4 Burst results for "Belton Piedmont"

"belton piedmont" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"belton piedmont" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"That Cat am Am Can am smokin fiend. Okay. So that's the character. But what's interesting is how often you see black American people depicted as speaking that way in many sources that you might think of authoritative and I have something even better than this is going to build up to a big fine. We're we're circling in. We're we're about to find the real thing but some other stuff. That I've found. So for example, there is a novel written by a Black Man, very conscious as we used to say black man eighteen, ninety, nine it's called imperium in Imperio, and the guy's name is Sutton griggs and for whatever it's worth his father was a Georgia slave. So Sutton griggs eighteen nine, he's post emancipation but he would have heard authentic black speech, the speech of. People who were denied education and what's interesting is that in one of his novels he is writing in very serious vain. We would today call him a black nationalist and he has seen where there's a black mother who is being humiliated by a racist white schoolteacher and she's trying to present her child and defend her child and what she says, and this is a black. Writer of black nationalist stamp who grew up with a father who had been at slave and not in New York City but in Georgia so we're talking about wear black English really arose and I WANNA say throws but that's not the were because it's thrived and so he has the mother saying about her child her son, his name and Belton Piedmont arteries, granddaddy arteries after so. Not His name is built in Piedmont his name and Belton Piedmont and she's a character of dignity. His name in Belton Piedmont not is built in Piedmont am. Arteries. granddaddy. What's Ardour ardor is after and shows how authentic this depiction of speech is in that we know that not only black people but also again regional vernacular speaking British people used arter and explains that problem with Jack and Jill. So Jack and Jill went up the hill to get a pail of water jack fell down and broke his Crown Jill. Came Tumbling after what the Hell is. That is that the best they can do of course, not it was Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling out. After, because, after can become after. After that is the way many people in for example, Yorkshire still say after October it's dialectal after and so they're always many people who said after and he came here and often they were either slave owners or they worked alongside slaves and so early biking, which has here's this woman and she's saying his name and Belton Piedmont Adar's granddaddy the ARDOUR. Very authentic. Are we gonNa really think that the AM isn't I don't think that Sutton griggs would have put minstrel speech into the mouth of his character or something else. This is further back. This is the. Eighteen forties, there's a white minister and he is entranced with this black preacher who he heard and he calls this preacher genius and he's truly just amaze at this preacher and his linguistic skill. This white man says of this black uneducated but very articulate preacher. He says, he spoke the true Negro dialect but seem to employ refined. If you please classic species, it rolled from his lips with sharpness of outline and distinctness of Annunciation that seemed to in part to it. Ah Polish and charm transforming it into a language of beauty. Oh, the way people had to write. Eighteen hundreds it's so artificial, but it can be so pretty very lincoln. But that's what this guy says about this black man speech then he gives samples of it. Now here's a sample and I warn you that this is going to sound like caricature, but this man meant it as respectful. The Best I can do by reading this is just read it. So this is one sample because a very long sample of this man's beautiful speech. But brethren did joy of the belieber in Jesus and set forth in a figurative manner into text it and compared to water to them what be dying of thirst and it goes on and on, and you can definitely feel the articulate nece in the content of it but the language, the grammar is like that including the am the believer in Jesus and set forth in a figurative manner in the text did and compared that looks so ridiculous to us today but remember that. This man loved the way this person talked and described it as refined. If you please a classic species at role from his lips with sharpness of outline I, wonder we can't know because these people are extremely dead but you wonder whether this white man really was all of a sudden making this black man sound like a minstrel and another thing is that minstrel shows were very new at the time and so how many minstrel shows was this man seeing we can't know but. Things like this. Make you think that people really did say it am and you an but now we're circling in something has been found. The problem has always been that you can say, well, it always seems to be on these pages, but there's no recording of anyone actually using am that way in running speech now there are people who say it on ancient records and even some early talkies. Where they are reading something reciting something that they were told to say but in terms of somebody actually recorded saying it, that's never existed including a precious source, which is that giving people work in the depression. One thing that happened it's the most blessed thing is that many people were set out to record ex-leeds because at that time, there were still a great many black people living who had. Actually been sleighs, record ex slaves talking about what they had been through nobody was thinking about linguistics but it means that there are now thousands of interviews most of them exist only on paper but thousands of interviews of people talking about what slavery was actually like now about two dozen of them were actually recorded and you can hear these people and it's no longer that you have to go. To some archive probably in DC now you can just listen online. Now it's always been assumed among people who specialize in this kind of thing that nobody on those couple dozen recordings uses this over-generalized am and that's often been seen as an indication that it isn't real makes perfect sense. But you know the truth is they do use it is on their listen to every second of those two. Dozen odd recordings. There is one example and you know what I have a lot to do, and there are times when I can be a little bit lazy. I have to admit I have not listened to every single second of those recordings I've learned many of but not every single second, and there's somebody who has I oh, this observation to Charles Carson, and.

