slash. Hello that's linked in dot com slash. Rush hello it takes five minutes and if you fill it out. Five responders will receive. Hello Monday gift. Package sent straight to your door. Thanks and we're back. With Ben Horowitz. In his Book Ben Looks to the Haitian Revolution for strategies on radical cultural overhaul at the turn of the eighteenth century a former slave named Tucson L'Ouverture led the only successful slave revolt in modern history. To do so he had to build a military force side of slave community. Now how exactly did he do. This spent asks. What does that have to tell us about how to overhaul broken company culture? The fact that to Saddle Stanton overture took a slave culture and built it into one of the great military cultures of all time shows. You can definitely change culture and get rid of flaws. In the biggest flaw in the slave culture was trust. And this is this. Is this fundamental story to your book which changes the story of the slave revolt in Haiti the only successful slave revolt in all of history. So maybe you can take a moment to explain why that was mind blowing line. Yeah so so yes the only one So which is and it's funny because you think about the the company thing it's like well like why are they going. It's really hard to move culture culture that far but why do slaves not successfully revolt as an interesting question itself. It's like well. They certainly are motivated. You know they'd be willing to die but it comes back to this thing where you know as part of the dehumanisation process of becoming a slave you lose your control of tomorrow so you just end up. It's like well like we will ask yourself. Like what am I gonNa do tomorrow. What am I going to do next week? What may what's my five year plan like slave? Those aren't the thoughts that makes sense. Because you don't own your future young on your today and trust as a consequence is very fundamental. Cultural concept is is based in this idea of you know I'm going to do this for you today because I trust that down the line. You're going to do something for me. And so it's very weak. In a slave culture in a military leterrier context. It's essential because if you don't trust the order then nothing works and so we had this problem of yet. The slave culture that he needed to move into this military culture and not only did he do it but he did it at tremendous scale so that you know it's peak. The Haitian Revolution had had five. He had five hundred thousand troops in the largest slave revolt in. US history was five hundred. And so that just showed like what he was able to achieve organizational away with with these cultural techniques. You know and he did like he was obsessed with culture just absolutely obsessed. He Incorporated.

facebook Google Eric Schmidt US Steve Jobs Ben Horowitz executive CEO Business Literature Church Andy Grove Morton Haiti Real Delta Delta Delta reporter Larry Page Lincoln Dot Silicon Valley Saddle Stanton
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

11:09 min | 11 months ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"You by Delta Delta flies to three hundred cities that's three hundred cities where people sing in the car three hundred cities where people miss someone one in one of the other two hundred ninety nine cities in Delta isn't flying those three hundred cities merely to bring us together but to show us. We're not that far apart in the first place. This Delta keep climbing from the editorial team at Lincoln I'm Jessi Hempel and this is hello Monday a show show about the changing nature of work and how that work is changing us so in my first week of work here at Linden my boss. Dan called me out. It was kind of embarrassing. We were coming out of a meeting where I'd been scrolling through my cell phone. I hadn't really thought that much about it. I did it all the time at my last job but Dan pulled me aside and he said we don't look at our smartphones during meetings here. Sure enough I began to look around and smartphones where all turned off in mostly hidden from view. Dan's Correction Shen was one of the many small actions that pile up to determine a company's culture and the culture is key to how we get things done at work at Lincoln everywhere else when a culture works works. But how about when it doesn't like when an office feels downright toxic. Can you change how you expect. People work together to move the culture. You can't dictate the culture. That's been Horowitz. He's a venture capitalist who had a ton of experience with this. He's helped build several several companies including the VC firm. In recent Horowitz that he now runs with Marc Andreessen and he's been investing in and advising companies for more than a decade Benz a bit of a management guru amongst startup founders Silicon Valley. They often references theory that companies need different kinds of leaders when they're facing threats as opposed to win business. Good call it. The wartime peacetime theory. His latest book is called. What you do is who you're how to create your business culture? Here's been you know people people been always say it's sort of an accepted platitude well everything has to do with culture. What does that mean? What is culture exactly day? Yeah so you know I. I love the way of the warrior. The kind of the Code of the Samurai says which is culture is not a set of leafs. It's a set of actions and that really gets into it because in a company it's all these things it's like. Well your employees like they got a phone call. Are they going to return it like in five minutes in an hour the next week. Never you know as ghosting people. Okay is showing up to a meeting on time the thing or is it twenty minutes late all these things and they're not in the mission statement they're not in the okay ours they're not in the KPI's they're not anything that you kind of directly manage and then you know you can tell. Yeah well like are they living the cultural values in their performance review. Well like how do you really know that like you know. You don't know if they return that phone call but it's those behaviors that that's how the company any feels to work. You know that's what feels like to work there. That's what it is like to do business with the imprint on the world. And so like how do you have a say in what that is is Turns out to be a really complicated question. And it's not really clear to me the degree to which you can even have a hand in prescribing. The culture maybe you can drive it to some degree but to what degree can a leader actually determine it so that's a great thing and you know my friend. Steve Stoute who does a lot of like like cultural marketing. He always uses term move culture. And I think that's the right term like how do you move culture and like how do you move in a direction. Because that's what you end up doing doing and I think that's absolutely possible and yeah you can't get it like comprehensive everybody's on culture all the time like you know we never have cultural misstep like nobody. It has like they might say they have it. But that's because they don't know what's going on their own organization. There's no way but there are ways to move it. I'll give you like a a small example there. We do kind of add entries Harvard so we have this cultural idea which by the way the idea is one that I think every venture capital firm has which is we really really wanNA respect entrepreneurs in the entrepreneurial process and it's like okay that's very easy to say because our business depends on them but the way the business works is they come to us and ask for money so think about that dynamic like you're sitting there and like I got the money you want the money so that makes me the big important person in you the little person asking for my money right like that's just how it feels to everybody and so as a result I would say. Most firms are very disrespectful respectful of entrepreneurs and you can see it. They show up like a half hour late to meetings. They you know they're just flipping with them. They you know. They speak to them and disrespectful manner. They don't get back back to them if they reject them they never they just go see them. It's like Oh you came in pitch me and I like and then I'm Never GonNa talk to you again and so all that goes on all the time I'm I'm so we didn't want that and I knew that saying it won't do anything so we kind of started with. Okay if you're late to meeting with an entrepreneur it's it's ten dollars a minute and I don't care if you like had to go. Oh you had to go to the bathroom. Five minutes late fifty dollars. I don't care you had important business. Call Ten it's like one hundred dollars. I don't care how important business call wasn't people go. Why like been why in the hell do I have to pay to work here like I'm doing? I'm doing business. I'm going to the bathroom. Human being like GonNa lay off and I'm like you need to plan when you go to the bathroom and you need to plan because if it was your wedding you'd be on time like you. You have to have that kind of respect for what they're doing it's very important. It's very hard to build a business and if you don't understand that then you can't work there and that story in the fact that they're reminded that story every single time they show up to meeting. That's what moves culture not the value on the wall. So an example that you cited sighted new book was Marissa Mayer. When she got your who and I it's been years and I bet most people still remember this even if you don't work in tech? Yeah one of the things that she did early on as she said okay. You have to come in no more working from home. I don't care what your circumstances are. You gotTA show up. Yeah Yeah Yeah. People really threw her under the bus for that crazy hunter. Why why online stuff whose brutal? Yes ally something like that and you would argue when you did argue in your book that that was pretty important at that moment for what she was doing with Yahoos culture. Oh yes look Yahu for whatever you think strategically anything else. People literally weren't coming to work on like so it had gone to that point. Where so there's there's a point in any culture where very dangerous to get to where people are rewarded more for not caring than for carrying and people who are who care then punished and so if you worked at Yahoo at that time and you came to work and you work your butt off? It won't make any difference you know like you couldn't get a decision. Made things went happened. You couldn't move the company forward. It was just a big bureaucracy. That can't do anything to the point where people figure that out. And they don't even come to work and they kept getting paid and they kept getting promoted. They kept getting like salary increases and all that stuff so that was as a culture she was dealing with and look that culture is more common than you might think in companies because as soon as the company gets bureaucratic that just like it starts rewarding not it carrying and so she had to make people Carrigan and and she knew she was right because she looked at the VPN loggins and like the People Busse said they were working for home. We're actually working from home. They weren't connecting. They didn't even have access to you. Know whatever the source code or anything like there's no way they were doing any work so she was like okay. We're GONNA change the culture right now. Everybody comes to work you know. Come to work you're fired and people like Oh that's it did a unlike maybe maybe in the context of the world not allowing work from home you know might have been too cruel and harsh but I yeah who is exactly the right cultural move and you know and like by most accounts. If if you talk to people who worked at Yahoo she did move the culture in the right direction on that now like didn't work out and there's a lot more that goes into companies success and just culture sure but I give her credit for that for sure so you bring up something that we all know to be true. which is that a lot of corporate cultures they can can introduce a heck of a lot of drag bureaucracy? Culture can kind of flat line. I understand that. Maybe there's something you can do about it in a leadership position Russian. What if you work at a place like that I I would say this is the one thing that as a leader like a lot of times leaders will know things? There'll be problems in the company. Vinny del De prioritize them. You know they will need fixing but it won't be the most important thing to fix and so it'll go and so you know sometimes as an an employee like pointing out something that the leader already knows isn't that productive But on cultural issues it's been my observation that the leader rarely knows that the culture has gone on adrift because they're not living in it in the same way that an employee is so I think that raising the issue but being very specific about it is important important so like a lot of times our culture is messed up. Our culture is like laser culture is toxic. But that doesn't get to the thing you have to actually get two okay. Why are you saying that and if you do that and the leader is good enough? And hopefully they've got the skills and cultural skills are hard then you can at least make a contribution on getting it back to where it needs to go. I do think that everybody's behavior the the other thing. Is You know particularly if the company is small. Aw You know. The culture of the even the kind of individual contributor leader employees tends to tends Sabih very infectious. And it's why you love people who come in you know who you can hire who are just generally like positive of an energetic because that's infectious and people who are negative all the time they're infectious and so You know the more you can bring your Kinda the best actions and cultural self to work that. That's super helpful. Always so you talk about honesty in your book. That's tricky. Because you want to be an honest person. Yeah sometimes people don't WanNa hear the whole truth right. Yeah No. I think that it's it's more like ability. You Know I. I think because I kind of comes into people's mind and oftentimes you know if you want somebody like you. You tell them what they wanna hear and what they wanNA hear. EAR MAY NOT BE. The truth. Often isn't the truth. And particularly if you're the leader of an organization It's very frequent that like people people don't WanNa hear the.

Dan Yahoo Horowitz Delta Delta People Busse Delta leafs Steve Stoute Marissa Mayer Marc Andreessen Lincoln Linden Jessi Hempel Shen Harvard Yahoos Silicon Valley
"ben horowitz" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"When they come to you with a problem and you say hey if you bring me problems bring me the solution. Don't bring a problem without a solution will don't don't expect anybody to come with problems anymore. Because they're going to be like. Hey I might not have the solution. A lot of people see a problem in front of them and they may not have a solution. They can't solve themselves. Maybe somebody else on the team can. But it's not being voice if it's voice or you're not encouraging them to voice it then you're incentivizing them to hate. Be Quiet and problems will be dormant Ormond and this was a huge lesson for me because you know growing a business. There are challenges. There are problems that come up and sometimes you get frustrated as the leader because you're always is being served all these problems solved and you're like hey I need your help guys if you Have come with a solution and that's just really out of frustration. But really what you should should do. And what he recommends is allow space and open time whether it's a meeting whether it's once a quarter to allow people just the voice. Hey these are my challenges. These the problems facing this I think are some glaring issues in our product for offer. And it's not complaining fest a chance for people to voice their concerns and also a chance for everybody to brainstorm solutions and you can sort of manage that conversation and what you'll find is often times when you solve one one problem that has come up. It solves a whole bunch of other problems with it. So be careful about what you incentivize and desensitize in your culture. Ultra everything you do. Everything you don't do is being watched is being observed by your team. So you gotta be very careful guys. It got more on today's episode before that. Let me give love to today's sponsor support for today's show comes from honey brook. It's what you've always dreamed of. You started your own business. You have no boss. Oh you are the boss but reality check running your own business is hard. Thankfully honey book makes it easy honey because an online business management tool that organizes your client communications nations bookings contracts and invoices all in one place. It's perfect for freelancers entrepreneurs or small business owners that WANNA consolidate services that they already used like quickbooks books. Google Suite Excel and mail chimp with honey book. You could automate. You're busy. They have easy to use templates for emails proposals brochures and invoices they also have e-signatures and built an automation to save. You time and get you paid faster like the sound of that. Simplify your to do list. Stink control with honey book and right now honey book is offering free our listeners. Fifty percent off when you visit honey book dot com slash. NBA payment is flexible. And this promotion applies whether you pay monthly or annually go to honey book dot com slash. NBA For fifty percent of your first year. That's honey book dot com slash. NBA What you do is who you are is a fantastic book. And it's a reason why I listed it as one of my top five books of two thousand nineteen that episode aired a couple of weeks ago episode fourteen. Oh nine fine. You want to check out my other books of the year. Ben Horowitz. Thank you so much writing such great books honest straightforward and useful. And I like to add had very well researched. Thanks for listening to the hundred Ambrosio. Pick up what you do is who you are right been Horwitz you will not be sorry you may have some days off coming up because of the holidays. Treat yourself to a great book before I wrap up. Did he do me a favor and hit. Subscribe Right now on. Whatever you listen to to listen to podcasts casts subscribe to the show and that way the PODCAST APP will make sure that the next episode? That's available is ready on your device as soon as it comes out also so share this show on social. Can you do that right now for me. Let others know you're listening to this. podcast this episode sharing a scaring do it now before I go want to leave you with this. This book is really a mindset book masked as a how to book and I really like it because you can listen to this book you can read this book and you can do it to sink in and think about it and see how you can apply to your own business for me at Webinar Ninja and the hundred dollar and BE A. I'm really trying to define our team trying to find our culture really honed. That in and really make sure everybody's singing from the same songsheet. There's incredible powered everybody's on the same page. You have so much momentum and it gives you that competitive advantage so invest in that and then investment is reading book pretty low cost love. Thank you so much for listening. It'll take you in tomorrow's episode. I'll see take.

