20 Burst results for "Ben Bradford"

Some ways to keep the power on in Californias fire season

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Some ways to keep the power on in Californias fire season

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by aqua the open source digital experience company brands often struggle to find a comprehensive solution to power their DRUBEL websites and applications aqueous Asturian of how does the rest of the system interconnect if everybody has their own rooftop solar array for instance that creates new challenges for out more of these alternatives yet the key word there is more so we can roll out this technology right now but there's sort of Heck demystifying the digital economy I'm Amy Scott in for Molly would the electric grid that we already have the legacy one that we all rely on in addition to that one reason that utilities often look at these kinds of distributed generation as even entire communities or the other thing that we've seen develop is what we typically refer to as rooftop solar which is basically solar arrays and now often with storage part of planned blackouts aimed at reducing the risk of wildfires the state's largest utility Pacific gas and electric has been blamed for sparking previous deadly fire last week more than seven hundred thousand people and businesses in northern California lost power lose power was cut off and even the utility itself marketplace's Ben Bradford has covered California wildfires in their aftermath extensively he said is there are alternatives that could prevent this kind of disruption in the future two options are microbes which are instead of having this kind of vast so the company cut power to areas it's is most vulnerable during a period of dry windy weather the overall effort was chaotic. According to P tax compliance dun-rite better tech change the wildfire scenario in California from American public media this is marketplace to upkeep that transmission system that the rest of us rely on then Bradford is a reporter at marketplace air that could be invested in these kinds of alternatives well you know the rooftop solar industry and some environmental groups they have goals that are anywhere from realistic but we're already seeing companies market off of this opportunity I got a press release from a rooftop solar company almost as soon as the first power shut offs were announced this or their own gas their own storage to be able to power either you know starting off with where we are right now critical functions like fire stations and hospitals and eventually Brett is because the more people that have a rooftop solar array and aren't paying for their electricity from the utility or aren't paying as much the less money there is couldn't be easier and they have experts in fifteen countries around the world to help as you grow learn more at Avi A. L. A. R. A. Dot Com Slash Tech avalon ray of electricity connections and power generation that a from miles away their communities that have their own generation our own solar that can go onto people's homes and provide power to them directly well all this seems like a potentially huge business opportunity I mean how much money are we talking about here. SIMPLIFIES SALES TAX WITH REAL TIME TAX RATE CALCULATIONS AUTOMATIC RETURN Filing Avalanche software seamlessly integrates with your accounting e commerce and point of sales systems so up to I would say about a quarter of the entire generation in California technically there are reports that California could power just every home and business that had the right kind of roof for it and write access to Sun that as much as seventy five percent of the state could be powered by them. I mean that's probably not and now for some related links another reason rooftop solar panels aren't a perfect solution they don't necessarily work during a blackout

California Ben Bradford Amy Scott Avalanche Software Reporter Brett Avi A. L. A. R. Molly Seventy Five Percent
"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

"And as senior editor Bloomberg document manufacturing most recently shot thanks a lot appreciate some extra. there's all all wrapped up in this California changed our workers are treated as contractors or actual employees I mean yes for the company sure it'll be more expensive and if you're a pure play gig economy company like uber or left it's a real business model challenge but there are changes coming for workers to how they get scheduled and how much they're paid Ben Bradford left the office one last time to get another perspective Oscar R. V.'s you has eight conflicted relationship with over and left I find it outside the LA Grande hotel in a shiny black suburban he's driven independently for years he says uber and lift her his business when they were not here our visit was totally different I had a lot of clients but now Vesey drives some independently and other times turns on the apps even though he says they don't pay much they give us nothing man actually driving this car all I get is a gas mining still our visa expresses the same concerns I heard from people I spoke with earlier about becoming an employee under California's new law I don't want to be an employee because I don't want to.

California Ben Bradford Oscar R. V. LA Grande hotel Vesey senior editor Bloomberg
"ben bradford" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"That's about where agreement in Washington ends in New York. I'm Sabrina short introduced Brancaccio, the house and the Senate agree. They want to send aid to the US, Mexico border were temporary shelters are overwhelmed. But they differ on the details two competing bills will have to be reconciled before any money goes out the door for the current debate is about triage. It's about emergency funding. There is a longer term approach to limiting immigration surges, according to a new report, send aid abroad, improve economic conditions abroad. Marketplace's Ben Bradford reports to see this principle in action look to Mexico migration from Mexico has dropped dramatically, and that's a direct result of the improvement of economic conditions, Monaco bowl at the Peterson institute for international economics says eight countries economics, even more than its crime rate indicates, whether people will attempt the uncertain, journey to the US, these peop-. Don't leave because they want to they leave because they have to a report from the Peterson institute this month finds Honduras and Guatemala, and I'll Salvador where US migration has surged have half or less the per capita GDP of Mexico. It says international aid could help Michael Clements at the center for global development says there's a faster way to juice. Those countries economies paradoxically, it's to allow a freer flow of people and goods. There's no Marshall plan for Central America that's going to transform those economies with aid, but greater market links would be successful, but he says, even in a best case scenario, it will likely be more than a decade before these countries have strong enough economies that migration slows. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. The past few decades presidents have avoided criticizing America's central bankers at the Federal Reserve. The President Trump has broken that pattern for months, and he's gotten especially aggressive, even mocking this week. He's complained. Again that fed chair j pow hasn't been lowering interest rates. And he said Powell is quote, trying to prove how Tuffy is by not cutting sooner in its own way, the fed has responded Powell emphasized, the importance of keeping fed policy, independent from politics in his speech Tuesday, Diane Swonk is chief economist at the tax and advisory from grant Thornton joins us. Good morning. Good morning. Federal Reserve member seemed to be making a lot of public appearances this summer. I mean, it's usually kind of quiet this time of year. Do you think they are responding to the president in some way, in many ways, they're responding to the president, one, because the president's actions have resulted in weaker growth, and they're now preparing to cut rates over the summer in order to sort of act as an insurance policy against a recession down the road that reaction and delineating between the fed reacting to the president's actions, not as bullying is hard line for people to understand. And I think also part of the reason you're seeing so many of them talk is they're talking about why they're doing what they're doing. Why is it so important? Why is it so important for the fed to explain that it is lowering rates because it thinks it needs to a not because the president has told it to the Fed's credibility insane what it's going to do. And then act on it is one of its most powerful tools and the more the president chips. Away that credibility that the fed can do what it says it's going to do when it needs to do it means that it won't have those tools later on. And one of the things I worry most about, is that undermining that credibility means when we need the fed, most and the economy actually slips into a recession, they won't have all the tools that they need to counter it. So it's really short sighted for the administration to go after the fed in this manner. Wonk is chief economist at the tax and advisory firm grant Thornton, thanks very much ink. You..

