17 Burst results for "Ben Gurion University"

"ben gurion university" Discussed on The Current

The Current

04:29 min | 2 months ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on The Current

"Your podcast. This is a cbc podcast son Million and with that israel marked its one millionth cova vaccination earlier this week. That's right one million vaccines as of today. That number has already passed one and a half million as many other governments around the world are struggling to get vaccines to as many people as possible as quickly as possible this morning. We're going to check in with three countries that have notable stories to tell about their vaccination efforts and we'll start in israel. Dr sav davidovich is the director of the school of public health. At ben gurion university he also sits on the israeli national advisory committee for covid nineteen. Dr hello hi. Good morning for you done for me. And it's one point eight million already how it's almost difficult to keep track of the numbers keep going up and up and up. How is it that israel is vaccinating so many people so quickly so it's a combination of factors festival. We secure the vaccine quite a early. We have excellent connection both pfizer and moderna. Actually the chief. Medical officer denies the graduate of university. My university but more deeply. We have a very strong culture of vaccinations going back to the mother and child care centers so resistance of oxygenation is not the big issue here what we needed to fight a fake news but more important. Maybe we have a very strong public health care system we say infrastructure. The community operated by four nonprofit health fans. We also making drills throughout the years because of but then that's too bad logical and threats also the political will. We are before election though there was a push also from the government to go head. Wish all part of covid nineteen prepared was so good as with vaccination in the nation is great that they're not going to solve our problems such as shortage of manpower entering another lockdown. Unfortunately i'm very proud about dyslexia nation campaign but i think it's also very unique to israeli society that you know we have a very strong preparedness program stronger community has where are you at now in terms of working your way through the population because with one point eight million vaccines. We'd all around the world. People are starting with the most vulnerable populations and then getting to Folks who perhaps are over sixty and then working their way down. So where are you at now. In terms of who's getting the vaccine so we have a special working on priorities They fest priority was Has woke as and people over sixty and different chronic conditions so both in terms of Has as both the hospitals and the community. Also people are over sixty. We covered about seventy percent. This is very important because we see now because of kind Other things that were not handled properly in terms of gathering we see in the last week arising severe cases and deaths we hoped covering the elderly in the chronic conditions will give us You know in the coming weeks. They much better position to be at this. Effort has been celebrated around world but at the same time. Israel as you know is facing fierce criticism wire palestinians in the west bank and gaza not included in this very successful exhibition program. If it could be only on the minister of everybody is for it both for moral reasons. Not from italy reasons because finally we. Are you know almost the same community our interaction so it can also israelis. I really hope that we are going to solve this problem. The political issues here and We oppressing talking about all the public has community to have the palestinians being vaccinated throughout the pandemic. We share information. We have many graduates from the university that we know very well It's also temple ventilators and testing. We try to share our resources. This is our ethical responsibility for sure..

israel Dr sav davidovich ben gurion university israeli national advisory comm Dr hello graduate of university moderna cbc school of public health pfizer west bank gaza italy
"ben gurion university" Discussed on Smashing Security

Smashing Security

04:54 min | 3 months ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on Smashing Security

"Characters and i wonder if someone was trying to if someone is trying to get like weed killer right right would it would it kind of you know in. They're putting the sequence for for some kind of dna weed killer. Who knows but if you did it might might try. Like i detected a flaw in this plan for a lot of these things that those dependent on this but if you take much soaked it will kill you. Can i order like a lady bug but one. That's nine feet wide. Wouldn't worry about that. She's not going to get into your house. What if she was nine. You telling me amazon. Don't have kabul is for that you're wrong on a more serious. No i have other concerns. So i'm not a geneticist but my understanding of genetic code is that there are very large parts of the human tendency code that we don't know what it does and are quite possibly useless just of remnants right from previous generations of humans. And who's to say if their home full or harm less if they were activated very concerned Mostly concerned about the giant laden book. But i'm sure the. Us government department got this all on crazy not totally. Thorough database logged marks concern. I if you request the request for the dna genes the synthetic dna has triggered either. The who the hell are you or on earth. Audrey china ladybird challenge. Then they look at a bit more closely they can eventually pass over to the nearest. Fbi field office specifically the weapons of mass destruction coordinator. So pretty someone whose job it is at the fbi vist after wmd and coordinate them and so he'll say yes or no so back to the egg heads over in israel. They say that there's a few problems one is. There's no comprehensive database of pathogenic sequences. So all the bad stuff. So they said the guidelines up fundamentally outdated already so they say that's a bit of a problem but more than that they created a proof of concept cyber attack which could obfuscate a nasty toxic. Dna sequence in such way that it wasn't picked up by the screen. And so what's the basically encrypt it and then slipped through well encrypted his palca yesterday the wrong term but it was something which would effectively emulate the same sequence of characters although it didn't look the same so it would. It would muddle it up. But you'd get the same result. Silla like snugly. Yeah maybe in a way. So how can they inject the toxic nasty militias dna sequence into one of these systems. What they're talking about is they could actually infect legitimate laboratories who are for synthetic dna and with a browser plugin so if they mentioned in store browser plugin when the when the scientists cut and paste their dna sequence they could actually intercept that inject some of their own nasty dna in there as well and in their tests fifty or for skated dna samples. Sixteen of them were not detected surrounded by a third of all of their attempts. Were successful to sneak past effectively militias toxic dna which then end up in the hands of people they weren't actually using toxic. Dna sequences presumably right so they basically office skate. Dna samples and said does this get passed or not. No i think. They looked to the databases which they felt were date and they found the toxic pathogens and they obfuscated skated those and they put them into the requests and they went through and they passed the tests. Oh great so. We now have a research team with sixteen toxic edina sequences great their israeli students. We can trust if anybody's looking for some biological weapons. You'll find them at ben gurion university. Yeah so it's kind of interesting. I thought thing as with much of the stuff done by this particular when comes to cybersecurity threats. It's not necessarily something. You should lose too much sleep over Despite marks nightmare vision of a giant lady bug at nights but clearly better screening is required so just relying on a compute look for particular sequences of characters is something which has to be maintained and make sure that someone's not trying to slip saint party so they go we've all learned about cyber biosecurity.