Ambrosio NBA Horwitz Ben Horowitz
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

10:17 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Masters in Business

"With a hundred billion dollars funds. Yeah forget the future. We'll let the jury decide on that. It was the impact on things like valuation and raising money of the Softbank Vision Funds since they launched in two thousand seventeen did. Did they really to shake things up in effect things who I think they They definitely affected the companies. They invested in A. You know I would say more. So than and the landscape itself such a unique slash unusual deal. There were some like regular deals that they did like they put money into slack and that it was kind of in a very regular way just they look like a growth investor right but in many companies. They wrote you know quite enormous checks and You know with the expectation that the company would live up to deploying that mine and I think you know some of you know when people right the retrospective on we work You know like some of what was distorting for we work. was they already had a very ambitious plan. Ray and then Softbank encourage them to be more ambitious and and the difficulty with the new company. And that kind of idea is if you if you're not sure poor and this gets back to what we I talked about earlier about how market I met but You know you have always like not one good idea but usually have like six or seven like really get ideas and you know he. The we works. Were all name we something but we live. We work school whatever. Yeah so you had all those good ideas The problem is that from a talent perspective. There are only a few people who can get you. The product market fit on any of those ideas in your company. So Oh like you just very quickly dilute yourself so if you if you like your top idea even if it's not your best idea there's a a real chance you can make it work but if you do your top ten ideas none of them are going to work. And that's almost guaranteed and because you've diluted your talent too much it's not. It's not not a money issue. It's a talent issue. And so you know when you'd and the problem is entrepreneurs don't know whether their first idea is better than their tenth the idea so that was the question you immediately put myself in that category like. It's very hard to distinguish. which is your best idea don't you don't really good? Ideas require the marketplace to validate them or a little bit of baptism of fire for the entrepreneurs to sharpen their skills and be able to get their best ideas to the market. Now exactly so A very good friend of mine wrote a paper called the idea as which describes the OH abolish. TRINA VAAS and I remember seeing that and in fact Your partner mark talks about the idea. mays any surprise then entrepreneurs come to Anderson harwit's our wits not having read it. Yeah no it's it's it's one of the I would say most important things to read if you're an entrepreneur Because it describes that process you have an idea but any idea there's tons of stuff wrong with it because it hasn't right hasn't bumped into the market and the partners and the competitors and the technology landscape and all the things that's GonNa bump into and so as you hit all those things you have to navigate your way through the maze to the actual product and doing that with one product is like it's hard enough. Yeah I mean it's like it is like the kind of business equivalent of giving birth. It's very difficult so I haven't tried to ten babies simultaneously you all the babies are going to die. And that's that's I think what can happen if you get a giant fusion of cash and so that's the thing that now on the other Hand and Peter Thiel describes as well zero to one which is getting to this product market fit in the nice one to end and I think that you know in theory Softbank could certainly put put money in something that was going to end and help it. Get to one to end faster But you know like well we'll see if that's how it works. It works in a different way is is too much capital potentially a burden for either the venture fund like the Vision Fund or for scrappy startup Like we works. Is that just too much. Money for young untested SORTA Green. CEO to deal with. Well I think that it is for a company company if it causes the ideas that you try to implement to multiply if you do that then then that's GonNa be very dangerous as opposed to take that one idea and see it through to its natural conclusion. Take Global That like if you need more money to take the market faster that's a more scalable activity it straightforward. There is kind of known methods and so forth. You can throw money at it and if you waste it it's not destructive but if you throw money at product that's destructive and so it's a it's a tricky balance And Yeah No. It's it's something that they are. Shirley have to struggle with so in in in the book. You quote your partner. Marc Andreessen you only ever experienced to emotions euphoria and terror I find that lack of sleep keep enhances both yeah. That's a description of entrepreneurship. So so is all that extra capital not helpful if it or does that rotates. Thanks away some of the terror. I think that that is actually dangerous. Because it's that level of focus caused by that like you have to be able to handle the emotion but like nobody ever. It's very hard to build a great company without that kind of feeling of. Oh my God. I've got one bullet and I have to hit the target and if I don't like that's it like the level of focus. Yes you have to have to do that is kind of what makes the company the culture like everything gets built off of that and To me if you take like if if you take that away you just have like You know you just end up with a big fat slow bureaucratic start up you know which companies don't execute that well generally but they do. They're so large they can just pound you with money but they've got a sustainable underlying engine like Google Google search or something right if you don't have that underlying engine you just have the money somebody gave you and you start acting like that that that can be super super destructive. So I'm I'm fascinated by your concept of the hard thing about hard things which is effectively spoiler alert. Hey there's no formula for doing this. No the framework. That's what makes them hard. It's a case of first impression That was a really insightful. Observation does that come From your work as an entrepreneur or is that something you really see as a venture capitalist or both while I think it was mainly my work as an entrepreneur entrepreneur. I think that Crystallized being a venture capitalist working with other entrepreneurs realizing that my experience was far from unique But Yeah Dan and I think this is what's wrong with most of the business literature as they try to put it into some framework care the three steps you need to go good to greater built to last or whatever gym con says Because it's not like e it is very situational it's very specific to your company and your product and your market and your people and and all these kinds of things and and so Yeah the things that you're doing he you know you have to understand different level. There's not the ABC's of building a company you you can follow the thirty steps building a company that anybody puts out and get nowhere all the time and you know same with culture you know with the The new book like people have these step-by-step. Oh have off site and like who you know. Create your values and then like put it in people's performance reviews. That doesn't do anything other than get you a hypocritical call culture where people go. Yeah we have those values on the wall that we don't live So you know you have to get to the real thing Another words create your own values values. Don't follow someone else systems work. You know know how well not even so much. Create your own values. It's like you got to focus on like how. How do you get people to behave the way you want them? I'll give you an example is so like Tom. Coughlin could've put values on the wall that said like we're going to be very detail oriented and we're GonNa like care about like everything more than anybody else does and like. Nobody would have done anything but what he did is he said. Here's the rule. If you're on time you're late right. Not Meeting on time. He'd find you like thousands of dollars because you need it to be there five minutes early. Why is that better one like as soon as he says that? Ah You're on time you're late you like where the hell am I like. What is this? Why sang that? And when you ask yourself why is he saying that. Then what you're going to find out is because like we're we're out working everybody we're paying more attention to everything than anybody like the way we practice every detail that we go over a like. We're going we're going to be here before everybody everybody then And flew right into it every time you go to a meeting like you can't like get away from that cultural value whereas like you put on the dam wall and you see it. Once a year performance review come on doing anything and for people may not be familiar with it. Coughlin was the coach of the New York. Giants won two Super Bowls Wrote a book Earned the right to win which I do not love sports books as business metaphors. This is a great book really really comes across his meeting. We'll talk about this later. His whole concept of meetings. If you're not there and prepared and thinking about what's going to happen at the meeting like you can't show up at the line of scrimmage a`moment before the ball is snapped figured out it's all the prep work that goes into it he. He was really a very deep philosopher and cultural philosopher. Yes yes absolutely. We have been speaking with Ben Horowitz. He is the author of what you do is who are how to create your business culture. If.

partner Softbank Coughlin Softbank Vision Funds Ray Marc Andreessen Peter Thiel Ben Horowitz Giants Vision Fund ABC TRINA VAAS CEO Shirley New York Anderson harwit Tom
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

11:47 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Ritholtz on Bloomberg radio. My special guest. This week is Ben Horowitz quits. He is the CO founder and general names partner. At andriessen Horowitz a highly regarded venture capital firm located right on Sandhill road in Silicon Valley. He earned his m s degree in computer science from UCLA following a BA in the same space from Columbia. He is the author of several books including the hard thing about hard things and his most recent book. What you do is who you are? Ben Horowitz welcome to Bloomberg Mark. Thank you very so you began your career at the legendary silicon graphics in Nineteen Ninety. What was the technology? Seen like way. Back then hoes. Oh is very different In that it was just there was just technology people so it's really broadened since then an amazing way and and the reason was you know we were or selling technology to technology people. It was all be to be. There wasn't really consumer businesses in the space and then silicon. Silicon graphics was kind of the Google of its day and that it was where all the best engineers went You know it kind of had all the panache We had done the kind of animation for the Terminator movie which was like a big deal and that kind of thing so I it was a super exciting time and just just amazing you know when I got there how smart everybody was which you know in life you just never get put in a situation unless you're in a company like that Quite quite interesting. How did you move from Silicon Graphics too loud cloud? How did that come about here? Well so The big kind of step in between it was a company. She called Netscape Which I joined in nineteen ninety five and What was your role in ninety five with them? Yes I started as a product manager On the kind of server product line which ended up being very important because Microsoft kind of take the money out of the browser product was our first one And they'll though that although it didn't work out all that welfare them provincially led to the antitrust suit which they lost I got no it definitely definitely put the hurt on them But they kind of food for us to sell the company so You know it was an interesting one where I think they win the battle on we won the war also we broke the windows monopoly. -opoly which was the thirty two. API was the kind of key lynchpin of it. And because of Netscape people. Stop writing to that and that kind of enabled the kind kind of way for everything else happened so from Netscape your your partner. Mark Andriessen Famously created the first browser. I think he was still in college. Eighteen years old yeah then came out and launched netscape which very quickly went public really kicked off the whole dot com fifteen months months old when it went public. Who was netscape? That's unbelievable that fifteen months. We we even today is the as craziest things have. I've been although the argument is it's everything's gone much further in the opposite direction. Let me bring this back to you. So from netscape going public. How did did you roll into loud cloud with Andriessen? Yes so netscape when public. But then eventually you know it was a very rough kind of a legendary very battle with Microsoft and we sold the company to AOL in one thousand nine hundred nine one point six billion something like that could not well with netscape. This is a netscape. Also netscape sold at the time. It was four point two billion but at the point the deal clubs was ten billion dollars so really. That's a giant Ryan transaction. Yeah amazing transplant nineties for sure. Oh yeah yeah yeah it was. It was a great outcome for a company that was four years old. You can't be mad at But at AOL. I we were. I was in charge of kind of AOL e commerce and the the interesting thing at A. O. L. E. Commerce was you you know was away like you come. You pay ten million dollars and they put you in the mall. That's kind of how the networked in those days and Gordon. Yeah the walled garden and once you were in the mall The problem was that your site would just basically collapsed because AOL had so much traffic. It would basically turn it on you and you would just not even be able to handle fire hose absolute. Oh my God yeah. And so that gave us the idea to create what it was kind of the original or at least the original named so cloud Computing Company loud cloud. The the idea is that this is scalable dynamically on the fly. If a ton of traffic comes in you servers and you don't just crash get to take full advantage of that traffic exactly and and so so. Let me back up a little bit. When I'm really curious about you? Still hard at Netscape as a middle manager. How do you rise through the ranks? And how do you eventually Become tight with injuries. And if I think there were two things And there were there were separate. So the relationship between marketing myself was due to kind of there's a phenomenon in companies where if you think about Product strategy not in the ability for any individual to create a new lower like to create a new product that works like that lands in the market is is a very kind of rare scouts. Kinda rare skill you have in a company and even in a really big company there are only like five or six people who can do that who can write a new product and get it to market in he. I and I were like whatever two of the six at the company and so we became friends over that and then I think the rise through the ranks was more more like almost nobody in Silicon Valley actually cares about her put effort into like management and developing people. And so. I kind of realized that early. I thought well you know I ought to do that. and then that'll distinguished man. I think that's kind of what led me to being a senior senior exact and then a CEO. That was a conscious decision. Hey we're ignoring our staffing. We're ignoring the people who work for us. And if I I find a way how to work with these people manage them motivate them etc That's a positive career move. I mean was it that well You know that calculated but that's kind of how it unfolded in that Luck you get rewarded in a tech company for kind of having having the best ideas and kind of knowing the technology and the products in that market the best like that that always gets you points and people usually don't even notice how well you're kind of running your team At least in the short term over time it becomes obvious and So that was a big deal. I think that's that was a big deal for me anyway. Quite quite interesting so you go from Netscape too loud cloud. Eventually loud cloud becomes ops where it gets sold to HP for one point six billion dollars And you stick around. HP for a couple of years what was that like who join year. Yeah I'd like I learned a lot HP At that time was. I would say Kinda pass the tape for shore and you know it had gone through through you know a bunch of CEO's in succession which has never generally get as the culture kind of gets twisted around and so forth And I think that the thing that I learned was You know a company's culture kind kind of goes bad when nobody feels like it's their company when they feel like they work there and I think we had gone to that point with HP where nobody felt like okay. HP's my my company. It was like I was eating. No equity participation. They don't feel it's not a financial incentive. It's it's more of a Spiritual ownership like this is M- I'm proud of my company where I work and so forth and You know I'm GonNa make sure that I represented in the best way and the work that we do is high quality and all that kind of thing They had lost that. I'd never seen a company that had lost it entirely. They had it and then lost it. Oh Yeah I mean. Of course you knew working silicon valley that they had a better than anybody You know the HP way You know Dave Dave Packard. It was just a legend as CEO and a manager and You know in that was kind of they built a lot of the culture of the whole all of Silicon Valley but by the time I had gotten there in the acquisition You know and there. There's this kind of thing which maybe you have seen it. People either get rewarded at work for carrying her for not carrying. Yeah meaning that like. How do you get rewarded for not Karen? Well let's say that The company can't make a decision for whatever reasons to bureaucratic. So you work your butt off you figure something out you have a new idea a new project or whatever you try and bring it forth and get a decision on it and like it goes nowhere because nobody can into side. Then you're punished for carrying because you spent all that time and you get nothing but frustration. Meanwhile the guy who was playing video games at his desk ask like that guy gets rewarded because he did nothing and he's probably going to get the same pay increases no negative consequences for not caring versus actual time waste and energy waste. I for carrying and trying to do exactly. Let's talk a little bit about the early days in terms of raising money and deploying it. What was that that like when you guys were first launching A16 Z.? As as it's known amongst a small group rose it was interesting because we had it had that quality. There's a quality that you always want. I understand US better as venture capitalists and I did as an entrepreneur. But you always really want it when you're starting something new. which is you want people to say? You're crazy that's the dumbest thing that I've ever heard because if you don't hear that then you don't actually actually have a breakthrough his if it's obvious to people then like it's not it's not that great idea And so we got that big time which was awesome so you you know we went and we When you're when you're launching andriessen Horowitz? Oh yeah now. Is that a function of we right in the middle of the meltdown or just general general. Who needs another venture capital firm? Well it it. was those two things so it was you know. Two thousand nine was the worst time I think. In the last thirty years to raise a new venture capital fund only only two new ones were raised us in Khosla ventures and Vinod KHOSLA super legend Roger Capital Business So like yeah. It was a super bad time to raise. Nobody needed another yet. Another venture capital firm and then our idea the behind it. which was we were going to use? Michael Ovitz is a as the blueprint for the firm. Everybody thought was the dumbest Thomas thing that they'd ever heard in their lives. I mean it was just like what are you talking about like this is nothing like Hollywood. You can't do that. You guys are. That will never work like it's been tried a thousand housing times every everything like it's so dumb nobody would ever try to like it's dumb and it's been tried already in Denmark. Explain the blueprint what you are doing and how different that was from typical..

