3 Burst results for "Ben Briley"

"ben briley" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

13:19 min | 1 year ago

"ben briley" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"Hello and welcome to Monaco on culture rubs off Sunning himself in Mexico so today you've got me Ben Briley running the show for topic up for discussion today live cover up of sex abuse in the French Catholic Church the film focuses on a group of men all of whose lives have in some way being affected by abuse at the ends of a senior member of the church deftly balancing heavy emotions with the frustrating complexities of the French legal process. It's certainly a challenging case bring to the screen not least because the real life story is very much still in Martian by the grace of God premed at the Berlin Film Festival where it took the you re Grand Prix prize and has been well received by critics thought what do our guests think joining me in the studio to discuss it today carrying Christina Vich and Tena Brody now there's.

French Catholic Church Ben Briley Berlin Film Festival Tena Brody Christina Vich Grand Prix Mexico
"ben briley" Discussed on Unspooled

Unspooled

09:00 min | 2 years ago

"ben briley" Discussed on Unspooled

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Code unspoiled for twenty dollars off your purchase. Okay. We have somebody awesome right now in the studio sitting here. Her name is Liz Hannah, you know, her. She wrote the film the post which lives in my very first question was going to blurt into it. The post has been called like a prequel to all the president's men. Were you thinking about that? When you were writing the script for sure all the president's men was a very important filmed for me when I was growing up. It was you know, my parents were baby boomers, they really believed in the ideals of freedom of speech freedom of the press. You know, they were huge Bobby Kennedy fans, and I was raised watching these types of films in watching these reading these types of books all the president's men is a thriller. It's it's a film that takes something that could be quite dull given it's a paper chase. But still it's a lot of it is them trying to write something and not having to ride and trying to track down a story and not having all these. Ends and the pace of it. And the intrigue of it and the character development that's in there. I mean, I can spend two hours talking about Ben bradlee alone. And he's in I think eighteen minutes of the movie. So it was a huge influence for me, structurally when writing it. And and at the same time, you know, we don't really make movies like that anymore. We don't make these seventies political thrillers, and I was dying to see one. And so I tried to write one. That's where it kinda all started. Well, is it good or bad for your creativity to watch all the president's men often as you're doing it or have this kind of vague presents Mentone lingers over you? But not be thinking about specifics, or I definitely wall. I was developing the strip script and structuring it, and I do with everything I do I have sort of a a bible of ten movies or television shows that are super influential to the style of what I'm writing, and that could be there's a character in there that I think is really accurate to the time. Or is a really interesting character that I want to try and figure out how they did their arc. It could be tone of the movie could be structured any of these things. So I sort of have these ten movies, and I kind of religiously watch them while I'm breaking the movie down or even while I'm doing the horrible like monotony of you sit on the couch and stare at a wall for ten hours trying to figure out why in God's name, you decided to write a movie about the subject, and then once I start writing I put them away. Like, I don't watch them. I don't think about them unless I get stuck. If I'm stuck on something, then I'll go back to it in all the president's men, Katharine Graham, who's a focus if you're a movie played by Meryl Streep know, she's this off camera quip where you just hear voices here. Torney General John Mitchell say Takeda Graham, she's gonna get her tit caught in a big fat wringer if that's published. What was she doing during this time in real life? That wasn't in the film. She was taking home those boxes of the articles and the research every night and reading them she was super involved with Ben and talking about what they were going to publish what they weren't going to publish. I mean, she was very actively involved. I wouldn't say as far as I understand it. I wouldn't say she was as involved as she was in the Pentagon papers. And that was one of the reasons that was I really wanted to write the post was because it was about the formation of this team Watergate and the publishing of, you know, all of the tapes and everything that happened because of the break in wouldn't have happened had it not been for the relationship that Katharine Graham, Ben bradlee were able to solidify during the Pentagon papers. And so. So she having said that she was very involved in actually she talks about in her book and her memoir, she talks about how peculiar had wanted her to be in her personally about character for her to be in the movie, and she was really nervous about it. Then eventually, she wasn't not obviously a character in the film. And that she always felt sort of sad that she hadn't been depicted or haven't been a part of it because she really was such an important part of the post life. But at the same time in a very k Graham way was like, well, I just wasn't important enough to show on screen, and no one would have been good at playing her like at the moment in nineteen seventy six. I mean every part back then went to Faye. Dunaway. But she's like probably like twenty years to that point Katherine Hepburn. Always. I mean, if if if that is an option that one's all I mean, look if you if you're talking about Meryl Streep, and you don't have Meryl Streep in nineteen Seventy-six you go to Katherine Hepburn. Well, how does that like parallel Jason Robards Ben Briley in the Tom Hanks, but Bren badly. I mean, I think definitely when Tom Hanks signed on. And when he was doing Ben bradlee, I think he he was doing his own Ben bradlee and very much. We wanted to differentiate who this guy was and you know, Bradley is was as a human little gruff at a little a little bit edge to him endearing Griffin edge. But and that's the thing that obviously Robarts has you know, reading the phone book. And I think people don't often realize that Tom Hanks has has well one of my favorite performances of his is league of their own where he's sort of this edgy alcoholic reformed. Baseball player who, you know, one of my favorite lines from the movie is like there are dozens of people waiting for you to play. And it says everything you need to know about what this guy thinks that these women, and what do you think of this and? And I think Hanks's just so incredible in it. And this was kind of an opportunity for him to do that side, again is to be a little edgy and a little graph. And I think also, you know, accurate to Bradley at the time the the real difference between the post Brent, Ben bradlee, and the all the president's men. Ben bradlee is he was completely insecure. They didn't have a like stand on when they were doing the post. They didn't have the backbone of were one of the best papers in the United States. They were like the second best paper in Washington DC, regardless of the United States. So by the time Watergate happened they were Dow competing with the New York Times. So it's a little more of an assured. Ben bradlee depiction watching all the president's men we have years ago and now having the post to watch and then watch all the president's men. It makes you more aware that this whole office building is really like a bunch of matches ready to go off that they've been through this trauma. You know this tension. And this isn't their first rodeo that makes it harder for them or more confident. But well, I think it's also made all the younger reporters more hungry 'cause they were like we know what we can do. And we know we have a publisher and an executive editor who are backing us who are going to back the real stories to think is one of the best parts of all the president's men. And it's so accurate to journalism, which is you don't have it. You don't have the store. You don't have a story. And it's interesting because kind of the villain in a lot of ways of the movie is Ben bradlee because he's the one that's the guy saying, you're not I'm not gonna publish this. You're not ready yet. And I think that is extraordinarily accurate. Not only who've been Bradley was. But also to what this situation is like, which is you're under the microscope. Now, like the post is on they can't publish anything. That's not accurate. That's not true and them being able to go toe