Audrey china Fbi kabul government department amazon Silla israel ben gurion university Us edina
"ben gurion university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:03 min | 9 months ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on WTOP

"Thirty five the trump administration is asking a federal judge to halt publication of former national security adviser John Bolton's book which is highly critical of the president but with the book's release set for Tuesday and copies already in circulation there may be little the White House can do the book published by Simon and Schuster a division of Viacom CBS depicts president trump as highly uninformed and motivated purely by self interest secretary of state Mike Pompeii always calling Bolton a traitor former chief of staff Mick Mulvaney takes issue with the book but admits president trump did not hire the best people those days did hire very well he did not have experience in running government and didn't know how to put together a team that could work well with him that's C. B. S.'s Ben Tracy reporting the navy will not reinstate captain Brad crozier as commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt that decision is a reversal for admiral Mike Gilday the top navy officer he initially said he was open to giving crozier is job back but now says a deeper investigation shows crozier made mistakes in responding to a corona virus outbreak on the aircraft carrier crozier was fired after an email he sends pleading for help to deal with the outbreak was leaked to the media well forget about a wire tapping it turns out spies can gather information by using the light bulbs it's called the lamp phone researchers at Israel's Ben Gurion university says that allows anyone with a laptop and equipment costing less than a thousand dollars to listen in on any sounds in rooms that could be hundreds of feet away in real time they do it by observing the vibrations the sound of the room make on a light bulb all they need is a telescope and a four hundred dollar electro optical sensor there are some limitations though it doesn't work with all light bulbs Gigi green WTOP news up ahead a federal prosecutors refusing to leave his job even though the justice department is trying to fire him it's nine thirty seven news never.

navy Brad crozier chief of staff Ben Gurion university Israel Mike Gilday Theodore Roosevelt officer John Bolton Ben Tracy president trump Mick Mulvaney Mike Pompeii CBS Viacom Schuster
"ben gurion university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:01 min | 9 months ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on WTOP

"Thirty five the trump administration has asked a federal judge to halt publication of former national security adviser John Bolton's book which is highly critical of the president but with the book's release set for Tuesday and copies already in circulation there may be little the White House can do the book published by Simon and Schuster a division of Viacom CBS depicts president trump as highly uninformed and motivated purely by self interest secretary of state Mike Pompeii always calling Bolton a traitor former chief of staff Mick Mulvaney takes issue with the book but admits president trump did not hire the best people those days we didn't hire very well he did not have experience in running government and didn't know how to put together a team that could work well with him that CBS is Ben Tracy reporting the navy will not reinstate captain Brad crozier as commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt that decision is a reversal for admiral Mike Gilday the top navy officer he initially said he was open to giving crozier is job back but now says a deeper investigation shows the crosier make mistakes in responding to a corona virus outbreak on the aircraft carrier crozier was fired after an email he sent up the chain of command pleading for help to deal with the outbreak was leaked to the media forget wire tapping researchers have developed a new way for spies to eavesdrop on targets using light bulbs it's called the land phone researchers at Israel's Ben Gurion university says that allows anyone with a laptop and equipment costing less than a thousand dollars to listen in on any sounds in rooms that could be hundreds of feet away in real time they do it by observing the vibrations the sound of the room make on a light bulb all they need is a telescope and a four hundred dollar electro optical sensor there are some limitations though it doesn't work with all light bulbs Gigi green WTOP news coming up a federal prosecutor is refusing to leave his job despite the justice department trying.

navy Brad crozier chief of staff Ben Gurion university Israel Mike Gilday Theodore Roosevelt officer John Bolton Ben Tracy president trump Mick Mulvaney Mike Pompeii CBS Viacom Schuster
"ben gurion university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post a route Sheba front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is a dressed various Jewish student groups and partic-. On debate panels, and she is the author of the copper, scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection by you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls.

Shelly Shelley Dead Sea Ben Gurion university Temple Mount Shelly Jerusalem Post Jerusalem vice president EMMY richard Israel Bethlehem Washington page magazine
"ben gurion university" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