Netscape Silicon Valley Ben Horowitz HP CEO AOL Nineteen Ninety Microsoft partner Bloomberg UCLA Mark Andriessen Andriessen Google Michael Ovitz CO founder Columbia
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

10:52 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

"Like who knows should mark Zuckerberg that this should facebook make that decision or should that decision to be made by voters and I think like he's got like I don't really think like a company deciding what's true or not intellect. CNN has political viewpoint. That facebook doesn't as-as Fox News as does. MSN doesn't have a political viewpoint. I mean we're I'm serious about seeing your view but I mean our that's our job it's to be down the middle and depressed the Democrats and the Republicans. It's what I do every morning yet but I I think that Okay well like I. I think thinking news organization that has a specific audience. That makes money on. There's also like I think that's a legitimate question and I don't you know like I. I think his answer is probably the correct one It's a very difficult kind of I. It's just like a Very difficult because either way he'd go like if he was making that decision and he eliminated any ad that either party ran like there'd the massive protests on that. Do you think we'll move on after this. I'm disinterested in your take was born you brought her up. She says facebook has too much political. Power our is she right. Well I think look here. Here's what I would say It is I don't know if it's facebook or the facebook community. I think like the facebook community is very powerful but in as a giant community But like the history of media or media technology has been that it it is had a lot of political power for example. The Radio Got Hitler elected. No question right like without the radio. His rise to power doesn't happen. The television got Kennedy elected facebook. Got Obama elected. Did facebook get everybody. I look look I think president trump went on facebook. No question And that's what that's what actually triggered the outrage. But it's something that's been going on for years and then and the question is okay. Now that we know that now that things have changed and you have this new media that drives elections just like television. Did just like radio did What's the right governance for it? How should it work and so forth and I think you don't know that until it actually happens? Does Mark Zuckerberg with fifty eight percent of facebook given that he has a little Over seventy five percent of Class B shares. Too much power there is he right is he the best leader in this moment to have the chairman and CEO role. Look I think he's an excellent leader. Are you know. He's a very earnest person. sure you've interacted with them and so forth And his intentions are the right ones. Now I think it's a very complicated needed. It's complicated. I would just facebook. It's a very complicated system. Can talk on diversity because I know this is very important to you. You and it's something that we don't have enough of in the valley for for sure Let's talk about your experience with it because you guys have in the last year just added four women. I believe general partners out of out of seventeen seventeen now right even toured the number birth. Something like that but talk about about that because you know some of the criticism of you guys has been you. Were slow to the game in terms of adding more women. What do you think yeah? It's not true because like if you look at any other top tier venture capital firm. They were all around like fifty years before they had their first woman. And like we're less than ten years old so or just ten years old so I think that that's not an accurate statement Look if you look at the firm just generally Where fifty two percent women? Then where I think it's twenty. Twenty two per cent African American Hispanic where it will like I think seventeen percent Asian so so it's like a pretty diverse firm But like the you know specifically the reason women general partners took a little longer was basically the original rules that we set up which is original brand promise of the firm and I changed that for other reasons But you know in like and we ended up with more DEF- diverse General Partner Base. But I think like the way you do inclusion is important because what's important is actually the number is like if we had seventy percent where men are eighty percent Chinese people. I would be fine with that what I care about is what does it mean to work there. And what are like what are the relative employee satisfaction rates promotion rates attrition rates across Gender and race because that says can you see the talent of everybody coming in. Do you really understand their capabilities and what they can do or are they dismissed because like your talent blind blind and if you can see the talent then eventually like at least my views a talent is out there. You don't have to Or like you're going going to track the right kind of people if you can see the talent and and you'll be able to see them coming in and you hire them because you said I thought it was interesting just building on your point what you said I think it's the the La Times in two thousand fifteen. You said this. I know that my firm would get a thousand times more credit if we had at least one woman general partner rather than fifty three percent of the firm being women. But that's the least impactful thing I can do. That struck me because I think most CEOS would be scared to make a statement like that although the Gold Star that says you know I I love this group. I love that group. Like that's what they're going for. But I think the more important thing is like. Can you see the talent and devalue it because because like that's the actual cultural sustainable thing you look at these companies that go for the Gold Star and the people who work that they attract Lee very quickly and don't like working there and don't get promoted in their numbers never changed for that reason on this point you said to the Wall Street Journal at Their Tech Conference. I think just last week or so that that at some companies still see diverse talent African Americans women as second-class citizens inside their own companies. Go in the side door. It's like okay. We need more women. We need more Hispanics. We need more African Americans. So we're GONNA have special diversity group and you're not going to go through the regular interview kind of this criteria you're going to go through the interview criteria okay. Well that's fine for getting people in but once they get there then they have to live with that decision that you made because everybody else Elson. Company can't unsee what they just saw and so you've created an environment where like it's just a bad place to work if you're coming from diverse US group the real thing like if you're doing at the railway then you will like understand what people bring to the table that aren't and like you say look. Here's the dynamic in in hiring is and you can look at any organization. Oh there's a man running that group there's a lot of men on working there. There is a Chinese person. There's a lot of Chinese people. There's a woman. There's a lot of women working there and that's because people get left to their own devices just hire themselves. It's like I know what I'm I'm good at. I can test for it in an interview and highly great okay. You have to break through that. If you're actually care you actually have a real inclusion strategy Jay you have to get beyond those criteria you have to get to things that you don't have and give you an example of this So we had a group who are when we started the firm. Everything was like that can also ask you about the Cultural Leadership Fund. What you guys are actually doing in this front? Yes yeah yeah well. Oh that's part of it but like it started with our own firm and you know we had like you know Franken was running research. We had all agents working for him. You Know Margaret was running marketing at all women working for all that kind of thing. And so I asked Margaret went down. I was like well. What's your criteria where no man can get the job and she said helpfulness and I you know took me back? I was blown away because I was like well. I don't know a lot of helpful men but more importantly how well you know more than I do. But here's the biggest thing on it. I didn't have that as a criteria where venture capital firm services organization. How can anticipating? Somebody's needs enacting on them. I'm before they ask not be powerful for a firm to distinguish it in the marketplace. Nobody had that criteria. We were blind to to that skill by taking by widening the net lowering the bar by widening. The bar like we can now somebody he comes in who's helpful. We can value that we value is on the way in and make us more likely to hire them and we can value them once they get there and learn from them and make that a real thing as opposed to trying to value somebody for like what color they are which is just like takes you right back to like the stupid kind of racist assist ideas that got us here in the first place and so you really have to. In order to make conclusion work. You have to be able to see the talent you have to be able to recognize talent that you don't have and that's and that's not the answer. No no no. It's a IT'S A. It's a process for understanding talent. Not that you don't have because it's not just on the way and it's once they get there like that's a more important thing because you know bring in people and making them miserable in your company any like that. You're not helping anybody with that. They asked US almost every executive. I sit down with you or your father. You have three kids right So what do you want. Your kids is to say about you one day. Well that's a that's an you know they're adults now. My kids are adults. They're still your kids. I mean when you you say when they look back at you and all you've accomplished and written and done and how you've parented what are you. What is your hope? In the end of the day I would say you know I hope they say that. I tried to contribute more than I take out but you know they're their own people now at at this point. So they're all they're they're probably You Know I. I'm very proud of my kids so I would just say that like that's probably the thing that I hope they take away is that you know. They came out outright. And so maybe I didn't mess it up there you go. I think that's the best. Any of US parents can help. Ben Horowitz appreciate the dialogue and congratulations on the book. Thank you very much thanks..

facebook Mark Zuckerberg US CNN Fox News MSN Obama Ben Horowitz Hitler Kennedy Margaret the La Times Cultural Leadership Fund Wall Street Journal
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