Federal Reserve president Central America Mexico chief economist Ben Bradford Michael Clements grant Thornton Peterson institute Senate US Trump Sabrina Washington Powell Brancaccio New York Honduras
"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

"They footsie index in London is down a half a percent. US stock index futures are also down the SNP one is down two tenths percent. The NASDAQ futures down seven tenths percent. Crude oil prices are down slightly today after skyrocketing yesterday when tankers were attacked with explosives near the strait of Hormuz the New York crude prices near fifty two dollars a barrel down three tenths percent. Now the crew here at marketplace is about to do you a favour, listen to this eighty percent of people who ask their credit card company for a better interest rate in the last year, got a better rate this from a new survey from an outfit, called compare cards, just ask, but few do as marketplace's Ben Bradford reports US credit card debt is near an all time high. So lower interest rates could save a lot of consumers money. But in the compare card survey, only one in five cardholders had asked people dramatically underestimate the power of the ask. Stanford business professor, Margaret Neil teaches negotiation so many people assume that most folks will say, no, when in reality, most folks say, yes, not only were card companies willing to lower rates. They also waved fees and raised credit limits. When customers asked Matt Scholtz compare cards says the card issuers have a business incentive to say, yes, it's about getting you to stick around and if waving an annual fee for a year or increasing your credit limit or lowering your APR a bit will get you to stick around. There's a good chance that they may do that Schultz says, cardholders can better their chances, if they come to the negotiation with another card offer for a lower rate and the ask their current card to match it. I'm Brad for marketplace. We can have grand.

US Matt Scholtz London Schultz Ben Bradford Margaret Neil New York Stanford professor fifty two dollars eighty percent
"ben bradford" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Many experts keep talking, boom, and near full employment. But there've been a lot of layoffs in recent weeks. I'm David Brancaccio. There's been a new warning sign about the US labor market, the outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas today, reported the number of layoff announcements by private companies rose forty six percent april-to-may tomorrow. It's the official jobs report for may and just back from gathering a Federal Reserve officials were supposed to stay on top of these things is our Thursday. Economist Diane Swonk chief economist at the tax advisory firm grant Thornton. Good morning. Good morning. So the Federal Reserve had this big multiday meeting out your way in Chicago to listen to outside economists you were able to get in there a bit. I was at the conference. There is an uneasy of walking on eggshells, and you really felt it in fact, fed chair, Jay Powell actually signalled that the fed was willing to do whatever necessary in a trade war to stabilize the uncertainty were feeling. Right now because of escalating trade tensions. Connected to this yesterday. We got this private sector survey of payrolls from ADP and it was astonishingly week. Tomorrow's the official jobs report. Do you think we're gonna see an echo of yesterday's report tomorrow? The underlying trend is you're slowing payroll growth. But there's a wild card out there. And that's hiring for the census, usually you see a spike in that may month the year prior to the census censorship, they staff up to open all their sensors offices, and that could be a real wild card throwing the number well over two hundred thousand but it doesn't change the underlying story, which is that we do expect payroll growth to slow. All right. Diane Swonk the chief economist at grant Thornton. Thank you so much. Thank you. When it comes to healthcare in America. The following is pretty big as of today, the nine million veterans who receive medical care through the department of veterans affairs, hospitals have new options to see outside non VA doctors lawmakers passed the changes last year to lower waiting times. But there are worries about unintended. Consequences. Marketplace's Ben Bradford reports veterans can visit outside physicians if they live more than a half hour from VA, doctor or can't get an appointment within twenty days, that's down from thirty air force veteran, Benjamin Krause hopes he'll qualify, I believe in having a choice, and as it relates to picking who touches me, who makes decisions about the type of needs that I have related to my health. Krause, also describes a trust issue. The VA's had a series of high-profile scandals, including over long waits, but Terry Topalian researcher at rand offers this, surprising fact, about VA healthcare, most often the studies are finding that the VA outperforms the non VA sector, the private sector, especially mental health care says, Heather Kelly at the American psychological association. She says outsourcing care could weaken, the VA services starting to pull apart that integrated care network, that have dramatic effects and some of them, unintended. The VA says it doesn't expect a surge of new takers for private care, despite the huge expansion in access. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. Renault stock is down more than five percent in Paris, after Fiat Chrysler, pulled out of the merger talks. It had instigated Renault also has a deal with Nissan, and it was getting all complicated while the deal is off. It may not be off off, as many parties rethink their positions..