Sutton griggs Belton Piedmont Jill Jack Piedmont Georgia Charles Carson Imperio Writer New York City Yorkshire
"belton piedmont" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

07:07 min | 3 months ago

"belton piedmont" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"From New York City this is Lexicon Valley. . A podcast about language I'm John Mc, , water and this week you know what I'm going to do frankly what I usually do, , which is just bring you in what was I thinking about over the past week or two? ? And it was a bunch of things but I happened to be revising an academic paper that I'm writing and that paper happens to be about black English I don't usually do those but I mean exception with this one because it's a topic that really grabs me and you know when deciding what to do the show about I thought you know I'm going to do what I'm thinking about I. . Don't WanNa, , do it about Comma Harris or something like that I'm not. . Sure. . What I could get out of that I wanNA do me and so I'm gonNA share with you some stuff about the always fascinating dialect of American English black. . English. . It's called by academics usually. . African American vernacular English but I have a hard time saying that so we're just going to call it black English and we're GONNA, look , at it from various angles that I have been sitting around laying around still in semi quarantine these days and one of the things is. . GonNa be the lost. . Am That's what my papers about, , and this is something that I've brought up on this show before, , and that is the question as to whether actual black. . American people ever as linguists call it over generalized an in two persons and numbers beyond where it would go and standard English and so for example, , I'll tell you I am a person but in characters of black speech back in the day, , the idea was that black people used am with all. . Pronouns, , and so you am this he am that we and the other thing that's something associated with minstrel shows and comic strips, , and you would think you would quite reasonably think that that's something that white performers made up as a way of making fun of black people. . That's what I thought for a very long time. . But after a while various indications seem to suggest to me that actually wait a minute black people did once us am in a different way than mainstream. . English does, , and of course, it , wasn't all black people but there have always been different ways of speaking even here in America and it seemed to me that well, , you know as I'm always telling all of you language always changes and black English is no exception and so it seemed to me maybe actually the minstrels overdid it they were characterizing but maybe there was that different usage of an because all these things seemed indicated and in a show that I did. Probably . back in about nineteen forty seven remember when I used to be sponsored by kraft macaroni and cheese way back. . Then I said that one evidence of this is that there are vernacular British dialects. . The US am in just that way you am we am the black country in Britain is sometimes called the people who are the Yam yams and what they mean by that is that they say you am saw gave you some evidence of that but that was that was. Back . right after the Second World War and so what about newer evidence? Well, ? , first of all, , what do I mean by this as you might call it over generalized am well, , here is one of the latest examples of it in pop culture. . This is a highly insignificant. . Hollywood. . Cartoon from the studio that gave us such indelible characterizations as Casper, , the friendly ghost and Herman and Catnip who were about the closest thing in real life to itchy and scratchy on the simpsons in. . Any case, one , of their other indelible characters was buzzy the Crow Buzzy. The . Crow was supposed to clearly supposed to be this this black American little character remember the Dumbo crows while Buzzy was <hes>, , an extension of that, , and so buzzy uses reflections of the old minstrel dialect. . This is a cartoon called no IFS ands or buts, , but spelled with two t's it's about smoking and this is what buzzy says about a cat who seems to have a smoking addiction listened closely. . Tobacco smoking. . To know. . That Cat am Am Can am smokin fiend. . Okay. . So that's the character. . But what's interesting is how often you see black American people depicted as speaking that way in many sources that you might think of authoritative and I have something even better than this is going to build up to a big fine. . We're we're circling in. . We're we're about to find the real thing but some other stuff. . That I've found. So . for example, , there is a novel written by a Black Man, , very conscious as we used to say black man eighteen, , ninety, , nine it's called imperium in Imperio, , and the guy's name is Sutton griggs and for whatever it's worth his father was a Georgia slave. . So Sutton griggs eighteen nine, , he's post emancipation but he would have heard authentic black speech, , the speech of. . People who were denied education and what's interesting is that in one of his novels he is writing in very serious vain. . We would today call him a black nationalist and he has seen where there's a black mother who is being humiliated by a racist white schoolteacher and she's trying to present her child and defend her child and what she says, and , this is a black. . Writer of black nationalist stamp who grew up with a father who had been at slave and not in New York City but in Georgia so we're talking about wear black English really arose and I WANNA say throws but that's not the were because it's thrived and so he has the mother saying about her child her son, , his name and Belton Piedmont arteries, , granddaddy arteries after so. . Not His name is built in Piedmont his name and Belton Piedmont and she's a character of dignity. . His name in Belton Piedmont not is built in Piedmont am. . Arteries. . granddaddy. . What's Ardour ardor is after and shows how authentic this depiction of speech is in that we know that not only black people but also again regional vernacular speaking British people used arter and explains that problem with Jack and Jill. . So Jack and Jill went up the hill to get a pail of water jack fell down and broke his Crown Jill. . Came Tumbling after what the Hell is. . That is that the best they can do of course, , not it was Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling out. . After, , because, , after can become after. . After that is the way many people in for example, , Yorkshire still say after October it's dialectal after and so they're always many people who said after and he came here and often they were either slave owners or they worked alongside slaves and so early biking, , which has