"I find this not only the technology fascinating and hugely important inconsequential consequential. But also. I'm fascinated by divide and big tech right now right so on facial recognition. You've got the likes of Amazon and Andy Jackson who are saying we're going the full steam ahead. We are not apologizing for working with the government on this like this is important and then you have some others like Google who are pausing hang on the API and at least viewing it a little bit differently. And I just I wonder what your view is. Where do you fall on this? Because it can be very helpful Fulda society and some of the Bilton biases that have not been fixed yet can be very harmful to society. I do think it's a little bit inevitable. So like the truth is they cannot just ide- you on facial they can idea on gait analysis like the way you walk like you know in China. They picked a guy in a stadium concert out by his walk. So I think you know a little bit a whole host of implications and issues in China. I think were running behind the curve. I mean I do think that In general I'm pro- Particularly where we are now. I think we're in a situation where you have a free society with freedom of speech actual some real privacy protection the US the US. Yeah and And you know in another societies and who were in a technological race with China does definitely not have that. And we're getting a real strong wrong dose of that. I mean Daryl Morey like does a retreat not a tweet a repeat and then deletes it and like they're so information information control oriented. They're like ready to kick the NBA Out of China's satellite. That's a pretty scary thing. And so my general belief is US supplying technology to the. US government is generally a very good idea and we should do it. And we should support the men and and women who support US and protect us with the best technology possible. And I think that You know I disagree with what Google is doing. I agree with what Amazon's doing on what should the NBA's experience in China teach us. And how does it inform you guys have companies that operate in China lime others and I just wonder you know you look at the Hong Kong protests like CEOS I think internally are freaking out and they don't know how to answer these questions many of them and the are trying to decide what what they're gonNA do yes. This is a very complex situation because you have a lot of businesses and and you have a lot of Clear policy going on now where you've got you know. Tim Cook running around saying how much he cares about. Individual Rights and then goes to China and censors. Everything so like Chinese. Tim Cook supports that kind. You think so but you can see how we got into that. Situation like China was kind of fundamental. They built their business and there are a global company. And you know you can't just pull out that easily In fact it would be devastating for apple to pull out of China So you know what's right right answer and let some things are getting very scary. You know when when when the permanent leader says he's going to grind people into gunpowder who support the Hong Hong Kong protesters. And they're you know they're very credible reports that they're harvesting organs from live Muslims against their will for transplant transplants. Absolutely an editorial note here the Chinese government told CNN in June. The allegations regarding quote live organ can harvesting are completely fabricated on quote and said quote the government attached high importance to the issue of organ donation and transplantation Russian Unquote. you start to worry. I mean like a lot and so I think as a business You know you get into the situation. We look back on the businesses that supported Nazi Germany. I'm I'm like that's their legacy from that. You it sounds to me like you're thinking deeply about this now and metrics for your money goes are you is is it gonNA change the businesses. How they operate that you guys are invested in your so in between Wadsworth a profit or not well? I think it's the very like when you talk about geopolitics. It's very very very difficult to assess every country and everything and figure out like where you come out and all these sorts. It's all things but for sure it's something that we have to understand and think about and it does matter And you know in luck. The people have China. We work with all the time and love and our brilliant scientists and engineers and and In many of our companies in our companies work with them. And all these kinds of things so you know when the government kind of goes a different direction. And like I don't. I'm not a geopolitical. Not a Chinese expert Bert to the extent that I can assess that At this point. But it's certainly something I think big. CEO's have to pay attention to and figure out where they stand. Because they're gonNA get into like. I don't think a lot of people expected the reaction that we got on the NBA thing That was like an eye opener like okay. This is very very real and very different than what we're doing here in the United States On on facebook. Obviously you guys were early. Investors Mark is on the board We just saw mark Zuckerberg on the hill testifying about libra. You guys signed down assigned on his founding members of the the Libra Organization What what's your view on that I mean you've seen all of the regulatory pushback? You saw mark Zuckerberg respondent say. Look if we don't do a China's going to do it. Does this thing play out. Well like I can't predict how it plays out But like what facebook is trying to do is much more kind of I would say simple and straightforward than Than is being portrayed so the challenge with money generally generally is it doesn't scale internationally Currencies are by country for a lot of reasons. There's a new technology known as CRYPTO currency which has got like this property that software? It's not necessarily doesn't have to be on by a company And the kind of properties properties of the monetary instrument are encoded into the into the software. And this kind of very interesting. Trust layer where you trust the mathematical Paul and game theoretic properties of system So what they're saying is like let's introduce something that a crypto currency that commute for payments That we won't own that'll be owned by why in association that we can use in products like what's APP to do global payments It facebook more power goes through. Well I think that it enables them to build a product that would be Otherwise build at that level of quality and convenience for for its customers customer. So yeah but in anything right. Anything that succeeds in business makes you more powerful business for sure. The other regulatory questions have been so like weird like you know like one of the questions was well how many lgbt people do you have working on libra. Now first of all Mark Zuckerberg has got a lot of projects at facebook. And to no end you hires and like eight. People quit like on a very high rate every day. So how you know how. Many people you'd have is one thing but like it's illegal to ask somebody if they're LGBT. You can't know that. So the White House like a lawmaker asking him that as part of the thing so it's just gotten so like circus That it's hard to say. I'm not sure exactly what's worrying the regulators haters because like the questions are asking or so bananas to me But generally I think it would be good for the US and good for the industry. If Lee breath succeeds and there's a way to do global payments for any company and you know kind of pegged. Its not its own currency in that its peg back to like the government currencies it. I'm fascinated by. It's really important so I'm fascinated by how it's GONNA play out. I don't know watching uh-huh Let's take facebook for a moment. You know I don't tell you that. Mark Benny off called facebook. Quote the new cigarettes. Yes he did he also said impromptu say he said to me it's addictive it's not good for you thereafter your kids. They're running political ads. That aren't true and they should probably be broken up. What are you saying response by partners on the Board of facebook my business partner? Marc Andreessen so I can't like Make a lot of comments but I would say years i. I don't agree. You know like like I disagree with Benny off. I mean I don't think that's right. I think that these new technologies get used in ways that you don't anticipate and I would say that most specifically in the case of facebook is we had rules for what you can do in a public square when the Public Square was like a thousand people. ooh And now it's like two billion people and it's international and we never came out with new roles either from And I don't know that facebook fictional setting those roles or twitter anybody else but it's tricky because I don't think you'd agree with companies setting and rules ever right really. Well I think thank you normally. You can kind of set at least The rules of how your company behaves. But it's a new thing to have wake of two billion people interacting with each other globally on anybody's product. Like that's a new thing. I think one of the concerns. I know that a lot of people have have is like is information and the political ads are being able to run false. Political ads on facebook is just the latest example of a bigger issue and Mark Zuckerberg has. I was defended it and said look we should not be the. We don't have rules of the road. We should not be censoring in his words. Free speech what do you think that I think it's a little uh more specific than that because what he's saying is we shouldn't very specifically in a political ad say what's true or not we should be. The arbiters of which politician is telling the truth. You think he's making the right call. Because for example is not airing ads that we know have false things in them. Yes But like in his case Elizabeth Warren has said you know Mark Zuckerberg's out to get me and now she wants him to decide whether the her ad is true whether okay she says I can pay like Medicare for all is affordable like. There's a lot of people say she's just lying on that. Maybe she has. Maybe she has Maybe she's not right..

China facebook US Mark Zuckerberg NBA Google Mark Benny Fulda Tim Cook Andy Jackson Daryl Morey Amazon Hong Kong Nazi Germany Hong Hong Kong Bilton apple Chinese government Libra Organization
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

14:21 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

"And beanbag chairs and free employees lunch. Those are all great of course but my guest today says they're not culture so what these company cultured truly. And how do you create it. Ben Horowitz is the CO founder of the venture capital. Firm andriessen Horowitz think early investors in facebook lift and many more companies his first book the hard thing about hard. Things is a Silicon Valley Bible for entrepreneurs now now he's taking that one step further in a new book out this month called what you do is who you are. The Sierra really has to be the chief ethics officer look companies. Don't have bad ethics because they intend to bet ethics general like it's very very very rare. It's a systems problem. It's.

andriessen Horowitz Silicon Valley Bible facebook
"ben horowitz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Your knowledge kind of translates literally into emotion and so often that emotion is right but sometimes particularly when you get into things like revenge or jealousy or like any of the seven deadly sins then you get into a situation where you would be better off using logic second forgetting your what your gut is telling you so to speak is it harder to manage your own psychology CEO or as a successful mainstream hip hop artist. I speaking of mental health issues I think it's actually quite a bit more prevalent in hip hop artists probably than CEO's so and that sounds like it's probably harder as a hip hop artist not being a mainstream hip hop artists it's tricky but like you know one of the things that writing this book look kind of brought me to a little bit which I found interesting is if you have like the first thing that you put out is a success like like the last book hard thing about hard things then the next one is kind of scary because it's like if I just left that book out there then my reputation is fine it's great it's whatever I put out the next one and the analogy I used to like as Terence Trent Darby second album I it's called Ne- neither fish nor flesh or some and crazy name like that was horrible you know like we everybody listened to wishing well and they were like wow this guy is going to be the next Prince and then next thing it's like he's gone so if he never put out another album it would have been better off so like I felt like that and that's a bit of a psychological trick because if you get too much into outdoing yourself then then you're gonNa that's not the thing you want to think about if you're writing a book or you make an album you wanna think about like what is like how can I translate like this truth best not like how do I top my last one that's very dangerous idea if you were Biggie Eggy or to park in the mid nineties how would you have avoided that confrontation becoming but not ever-higher should night fair enough what are the lessons of leadership that we can learn from Rizza well so the thing that Rizza I would say that was most like amazing using to me and I still don't quite understand how he did it is you know he had nine guys on the rap group which is basically six more than anybody else ever successfully successfully did and he was able to kind of he kind of created a new like you can't run it like as a typical group where like okay we have the groping open even when they were getting signed people were like you guys there's just not going to be enough money around with ninety s in there but what he did was he kind of created this open structure where they could make their own albums he would still produce them so like that that organizational construct of the Wu Tang clan with nine people could work work and I think that that reminds me a little of open source and it reminds me a little of what's going on in Crypto but it was like a very advanced organizational national idea which I don't know the quite understand exactly how to interpeted yet but very interesting super talented musically obviously okay but also a very kind of smart organizational thinker Dj premier was perhaps the best producer in the early nineties and he actually studied trae Dr Dre all right sure I mean very different types of producers yeah but I don't think you you put them above Dr Dre all right fair enough but he stayed computer science before he became a producer yeah like a lot of the guys a lot of the producers are very much like engineer so like grandmaster flash also was like like if you watch they had a great segment on him in hip hop evolution and like you listened to him talk and he sounds like any engineer talking about his childhood he was fascinated with everything worked took everything apart he'll like all all that kind of stuff so yeah you definitely there's a link for sure and much like in the software industry hip hop there are these technological inflection points like the MDC version Ed definitely lots of music and general you know there was like the kind of advent of like singers and pop music came with the phonograph which didn't exist in the same way before you'd like folk music and classical all music but she didn't have this kind of pop music idea and then very interestingly the original LP's the technology was such that if you made the grooves to narrow the record with skip so songs were kind of limited at three minutes or less so all those James Brown songs that are like two minutes it's two and a half minutes I was like a technological thing that caused that sil- they're entrepreneurs who seemed to be completely comfortable in any domain like Jeff bezos for example there also artists who seemed to have this kind of ability for Conway for example time you Quincy Jones Quincy Jones Ray Charles Yeah what are the defining traits that are common between the most flexible artists at entrepreneurs yeah well I think it's kind of a little bit the highest level because you're not you're not speaking the language of jazz speaking the language of hypothesis big music and similarly I think you're not in the discipline of computer science rocket science or or what have you view year just in the area of like engineering and invention and so it's a higher level broader concept and most people can't get to a mastery at that level but the few very special entrepreneurs can and musicians scans I've I think that is very much the same like you won't see people doing whether you like most people would kill their companies if they tried to do any lawn musk but like you know he can do it and you know most people can't work with count basie then right it's my party cry if I want to then work with Michael Tax and then right Sanford and son like like yeah that's a that's a special guy the Berkeley amp lab was one of the most influential sources of technology in the last decade what can we learn from the culture of the amp lab yeah you know that's a great question I think like you have to give credit to John Strike on Mike Franklin and all those guys you know who are involved in it Ah I don't know that I know the answer to that I do think that the one thing that they did was they kind of then crossed the line all the way over into into business but they kind of took themselves out of academia and said we're really gonNA build open source projects that like go like not we're we're not GonNa do the academic oh I approve this out and I'm going to write a paper that wasn't what they were going for but they were going for was like we're right software it's going to work it's going going to scale and people are going to deploy it so if you look at spark versus what normally comes out of academia like spark was is a way more finished project and and I think that just that attitude really differentiated them what can start up's learned from the dynamics of prison culture well good question let me I'll give you a couple let me start with this one so when Schalk Gore I center prisoners went to prison for a murder he did commit and he gets to prison and they put him in the quarantine area and then he comes out of quarantine with like whatever five or six guys who also came out of quarantine and I stay in the recreational malaria kind of like first day in prison one of the prisoners walked up to another prisoner in stabbed him in the neck pull the shank out prisoner bled to death and died and and the other guy through the shank in the garbage and walked to the cafeteria and had a sandwich I'm talking to talk about that and he said look when I saw that I had to ask myself could I do that and I said well you're in for murder like of course you do that you already did that he said no I didn't do that what what I did was like I'm GONNA drug deal guy jumps out of the car he's rushing at me I have a gun my pocket I react I shoot him that's very different than spending like a week filing a two liter bottle into a weapon and then deciding whether you're gonna step something stomach or stabbing in the neck whether you're gonNA wound on where or you're gonNA kill him and then Kelman keep it moving to the cafeteria and have a sandwich I couldn't do that he said I had to ask myself could I do that because because clearly that's what you need to be able to do to survive in this place so if you think about that you go well clearly it's experiences like that new prisoner orientation that make prison so violent that sets the culture as soon as somebody asks what I need to do to succeed a messy answer answer then you've set the culture in a very violent way every company in the world when a new employee walks in their first day week on the job they're going to look and see who's successful in that company and whoever that person is behaving that's how they're going to behave and that's your actual culture your culture isn't the values you have on the wall and you're all hands meeting and what you say are you at values and the performance review like none of that has anything that's just whatever ever you wanted it to be but that's not what it is what it is is what do I need to be successful here because that's what I'm GonNa do and what you do is who you are at loud cloud mark cranny change your culture in a way that you would not have expected it was a cultural change that you actually needed did your in a smart where you absolutely needed a culture change at a sixteen a do you look for people like that despite the fact that you're doing well oh well Oh yeah yeah so we're doing well but like we do different things and we need to get better at things and so forth so for example when we went to do the Bio Fund we knew we didn't we didn't have anything about that culture even from a venture capital standpoint in that the entrepreneurs preneurs in bio scientists and they're a lot of times doing science as supposed to engineering and we didn't have a science culture we had an engineering culture so you know we Brought in a scientists PJ pandey tell us kind of get to that but yeah absolutely as business evolves they end up needing new elements it's very hard to create a new complex cultural element without incorporating outside leadership one of the great learnings I had from Tucson because it's like well how do you go from a slave army to a great military force in something nobody had really ever done before and one of the great trixie pulled off which I'm sure nobody ever tried before was he incorporated the enemy and his army he incorporated French and Spanish Russian British soldiers as his lieutenants alongside you know guys who had been slaves and enslaved by those same people and and but that got him that European military culture those elements that he really needed and he ended up doing that better than they did even you know because he he picked the parts of that culture that we're really powerful and he kept any random very tightly netflix sees itself as a pro pro sports.