11:43 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on WRVA

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her MA in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the negative the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish student. Groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the Kumaon caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper scrolls, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history when that schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls found me at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. That it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Nineteen forty seven whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that that one's just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation and the day in desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and go home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day, but goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So you really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their cap. Put it in a in a bag and hung up from ten and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you imagine, oh, my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested, hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story the Dead Sea scrolls began so really to me even just right up five the getting it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship. What it did for our understanding? Yeah. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us assigns like. Alight into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book really training, biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and where the psalms in the same order then is now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to just maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And then looks like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed correct? That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of preposterous are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. There are eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not what's close, but we know that it wasn't Todd scroll. So there was twelve cave. The copper scroll was found in cave. Every what if you caves it was found by legitimate archeologocial team? Most of the other scroll caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, she's close case. I would it be the bedouin or the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war in the case of Cape three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined is scrolls written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days. They were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof at the cave had collapsed, and then take so once it clap once it broke, the jars been this grows were exposed to rodents and time, and so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the day that they see that. Almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I guess another the actual appearance of the conference call I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall of the secret chamber. And I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they chips through it live down. And they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls, as it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so is really just like nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this super unusual that she throws. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the copper close ones grow. But antiquity when they were rolling it up it had snapped. And to those two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green. The color of the statue of liberty because copper did what copper does. And and I got that. Nice. Patina on it oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it, and where he would have clean it off and use mirrors. And and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long with a foot wide. It has read it on the four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall and the copper scroll. What was what? It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper I mean, the decision to try and unscrew it without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to have probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They sat on it for three years, and partly for this reason, it was it was it was shattered. You know, it was so vulnerable even to just the slightest touch. So they really they they talked to a Metallurgist at Johns Hopkins. They really shocked it out kind of internationally just is there any expert out there that can help us in this process to unroll it and pretty much universally no-one said that it was worth the risk of of unrolling it, but they could see words on the outside. And three words that capture repeating themselves were dig and gold in Cuba. So I mean, they knew what they had on their hands. It was something unlike every other Dead Sea scroll, but I think too. There was a, you know, Israel's not sovereign over Jerusalem. At this time that the Dead Sea scrolls are in the hands of the Jordanian antiquities already. And so no Jewish scholars are allowed to work on the Dead Sea scrolls at this point, which really reduced their expertise level as well. I think the Dead Sea scrolls aditorial team that was there which is worth a book in its own. Right. Just to those guys were they were overwhelmed. They were being flooded with all of these these both every day. So I just don't think the copper scroll was very high on their priority list. They had you know, a publishing schedule that they would be thirty years off on in terms of once they were able to to get the Dead Sea scrolls publicity to the public. So they were going to spend the rest.

Dead Sea Bethlehem bedouin Shelley Jerusalem Israel Temple Mount Shelly page magazine Ben Gurion university Jerusalem Post Shelly richard Washington Samuel Isaiah vice president Iraq Johns Hopkins Deuteronomy
"ben gurion university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

10:17 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Alarm to play nine seventy WFL a every day at six AM. Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her in Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the negative the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is address. I various Jewish student groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture force if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she's schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first that sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of hard as our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in airbag, much less. Hebrew, or ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the recap put it in a in a bag and hung up from ten Paul and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll stop around, and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story, but that's used gross began. So really to me even just right up five hundred again, it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for scholarship what it did for our understanding. This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us a like a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book. Really turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say, it looked like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then as now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. With the same now. As it did. Then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meetings have been changed the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And and so amongst the the these scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that Lebanon caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, right twelve cable was found. Not what's close, but we know that at one touch scroll. So there was twelve gave the copper scroll was found in pays every. What of the few caves, it was found by a legitimate archaeological team, most of the other squirrel as were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said, he's calls cave. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war in the case of three. It was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine. What they're expecting defined as it scrolls written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasure in its own, right? But it was. It was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it once house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed and integrity. So once it clap once it broke, the jars then the scrolls were exposed to wrote him some time, and so most of this growth, where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that lasted day of the day that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I guess about the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false law the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. Do they chips through it live down? And and they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found really in the Dead Sea scrolls, as it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity. And so there's really just like nature had created a perfect hiding spot for this. Super unusual that she throws. So the way looked was two roles. So really, the copper scroll is ones grow. But and integrity when they were rolling it up. It had snapped any. So it's two rolls laying next to each other. And they were green the color of the statue of liberty because copper copper does. And got that. Nice patina on it. Right. It oxidises. Yeah. Exactly. And that would prove to really be a protect that for the copper school for two thousand years. And and so once they got it and where he would to clean it off and use mirrors. And and and and they could only see the words that were on the outside of the copper scroll. And so it took three years for them to be able to open it. Now, we know that the copper scroll originally measured about seven feet long was a foot wide. It has rivets on the. Four corners, which means at some point. It was probably hung on a wall. And the copper scroll was was one. It must have been incredibly precarious unscrew rolling something that had been scrolled up for twenty four hundred years something that's made of I don't know how brittle it is. But copper. I mean, the decision to try an unscripted without destroying it. That must have been nerve wracking. Absolutely. I think it was a combination. You know, now, I don't think that we would have tried to cut it open, our unfurl it. Now, I think we would have the ability to probably been able to scan it and see see what was there without even making such a risky move. But then they. They.