Buzzy Comma Harris New York City John Mc Lexicon Valley US America Casper Hollywood Britain Herman
This Am a Minstrel Stereotype, Right?

Lexicon Valley

07:07 min | 3 months ago

This Am a Minstrel Stereotype, Right?

"From New York City this is Lexicon Valley. A podcast about language I'm John Mc, water and this week you know what I'm going to do frankly what I usually do, which is just bring you in what was I thinking about over the past week or two? And it was a bunch of things but I happened to be revising an academic paper that I'm writing and that paper happens to be about black English I don't usually do those but I mean exception with this one because it's a topic that really grabs me and you know when deciding what to do the show about I thought you know I'm going to do what I'm thinking about I. Don't WanNa, do it about Comma Harris or something like that I'm not. Sure. What I could get out of that I wanNA do me and so I'm gonNA share with you some stuff about the always fascinating dialect of American English black. English. It's called by academics usually. African American vernacular English but I have a hard time saying that so we're just going to call it black English and we're GONNA, look at it from various angles that I have been sitting around laying around still in semi quarantine these days and one of the things is. GonNa be the lost. Am That's what my papers about, and this is something that I've brought up on this show before, and that is the question as to whether actual black. American people ever as linguists call it over generalized an in two persons and numbers beyond where it would go and standard English and so for example, I'll tell you I am a person but in characters of black speech back in the day, the idea was that black people used am with all. Pronouns, and so you am this he am that we and the other thing that's something associated with minstrel shows and comic strips, and you would think you would quite reasonably think that that's something that white performers made up as a way of making fun of black people. That's what I thought for a very long time. But after a while various indications seem to suggest to me that actually wait a minute black people did once us am in a different way than mainstream. English does, and of course, it wasn't all black people but there have always been different ways of speaking even here in America and it seemed to me that well, you know as I'm always telling all of you language always changes and black English is no exception and so it seemed to me maybe actually the minstrels overdid it they were characterizing but maybe there was that different usage of an because all these things seemed indicated and in a show that I did. Probably back in about nineteen forty seven remember when I used to be sponsored by kraft macaroni and cheese way back. Then I said that one evidence of this is that there are vernacular British dialects. The US am in just that way you am we am the black country in Britain is sometimes called the people who are the Yam yams and what they mean by that is that they say you am saw gave you some evidence of that but that was that was. Back right after the Second World War and so what about newer evidence? Well, first of all, what do I mean by this as you might call it over generalized am well, here is one of the latest examples of it in pop culture. This is a highly insignificant. Hollywood. Cartoon from the studio that gave us such indelible characterizations as Casper, the friendly ghost and Herman and Catnip who were about the closest thing in real life to itchy and scratchy on the simpsons in. Any case, one of their other indelible characters was buzzy the Crow Buzzy. The Crow was supposed to clearly supposed to be this this black American little character remember the Dumbo crows while Buzzy was an extension of that, and so buzzy uses reflections of the old minstrel dialect. This is a cartoon called no IFS ands or buts, but spelled with two t's it's about smoking and this is what buzzy says about a cat who seems to have a smoking addiction listened closely. Tobacco smoking. To know. That Cat am Am Can am smokin fiend. Okay. So that's