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Cloud the dot Com bubble burst but loud cloud needed cash so badly Hedley that he took the company public in two thousand one loud clad went through layoffs downsizing and a difficult strategic maneuver in which allowed cloud sold its cloud provider business for cash and then used the core competency that it had developed to create new software for building and running cloud services this new software was the core product of the company OPS warfare which was sold to HP in two thousand seven for one point six billion dollars the the loud cloud story looks like a rational straightforward execution in retrospect but at many points in the time line Ben was unsure he was making king the correct decision has the subtitle of his first Book States there are no easy answers the hard thing about hard things tells the story of loud cloud and ops wear inhering detail most founders of software companies will end up reading the book at some point when they're building in their company because there are so few books which capture the granular details of what it feels like to run a company a CEO is completely Lee alone in their understanding of the company nobody else has nearly as much information as the CEO not the board not the market and not the employees tell us when you are a CEO there is simply nobody to turn to who can give you the actionable advice that you wish you could have access to and because there there is nobody else it means that the CEO's own psychological state is extremely important the hard thing about hard things provides a CEO with solace while the CEO is alone within their company they are not alone in the world every CEO has a set of issues which they have never for faced before and the CEO can learn to face those issues confidently and competently like any influential book the hard thing about hard things presents the reader with useful answers but also raises many questions how can a normal person foster the mentality of a leader how can a leader convince smart people to follow their direction how can a seemingly crazy direction be framed is completely rational the second and book by Ben Horowitz is called what you do is who you are this book surveys a set of case studies in leadership including a Haitian slave revolt the Mongol Empire and a dominant prison gang by studying violent environments Ben Frames leadership in the context context of the highest stakes these stories are about life and death when a leaders performance is measured in blood it frames aims the true nature of leadership in the starkest resolution ben uses each distilled example as a base case which in ducts into broader applications the cultures of net flicks facebook Uber and McDonald's are export alongside editorials about Hillary Clinton Clinton and hip hop culture throughout all of these stories the most important thread is continually reinforced the leader creates the culture the culture is the leader what you do is who you are Ben joined the show to discuss his writing and how he has applied applied his beliefs to building under and Horowitz the venture capital firm that he co founded and leads today Ben Horowitz Welcome Software Engineering daily all right thank you thank you so beer Andy Grove wrote about inflection points in technology only the paranoid survive as right an inflection points also exists in warfare describe how a leader Peter should correctly evaluate an inflection point andy the way Andy always said it was there's that'd be a ten exchange in something in business that was a ten exchange in competition attacks change in the market ten exchange on the supply chain that kind of thing and then if that happened then that required a strategy change and I think you you know war is kind of similar kind of thing and you can imagine that happening with competition our supply chain in war as well you know any kind of esscalation like that so so that's I think that's probably the most correct definition it's us it's like super loose like now it's like everybody's always at inflection point when they come see us for example sample on Andy Groves model of the breakfast factory we know that it maps to building technology companies companies does it also map to build a military force. There's some analog care you know I probably my my business knowledge is much better than my military knowledge so I think you know that example in particular was very manufacturing order oriented of course and had to do with process measurement and really I think the big insights out of the breakfast factory were that got a lot of people have metrics for okay I want achieve this are on achieve that but which really have to think about it it's okay if you want achieve this then what is it gonNa cost you like what's he called that the parrot indicator so like great that you want your software to ship on time but like a coup what El- what better you be worried about like a quality or alike company features have or that kind of thing if you're going to focus on that metric and then also he did a very nice job of distinguishing leading and lagging indicators and how that works so I imagined in a military very context to the point that you were trying to understand the output of any operation I think that military operations tend to be a little more kind kind of one time in nature whereas like what he was talking about the breakfast factory was a repetitive process that you refine so it depends I guess on how you're GonNa apply it Mike Ovitz is another of your influences what do you disagree with Mike Ovitz about he's also a friend of mine so only get too much on that like I I mean I think the way he ran ca was different than you know for example we run a venture capital firm for example no one thinks I talk about in the book is he had a very kind of specific idea about how people should dress at CA. And I don't know that I disagree with him on I you think we haven't implemented that here just because I think one work as well given our strategy but that's like their strategy was we're gonNA come off as the the most professional talent agency and well everybody else's wearing you know tie-dyed shirts and this and that we're going to wear dark suits like ties and white shirts and that kind of thing and very effective for him and not so affect us but like different contexts he was in he's in the talent agency context and we're in the venture capital context but a lot of things did translate ca was able to package actors and directors and and command higher pricing for their way higher pricing within a sixteen have you figured out any analogous strategies for meeting deal terms or some kind of differentiate advantage like that I don't think there's a great analog for us in venture capital for that so you know what Michael did there was in those days the studios had all the leverage because if you want to be in the movie yet to sign whatever contract they had and that's kind of how Hollywood work and the top actors in those days kind of got paid the equivalent of like five hundred thousand dollars of film and I think now it's over twenty million filmed film and that change and now I'm talking like real dollars inflation adjusted the change in salary they'll like forty x increase was due to Michael Ovitz has packaging and what it did was changed basically the power structure from the the studio to the actors because all of a sudden you couldn't make a movie without the actress because he would have them all and you needed like ninety percent share to do that so I don't think we're as well as we're doing we're definitely not a ninety percent share and adventure gobbles harder to kind of get to that that kind of market share because it's an open system not close system what have you learned about managing your own psychological state that you did not learn at loud cloud look I I think that these days I have an easier easier job than I had allowed cloudy in your company's melting down it's much harder on your psychology than it is when everything's going well so I don't know that I'm tested as much but but I think like I think the big thing is you know experience helps you a lot in managing your psychology particularly if you've been through things that are worse than what you're going through you know like where your limit says as person are what do you do when portfolio company's CEO suffering from mental health issues well. I don't know that we've had one that had like a real mental health issue and you talk about something like bipolar Schizophrenia or some of the real things that people deal with but if they were to have a mental health issue I think that one of the big mistakes we've you've made it as a society as even calling it mental health that's health and if somebody has a health issue the thing to do any kind of health issue is like that's the priority and if we need to make a change back fell that temporary fix whatever we have to do that's what we have to do and I think that goes for sure amount off as well some people are successful despite very idiosyncratic habits it's the first protagonist of your book to sought quote slept two hours a night and could live for days on a few bananas and a glass of water it is a car you know and you wonder you know with these war stories like you know how much is stretched just because it is a war story by yeah that was legend of him he he was and then even his enemies would report like this guy is literally everywhere like we can't even believe like he's ever he knows every single a person on the phone he's everywhere all the time like we just can't deal with them so let's say somebody so he certainly had that level of energy where that would make sense where he would sleep to ours and in a couple of bananas a founder Tony was very actually interestingly he was really really paranoid of being poisoned and there was a lot of like poisonings his predecessor in the one of his predecessors who attempted and failed to lead a slave revolt in Haiti was was a guy by the name of McIntosh and he was actually poisoned so that's part of the reason you know I hate to bananas was a banana you build a new on poison and and the other was like anything else would you trust a founder who came into your office instead got this amazing idea I've got some amazing software by by the way I only bananas and sleep two hours a night who we've had founders with like not quite that but some things where they would like literally really stay awake for four or five days straight and then sleep for three days so like we we have run into that for short and it's definitely a special kind of personality this analogy but the exist out there to song was imprisoned by Napoleon and then he died Napoleon later expressed I regret that he imprisoned to sought he should have ruled Haiti through Tucson so he said and here we see the dire consequence Wentz of Napoleon essentially making a decision out of emotion out of envy this decision was clearly good for nobody this was a lose lose oh yeah we'll replace someone who of course within three days of taking over killed all the white people in Haiti or at least the French people in Haiti so yeah yeah that was probably mistake for him but focusing on the emotional aspect or whatever was driving Napoleon to make that decision we see see these kinds of decisions all the time in the software industry why is it that with all of our technical advancements we still make these short-sighted the negative some decisions well look I think that it's a careful balance because you know as we're learning now like your gut is very connected to your brain and a lot of times what you feel is a kind of the sum total of all.

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Lessons of leadership that we can learn from Rizza? Well so the thing that Rizza I would say that was most like amazing using to me and I still don't quite understand how he did it. Is You know he had nine guys on the rap group which is basically six more than anybody else ever successfully successfully did and he was able to kind of he kind of created a new. Like you can't run it like as typical group where like okay. We have the groping open even when they were getting signed. People were like you guys. There's just not going to be enough money around with ninety S in there. But what he did was he kind of created this open structure where they could make their own albums he would still produce them so like that. That organizational construct of the Wu Tang clan with nine people could work work and I think that that reminds me a little of open source and it reminds me. A little of what's going on in Crypto but it was like a very advanced organizational national idea which I don't know the quite understand exactly how to interpeted yet but very interesting super talented musically. Obviously okay but also a very kind of smart organizational thinker. Dj Premier was perhaps the best producer in the early nineties and he actually studied trae. Dr Dre all right sure. I mean very different types of producers. Yeah but I don't think you you put them above Dr Dre all right fair enough but he stayed computer science before he became a producer. Yeah like a lot of the guys. A lot of the producers are very much like engineer so like grandmaster flash also was like like if you watch. They had a great segment on him in hip hop evolution. And like you listened to him talk and he sounds like any engineer talking about his childhood he was fascinated with everything worked. Took everything apart. He'll like all all that kind of stuff. So yeah you definitely. There's a link for sure and much like in the software industry hip hop there are these technological inflection points like the MDC version. Ed definitely lots of music and general. You know there was like the kind of advent of like singers and pop. Music came with the phonograph which didn't exist in the same way before you'd like folk music and classical all music but she didn't have this kind of pop music idea and then very interestingly the original. LP's the technology was such that if you made the grooves to narrow the record with skip so songs were kind of limited at three minutes or less so all those James Brown songs that are like two minutes. It's two and a half minutes. I was like a technological thing that caused that sil- they're entrepreneurs who seemed to be completely comfortable in any domain like Jeff bezos. For example there are also artists. Who seemed to have this kind of ability for Conway for example time you Quincy Jones Quincy Jones? Ray Charles. What are the defining traits? That are common between the most flexible artists At entrepreneurs yeah well I think it's kind of a little bit the highest level. Because you're not you're not speaking the language of jazz speaking the language of Hypothesis big music and similarly. I think you're not in the discipline of Computer Science Rocket Science. or or what have you view year. Just in the area of like engineering and invention and so it's a higher level broader concept and most people can't get to a mastery at that level but the few very special entrepreneur scan and musicians. Scans I've I think that is very much the same like you won't see people doing whether you like. Most people would kill their companies if they tried to. Do it Elon. Musk but like you know he can do it. And you know. Most people can't work with count. Basie then right. It's my party cry if I want to then work with Michael Tax and then right Sanford and son like like yeah. That's A. That's a special guy. The Berkeley amp lab was one of the most influential sources of technology in the last decade. What can we learn from the culture of the AMP lab? Yeah you know. That's a great question. I think like you have to give credit to John Strike on Mike Franklin and all those guys you know who are involved in it AH. I don't know that I know the answer to that. I do think that the one thing that they did was they kind of then crossed the line all the way over into into business but they kind of took themselves out of academia and said we're really gonNA build open source projects that like go like not we're we're not gonNA do the academic. Oh I approve this out and I'm going to write a paper. That wasn't what they were going for but they were going for was like we're right software. It's going to work it's going going to scale and people are going to deploy it so if you look at spark versus what normally comes out of academia. Like spark was is a way more finished project and and I think that just that attitude really differentiated them. What can start up's learned from the dynamics of prison culture? Well good question. Let me I'll give you a couple. Let me start with this one. So when Schalk Gore I center prisoners went to prison for a murder he did commit and he gets to prison. And they put him in the quarantine area and then he comes out of quarantine with like whatever five or six guys who also came out of quarantine. And I stay in the recreational malaria kind of like first day in prison. One of the prisoners walked up to another prisoner in stabbed him in the neck. pull the shank out. Prisoner bled to death and died and and the other guy through the shank in the garbage and walked to the cafeteria and had a sandwich. I'm talking to talk about that. And he said look when I saw that I had to ask myself. Could I do that and I said well. You're in for murder. Like of course you do that. You already did that. He said No. I didn't do that. What what I did was like? I'M GONNA drug deal guy jumps out of the car. He's rushing at me. I have a gun my pocket I react I shoot him. That's very different than Spending like a week filing a two liter bottle into a weapon and then deciding whether you're gonna step something stomach or stabbing in the neck whether you're gonNA wound them where or you're gonNA kill him and then Kelman keep it moving to the cafeteria and have a sandwich. I couldn't do that. He said I had to ask myself. Could I do that because because clearly. That's what you need to be able to do to survive in this place so if you think about that you go well clearly. It's experiences like that new prisoner orientation that make prison so violent that sets the culture as soon as somebody asks what I need to do to succeed a messy answer answer. Then you've set the culture in a very violent way every company in the world. When a new employee walks in their first day week on the job they're going to look and see who's successful in that company and whoever that person is behaving that's how they're going to behave and that's your actual culture? Your culture isn't the values you have on the wall and you're all hands meeting and what you say are you at your values and the performance review like none of that has anything. That's just whatever Ever you wanted it to be. But that's not what it is what it is is what do I need to be successful here. Because that's what I'm GonNa do and what you do is who you are at loud cloud mark cranny change your culture in a way that you would not have expected. It was a cultural change that you actually needed. Did your in a smart where you absolutely needed a culture change at a sixteen a do you look for people like that. Despite the fact that you're doing well oh well. Oh yeah yeah so. We're doing well but like we do different things and we need to get better at things and so forth so for example when we went to do the Bio Fund. We knew we didn't. We didn't have anything about that culture even from a venture capital standpoint in that the entrepreneurs preneurs in bio scientists. And they're a lot of times doing science as supposed to engineering and we didn't have a science culture we had an engineering culture so You know we Brought in a scientists. Pj Pandey tell us kind of get to that. But yeah absolutely as business evolves they end up needing new elements it's very hard to create a new complex cultural element without incorporating outside leadership. One of the great learnings I had from Tucson. Because it's like well how do you go from a slave army to a great military force in something. Nobody had really ever done before. And one of the great trixie pulled off which. I'm sure nobody ever tried before. Was He incorporated the enemy his army he incorporated French and Spanish Russian British soldiers as his lieutenants alongside. You know guys who had been slaves and enslaved by those same people and and but that got him that European military culture those elements that he really needed and he ended up doing that better than they did even You know because he he picked the parts of that culture that we're really powerful and he kept any random very tightly. Netflix sees itself as a pro pro sports team. Not a family. Is this a universally good cultural idea or should some companies cultivate a sense of family. Ha They give you a quote from my boss Jim Barksdale he used to say look. This is not a family because I am not your Daddy Daddy. Then what he meant by. That is your daddy's not GonNa fire you but I am. I think the family metaphor is a little tough and business because you have to be willing to fire our people and that's very dysfunctional family. If you start firing your family members so I I do think sports is a better analogy when you were building loud cloud none of the management books you read were useful. What about books on psychology? He I mean I do think well you. It's interesting. Because the organizational psychology books which I looked at a lot for this book because they are more about culture I think are I think they're useful. I think they're you know. They tend to be a little academic as opposed to practical and so they have limitations. I mean I like not not all management but like high up at management is great book. Obviously only the paranoid survive. Great Book So there are some good management books. I think a a lot of management books though you know as I said focus on the easy thanks And they make things into three step methods. Set aren't three step methods in that kind of thing Amazon useful but Yeah I mean like I. A lot of psychology. I found useful. I mean in fact thinking fast and slow. Oh by Daniel was like very very influential and lot of my thinking about how inclusive actually works goes so so for Sharia Sharia is the lean startup a book about strategy or book about tactics. It's a book about tactics but impacts ex- strategy so the way would think about the lean startup is a startups kind of corey. Issue is finding product doc market fit. And that's very very difficult complex tasks that requires the incredibly precise communication among the people. You're working with and you generally don't have a lot of leadership in any company that can get you to that even if you're like ten thousand thousand person company you probably have only a handful of people who can get you. Product market fit in any new product. So if if.