VA Federal Reserve chief economist Diane Swonk David Brancaccio official Benjamin Krause Ben Bradford US grant Thornton Jay Powell Challenger ADP Renault Thornton Chicago Gray
"ben bradford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The saying. Hi composite in China closed down five point six percent this morning. The Shems index is down seven point six percent here. The Dow and s&p NASDAQ futures are down two percent with the Dow future down four hundred eighty six points. The footsie in London is up for tenths of a percent. The ten year. Treasury yield is two point four eight percent. Digital cryptocurrencies like bitcoin. There are thousands of them. Most you've probably never heard of the IMF and the World Bank are launching one J P Morgan house one. And now Facebook is working on one two. According to the Wall Street Journal Facebook is obviously late to the party here. But it could still make quite the entrance. Marketplace's Ben Bradford reports the point of a digital currency like bitcoin is that it's decentralized and not controlled by any one entity rooming Morales at the firm outlier ventures thinks Facebook's coin will probably look more like a casino. Having township in the house. Facebook is casino and users of its apps like Instagram and WhatsApp can pay or retailers using the company's currency Mike Alfred at digital assets. Data says those existing platforms gift Facebook, an edge over other crypto currencies possibly even some foreign financial institutions using the Facebook coin would actually be more stable place for a lot of people around the world to store their own money. And also. Do transactions. And why you professor David your MAC goes a step farther. You think about how many people are citizens of Facebook command? There's two and a half billion people, and they could really become a serious rival to the Federal Reserve. And if all those people, adopt Facebook's coin, it could reward the company with a whole lot of the currency Facebook values, most user data. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. Marketplace morning report is supported by rippling a.

Facebook Ben Bradford Wall Street Journal Federal Reserve China London Mike Alfred IMF World Bank Instagram Morales professor David six percent four eight percent two percent ten year
Can Apple's streaming service really think different?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Can Apple's streaming service really think different?

"Despite the fact that I'm in Washington, we're going to leave the news about the special counsel's investigation to the political shows and go somewhere else today, specifically Cupertino California where today apple hosted one of its special events at their headquarters in Silicon Valley. Usually these things are for the splashy rollout of new products. The latest iphone or MAC unveiled on the black stage with dramatic music and slick videos, you had all of that today too. But apple wasn't launching new devices. The company announced a whole new suite of services, a new credit card that works with Apple Pay along an -ticipant streaming TV service, plus a bunch of original content. Marketplace's Ben Bradford reports on how apple plans to compete in the already crowded streaming business one. Way to compete trot out the big names apple announced a slate of original shows and movies with Steve Carell m night. Shamlan Steven Spielberg and Octavia Spencer in Reese, Witherspoon, I create the dimensions of this woman. And now if you were this person imagine if you lived in alcohol apple spending over a billion dollars on new content. But media analyst Michael Goodman at strategy analytics says, the company's got its work cut out for it. That billion dollars is getting them in total about thirty shows. That's nothing compared to what you see interns, original content on Netflix, Amazon, everybody else customers can add HBO Showtime and other channels by paying extra who already does that. But apple feels it has an advantage, and you can play all of it right inside. The apple TV a-. Peter stern apples VP of services. Repeated a theme of the company's presentation. No more bouncing from app to app, he's marketing apple TV. Plus as. As a one stop shop. That's an antidote to streaming fatigue. A recent survey from consulting firm, Deloitte, found about half of US consumers are getting tired of too many streaming options. Jeff Laos conducted the survey of even talked to one person who said that she uses a spreadsheet to figure out which shows you can watch on which service apples been relying more and more on services to generate revenue the company brought in ten billion dollars to services in the last quarter of last year. And over the next four years the company wants to double that number.

Apple Cupertino Steve Carell United States Special Counsel Silicon Valley California Steven Spielberg Deloitte Jeff Laos Ben Bradford Michael Goodman HBO Washington Media Analyst Peter Stern Netflix Octavia Spencer VP
What Airline Passengers Need to Know After the Boeing 737 Max 8 Crash