Dead Sea bedouin Bethlehem Shelley Samuel Temple Mount Shelly Ben Gurion university page magazine Jerusalem Shelly richard Israel Washington vice president Jerusalem Post Isaiah Iraq Paul Lebanon
"ben gurion university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her m a and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending be two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at Kumaon in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau. She is addressed various Jewish state. Groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history when that schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first that sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Holy nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep Ronin across sparse vegetation and the day in desert that one of the bedouin through rock and cave. And here's a shattering of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when I was just broken pottery. And what their purposes they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to their camp. Put it in a bag and hung it from temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And and you imagine all my Lord what a lot. But it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, what's good about Lehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around, and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story. That's us pros began. So really to me even just right up front in front of the getting is it's a it's a story of just provident. Absolutely. And why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for biblical scholarship. What it did for our understanding? This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond. What books were Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular? It gives us. It's shines a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible, and the even just books the book. We'll be turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I look like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then as now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. You know, they make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And I they then looks like Isaiah now and certainly Genesis through. Deuteronomy? Look the same now. As it did. Then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meetings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really a confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And so amongst the the the scrolls of papyrus are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that. Eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not what's close. But we know that it wasn't scroll. So there was twelve gave the copper scroll was found in pays every one of the few caves it was found by legitimate archeologocial team. Most of the other scroll caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said sees close cave. I would it be the bedouin are the archaeologists and the bedouin usually won that war and the case of Cape three it was a French. Archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting to find is it's close written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof of the cave had collapsed in antiquity. So once it clap once it broke the jars then this girls were exposed to wrote in some time. And and so most of this growth where we're really not salvageable, and they were closing out the big and really it was in the last hours of of that last day of the day that they see that almost there's this false wall at the back of the cave. Sorry, I got the actual appearance of the conference call, but I feel like I have to pay this picture. Thank you. So so it was it was like this false wall, the secret chamber, and I mean, that's just the only way I can describe it. And so they threw it live down. And they see I'm like every other scroll that's been found. Really does it was resting on a man-made shelf behind this wall, which probably had collapsed in antiquity? And so there's really dislike nature had created the perfect.

Dead Sea Shelley Bethlehem Temple Mount Shelly Ben Gurion university Jerusalem Israel page magazine Shelly richard Jerusalem Post Washington Kumaon Samuel vice president Isaiah Lehem Deuteronomy treasurer
"ben gurion university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

07:15 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand to two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles have appeared in the Jerusalem Post. A route Sheba front page magazine. And more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national funds. Speakers bureau, she is addressed various Jewish. Student groups and participated on debate panels, and she is the author of the copper scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the Coomer caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection, but you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on that the miracle that is the Dead Sea scrolls and to really put yourself in that time and point in history. When that she schools are flooding the black market. I'm sure the, you know, the story of how the first Dead Sea scrolls were found made at this point. It's kind of part of our of our cultural fabric. But. But it had it not been somehow the Dead Sea scrolls were hidden for two thousand years, and and it was in the nineteen fifties. Probably nineteen forty seven. Whenever no one knows quite for. Sure. Nineteen forty seven. Nineteen Forty-six that bedouin just letting their sheep run across sparse vegetation, and the Judean desert that one of the bedouin through Iraq and a cave, and here's a shattering of of something and goes home and thinks he's too scared to go in the cave that day that goes back the next day with his cousins thinking that they'll find some sort of very treasure and really were quite disappointed when it was just broken pottery. And what for their purposes, they were literate in Arabic, much less. She brewer ancient Hebrew. So he really had no idea what they had. But they brought it back to the recap put it in a bag and hung it from a temple and debated. Sort of what to do about it? How to repurpose it? There's one part of the story is that there was a debate about repurposing the leather for something else. And can you imagine? Oh, my Lord what a loss, but it was one on goal who suggested. Hey, let's go to Bethlehem on a market day that that when are already going to Bethlehem, and and we'll shop around and he knew somebody who knew somebody that was connected to that the black market. And that's that's where this story the Dead Sea scrolls began so really to me even just right up front in front of the getting is it's a it's a story of providence. Absolutely. But wh why are they significant? These scrolls have Hebrew inscriptions on them. What is their significance? Right. Well, so before the Dead Sea scrolls, really the Dead Sea scrolls are pre dating our oldest known Hebrew manuscripts by thousand years. So in terms of what that did for bevaqua scholarship. What it did for our understanding? This is pre canonization of the bible. So really what it did for our understanding of that process and really in first century to respond what books where Jewish sects reading what books were the most popular. It gives us. It's shines a light into this window of time. That's so critical for the rest of the two thousand years for our bible in the even just book the book. Be turning biblical scholarship on its head in terms of what did I say, it looked like two thousand years ago, would it Samuel and chronicles and what they were the psalms in the same order. Then is now what we found. I mean scholars for scholars small differences. They make their living off of what did they say the narcissism of small differences? And so for them, they look at Samuel, and they see differences and and study those, but for our purposes for the purposes of any believer. I mean, it is astonishing that the bible was able to maintain its it's authentic fabric for for all of this time. And then looks like Isaiah now, and certainly Genesis through. Look the same now. As it did then. Right. So for people who argue that the bible has been mistranslated or the meanings have been changed. The the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, really confirms and buttresses the the the consistency of the biblical narrative. It hasn't changed. Correct. Absolutely. That's exactly right. And so amongst the the these scrolls of Paris are two different types of scrolls. Copper what do they look like? So the copper scroll. There's we've always thought before that eleven caves that house Dead Sea scrolls last year, twelve cable was found not what's close. But we know that it wasn't scroll. So there was twelve caves the copper scroll was found in cave every. One of the few caves, it was found by legitimate archaeolgical team. Most of the other squirrel caves were found by bad ones. I mean, really in the fifties. It was just a race against time. In terms of who could find the next said sees close cave. I would it be the bedouin. Are they are gala just and the bedouin usually won that war and the case of three it was a French archaeologist. And so you can imagine what they're expecting defined as it's written on papyrus or leather. And every one of those is, you know, a treasurer in its own, right? But it was it was case three that they excavated for ten days, and they were pretty disappointed because they could tell that it wants house. At least forty scrolls. But that that. Roof.