"ben horowitz" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"As we win and if you look at every single incident that they had almost every single one was driven by competitive intention this is how we're going to win and like for example the hacking the competitor's APP actually was done to them I buy dd in China right right that was okay but because there was no like explicit instruction about whether that was okay or not they just brought it back and did it here and you know if you go through one by one from you know Susan Fowler to eleven to Ascii to whatever it was always about winning and with Levin Desk remembered Google was kind of attacking Uber GonNa they were partner Uber's but then they were gonNA launch Goober got were they're going to launch a ride sharing thing and so was a competition and it was about winning but if you don't have the line and everybody's using their own judgement on that that that's where things got kind of wacky on them I'll bet travis learned from that and I'll bet that he'll be very successful in the future because he's tremendously gifted Nellie CEO but he's tremendously gifted on Culture but it's very difficult you know that that little thing 'cause the whole thing to nearly unravel right so it's almost like the example where if you have the best paper clip king a then it's like follow the rule to an extreme conclusion now it's dismantling humans to make more paperclips or whatever it's culture as a code that has added consequences potentially and often does I mean I think culture often as unintended consequences and you don't want them to be fatal that's key yeah and have to be really really thoughtful about how you them and then you have to pay attention to it and you have to change it when it's broken a few of the cultural rules come from really unexpected places well the slave revolt was unexpected for but Shaq has sanger who's this prison gang leader guess for lack of a better word he says we don't call them gangs and prison okay gone squad squad organizations sees a wide religious ran the it's called the latics yeah yeah across the weirdest story So I was actually interviewing Oprah Winfrey for like she was having an event out here and an interview her for her the launch of show she had called belief but like interviewing Oprah th that's scary tasks that's like giving Albert Einstein up quiz so I was like okay in physics and so I said Oprah like can you give me a little less than an interviewing B you're like I think you if you go there and you're like tell me five tips on interviewing what what was the actually says finding the first step was she goes ban like while the the thing is I don't like have listed questions and keep thinking of trying to memorize them because right then you're not gonNA ask the most important question which is a follow up and I said like I actually know that already I've done interviews I got that part however like what I really WanNa know is like how do you ask these super aggressive questions and then rather than in people being defensive they just like burst into tears right yeah these awesome interviews and she goes Oh yeah that one and then you know she got into this thing that that you talked about earlier which is I start by asking them what are they are intense and then I tell them like I'm GonNa get you your intention but you have to trust me and I say okay so and she goes so let me give you an example tweet my show super bowl Sunday like Memphis guy nineteen years in prison seven years in solitary confinement scary guy dreadlocks tattoos big muscles he's like so I'm interviewing him and I say them I say when did you get into crime and he says well I hit the streets when I was fourteen in yourself and she goes Ben but I had read his book and so I didn't think that was right so I said to him I said well what about that time when your mom you know when you came home a straight A.'s on your report card your mom reacted by throwing a pot at your head and over says well he said that didn't make me feel very good and he Kinda tighten up faltas arms and she goes how did that really make you feel and he said it made me feel like there was nothing that I was we're going to do in life that mattered and Oprah says you hit the streets when you were nine and we both are crying she said and I was like Oh my God that's a greatest interviews I've ever heard my life so I run home tell my wife she's like Oh that's great story and I didn't think anything but next thing I know my wife has had him on facebook probably the most advanced co that I've talked since Andy Grove passed away like it's like that you know and then we'd listen to the same kind of music and whatnot so we talking about seven hours at night and you know we became friends and then you know and learning historian learning how to deal with prison culture with some like a lot of cultural elements like things that you would want things that they've been trained on things the guys he got in prison like Ground Zero league they were in prison because they came from like really psychotic cultures and so he could use almost nothing that they came with so how do you build a culture from first principles range it in advance at and of course he does all these things you're listening to the Jordan Harbinger show with our guest Ben Horowitz we'll be right back after the this this episode is sponsored in part by hostgator it's eleven o'clock do you know where your website is looks like there's another outage at your target audiences prime-time costing you Russia's dollars every minute it's down it's a grim scenario that's played out daily across the globe to the frustration of small business owners like yourself and your customers with web host tis.

China nineteen years Zero league seven hours seven years
"ben horowitz" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

10:30 min | 1 year ago

"ben horowitz" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Hi this is Ben Horowitz and you're listening to the Jordan Harbinger show welcome to the show I'm Jordan Harbinger as always with producer Jason to Filipo on the Jordan Harbinger show we decode the stories secrets and skills of the world's most brilliant and interesting people and turn their wisdom into practical advice that you can use his own right founding partner of superstar venture capital firm and Driessen Horowitz got Ben Horowitz here with us today recorded on location here at the offices A16 Z. in Palo Alto California then has written a few excellent books and this latest one takes on historical events and turns them into business lessons especially with respect to culture corporate culture I know that might sound a little bit like corporate speak here but today we're gonNA explore what the Haitian slave revolt can teach us about running a business will also learn a prison culture as discussed by a couple of Silicon Valley geeks which is by the way influences how some billion dollar tech UNICORNS are managed and will discover that culture and or values can actually have a dark side and we'll see how that dark side shows up and companies like Uber for example and can lead to some pretty big disaster it's always fun to sit down with someone Ben who's objectively been very successful and take a peek behind the Komo of what makes someone like him and the companies he invests in and helps manage tick and if you want no how administer book guests like Ben Horowitz got crazy network and I wanNA teach you how to do the same and teaching you how to do this in my free networking course not enter your credit card free just free I mean it's at Jordan Harbinger Dot com slash course and most of the guests on the show they subscribe it of course and the newsletter succumb join us and you'll be great company all right here's Ben Horowitz I did notice the reading both books you've got some street in you you know you quote a little rap here in their hip hop here and there and I wonder do you listen to that or was that something like no no you have to listen to that yet to know the exact right rap quote for the story that you're telling a lot of it actually is the kind of backwards of that so I listened to so much rap music a lot of the ideas I get for what I'm going to write come from the actual music itself so it's a little bit of a way of kind of giving credit where credit is due just so it doesn't feel like I'm stealing it right expensive though like licensing those lyrics in your book that you think about that right he's got a call Jay z's people and I can use this and a book about corporate culture yes exactly no is expensive but like the process is like really complex yeah talk about something that's ripe for disruption yeah you try to use a sample of music on a podcast I mean it's cheaper if someone did remake of us right exactly the songs cut like eighteen authors and the you know the lawyers go after you and then they charge too much like the whole thing is just crazy yeah it's unreal what are you listening to what's on your your Ipod your phone that might surprise us well so the thing album listening to constantly now is the young thug album I love that album it's called so much fun he really did an amazing job with it so that's that's probably the number one thing Listening to New Jersey Album Rick Ross album unlike those guys but are if you're a big fans are really good but they're not the young tigers like truly special album I think it's not entry level is that what kind of what you mean I think it's a little bit underrated as an artist you know he's just put together you know he's done a lot of good things in the past altogether on those funds really special the reason I'm starting with this seemingly flimsy question there's some juxtaposition here that I think a lot of people don't really appreciate it's really easy to look at somebody in the tech sector or investment sector industry like these are some pretty square guys that only look at spreadsheets and are only looking at numbers and that's not really what you do it all yeah no like I think I come from a different perspective in that for one came up as an entrepreneur not as a finance guy so I'm like that way so it's more of a you know I'm looking at things more from a culture leadership perspective just throughout life hip hop from a cultural perspective I talked about this in the book a bunch is really great example of just the power of culture because you have this you know it started with parties in the Bronx and kind of you know a very very very underground kind of thing and nobody in the music establishment thought it was a good idea so mtv won't play the videos radios when play the songs the record companies went make albums like so there's like literally no infrastructure support at all so then the kids were all like there are poor all black and so they're coming up and you go like well how are they going to succeed against the system and then you fast forward to two thousand nineteen go wow this is the biggest musical art form worldwide by far it's just wiped out all other music it's like that significant like so how did that happen and when you go back and look at it like a lot of it was the culture they had you know and there are a lot of elements in it but you know the just idea that you were going to create something from nothing the idea that like you were going to go that no help and you were going to figure it out and one of my favorite stories is Ralph mcdaniels who is you know like an early guy and hip hop and nobody would play the video so he'd liked literally a television station to play rap videos television show called video music box and that kind of started the whole thing and then he became equally famous because he invented the term shutout oh that's worth which everybody uses now but you know they were going to invent whatever they needed get to the next phase and that was like it was a cultural like attitude and belief as much as anything else there was no reason that that it would have gotten so big so you really are kind of like listening to this music kind of thug in your car on the way to work and then it's an particularly kind of an era that I'm from rap music is more is very entrepreneurial music because they were all entrepreneurs because they had to be there was no like you couldn't go like oh I got signed signed rap you know and so what they rap about a lot is like how do you make it how do you think about competing how do all the things that an entrepreneur thinks about so it kind of is very it's inspirational for the kind of work that I do the new book uses history like the Haiti slave revolt and takes more culture ideas and notes out of history which is a really interesting way to look at corporate culture I don't think has anyone ever connected these kinds of things before I've never seen not that I'm aware of I will say this like People mike or not like the book but you have not read a business book like this yeah that's for sure yeah I read a lot of business books for show and a lot of people will take like Ryan holiday we'll take stoicism put it into a Bryan his context or modern context but very few people are looking for like in fact anything I've ever read about the Haitian slave revolt ever Yeah Really Interesting Story Yeah Yeah Yeah where did you where did you find these were you just researching random historical bits and others idea here or did you get the ideas from yeah this is my life's work so you know I got introduced to the various things at different points in my life but these were the things that influenced me most personally as leader the basically the you know the forest stories that are in a bucket of the things that you know as I tried to learn how to create a culture change it and so forth they were most influential leaders and thinkers for me and The Haitian Lucien is just this unbelievably remarkable story which unfortunately not a lot of people know about where there had never been a success so slave revolt like ever in the history of humanity like that just you know for like the transatlantic slave trade or whatever you know not the slaves of the Han dynasty nothing gauls Romans enslaved not ever not nobody ever like revolted and one Intel this slave army led by toussaint l'ouverture and and they were up against like crazy bad odds because slavery in a lot of people who follow slavery know that this was probably the worst form of slavery in the history of humankind and that it was sugar plantations this extremely brutal like more people died than were born like all that kind of thing and then the leader himself to sound was born a slave so he kind of you know came up in that but he was a genius but more specifically cultural genius and he master a French colonial culture and then he mastered kind of military culture including you know from reading Caesar's commentaries so he picked up like when he studied he learned all of Julius Caesar's like military techniques but I think most importantly because he was so kind of multicultural and his education he knew you kind of where the limitations of the slave culture he had were and it's very hard to make slave culture into military culture because slave culture almost by design and his low trust and the problem with a low trust culture and right trust is about tomorrow I'm going to do something for you today because I trust that so you will do it for me you know down the line when you're a slave there is no tomorrow you don't own anything can be taken away from you at any minute you can be killed like a whim so there's no like long term thinking in the culture and so taking that and then trying to build an army is very difficult because armies run on trust oh I don't trust the command then it's chaos like it's the Byzantine generals problem it's a very very terrible way to try and take on like Poland yeah just what he did so you know he went through this like amazing set of steps and techniques to kind of change the culture and the amazing thing of course was the army that he ended up with not only defeated the British the Spanish and the French under Napoleon but the reports of what they were the most disciplined army they were one army that didn't rape and pillage in fact one of my favorite stories in the book is because he was changing the culture he said look you can't rape you can't allege.