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:11 min | 1 year ago

What Airline Passengers Need to Know After the Boeing 737 Max 8 Crash

"Aviation accidents are almost always complicated, and it can take months or usually longer to figure out what actually happened. And why? So while we wait for the specifics of Ethiopian flight three oh to to become more clear. There are some very real concerns being raised by would be travelers and airlines about the aircraft involve as you know, it's the newest Boeing plane the seven thirty-seven max eight the same model that crashed in Indonesia late last year, south west an American or among the US carriers that fly at marketplace marrow. Sagarra looks at what this crash might mean for them when Stephanie Johnny heard about the thean airlines crash. She thought about her daughter Juliet who's about to fly to Thailand, I sent her Texas morning thing. Juliette? If you're a need to find out what kind of plane, you're flying to Beijing. And then Thailand because if it's a seven thirty seven max. Changing your fight by Yanni is fifty three and lives in DC. She owns an active wear company and travels a lot for work. Now. One more thing to do check. What kind of a plan you're on? It's not clear yet why the airlines flight crashed on Sunday. Or if there is any problem with the Boeing seven thirty-seven, max eight and regulators like the FAA will be looking into this Daniele Quincy Chiku is an aviation professor at the university of North Dakota. We jump at this point, we hugest wheat, whatever instigate this to come up with the commend issues. B's don't sucks. The US airlines that fly the plane southwest in American say they stand behind the safety of their fleets including the seven thirty seven max eight, but travelers are getting nervous. American Airlines says it won't be waiving. It's changed fees for customers who refuse to fly on the jet southwest wouldn't disclose its policy Richard Obolov via an aviator. Analyst at the teal group says any cancellations probably won't have a huge affect on the airlines there are only three hundred fifty of these planes in the world. American Airlines has twenty four south west has thirty four. Ruin away small number. So they're not gonna lose business. I mean, just because of the relatively small number fight service by these jets Stephanie body, I need by the way was relieved to hear that her daughter will not be flying to Thailand on the Boeing seven thirty-seven max eight I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. One of the reasons the crash of flight three, oh two has led to so much international concern about the max aid is that if the opium airlines isn't some small budget airline. It's big it's well respected into an international carrier with a history that goes back to the end of the second World War as marketplace. Ben Bradford reports it is also arguably the most significant company in the horn of Africa, both economically and culturally in the US. The president doesn't typically show up for an airport opening a new terminal, but that's what happened in Ethiopia in January. People celebrated as prime minister, a b m cut the ribbon on the new international terminal at the bully airport in the country's capital Addison baba expanding Ethiopian Airlines hub to about the size of Dole's airport outside Washington DC. Is ABI linked. The airport's expansion without of Ethiopia's economy praising it saying the country still has far to go. If yoga was sub Saharan Africa's fastest growing economy last year. It's trying to drive that growth through state investment, and the airline is its crown jewel analyst Craig Jenks lichens Ethiopian incised to Canada's westjet, it is widely regarded as a well run a well-managed well operated company, the company's passenger count has quadrupled over the past decade is over a hundred international routes and its revenue is a quivalent almost five percent of Ethiopia's entire GDP. Economist Dubna lemme at the university of Massachusetts says via Skype that it's not just the country's economy. But it's national pride that's tied up in the airline. It's something happened. Something like, this is not considered just us. Some accidents happen on some company. It's considered as the symbol of the country. After yesterday's crash Ethiopia's parliament immediately declared a national day of mourning.

American Airlines Ethiopia United States Thailand Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Stephanie Johnny Yanni Sagarra Beijing Indonesia Juliette FAA Texas ABI Stephanie Body Opium Daniele Quincy Chiku Richard Obolov Africa
"ben bradford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Footsie index London up one and a half percent. Nasdaq futures up two tenths percent. There is news that Google alphabet has been spending money like crazy to invest in its future. Twenty five billion dollars for last year still revenue last quarter was robust. The stock is down two point three percent in pre-market trading. Now, let's talk about the slack type messages back and forth with your team at work. The news is slack has filed the government paperwork to sell stock to the public for the first time. But no word on the timing. Marketplace's Ben Bradford has more on how slack makes money. Slack didn't create the idea of instant messaging or collaboration in the workplace. But it certainly took that world by storm. This is like the Uber of the category. Ray Wong at constellation research says slacks revenue and users keep growing by double digits each year Wong slack user himself. Who says it's the most polished product on the market. It's very intuitive going forward. He thinks the company can dominate on the other hand slack faces competition from Google Facebook. And maybe most of all Microsoft, which bundles a free messaging app called teams with its widely used office. Three sixty five service Peterson guy at tech companies spice works says that's gonna be good enough for a lot of businesses. I'm not certain companies are looking for the very best app. They just want that capability in the office. And they just want it to work slack is just one of several high profile tech firms plan to go public this year. Others included Uber lift and Airbnb. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. Marketplace morning report is supported by legalzoom for those wanting to start a business or secure their family's future from wheels. And trust to Al season trademarks legalzoom is committed to helping people get started legalzooMcom/marketplace and by Fidelity Investments, taking a personalized approach to helping clients grow preserve managed their wealth. Learn more fidelity dot.

Slack Ben Bradford Google Ray Wong Fidelity Investments London Microsoft Airbnb Al Peterson Twenty five billion dollars three percent
"ben bradford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Markets the footsie index London up one and a half percent. Nasdaq futures up two tenths percent. There is news that Google alphabet has been spending money like crazy to invest in its future. Twenty five billion dollars for last year still revenue last quarter was robust. The stock is down two point three percent in pre-market trading. Now, let's talk about slack. We type messages back and forth with your team at work. The news is slack has filed the government paperwork to sell stock to the public for the first time. But no word on the timing. Marketplace's Ben Bradford has more on how slack makes money. Slack didn't create the idea of instant messaging or collaboration in the workplace. But it certainly took that world by storm. This is like the Uber of the category. Ray Wong at constellation research says slacks revenue and users keep growing by double digits each year Wong's slack user himself. Who says it's the most polished product on the market. It's very intuitive going forward. He thinks the company can dominate on the other hand slack faces competition from Google Facebook. And maybe most of all Microsoft, which bundles a free messaging app called teams with its widely used office. Three sixty five service Peterson guy at tech companies spice works says that's gonna be good enough for a lot of businesses. I'm not certain that companies are looking for the very best app. They just want that capability in the office. And they just want it to work slack is just one of several high profile tech firms plan to go public this year. Others included Uber lift and Airbnb and then Bradford for marketplace..