Dead Sea bedouin Bethlehem Shelley Temple Mount Shelly EMMY Ben Gurion university Jerusalem page magazine Speakers bureau Shelly Israel Jerusalem Post richard Washington vice president Samuel Isaiah Iraq
"ben gurion university" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on Unorthodox

"This is not my business to portray Israeli society. I portray individuals. I don't portray society if you could think of of an Israeli writer, you would recommend people to read maybe from a newer generation, a younger generation to do you have one in mind. I have many in mind that will be unfilled to some of them. If I mention just one name. But I strongly recommend your readers to read at gull carrot. I think he's an excellent writer. He is on expected and full of surprises. You may not remember, but eight years ago, I took a class with you at Ben Gurion university in southern Israel. It was Shakespeare's Othello. And I remember each week you stood in front of the class and you spoke for three hours without notes. And my recollection of that time was was as if you were reciting a novel. I really felt that it was like you were speaking the first draft not the first draft of of of something, but the final draft the Hebrew the way that you spoke Hebrew was was different than the way that I had. Heard other Israelis speak. Hebrew, first of all, how would you describe your use of language, and do you feel that you're filling some kind of linguistic obligation in your work will thank you for the compliment. But my classes on the first draft I prepare and prepare very thoroughly for each plus for each lecture, and it's true that I often speak without notes, they speak without notes because I prepare long and hard at home before I come to class is I feel particularly Gatien told language language is my craft language is my musical instruments. I treat the language the way they violinist treats the violin. And for me, the most important thing in my writing, and in my teaching is precision any favorite Hebrew words. No. Can't point particular words as being my favorite. Hebrew words. I love the Hebrew language, and I'm very biased about it. I could speak about the Hebrew language for hours and hours. I think it's a wonderful musical instrument. I think modern Hebrew has many things in common with Elizabethan English. I think a writer or a poet of contemporary Hebrew can still take very daring liberties with the language can even legislate into language because Hebrew is like melting lover like an erupting volcano and one can steal leave. A certain imprint on the language. Well, I know that your father first of all invented a number of words. Uncle invented the number of words. Yes, migrant he invented a number of Hebrew words. And I have invented a couple of Hebrew words. And I'm very proud of them. Can you tell us which ones difficult to translate them into English because they don't exist into English. But one of them is the verb to rhinoceros their evade rhinoceros authorize their evasion from the non rhinoceros. That was a play by the fringe player. Idealist go the Romanian, French playwright UNESCO called the rain nostrils. It's about a society where people are becoming more and more conformist and they adjust themselves to the held every day. And this play is called the rhinoceros, and it was played very successfully in Israel in the nineteen sixties. So in one of my articles, I invented the verb to rhinoceroses all the noun rhinos arrived describe a man who becomes conformist who changed his or hair opinions in all the to adjust to a certain general mood Oto certain general trends late current F. Right if let's right. Do you ever? Hear anyone use it and out on the street and think that's mine. It came back to me from Texas driver who had no idea. I was the proud parent of this world. I felt very proud and very happy..

writer Israel Gatien Ben Gurion university UNESCO Shakespeare Texas fringe eight years three hours
"ben gurion university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:54 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"In this pretty much encompasses ninety plus percent of all the sweet artificially sweetened products on the market that aspartame sucralose saccharin Neo tame advantage and sell fame K and these were shown to turn healthy bacteria. Get this into that in the digestive system toxic. It turns that it actually converts the healthy bacteria toxic bacteria, this from researchers at Ben Gurion university and Israel and also a technical university in Singapore. And they say that this is a shocker concentrations as small as one. One milligram per milliliter altered gut bacteria negatively, and of course, there's a lot more than one milligram in these artificially sweetened, you know, whether it's a beverage or food or Gummer, whatever, what do you think of this Randy? Well, we've known about this for quite some time these compounds these these artifices sweet news, David they're not they don't exist in the in the environment to be made by man before humans. There was no aspartame. There was no. Sucralose is chlorinated donated sugar, Honey and maple syrup and natural sweeteners dates. Yes. The problem is when you have a an organism as simple as a bacterium dividing is fast. That does equal. I can double itself every twenty minutes. It has to rely on on its genetics. That are much simpler than the genetics human being elephant, for example. And they're very easy to disrupt. So what's happening with these these xenobiotic compounds that didn't exist prior to man is they're having reactions with genetic. So the bacteria changing them in unpredictable ways. And sometimes you never know about it because the change is big enough to cause the bacteria die. Wow. When it when it's just the modification it goes on, and it can be it can be a bad situation. Like you like the talking about since you mentioned genetically changing the bacteria, genetically has changed. What about genetically modified foods? Do they influence the the intestinal flora in a negative way? Or is there has there been any research on that? You know, I know people are always afraid when you say GMO, and it's a complicated subject that the treated briefly. There are GMO derived organisms that are dangerous because the genes have been changed that have had multiple functions. And you don't know be you might be looking for one thing like probably the ability of a clamp grow in the desert better. And you might have changed the plants ability to make some talks, and you don't even know it. Generally, you gotta be very careful what GMO, but there are some things that are at an advantage. Okay. All right. Just wanted to check with you from an expert point of view on that. Now. Yeah. If you think you're eating genetically engineered asparagus, you'd better Google, the strain or where you got it from and find out more about it. Okay. All right now, let's get back to foods and talk about holiday meals at it occurred to me that holiday meals, they can be almost as bad as those of teenagers. The the diets of teenagers in other fast, food and soda and chips and candy even though. Those are not typical holiday foods, but they can be just as high in sugar and fat and. Dilatory compounds as as if we were eating fast food or just low quality food. So just because it's home-cooked. And and homemade it doesn't it doesn't mean that it's necessarily healthy. And we were talking we talked about that somewhat at length in the first hour, but let's talk about some of the ways again where people can make up for that or compensate for that. In the first hour, you were mentioning the fact that you can take ends delays, which is one of the most high-powered enzymes on the market digestive. Enzymes twelve different enzymes in there. That digest your protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, etc. Anything else? We can do. I think you mentioned probiotics to write to allay. The negate some of the dilatoriness effects of of foods, anti nutrients and and some over eating and eating the wrong combinations of foods things like that. Whether it's a holiday meal or whether you're just shifting the type of food. You eat. You're going to Japanese barbecue or a Brazilian barbecue. And you haven't eaten that kind of food. You can disrupt your biker bio, right, certainly eating forty six hundred calories at thanksgiving compared to normal two thousand like we talked about earlier can disrupt your microbial complex, a bacteria, and your one of the important things is to make sure that your enzyme activity is up to snuff and delays has a highlight pays content. I'll tell you why that's important in a minute. Why pieces the enzyme that digests fat and typically holiday meal has a lot of fat in it. Right. And and what happens then is the fat coats. Although the other nutrients that the different food groups carbohydrates get coated with fat. Proteins get coated with staff of fiber gets caught with that. And your whole slow your whole system slows down it's easy to digest all of these foods. So you need a multiple enzyme supplements that has a strong light pace concentration. We've got six hundred six thousand f IP units called French international protocol unit Vajpayee in each capsule, and tell us why Randy because people might you know, might be Greek to a lot of people when you're mentioning the technical aspect, but the average enzyme out there is lucky to have six hundred or one tenth as much tell us why nobody no company usually puts enough life as in there. It's it's the most expensive so Ryan greedy, and in as far as raw material ingredients in digestive enzyme, right? It's very expensive, and then it's sensitive. He put it in. Oral product sensitive stomach acid. Just like just like probiotics are. So you need to have protection from stomach acid as well. For the for the enzymes. One of our patents with with the sodium. Alginate? I see okay. Okay. Randy. We need to serious you here. But we need to take a break. We're way past time to take a break. And when we come back, we'll have much more information for digestive health here on our special edition of the program with biochemist and microbiologist Randy per up Ken talking about how you can stay safe and healthy through the holidays, or at least keep your Justice system.