Ben bradlee president Meryl Streep Bradley Katharine Graham Katherine Hepburn Tom Hanks Bobby Kennedy United States Pentagon Baseball Liz Hannah Dow New York Times Washington Dunaway Jason Robards Robarts
"ben briley" Discussed on Unspooled

Unspooled

13:25 min | 2 years ago

"ben briley" Discussed on Unspooled

"I want to count you out anyway, fracturing dot com slash. This story reminds me so much of basically like the George Clooney arc own the nineties. Right. You know, you have this guy Robert Redford, huge star coming on just as massive string of hits still trying to make sure he had shed the pretty boy image it already shut it. But I think he just couldn't help make sure what it was gone like forevermore. And so he wants to do this very serious film. I think in a way to prove that he is a very serious, man. And he wanted he wanted it to be like black and white. He wanted it to be documentary almost he wanted to not be in it like you're saying he wanted to basically do what George Clooney did ally in the nineties like took mysteriously, which I was thinking like as I was driving to the studio wind did that even start that like are actors are serious actors were like determined to be taken extra seriously Clint becoming a director. It'll even look at Jan Fonda. I mean like, you have all these amazing actors, and I can talk about it from my experience too. Being an amazing actor, but just from being in this business. Like, you feel like you have this duty to get out where you feel like there is inequality or there is something that needs to be shared, and I feel like, you know, this is a time in in the seventies. Where people were feeling that. It was their duty to tell stories that exposed things that they were passionate about whether it was, you know, the world of mental health are was the world of investigative journalism. These stories were not the stories that we're being told to when you have power, can you tell a more persuasive story. And I think that that's all you hope for is like we were talking about this for recorded, the podcasting. Somebody like Jordan Peele makes these two movies. Once you become that successful. They make one hundred million dollars. Now, you can make whatever he wants. And you can make whatever you want. Then this become higher. You can't make like, you know, dude, where's my car to? Okay. But like you didn't have Clark Gable? Being like now, I must tell my story or even the people. Would you think that the times like the sixties and seventies bread a different type of actor than the forties and the thirties? Right. I mean, you did have the people in the forties or like I fought in the war. And I'm going to tell you my World War Two story. And it's gonna be a gritty, you know, like, you know, there's a there's a patriotism that was definitely an influence and all those films, you know, about, you know, the Jimmy Stewart like, you know, Mr. deeds goes to Washington that idea like it was a different kind of don't telling this story now. Yeah. But it wasn't like Jimmy surfing like and I must directed. I want to make okay, I am like not just Jimmy Stewart. Lovely handsome rubbery face. Right. I'm Jimmy Stewart autour. Yeah. And I wonder if maybe it's just, you know, the people like Warren Beatty, you know, getting forward to going like we can do this. And you know, I think a lot of these big marquee actors once they've been onset. You know, you're so hands on. I mean, Robert Redford really says that he wrote the script with you know, pack, you'll like the another script attended in after the the. Bernstein, nor Ephron script. And you know, this is again by William Goldman like this is trash they hole up from month, Redford impact, and they rewrite it, and they say that about ten percent of the script remains from William Goldman. But then some researchers have gone back and looked at the original scripts and there it's roughly the same verse like who gets credit. I read I read the original this is basically the movie why are they saying they only kept ten percent of. I think those people get so possessive where they are like I changed to lines. And that he no I rewrote the scene. It's like well. No you, and you can't change the script. It's true. It's a true film. There's other outcome. What is definite is that Goldman was miserable. Gobind said after the fact like if you like if you would ask me what I would change if I'd had my whole movie life to live over I would've ever I would've written exactly the screenplays. I have written only I wouldn't have come near all the president's men. It was not. A happy experience. He is a, you know, a fiction writer who was to interpret these events, and I think Redford one at something very specific. It's it's hard because you have a, you know, then just writing yourself, and that's what I think he wanted to do. I think he wanted to have