Slack Google Ray Wong Ben Bradford London Airbnb Microsoft Peterson Twenty five billion dollars three percent
"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

"A forty six percent drop in applications to open positions at federal agencies and Tracey Samuelson for New cars nowadays are really just a bunch of computers right on wheels. All the sensors and driver assist bells and whistles, the automatic breaking in the lane, keeping their Guinness closer and closer to fully driverless cars till then there is human error to account for a couple of weeks ago. Marketplace's Ben Bradford did a story on how drivers misunderstand and sometimes misuse car technology today, the high cost of fixing those cars when humans get involved last. Winter Baltimore resident Adam Richardson found a six inch long crack in the windshield of his twenty seventeen Ford fusion, I didn't think it was gonna be that big of a deal. He thought a couple hundred bucks. But then he called an auto glass company. I said, hey, I've got this crack here's the make mama my car, and they said, oh, not a great sound seat. Richardson's car has front collision sensors behind the windshield replacement glass, that's different thickness or clarity can cause them to malfunction. So Richardson had to buy manufacturer approved glass, and then have sensors recalibrated to work properly. It ended up being somewhere north at seven hundred. So that was definitely worth anticipated and more than at least one in three drivers can afford for an unexpected Bill. According to triple A, the organization also recently found that cars with advanced safety. Features commonly cost twice as much to repair as low tech vehicles jet. Gonzalves king owns.

Adam Richardson Tracey Samuelson Ben Bradford Baltimore Gonzalves king forty six percent six inch
"ben bradford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tech companies in Los Angeles. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. If you saw the Cardi B thing on Instagram, and quite possibly, even if you didn't there's been a mean floating around out there, you've probably at least heard of it's called the ten year challenge where you post two pictures one taken recently one from ten years ago, just to show how much you've changed. I guess is the deal technology motorcade O'Neill sought instead of uploading her pictures. She wondered aloud on Twitter, if the whole concept might just be being used for something not entirely innocent. Kate welcome to the program. Thanks guy. Great to be here. Thank you. You chose not to participate in the ten year challenge or you could say I participated in my own way. Yup. Said you you tweeted your logic. But but laid out would you? Yeah. So I was looking at this trend and people staring their pictures from ten years ago. And now, I recognized it as an opportunity that data researchers and data collectors, let's say could could gather all these contributions, and it could feasibly be used for something like a facial recognition training for you know, for age progression. And I did not expect it to be quite. So I don't know interestingly receive so let me lay out a couple of things first of all. And as you point out in this piece. There are a gazillion pictures out there. What's the harm of a couple more? Right, right. Everybody has a bunch of profile pictures for the most part. And I think most people would think well, they're they're all out there. And for the most part, they're chronologically sequenced. So that's just available. Anyway, this is curated photos that yours specifically saying this was two thousand eight this is two thousand eighteen or or something along those lines. And you're selecting them. If for the purposes of saying that these are Representative of you early Representative the aspirational, you let's say. The the other information that that is attached to those images like the creation date any kind of modification date that date I would not necessarily be there. Once it had been uploaded and moved across platforms. Sometimes that's scraped by platforms in the interest of privacy. Ironically this now. Let us pause for a moment here though to check in with Facebook, you call them or you got a statement from them what they say well in in no way that I ever mean to suggest that this was directly started by Facebook. It was all just a speculative sort of hypothetical, meaning the picture is larger than Facebook. In fact, it we're we're talking about is there's an overall trend that the more people participate in social media in these kinds of games and memes. The more opportunity there is for hackers or any kind of, you know, untoward agent say, hey to gather this information and use it in ways that it's not wasn't intended for your final point. You're concluding point in. This piece is look if we want corporate America, and those gatherers out there of big data of which this face recognition Meam is one this ten years me, MS one if we want them to respect it we have to respect our own data be smart about that's the challenge here is that we're we have to be responsible for safe. Guarding our own data and our own privacy. So how we look at things like the ten year challenge, which could be perfectly innocuous in reality. But it's indicative of a larger pattern of memes and games. Like, this that ask for participation in a particular way. And that's the kind of thing that I think we need to be a little bit cautious about in going forward. Kate O'Neil writing wired about the ten year challenge that you might have seen out there online her book on this subject and a bunch of other stuff is called text humans. Okay. Thanks a lot. I appreciate your time. Thanks bye. Coming up the chocolate milk for.