Randy Ben Gurion university David Singapore Israel Google Ryan greedy Ken forty six hundred calories twenty minutes
"ben gurion university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:53 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"In this pretty much encompasses ninety plus percent of all the sweet artificially sweetened products on the market that aspartame sucralose saccharin Neo tame advantage and sell fame K and these were shown to turn healthy bacteria. Get this into that. In the digestive system toxic turns that it actually converts the healthy bacteria toxic bacteria, this from researchers at Ben Gurion university in Israel and also a technical university in Singapore. And they say that this is a shocker concentrations as small as one. Milligram per milliliter, altered gut bacteria negatively, and of course, there's a lot more than one milligram in these artificially sweetened, you know, whether it's a beverage or food or gum or whatever. What do you think of this Randy? Well, we've known about this for quite some time these compounds these these artificial sweeteners, David they're not they don't exist in the in the environment. They had to be made. By man other words before humans. There was no aspartame. There was no. Sucralose chlorinated donated sugar, Honey and maple syrup and natural sweeteners dates. Yes. The problem is when you have a an organism as simple as a bacterium dividing as fast that does equal. I can double itself every twenty minutes. It has to rely on on its genetics. That are much simpler than genetics and human being elephant, for example. And they're very easy to disrupt. So what's happening with these these xenobiotic compounds that didn't exist prior to man is they're having reactions with the genetic so the bacteria changing them unpredictable ways. And sometimes you never know about it because the change is big enough because the bacterium to die. When it when it's just the modification it goes on, and it can be it can be a bad situation. Like like talking about since you mentioned, genetically the changing, the bacteria, genetically has changed. What about genetically modified foods? Do they influence the the intestinal flora in a negative way? Or is there has there been any research on that, you know, I know? I know people are always afraid when you say GMO, and it's a complicated subject that the treated briefly. There are GMO derived organisms that are dangerous. Because genes have been changed that have had multiple functions. And you don't know you'll be looking for one thing like the ability of a plant to grow in the desert better. And you might have changed the plants ability to make some talks, and you don't even know it. Generally, you gotta be very careful what she MO. But there are some things that are at an advantage. Okay. All right. Just wanted to check with you from an expert point of view on that. Now getting. Yeah. If you think you're eating genetically engineered asparagus, you'd better Google, the strain or where you got it from find out more about it. Okay. All right. Let's get back to foods and talk about holiday meals at it occurred to me that holiday meals, they can be almost as bad as those of teenagers. The the diets of teenagers in other fast, food and soda and chips and candy even though. Those are not typical holiday foods, but they can be just as high in sugar and fat, and you know, deleterious compounds as as if we were eating fast food or just low quality food so just because it's home-cooked. And and homemade it doesn't it doesn't mean that it's necessarily healthy. And we were we talked about that somewhat at length in the first hour, but let's talk about some of the ways again where people can make up for that or compensate for that in the first hour, you were mentioning the fact that you can take ends delays, which is one of the most high-powered enzymes on the market digestive. Enzymes twelve different enzymes in there that digest your protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, etc. Anything else? We can do. I think you mentioned probiotics to right to allay. The negate some of the dilitariness effects of of fine foods, anti nutrients, and and some of over eating and eating the wrong combinations of foods things like that. Whether it's a holiday meal or whether you're just shifting the type of food. You eat you're going to a Japanese barbecue or Brazilian barbecue. And you haven't eaten that kind of food. You can disrupt your micro bio, right certainly eating forty six hundred calories at thanksgiving compared to normal two thousand like we talked about earlier can disrupt your microbial complex, a bacteria and your got. One of the important things is to make sure that your enzyme activity is up to snuff and Angeles has a highlight pays content. I'll tell you why that's important in a minute. Why pieces the enzyme that digests fat and typically holiday meal has a lot of fat in it. Right. And and what happens then is the fat coats, all of the other nutrients that the different food groups carbohydrates get coated with fat. Proteins get coated with staff of fiber gets coated with fat and your whole slow your whole system slows down its ability to digest all of these votes. So you need a multiple enzyme supplement that has a strong light pace concentration. We've got six hundred six thousand FIPS units called French international protocol units pace in each capsule, and tell us why Randy because people might you know, might be Greek to a lot of people when you're mentioning the technical aspect, but the average enzyme out there is lucky to have six hundred or one tenth as much tell us why nobody no company usually puts enough life as in there. It's it's the most expensive cereal Ryan greedy, and in as far as raw material ingredients in a digestive enzyme, right? It's very expensive and sensitive. He put it in. Oral product sensitive to stomach acid. Just like just like probiotics are. So you need to have protection from stomach acid as well for the for the enzymes of our patents with what the sodium alginate. I see. Okay. Okay. Randy. We need to stop you here. But we need to take a break. We're way past time to take a break. And when we come back, we'll have much more information for digestive health here on our special edition of the program with biochemist and microbiologist Randy pumpkin talking about how you can stay safe and healthy through the holidays, or at least keep.