Jordan Harbinger Jason Filipo Driessen Horowitz producer founding partner billion dollar
Tristan Walker's Winding Journey to Walker & Co.

How I Built This

07:19 min | 1 year ago

Tristan Walker's Winding Journey to Walker & Co.

"I got laid off in January of two thousand eight. I was applying to Stanford for business school. I applied there in the fall. All of that year and fast forward I started Stanford September of two thousand and eight crash happens a month later. Wow so you get to Stanford and from what I've read like you didn't really have a sense of what Silicon Valley was and what the tech world was any of that at all so so what what did you like. What was your impression? We got there so at Stanford I got there is two thousand and eight. I was twenty four years old and very quickly I knew as where I needed to be primarily because I saw the twenty four year olds not only making millions of dollars but fundamentally changed in the world and like how come I had no idea about this place. Seriously thought Silicon Valley was a place where semiconductors got made right. That's it that's it. This was before kind of you. Know facebook became what it did witter mujber all that stuff right in foursquare. I say wow I can participate in this and I started to have that kind of hotchkiss moment again right yeah. This is something new but I can you do while you are a student at Stanford you start to reach at a four square league. I mean what what what's the story like what what is foursquare at the time foursquare location based at at ten thousand users at the time. It was getting me explore. My the city is getting me to do things that I didn't WanNa. Do Give me the gym more like how is this thing actually inspiring me and changing my behavior I and I said wow like I. I want to figure this out found. The founders emails on the Internet is the classic story emailed Dennis Crowley the CEO founder eight times and the eighth time he might be back and never forget this. He said he said after all these ideas as I share with them you know what Karma I just may take you up on some of this period. Are you ever in New York question-mark Dan's my wife and I were watching lost binging on loss at the time I remember this very vividly in liver and it look like what should I do in five minutes later I said actually yes. I was planning on being in New York tomorrow. So I booked my flight. That night flew out the following morning. Show at the office and you're like I'm here and what happened. I was thirty six Cooper Square. We were on the fifth floor. They surprised to see you. I opened the door for Dennis was facing the back he turned around and he looked at me. Surprise as if like I wasn't actually going to come and here's this awkward moment like what does he do now and it so happened that there were like two empty desks there. He's like yeah go over there over there and throughout the day I mean he had a meeting yeah couple of meetings and then when he's done with came over he's like all right. So what do you want to do and I was like. I don't know and send him some ideas over email around kind of signing up retailers merchants that sort of thing anyone who's familiar with foursquare very small business focused. We wanted to get merchants on the platform orm to start engaging with their customer. I'll tell you what sign up thirty merchants by the end of the week and get a job and and he's like what do you want your title to be as like a business development because as we're business in it and I go to business school so it makes a lot of sense and how many people by the way how many people worked at four square there are two and a half Dennis Navene they were co founders and then Harry who is leading engineering but he wasn't quite fulltime but I guess US theoretically so he's he gives you challenge signed thirty businesses up by the end of the week and we'll see if we can do and what happened signed up three hundred four hundred. Oh Wow so you end up going to work four square after you after you graduated from Nope is actually in between my first and second year business school so I work fulltime foursquare during my second year school and four square gave me a gift you know because I was so early I felt as it was as much as my company is. Everybody is a family. They were doing something completely different. You know we had folks like facebook trying to come after us and that felt that was energy. I loved it and I felt like my work wasn't done so new. Dentists was kind enough to let me work on the West Coast to allow me to get a platform for people to know who I was after I graduated. He didn't ask me to come to New York. He's like you can stay on the company was growing yeah. There's a lot that I had to learn to write and through that process in not only kind of kind of growing the business. What does it look like to go from two employees one hundred fifty to raise tens of millions of dollars to build something uniquely authentic? It was an education that I wouldn't have gotten alone so you were there three and a half almost four years three years so you decide that's roads course and I'm going to do the next thing and it turns out that you either met or you knew Ben Horowitz the one of the partners of injuries in Orleans and he convinced you to become an entrepreneur residents there. How did that happen? How did you meet yes so when it's on the board of four squares they were the four squares largest investors? I known been not very intimately which is kind of as board member in new of the work that I did. I'm so when I told Dennis that I was leaving the company Dennis reach us on the board told them I was leaving and then Ben reach out to me a day or two later he said Tristan I get it right. I understand and you should not be an entrepreneur in residence reasons why and he said but if you're going to be an entrepreneur resonated with us and what were you going to do entrepreneur residence basically come up with ideas and and pitch ideas to them in theory they would fund those ideas so in as I think about the job is one of the craziest jobs in the world you get paid to think of ideas all day. He said comes to spend six nine months with us to figure this out and I was like I'm gonNA spend all nine months to figure this out residents. It's interesting because I've never met one who's enjoyed myself included but it spending a lotta a lot of time to think about things in an authentic way right you know the lesson I learned in Ben Taught me a lot. He's like tristen. You got to understand that you need to do the thing that you fundamentally believe that you are the best person in the world to do right. We have a unique proposition giving your story to solve that problem again. If you're doing something that's like inauthentic. This is hard enough right. You can't do

Foursquare Stanford New York Dennis Facebook Silicon Valley Ben Horowitz Dennis Crowley Cooper Square Entrepreneur In Residence Dennis Navene Hotchkiss Wanna United States Ceo Founder Witter West Coast DAN Harry Orleans
"Meat" Means Only Animal Products, Say States

Business Wars Daily

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"Meat" Means Only Animal Products, Say States

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily and it's Tuesday. April sixteenth. Remember big dairies campaign against the use of the term milk by companies that produce nuts avacado 's anything that doesn't have breasts caused quite a stir in the beverage industry. Well, meat producers are following in the dairy industries big footsteps, four states have now made it illegal to misuse, the term, meet Missouri. Was I followed by Mississippi and South Dakota, the Montana legislature recently passed a similar Bill, which is awaiting that governor signature in those states. The legislation says you can now name food meat only if it comes from an animal, not a plant and most certainly not a cell culture. In addition, ten other state, legislatures are considering similar bans the campaign is a legislative attempt to stem, the tide of consumers choosing to go meatless. The industry site food. Dive reports that seventeen percent of Americans are now vegetarians and another sixty percent say they're reducing their meat consumption. A lot of these folks are switching to plant based alternatives and more recently moved into burgers and other meatless meat products created in laboratories to such alternative meat companies have gotten a lot of Presley, impossible foods and beyond burger are both growing meat substitutes. That are said to look taste and smell like beef. And that's pretty scary to ranchers and meatpackers perhaps the timing of the growing number of state bills is no surprise meet grown in Petri dishes is getting so big that Burger King just put impossible burgers from the company impossible foods on the menu. They called the new item and impossible Walker. When one of the world's biggest hamburger chain start serving non meat meat. Ranchers blanche, the veggie brand tofurkey along with others, including the American Civil Liberties union immediately challenged Missouri's labeling law when that state passed it last year a settlement in that case is expected by may first in Montana, the Republican who sponsored the legislation. There says it's only fair that Montana's know where their food is coming from it doesn't ban. So cultured products just says they can't use the term meet to describe them the ways in which the meat industry's responding can be confusing big companies like Tyson, the chicken producer invested impossible foods rival beyond meat. Think of this the same way big donors contribute to Republican and democratic candidates to make sure they benefit from the eventual winner, but smaller states in producers don't have this kind of clout. And so they are fighting instead meat production is a top industry and many smaller rural States, South Dakota. For instance is. The twelfth largest meat and poultry producer in the nation. Meaning a big swath of that population depends on animals for their livelihood as they gear up for a fight. Ranchers slaughterhouse owners and Packers are also looking beyond. The lab the Montana law is also fending off a growing competition of the six legged kind. It also says you can't call an insect ameet how we name our food may or may not have much to do with what we actually choose to eat. That's a dilemma that will play out over the coming months and years in our shopping carts and on our dinner tables. In the meantime, semantics will continue to play out in the courts in an increasingly hot question for all sides. From wondering this business wars daily. If you think we're the real thing. We'd appreciate you. Spreading the word sheer this episode on social media widget. Thanks, I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneurs heart, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like VC's, Mark, Andrew Jackson, and Ben Horowitz. And Netflix is potty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick harassed co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Montana Octa South Dakota David Brown Missouri Producer PO Burger King American Civil Liberties Union Netflix Packers Mississippi Presley Joshua Davis Walker Tyson Ben Horowitz Andrew Jackson Contributing Editor
Friendlys Fire: Sudden Store Closings Spark Fury

Business Wars Daily

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Friendlys Fire: Sudden Store Closings Spark Fury

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business words daily on this Monday, April fifteenth, there are a whole lot of things happening today. It's tax day patriot's day and the one hundred and twenty second Boston marathon, even for non runners the marathon is an institution viewing it or watching the barrage of ads for footwear, athletic, clothing, and sports drinks can inspire even the most dedicated couch potato to go out for a jog. Well, maybe not the most dedicated couch potato for those of us who rather sit than sprint friendly's, the iconic east coast ice cream chain is offering a celebrate Tori marathon Sunday. So what makes it a marathon Sunday? Try twenty six point two ounces of ice cream. That's one ounce for every mile of the marathon, the six coupe red white and blue patriots Sunday costs almost ten dollars will only be offered today in friendlies Massachusetts stores. Offering marathon theme. Treat is counter intuitive and gives friendly's chance of standing out from the outdoor branding mania surrounding the race. But friendly's has been facing just about as many rivals as any top marathon runner from traditional competitors. Like restaurant chain Bob Evans to a multitude of healthier fast, casual restaurants as a result. What's going on in the friendly's boardroom is well anything but friendly in early April at about the same time that it announced its gigantic Sunday friendlies abruptly closed twenty three restaurants in New England and upstate New York, reportedly without warning employees. I the closure sparked controversy over whether the company had complied with federal law requiring sixty days notice of an eminent layoff friendly's owned by a private equity firm has been on a downward slide for years in the last decade is closed more than three hundred locations leaving it today with one hundred seventy four while every company has its own management. Uh-huh. Friendly's is also struggling with dynamics that are squeezing big food brands everywhere. It's an ice cream and burger place in an era when families are searching out healthier lighter foods, it's been in and out of chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. In the last several years. The company says the closures are intended to help the chain and its latest rebranding effort, but the term challenges friendly's faces could be the eighty year old chains. Heartbreak hill. Romm wondering this is business wars daily take a second away from that. I r s deadline and rate and review our show on your favorite podcast Appalachia. We promise it's a heck of a lot easier than those taxes. Thanks bunch. David brown. See you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur heart, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful. Entrepreneurs to get where they are today. People like VC's, Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is potty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Octa David Brown PO Bob Evans Massachusetts Boston Heartbreak Hill Joshua Davis Romm Frederick Carris Netflix New England Mark Andriessen New York Ben Horowitz Contributing Editor Co-Founder Twenty Second
Going Bananas: Chiquita Launches New Snapchat Filters

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Going Bananas: Chiquita Launches New Snapchat Filters

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From one I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily. It's friday. And that means it's time for dancing bananas. We like to think receives about business here, but we couldn't help but chuckle over the campaign Chiquita is rolling out to celebrate world banana day, which is next Wednesday April seventeenth the one hundred fifty year old banana producers been moving swiftly into the twenty first century embracing both Snapchat and augmented reality in its efforts to get teens and young adults to eat more of America's most popular fruit through the end of may the blue sticker on Chiquita's bananas. We'll be adorned with one of three Snapchat snap codes for you, Snapchat, novices out there that means if you have Snapchat on your phone, you can scan the sticker in one of three augmented reality scenarios will play out, according to the company one Lynn's will turn you into a dancing banana character on Snapchat. Another transforms your. Face into Chiquita banana and third game. Fide? Snapchat, lens invites you to catch falling bananas to score points. Sure. It's silly. But the campaign which will appear on two hundred million bananas underscores a couple of trends one is that marketings becoming more and more interactive. But more accompany can get you to engage with something. Instead of just looking at it, the more interest in loyalty, you might feel at least that's the idea and snap Chatters share their activities widely meaning campaigns like this have the potential to create huge ripple effects on social media tiny banana, stickers that turns out our huge business that you keep us nap chat campaign rivals Dole's current heroic effort dole began piggybacking off the captain marvel movie release in March stickers on millions of it's bananas depict comic book and real life heroes, including women farmers anti-hunger activists and more through the end of may like Chiquita the does. Promotion, which includes recipes inspired by comic book. Superheroes. Intended to get shoppers to spread the word through social media peo- back these playful promotional campaigns. And there's a lot of steak. Both companies are vying for the growing organic market, and though the sweet fruit is easy to sell. Neither rival wants to let their produce lose the spot of top banana. I'm wondering this is business wars daily. This week's episodes were written edited and produced by lane Appleton brand Emma Cortlandt is our editor and producer. Our executive producer is Marshall Louis created by or non Lopez for wondering, I'm David Brown. See next week. Business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur is hard, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to IPO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful. Entrepreneurs to get where they are today. People like VC's, Mark, Andrew Jackson, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcasts.