Kate O'Neil Facebook Meam Los Angeles Twitter Ben Bradford Representative motorcade O'Neill America ten year ten years milk
"ben bradford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Los Angeles. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. If you saw the Cardi B thing on Instagram, and quite possibly, even if you didn't there's been a meme floating around out there, you've probably at least heard of it's called the ten year challenge where you post two pictures one taken recently one from ten years ago, just to show how much you've changed. I guess is the deal technology writer Kate O'Neil sought instead of uploading her pictures. She wondered aloud on Twitter, if the whole concept might just be being used for something not entirely innocent. Kate welcome to the program. Thanks guy. Great to be here. Thank you. You chose not to participate in the tenure challenge Akam or you could say I participated in my own, okay. Yup. As you tweeted your logic. But but laid out would you? Yeah. So I was looking at this trend and people staring their pictures from ten years ago, and now, and I recognized it as an opportunity that data researchers and data collectors, let's say could could gather all these contributions, and it could feasibly be used for. Something like a facial recognition training for for age progression. And I did not expect it to be quite. So I don't know interestingly receive. So let me lay out a couple of things first of all. And as you point out in this piece. There are a gazillion pictures out there. What's the harm of a couple more? Right, right. Everybody has a bunch of profile pictures for the most part. And I think most people would think, well, they're all out there and for the most part, they're chronologically sequenced. So that's just available. Anyway, this is curated photos that yours specifically saying this was two thousand eight this is two thousand eighteen or or something along those lines, and you're selecting them if for the purposes of saying that these are Representative of you early Representative of the aspirated will you let's say the the other information that that is attached to those images length. The creation date any kind of modification date that data would not necessarily be there ones that had been uploaded and moved across platforms. Sometimes that's scraped by platforms in the interest of privacy. Ironically. Now. Let us pause for a moment here though. To to check in with Facebook, you call them or you got a statement from them or they say well in in no way that I ever mean to suggest that this was directly started by Facebook. It was all just a speculative sort of hypothetical, meaning the picture is larger than Facebook. In fact, it we're talking about is there's an overall trend that the more people participate in social media in these kinds of games and memes. The more opportunity there is for hackers or any kind of, you know, untoward agent. Let's say to gather this information and use it in ways that it's not wasn't intended for your final point. You're concluding point in. This piece is look if we want corporate America and those gatherers out there of big data of which face recognition Meam is is one. This ten years is one if we want them to respect it. We have to respect our own data be smart about that's the challenge here is that we're we have to be responsible for safeguarding our own data and our own privacy. So how? How we look at things like the ten year challenge which could be perfectly innocuous in reality. But it's indicative of a larger pattern of memes and games. Like, this that ask for participation in a particular way. And that's the kind of thing that I think we need to the little bit cautious about going forward. Kate O'Neil reading wired about the ten year challenge that you might have seen out there online her book on this subject. And and a bunch of other stuff is called tech humanist K. Thanks a lot. Appreciate thanks. Bye. Coming up the chocolate milk for the.

Kate O'Neil Facebook Akam Los Angeles Ben Bradford Twitter Representative writer America Meam ten years ten year milk
"ben bradford" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Los Angeles. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. We did some reporting earlier this week about retail over the holidays who did well and who did less. Well, Macy's and JC. Penney are firmly in that latter category. But it got us thinking this morning about Atlanta forgo. She manages the beauty plaza Molin Butte, Montana. We talk to her every now, and then conversations that turned not infrequently to the retail apocalypse that's been happening past couple of years. She even lost thrown JC Penney at the buke plaza mall, which is where we got her on the phone today. Helena, it's Chi. How are you? Happy new year. Happy new year to you too. Thanks for taking the time to call us. I understand you had a nose bleed situation there. So I appreciate yeah. There's there's walking program today. And you know, they come in from the cold start walking. Yeah. So how does this pass off some tissue? Everything's good. Everything's good. So the walking program is just people walking around the mall. Yes. Yeah. Our local community health. She has organized a program they used to walk outside. But then things got a little smokey. So that drove them into the mall, and they have enjoyed it so much they have coordinated their walking program inside. Well, that's good. 'cause you know, you're getting people in the mall, and and look it's that's what that's why we're calling right to find out what life is like in the beat blah's them all these days. Things are better. Well, that's good. Because honestly last time we spoke. It was maybe not so good. First of all how we're the holidays for all the holidays were strong, people were just wonderful. They shopped local they start they shopped small they shopped strong really seemed to be a commitment to that this year. That's great. So so small dollar purchases. But a lot of them a lot of them. Yes. It was just very joyful in very supportive. Well, that's good one of the things that kind of bummed me out last time, we spoke whereas that one of your anchor stores was closing. And you had I think it was it was a hotel nearby. Using one of your big stores is like storage space. Right, right. They were doing a remodel. So they were staging all of the new furniture here and then moving at to the hotel as they emptied the rooms. But now you have filled that space with attendant. Do I have that? Right. We have least that space. Yes. Talk to me about that. So they actually are a call center business. They provide support for about seventy clients. It is a call in center, not telemarketing. So they won't be calling. You. Okay. That's good people. You wanna talk to? Yeah. I was thinking before we got on the phone today that that really your job as the manager of that mall is basically to keep the square footage rented, right? And and it doesn't much matter really. Whether it's a big department store, maybe or or call center, you know, we we've talked about this sustainability of exclusive retail properties really needed to be looked at properties who've embraced mixed use concepts. That's the direction that's going to be our reboot. Right. But you know, if we can bring up to three hundred people that's definitely going to bring some life back to this block visits three hundred jobs. That's what you mean. Right. Yes. We can ask for a better happy new year. Now talk to me about the rest of the mall. Howard, not the big anchor properties. But some of the smaller retail spaces through that mall. Do you know things so still been tough, we closed our PayLess shoe store? Yeah. And our our manager. She's. Been with a company thirty four years, a personal friend of mine that was really hard. You know, if there's one thing that retailers. Do we adapt if you don't adapt you will you'll go the way of the dinosaur, Sarah? You know, I know things are going to pick up a lot of Furka. She's a manager at.