that power to write it himself. Was mad that Goldman didn't approach it like journalist that he wanted Goldman to do what he was doing. Which is like go to the offices look through the trash cans in golden was like I've writing what I'm reading in this book, and he was like, no like be a gumshoe man like pursue this the way that I with this kind of manic intensity that Redford was putting into it. But what I think is fair is that Redford would then tell stories like. Yeah. Just because he met these guys they randomly sent him a copy of the book. And then he thought he was writing the script. And you're like that seems like a lot of coincidences that. But it sounds a little bit like a my ex girlfriend. She's so obsessed with me, really, really. But it's the ego of the lead in this era. We're talking about Stallone. Remembering rocky? He's like, oh, yeah. I, you know, I choreographed all the fight scenes. I wrote the script, you know. It's like this. I think there is an ego here in the seventies. It's kind of foreshadowing the era of the eighties greed, and that kind of energy because I think it's. It it feels like that. I don't think you feel that anymore. I don't think that you feel the autres you get now are a little bit more humble that makes pretending to be humble, I would buy that ever. What I think is running about all of this is it this is a movie that celebrates the opposite of that the guys who don't need to be stars. Right. Weren't trying to be stars. And then the fact that they became stars win. All of this news, finally broke when people finally paid attention to them was so weird. I think that's one of the things that bonded Dustin Hoffman to Carl Bernstein. He's like, I know what it's like to be a full grown adult and suddenly be really famous like it's strange when you didn't prepare for this your entire life. And yet you're like in the scenes like everything that's honored. Here is just people who are listening people who are trying to pay attention for what matters to them. They're like, they're empathetic isn't the right word, but the kind of acting that rubber Redford dozen this movie, I think is so subtle here. Let's listen to the scene, and then just sort of analyze it for a second. This is difficult for me. I'm caught in the middle of something. And I don't know why I do think it could be. I deal with a lot of important people people who work for the committee. Hello for the committee. The committee reelect the president. You see I raised that money in cash, and I I have a winner pool in Florida Miami. Poker return. And then I didn't want to carry all that cash around. You can understand that. Of course. So I had it exchange for the cashier's check. And how do you think you'd got into Barker's account is everything in there? I love because it's so subtle you hear him taking information as we haven't heard it for the first time, you know, kind of press for facts it here like this urgency in his voice, but it's not overdone. It's not like what Boca Raton, you know. He kind of quietly like he doesn't want to spook the guy. And then you hear him use just enough. Let kind of buddy buddy, John like, oh, of course, you know, put a soft tone in his voice, and he's just standing still sitting still it's a close up of a man out of phone in a voice on the other line. And there's just all these shades to it that I find really really intelligently done. It goes back to I think pack, you're who has this very deft hand, he creates a narrative that feels real and puts a pace to it. There's a rhythm to this movie. There's a there's a style and tone to this movie that is so like perfectly walked no seen feels to blown out or over exposed to children now. I'm watching real journalists. And I think that that that's a bold move in a time where again going back to these movies that we're talking about taxi driver mash one flew over the cuckoo's nest. You know, rocky like there is a this is a time for bigger films. And you view this film like that. And I think when I watched the first I can't wait going to get in this movie, and it's going to be like deep throat running over here doing all this stuff, and it, and it just not into simply go away from that is really impressive. I mean from director stamp to stand then that line. Yeah. I mean, like what Disney Robarts examples said like watching all of these scenes happen, which he had to watch a lot of them have because in so many of the scenes they use it like crazy, deep focus. We can see all the way to the back of the office even on the days when like Jason Robards didn't have to do that much being Ben Briley being the head of all of this. He's had to be onset somewhere like in the back in his office reading books. Looking busy. Just in case. You could see him mean very much like the office TV show. We're in the background. Exactly. Just the film had this texture of