Chiquita Snapchat Octa David Brown Dole Joshua Davis Frederick Carris Netflix Contributing Editor Patty Mcchord Ben Horowitz Lane Appleton America Executive Producer PO Emma Cortlandt Lynn
FDA, Activists Pressure Walgreens to Stop Cigarette Sales

Business Wars Daily

04:47 min | 1 year ago

FDA, Activists Pressure Walgreens to Stop Cigarette Sales

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Thursday, April eleven Walgreen cigarette. Sales could go away in a puff of smoke outgoing FDA. Chief Scott Gottlieb has been criticizing the country's biggest pharmacy chain for continuing to sell cigarettes. In February Gottlieb issued harsh criticism to Walgreens over its high volume of illegal sales of cigarettes to minors. Twenty two percent of its stores were found with sold cigarettes to teenagers in most states the legal age to buy tobacco is eighteen. Now. Some activist investors are pressuring Walgreens to stop selling cigarettes altogether saying cigarette sales put their money at risk of lawsuits. So far, Walgreens says no it has no plans to quit CEO Stefan persona says customers demand cigarettes rival CVS ended. It's cigarette. Sales in twenty fourteen attempting to reposition itself as a health and wellness company. CVS says that choice cost the chain about two billion dollars a year in sales. And here's the rub Walgreens just posted its worst quarter in four years, although sales were up they still didn't meet Wall Street's expectations. Last year. Walgreens announced it would cut costs by a billion dollars by the end of twenty twenty one following its flagging second quarter results at tightened the screws, even more. Now, the company is cutting costs by one and a half billion dollars. Walgreens, doesn't say how much money it makes from cigarettes. Although it does say sales have been falling still when it comes to smoking. Walgreens is caught between a rock and hard place on the one hand it may need its existing tobacco sales on the other hand like CVS Walgreens is trying desperately. To become a health centre rather than it retailer, prosciutto the Wall Street Journal last week. He says future success will Bank on its in-house healthcare clinics and lab testing, not it's retail side. Critics have all green cigarette policy point to the obvious conflict between cigarettes and Walgreens efforts to serve chronically ill patients the company which has ten thousand US locations is piloting tobacco-free stores at about eighteen of them to see how customers react a twenty seventeen study showed that when CVS stop selling cigarettes smoking fell by statistically, significant margins. Whether or not Walgreens, stop selling cigarettes, probably won't move the needle on its financial health the strategic problems facing both Walgreens and CVS are far bigger than the cigarette business. But the issue is a huge public health concern last year the surgeon general declared teen e cigarette use epidemic for Walgreens, it's a branding problem. Will consumers close their rise to the conflict between offering healthcare services and selling cigarettes for the ailing pharmacy chain this issue isn't likely to evaporate quickly. From wondering this is business wars daily. We hope our daily episodes light you up tell us. Why don't you tweet us? Your thoughts about this episode at business wars and thanks alive. I'm David Brown. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneurs hard, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like VC's, Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Walgreens Octa Chief Scott Gottlieb Ceo Stefan Persona David Brown Wall Street Journal United States PO FDA Joshua Davis Netflix Frederick Carris Patty Mcchord Mark Andriessen Ben Horowitz Contributing Editor Co-Founder
Sweet Sorrow: Kelloggs Says Ciao to Keebler, Famous Amos

Business Wars Daily

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Sweet Sorrow: Kelloggs Says Ciao to Keebler, Famous Amos

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Wednesday. April tenth brace yourself. This episode could make you hungry for the next. Couple of minutes will be talking chocolate. But cookie business has become one big chess game last week Italian company Ferreiro announced it's buying Keebler and famous Amos cookies from Kellogg. Yes. The Keebler elves are legally any way moving to Italy Ferraro is spending one point three billion dollars to spirit the elves across the pond famous Amos and Kellogg unit that bake some girl scout cookies, we'll go with them Forero known for its new Tele hazelnut spread is quickly becoming one of America's sweetest sweets companies. This is the fourth American cookie or candy brand. It's eaten up since twenty seventeen. Ferreiro bought Nestle's candy division little over a year ago. Those Keebler elves will be joining baby Ruth butterfinger. And many other delicious American trifles. So what's going on Kellogg admits that it was starving? Those poor elves and Amos of resources it was pouring its efforts and money into treats that have sweeter returns on investment from pop tarts to Pringles Kellogg. I started shopping the brands in November it's been trying to figure out how to spur Americans lagging appetites for snacks from big old brand names. In fact, it's been a rough patch for most consumer packaged goods companies. According to NPR, young shoppers, simply aren't brand loyal the way baby boomers were for Kellogg. That means the Keebler name no longer pools. It's weight as American shoppers are increasingly avoiding processed foods Kellogg in its competitors. Are pulling their hair out at least sixteen consumer packaged goods CEO's had left their jobs between twenty sixteen and twenty eighteen the Wall Street Journal reported presumably. They were failing at or exhausted from trying to kick start growth, but if it were just the shift toward healthier food that was hurting cookie sales. Why would Herero be sweetening? It's own desert portfolio apparently will still indulge plenty, especially if the quality is high for railroad specializes in improving tired brands in February and relaunched Nestle's one hundred year old butterfinger candy Barr with more chocolate and no hydrogenated oils. So Ferreiro sees a huge opportunity in our collective sweet tooth as does delay international. Jones. The Oreo Mondays spending more than two billion dollars to buy those yummy. Danish butter cookies dance or rather maker the Kelsen group from Campbell Soup. Campbell's is another legacy food brand that's been struggling to reshuffle. Its portfolio Monday is also buying Australian cookie maker or. Or should we be calling them biscuits? So cookies are not being flattened by celery and carrots, there's still a lot of money to be made in indulgences, but selling them is harder than it's ever been. Which is why cookie chess his getting so aggressive? From wondering this is business wars daily. Hey before you run off to that mid morning snack. Take a second Llosa five star rating on your favorite podcast app for us. That'd be a better gift of box chocolates bags. I'm David Brown. We'll see you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur's heart. And it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like the Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcasts.

Kellogg Amos Octa Keebler David Brown Campbell Soup Nestle Ferreiro PO Wall Street Journal Italy Ferraro Joshua Davis CEO Netflix NPR Frederick Carris Jones
New York Giants Odell Beckham Jr. handled minicamp perfectly

Nanos at Night

02:15 min | 2 years ago

New York Giants Odell Beckham Jr. handled minicamp perfectly

"To play eight five five two one two four cbs that's eight five five two two forty two twenty seven could always give me a following the good old cesspool of twitter at zach gelb that's z a c h g e l horowitz in greece epo on the other side of the glass eric muscleman the head coach of nevada is gonna join us coming up forty minutes from now we'll chat a little bit about his past season with nevada sweet sixteen team very fun run the nc double a tournament a lot of passionate also get his take on the upcoming nba draft that does commence on thursday we gotta squeeze in a little football here and you know me i always love talking football i always say football's king so we've had these mandatory minicamps underway over the last few days and there's a a lot of contract disputes some players they show up and trying to have resolution to their contract and some other players they send a message they skipped the voluntary ota's and they skip the mandatory many camps and say hey i'm not stepping forward the our football field until they get a brand new deal without a lot of big names though and not all of them have elected to not show up like odell beckham is a huge huge huge major name and he's elected to show up and then there's players that have not shown up like a julio jones a levy on bell aaron darnold aaron donald earl thomas david johnson and also khalil mack those are some players that have been shown up in trying to get a brand new spanking contract so let's go and let's start with the dell i just because the difference here is oh del is showing up and the other players aren't and just to be clear odell shown up for the majority of these workouts he wasn't at the last two voluntary ota's but he's been there for all the other stuff as well he's just not participating in team drills which i'm sure my producer ben horowitz could agree since ben's a giant fan and i'm not that that's the right move by odell up you have a new coach you have new gm show that you're doing the right thing now you don't have to go percent you don't have to participate in team drills because you're coming off a nasty injury where you broke your leg.

Twitter Zach Gelb Nevada Football Odell Beckham Dell OTA Ben Horowitz GM Greece NBA Julio Jones Aaron Donald Earl Thomas David Khalil Mack Producer Forty Minutes
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL's Hamilton Tiger-Cats in comeback

The Cigar Dave Show

02:15 min | 2 years ago

Johnny Manziel signs with CFL's Hamilton Tiger-Cats in comeback

"Sports could pick up your spirits a little bit and that's what j j watt has done he i did it would be terrible hurricane the happened in houston with all the money that he raised and now he's doing it here with the victims of the terrible santa fe texas school shooting he's going to pay for all ten of the funerals for those victims it's tough to talk about and that's why it's tough to get through this because you don't want to talk about it because you hope that these people would still be living in their lives were just innocently robbed and it's absolutely terrible and it's another senseless act of violence that have changed in our country but i give a lot of credit to jj watt for doing something that he's been doing his entire career and that's just being a good guy i know he's a great football player but he's a better human being and i want to recognize jj watt and give him a stock up we will now get to mr ben horowitz go ahead ben thank you my first stock up is going to go to johnny football johnny manziel announced earlier yesterday that he was going to take his talents to canada johnny canada perhaps to the cfl and the hamilton tiger cats and i think this is the perfect move for it's a low pressure situation it gives them an ability to rehab is image rehab is gain and give him an opportunity to get back to the nfl he's gonna light up that league because let's face it the competition isn't there any lit up d one college football johnny football as a result of this will be back in the nfl not necessarily starting but we'll be back in the nfl and three years give me a huge stock up to johnny football i don't think you'll ever make another fifty three man roster in the league but hey we agree to disagree go ahead look at the type of backup sitter in the league go ahead stocked up number two we already had this position stock of number two is i brian jack mckeon stock up number two goes to the us supreme court who finally ruled after the state of new jersey fought numerous times through.

Houston Jj Watt Johnny Manziel NFL United States Texas School Football Mr Ben Horowitz Canada Brian Jack Mckeon Three Years
Texas woman wins $1.2 million with Pick 5 bet that included Kentucky Derby winner Justify

KMOX Profiles

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Texas woman wins $1.2 million with Pick 5 bet that included Kentucky Derby winner Justify

"And also now i feldman on the other side of the glass can you get ryan hickey out of there please his shifts over get him on out we're not paying them anymore but don't wanna pay many over time so we welcome to the program i get to see your brother what's up cj or z g i tried to give you some airtime and then boom jay how you doing it's all right i i'm still recovering from a hangover we could tell to give you a two minute embellishment penalty yourself to put you in the penalty box stews probably just going nuts in there right now so call the ho cj get on the radio probably freak it out pretty much yeah i i understand because my producer ben horowitz saturday and sundays he's an angry elf as well and susan angry al also so they get they get annoyed agitated off the little things so we'll talk to jr coming up hopefully at twelve thirty five am eastern time we'll get the putts in and just a bit before we play this game of fair and foul which is a staple of the carmen show and i'm filling in for him so it's only right to do ken right let's get a little bit into the kentucky derby i'm not a huge horse racing fan i care about horse racing three times out of the year kentucky derby preakness and then also the belmont and always wanna see a triple crown winner but there's always one of those betting stories that do happen and there was a woman in texas how about this payday she put an eighteen dollar bet down she had a pick five she had justify won the kentucky derby and she had the winners of the four races leading up to the main event can we have any guesses let's try like he's out of the penalty box let's try this the second time for she put eighteen dollars down she to pick five how much money do you think the lady in texas one ten point one million what's your guess ching ching ching is right off a great job by her a pick five she had justify and the other four are racist leading up to the main event a woman in taxes that's a nice peter i always sometimes wonder how much the horse actually does now we were talking about this sunday and.

Ryan Hickey Producer JR Kentucky Derby Feldman Ben Horowitz Susan KEN Kentucky Texas Eighteen Dollars Eighteen Dollar Two Minute