Randy pumpkin Ben Gurion university David Singapore Israel Google Ryan greedy FIPS Angeles forty six hundred calories twenty minutes
"ben gurion university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on KGO 810

"Week and it was by a lot but we at, this, point it's difficult to tell exactly what they were able to, access? But you could go back. Into a forensic analysis of the different cameras. That are in different rooms around this palace sitting over the press conference we knew that. There was a a it showed us that that feud that happened, beforehand with a reporter we could watch it. So that camera was, linked right but the the degree to which they were you know close to that camera that's you. Know one question really. There's a lot of opportunity for intelligence collection going, on in the. Sort of satellite meetings that are happening around the meeting so even if? You can't get into because presumably you would imagine that the translators and everybody else are supposed. To go in without their phones we have absolutely no idea? Whether or not letting Putin recorded the conversation or his, translator did but it's supposed to not be, recorded but on t. outside of that. You've got meetings with John Bolton you've got meetings with national Security Council people You've got a Russian meetings their. Side and they're discussing what, happened as soon as the summit actually concludes and in the. Run-up to it so there's going to be a lot of very important discussion about what just happened outside the civic room that offers potentially a. Huge opportunity for intelligence collection we don't. Know what devices are in those rooms but this is a secure, facility that means potentially. Monitored and that means potentially, insecure? That's just the irony of this age you, have a, quote in your article. About, this from, Michael Pillsbury director. Of the center on Chinese strategy at the Hudson institute quote we have made a good start toward a new strategy toward. China but we may still be underestimating, the problem China's resistance to change now it seems to me a good start would be to publicize this. Patrick I don't remember this winding up on the front pages of any newspaper that the Chinese, hacked Helsinki well and but here's the, thing this really speaks to the, huge difference in the way China. Collects information and then uses it compared, to Russia Russia of course after expo trading information even have relatively small amount the big difference between our conversation about them pre two thousand. Sixteen and post two thousand sixteen it's the same, conversation people in Europe or having pre and post compromise they take information they publicize. It they use it for manipulation they. Use it for influence causes a big splash causes a lot of argument the Chinese do not do this. Information they exfiltrated they keep, it goes into a larger strategy they use it in a way, that's much less conspicuous in public to align with goals that reach. Out to twenty thirty so the reason we don't talk about Chinese malicious cyber. Activity in the same ways because they don't have a policy or strategy of disruption they have a policy, and strategy of gradual domination. We turn to the future and hacking or malware or bad actors and you identify at Ben Gurion university In Israel a team that's working on. An antivirus program but this antivirus program, is, a robot, is a how to describe this well yes it's. A unsolvable of different machine learning approaches so basically that means a whole bunch of very little. Tiny a is not some sort of strange how like thing but little. Tiny almost mechanical. Is all of. Them sort of running together. And what they did is they took a bunch of. Militias MLS huge data, set of three three thousand plus some. Emails many of them malicious and many of them not. So that you can train the ensemble to recognize good from bad and what they did is they found all of these. Characteristics that exist in militias Email that all of these very fancy expensive name brands cybersecurity companies have overlooked because these cyber security companies look. For these specific things a little bit of malware. In this field it's an attachment that's going to have some buggy, software we know that the signature of The buggy software, so we find it this way but there's, a whole lot of weird similarities among bad Email that you wouldn't pick. Up, if, you were just a virus analyst software program. And it could have to do with whether or not the. The link in the Email actually goes to the page, that it seems, to be going to it could have to do with..