buke plaza mall JC Penney Macy Molin Butte Los Angeles Atlanta Montana Ben Bradford Sarah Helena Furka Howard thirty four years
"ben bradford" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"China in the US talked trade face to face today. I'm David Brancaccio in New York with both the US and China agreeing to hold quote, positive and constructive dialogue talks aimed at ending the trade war resumed today in Beijing. The BBC's economics correspondent Andrew Walker is following this. Hi, andrew. How'd I did? I think this is the first time the US and China have talked trade face to face since the summit in Argentina in November any details emerge after day. One of these talks today, not really any details about what they might. Or might not have a chief during the course of the days worth of meetings. But I had of it. We did get some sort of briefing that will they were trying to make some progress on was this highly vexed question of what President Trump called the theft of technology from American firms that are either doing business in China, by way of conditions that force them to transfer technology and lose. Control of it to a Chinese partner or indeed cyber theft hacking access to American firms to get hold of their technological secrets. Are you seeing indications that these talks this week are more than pro forma that there's a I don't know a seriousness of purpose here. China has this persistent problem of a slowing economy to a point. Of course, it needs to slow down from the breakneck growth rates it had over previous decades. But the slowdown is proving to be a bit of a problem. The United States also has declines there being in the stock market and both of these issues have been aggravated at the very least by the continued trade tension. So there are good reasons why perhaps both sides might be more willing to move than they were a few weeks ago. The BBC's economics correspondent Andrew Walker. Thank you for this. My pleasure. David markets on this Monday, London is down seven tenths percent, US, doc. Ex- futures are down this morning, minus two tenths percent for the SNP future. If the federal government's partial shutdown drags on much longer. It could affect your tax refund. The internal revenue services operating at what you might call a skeleton crew down to just an eighth of its workforce. Marketplace's Ben Bradford explains how this this could put the tax return timeline in limbo. Usually filing season starts saying you can send in your latest tax return in about three weeks. But this year, we don't know. It's uncharted territory for the IRS. They've never been in a situation like this. Former federal tax official Mark mazer now at the tax policy center. He says the IRS could choose to delay filing season because of the shutdown or start it but withhold refunds the agency. Hasn't said this is largely judgment call and it comes down to whether you can actually pull this off with the you know, limited staff that that is available. If the agency does delay refunds, low income families will feel it most. Sarah, Louise Smith runs, the Alabama nonprofit impact America, which helps people file returns. And this is the largest check they're gonna see all year. And so, you know, if it doesn't come when you expect to calm than it does put you in a bind the one thing we do know barring a change from congress tax returns remain due April fifteenth. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace..

China Andrew Walker United States David Brancaccio BBC Ben Bradford Mark mazer IRS theft Beijing New York SNP President Trump partner London Argentina congress Louise Smith
"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

"Servers endpoint protection. High availability and disaster recovery and data migration. Learn more at carbonite dot com. And by Kronos, HR payroll talent and timekeeping in one unified system. Learn more at kronoScom Cronos workforce innovation that works. I'm David Brancaccio in New York borrowing allows more immediate gratification, and we humans like that. A new report from the International Monetary Fund finds all that borrowing whether individuals companies governments has resulted in an all time planet wide record one hundred and eighty four trillion dollars in debt for last year. Marketplace's Ben Radford has details that comes to eighty six thousand dollars per person. According to the IMF, it's like saying everyone in the world owes one super-luxury BMW's worth of debt that level of debt. It comes close to two and a half times global output Sony gives the institute of international finance. So is a tremendous amount. In in many ways is is kind of a dead weight for for global growth on the other hand. It's not as if that debt is evenly divided. Harvard. Economist Carmen Reinhart thinks the big global number isn't all that meaningful. She says you have to look at who's holding debt more than half of its in the US, China and Japan, those countries have problems with that. But it's not immediate ticking bomb that it is in countries that are tiny. But there are more than they can handle immediately. The IMF says the biggest culprit is not government, but the private sector, which has tripled its level of indebtedness over the past seventy years. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. Shall we do the numbers.

International Monetary Fund Carmen Reinhart Ben Radford David Brancaccio kronoScom Cronos Ben Bradford Kronos institute of international fin Harvard BMW Sony New York US China Japan eighty four trillion dollars eighty six thousand dollars seventy years
"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KCRW

"Google and Facebook joined the creator of the World Wide Web this week to sign onto principles for how the internet should work. This includes a pledge to respect user's personal data and fight information abuses. Even though those companies have pushed back on regulations to that effect. Marketplace's Ben Bradford has more on this contract for the web. Tim burners Lee created the World Wide Web. But this week at a conference in Lisbon, he lamented its unintended consequences. We have fake news. We have problems with privacy advocate Christine. Bannon at the electronic privacy information center, says Google and Facebook have resisted regulation and she expects little action. Even though the companies have signed onto burners lease principles, which are vague. I think that Google and Facebook claim to be following them. No matter what both faced lawsuits alleging they've skirted new European privacy rules, but Berkeley, professor Deirdre. Mulligan says pressure from regulators and advocates and employees. Is forcing companies to reconsider how they handle information. I think we had like this confluence of energy saying, hey, you haven't been attentive the contracts could add to public pressure. Bursley himself suggested is packed isn't just about enforcing new data rules but changing attitudes about them. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. Then back to the election results, some ballot measures we'd covered in Maine a bid to raise taxes to pay for free home health care aides for the elderly and the disabled appears headed for defeat San Francisco voters did approve.