reality. That was so important every. Onset feel like that thing where it's again, this director going we need all of this. Do you really need it? I don't know. I don't know. Sometimes like I like if he wasn't in the background. Would you care? I don't know. I don't think you would. I mean, you're probably right. Like there is this limit where you're almost doing it more for just like the story in the PR circles, circling oh, man. Let me tell you about the film. We just did. You know, we copied the trash cans, and we had Jason Robards doing origami in the background for two months. Right. It's it's sort of all this anecdotes. We'll stuff like it was you can't not like it because it's all real. If you don't like it. It means that you don't like the truth because you don't like that line. They actually said it, and it's like one of those things where. It's almost protective. You know? I think but again, this is a good movie. It's just sort of like, I it reeks of that. It reeks of like a heavy hand of control and from all sides. I mean, you're talking about Jason Robards. I mean, Ben bradlee didn't want Jason Robards to play him because he didn't like the way that he walked around the newsroom when he came to visit. He's like nine think this guy gets me. And everyone's laying in on who they are. And what they want to be. And it's like a very funny thing it is at the end of the day of film. You know, what are the things that Ben bradlee said to have a red for 'cause he was really nervous about this. I mean, it was so hard to get the post prove you know, that certain times they're like alyssa's make it about a fake paper radio that did this story that we all know we're talking about here. We all know who it is. But, but like pack was so committed realism and so's read for they're like, we can't just sort of bunt Hoffman was on team Bunce, Ed Redford resigned, but in their conversations, they're having Bradley like other things have been Bradley said to rhetoric is like just remember pal that you go. Off and ride a horse or jump in the sack with some good looking woman in your next film. But I am forever and asshole if they had gotten this wrong, but that said, we Robards was onset one of the things he said about the difference in acting style between Robert Redford and doesn't Hoffman is he said Dustin Hoffman acts with his whole body Moore Redford acts with his fingertips in that to him was a greater compliment. He said Redford had class. Maybe it's the way it's edited in. Maybe you know, a lot of the times you see something on set in the way, it's kind of filtered through and is different. But I I don't feel that Hoffman is showy in this movie. Do you feel like he is well pack Hewlett said like one of his quotes is about about being unless this was that he had never seen so many experienced professionals overacting in all of his life. I think he had a hard time reigning in Hoffman, right and keeping him keeping him normal. Because Hoffman is I think I think often show even when he's not show like rice. He's so Scholley Lang. In the graduate, right? He's got the that kind of Al Pacino bug. You can't kind of take it out like me. So again going back. We all roads lead back to pack ya for being able to rain vis ship in because under the handsome ship right there. Oh, yeah. I don't then you wouldn't rain ship. So I don't know rain, this horse rain this horse in because I do think this is one of those moments where I don't think pack Hewlett gets enough credit for being a great director. And this is where the best director shine of such a fan of Michael Showalter. And as a director, I think what do you do with my name is Doris, and what he did with the big sick is so subtle. But so effective. He kind of lets everyone rise to the service without showing you like AM behind the camera. And that's a real art of an an a really interesting director talking about Jason Robards. I wanna play like a thing that I feel like is the most I dunno triumphant moment or to me in the movie. It's it's the moment. I remember the most. And and I think it it's about like this level of realistic triumphant another movie, it might have been bigger, but ticklish to this. You know, once when I was reporting Lyndon Johnson, stop guy gaming the word. Looking for a successor, forget your Hoover. I wrote it in the day, it appeared Johnson held a press conference and the point is Hoover head of the FBI for life. When he was done turned to his top guy in the president said call Ben bradlee and tell them fuck you. L? Everybody said you did it ban. You screwed up. You stuck us with Hoover forever? I screwed up. I wasn't wrong.

Robert Redford Jason Robards director Dustin Hoffman Ben bradlee William Goldman president Jimmy Stewart George Clooney Jordan Peele Carl Bernstein Hewlett Redford Jan Fonda Clark Gable Warren Beatty Lyndon Johnson Boca Raton Clint FBI