China John Bolton reporter Michael Pillsbury Hudson institute Europe Putin Russia Ben Gurion university analyst national Security Council Israel Patrick director
"ben gurion university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They appear to be able to store this information over time and even reliably draw complex associations between them that's a lot of computing power but it doesn't stop all the research goes further to suggest that plants actually capable of sharing this information with each other professor arielle nova plant ski researches how punts do these things at the ben gurion university of the negev desert in southern israel his lab has done fascinating experiments which are that punts communicate or perhaps more eavesdrop in ways that i would not have believed like in the game was broken phone if you remember as yup you whisper something into europe your neighbor and the neighbor has to whisper it did years of it's all neighbor cetera et cetera chinese virtually we asked the plan can you play a good game of broken phone now china imagine a scientific experiment they did they took plants they would use the roots to to each and they potted them up in a way that meant that each plant had one route in one part and the other route in a next part and this was shared by the first root of the next punt and so on are you with me picture arro of children holding hands the first hand of the first child won't have anyone else to hold onto but the next one does and so on creating an unbroken chain of plants connected by their roots up to five months long then what scientists did is they expose the first root of the first plant to drought but they did water all the other plants so the question was dupont's play chinese whispers and pass the message on about drought down the line even though only the first route was exposed to it and in fact they do we have shown for the first time this information is noble in past the immediate neighbor but it can be relayed like an domino effect or like in the case of a broken fallen game to more and more neighbors and the scientists could measure that this message was communicated as the recipient plants close the pores in their leaves reduce water loss exactly as thirsty plans to even though they were not subjected to drought but is this information retained.

ben gurion university negev desert israel dupont professor arielle nova europe china five months
"ben gurion university" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The tel aviv review hello and welcome to the tele review the program dedicated to books and ideas and israel not assailing this older brought to you by the van near jerusalem institute which permits humanistic democratic and liberal values in the social discourse in israel i am your hosts cannot happen and i narco hostess dahlia shenlin every week we'll be talking about as get upset books in research and fascinating things that we think are important our guest today is a historian of the modern middle east at ben gurion university of the negative and the keep us in college in tel aviv her name is lee at mageed alana and we'll be talking today about a paper she recently presented at the van their jerusalem institute about the jewish bourgeoisie and interwar egypt fascinating yet somewhat under research episode in both middle eastern and jewish history the at mcgeechan hello welcome to the show thank you for having me tell us about the jewish community of egypt you're looking at this community between the mid 19th and the mid 20th century and you describe the sort of a change of kind of their position in egyptian society from the early are phase when they were this sort of organic small mill at community to a really larger and kind of bourgeois society that stood out in other ways from egyptian society and distinguish itself who is this community and why did they make that change while it was a part of the general egyptian society even when it was small i was a part of the egyptian society in when he grew it was a result of some consensus that were unique to egypt at the time and egypt is going through drastic changes throughout the 19th century into the 20th century and one of them is growing my immigration into egypt of not only of jews bed of italians and multis and greeks and uh people from around the mediterranean and the ottoman empire so the jews chart getting in growing numbers into egypt from the eighteen 40s following an invitation in circumstances that change and and benefited nonmuslim populations an invitation and invitation by the.

jerusalem institute israel ben gurion university mageed alana egypt mediterranean van their jerusalem institute mill
"ben gurion university" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on Unorthodox

"And that kristen minds rates back oh my gosh at tamiko and it's a miracle wasn't sure you would even remember mi old friend and tammie cohen says of course i remember you i mean six gained was a long time ago but still smiley face well good hayward gifted a challenge program together as i recall and so now they're back in touch of the oil found an echo of only someone could find nimrod wiesel pretty close i think i think we're close mazal tov stephanie have you will mazal tov this first night of hannuka i have two the first is for carry brody a guest on the show she's the founder of emma's torch and she was featured in the new york times just about the graduation program that is the culinary institute for refugees issue is featured in the new york times about amtrak met the graduation ceremony that had just that it just happens over snaps for her herring roe and a big golden mas attempt to rachel brosnahan who stars in the marvellous mrs maes all and she just got nominated for a golden globe for best actress in a television series musical or comedy yeah and that show i mean love that yo she in katherine han both nominated for portrayal of a jew by it category i should be a category oscar for best pitcher drew we're going to ask her season later an orthodox oscars that that would be the only kellyanne asked lee l my mazal tov is to dr yard kc he from ben gurion university so dr qatari developed a an online platform a multi it's called the muka multi something learning gathering course.

kristen tammie cohen hayward nimrod wiesel stephanie brody founder emma new york times mrs maes katherine han amtrak rachel brosnahan lee ben gurion university
"ben gurion university" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ben gurion university" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Tel aviv review hello and welcome to the tel aviv review the program dedicated to the world the thought i had to debate brought to you by the van miert tourism institute which promotes humanistic democratic nibiru values in the social discourse in his israel i'm your host cannot happen and this interview has been recorded on the premises of the annual conference of the association for israel studies at brandeis university my guest today is a lecturer at ben gurion university's institute for the study of israel and zionism and the author of a new book entitled revoking citizenship expatriation in america from the colonialera to the war on terror it was recently published by neocon events press to happen herzog hello and welcome to the tentative review they'll the morning so most people are under the impression that in a democracy fleeced citizenship is in in the early in the ball right other rome right more or less they're not wrong but on the other hand most democracies also have laws that khin allowed to stay to take fitted in ship i mean usually those immigrants or naturalized citizens or more risk than uh native born citizens but also sometimes native born should also can lose citizenship and in this book i looked specifically on the united states and which this writes this idea of citizenship it is even stronger but even in the united states thousands or hundreds of salvan sexually hard to note the numbers of citizens were stripped of their civil rights but it has to be under very specific circumstances might them in the the provisions it's it's it's kind of an extreme case and the provision of exceptional it depends on which time what perspective you look at for example a sham off.

van miert tourism institute israel lecturer ben gurion university america united states civil rights brandeis university herzog rome khin