Facebook Google Ben Bradford Lee Bannon Bursley Lisbon Mulligan Christine Maine Tim Berkeley San Francisco professor
"ben bradford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Google and Facebook joined the creator of the World Wide Web this week to sign onto principles for how the internet should work. This includes a pledge to respect user's personal data and fight information abuses. Even though those companies have pushed back on regulations to that effect. Marketplace's Ben Bradford has more on this contract for the web. Tim burners Lee created the World Wide Web. But this week at a conference in Lisbon, he lamented its unintended consequences. We have fake news. We have problems with privacy advocate Christine. Bannon at the electronic privacy information center, says Google and Facebook have resisted regulation and she expects little action. Even though the companies have signed onto burners lease principles, which are vague. I think that Google and Facebook well claim to be following them. No matter what both faced lawsuits alleging they've skirted new European privacy rules, but Berkeley, professor Deirdre. Mulligan says pressure from regulators and advocates and employees. He's is forcing companies to reconsider how they handle information. I think we have like this confluence of energy saying, hey, you haven't been attentive the contract could add to public pressure. Bursley himself suggested is packed isn't just about enforcing new data rules but changing attitudes about them. I'm then Bradford for marketplace. And back to the election results, some ballot measures we'd covered in Maine a bid to raise taxes to pay for free home healthcare aids for the elderly and the disabled appears headed for defeat San Francisco voters did approve attacks on big companies to.

Facebook Google Ben Bradford Lee Bannon Mulligan Bursley Lisbon Christine Maine Tim Berkeley San Francisco professor
"ben bradford" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hold their current jobs at one hundred thousand dollars salaries it is a recipe for disaster for a party political analysts generally favored democrats to flip isis seat if republicans managed to hold on how they do it could serve as a blueprint for the party going forward for npr news i'm ben bradford this is npr news the nra kicks off its annual convention in dallas this week where president trump is the guest of honor does no bigger fan of the second amendment that me there's no bigger fan of the nra and these guys are great patriots a great people meanwhile hundreds of gun control advocates descend on the city to protest that story on the next all things considered from npr news you'll hear all things considered beginning at four thirty this afternoon ohio design us i'm rachel martin with news from japan today a group of bus drivers in okayama are on strike they're demanding that their employer gives them more job security the drivers realized though that if they stopped driving and protest the japanese public would end up suffering the most with fewer buses to ride so the drivers settled on a compromise their technically on strike but still driving and giving all their rides for free which surely has writers saying domo oregon tacos amos it's morning edition may third i communications satellite was launched in one thousand nine hundred sixty and hundreds of followed some satellite scheduled for launch as early as this month though are going where no comsat has gone before one will relate messages from the far side of the moon while two others will follow another spacecraft to mars the moon satellite will be launched by china the country plans to land a probe on the far side of.

ben bradford nra dallas trump rachel martin okayama npr president ohio japan china one hundred thousand dollars
"ben bradford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"ben bradford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Trump administration sessions devoted nearly two minutes of his speech to criticizing oakland mayor lippi chef who roared residence of an impending migration rate last month so here's my math the mayor share how dare you the states involved in more than two dozen lawsuits against the trump administration about everything from immigration to climate change policies other states with sanctuary laws such as colorado in oregon we'll be eyeing this latest challenged by the trump administration as it begin move through court for npr news i'm ben bradford in sacramento let's bring in the voice now of the attorney general f california he is heavier ba seram he's named in the federal lawsuit along with california governor jerry brown at mr vieira welcome mary louise thanks for having me let me start here what is wrong with the justice department argument that your state is interfering with federal immigration enforcement and violating the constitution though because we're not we're simply doing what the tenth amendment allows every stake to do in this to determine how we will provide public safety for all of its residents we leave immigration enforcement to the federal government and so we don't wanna be coerced into trying to do the federal government's job let me ask you this this matter of of state versus federal jurisdiction over immigration law as you know at went all the way up to the supreme court and 2012 with arizona versus the united states and the supreme court mostly ruled in favor of the fed's citing the constitution the reasoning was you can't have every stage setting its own immigration policy it's just unworkable and that's absolutely correct arizona was trying to sit immigration policy which the state don't have the right for the power to do that left to the federal government how is what you're trying to do different we didn't enact immigration laws we enact laws regarding or public safety and so we wanted to make sure that we could move forward with providing for the public safety of californians and their privacy interest not immigration attorney general jeff sessions as we just heard is in california is making the case today for his federal immigration policy and comparing it to other areas a federal enforcement let's take a lesson i want to let you respond to what he said just imagine if if a state passed a law forbidding employers for cooperating.

colorado oregon ben bradford jerry brown federal government arizona united states fed california oakland mayor lippi npr sacramento attorney two minutes