the character. But what's interesting is how often you see black American people depicted as speaking that way in many sources that you might think of authoritative and I have something even better than this is going to build up to a big fine. We're we're circling in. We're we're about to find the real thing but some other stuff. That I've found. So for example, there is a novel written by a Black Man, very conscious as we used to say black man eighteen, ninety, nine it's called imperium in Imperio, and the guy's name is Sutton griggs and for whatever it's worth his father was a Georgia slave. So Sutton griggs eighteen nine, he's post emancipation but he would have heard authentic black speech, the speech of. People who were denied education and what's interesting is that in one of his novels he is writing in very serious vain. We would today call him a black nationalist and he has seen where there's a black mother who is being humiliated by a racist white schoolteacher and she's trying to present her child and defend her child and what she says, and this is a black. Writer of black nationalist stamp who grew up with a father who had been at slave and not in New York City but in Georgia so we're talking about wear black English really arose and I WANNA say throws but that's not the were because it's thrived and so he has the mother saying about her child her son, his name and Belton Piedmont arteries, granddaddy arteries after so. Not His name is built in Piedmont his name and Belton Piedmont and she's a character of dignity. His name in Belton Piedmont not is built in Piedmont am. Arteries. granddaddy. What's Ardour ardor is after and shows how authentic this depiction of speech is in that we know that not only black people but also again regional vernacular speaking British people used arter and explains that problem with Jack and Jill. So Jack and Jill went up the hill to get a pail of water jack fell down and broke his Crown Jill. Came Tumbling after what the Hell is. That is that the best they can do of course, not it was Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling out. After, because, after can become after. After that is the way many people in for example, Yorkshire still say after October it's dialectal after and so they're always many people who said after and he came here and often they were either slave owners or they worked alongside slaves and so early biking, which has

Jill Belton Piedmont Buzzy Sutton Griggs New York City Jack Comma Harris Georgia John Mc Lexicon Valley Piedmont United States America Hollywood Casper Yorkshire Imperio Britain
"belton piedmont" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"belton piedmont" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Listen to Zora Neale, hurston speaking here, it is particular ambi-, whom I photograph whom I think I'm the first place on earth and probably the last one ever photograph was ambi-. She had died in nineteen hundred and seven. And nobody so her anymore until nineteen thirty six when she was found naked on a rolled. But she remember little she remembered where she used to live, and she went to plantations that used to be fathers, which was now brothers. She was a dentist bide by her brother. Her ex husband or son was now grown. He was three years old when she died and nineteen hundred seven shoes, a dentist fide, and she was officially dented by the Haitian government, and that was all the records of her death and her barrel, and I voted grabbed her in nineteen thirty six noticed. She says placing for person because she's southern and so as we've seen on the show, saying fireworks is an only Brooklyn. It's also south. You never know what sounds are going to do. So Lillian Carter said Boivin on our southern show and Neil hurston. If you listen closely placing not person, but just a little bit of it. But it would tell you right away that she was born. Born in the south like, the vast majority of black people back, then you wanna believe everything. That's order. Neil hurston says, and we an seem so strange, but you know, there's a lot of evidence that people did use am that way black people specifically. So there's a Harlem renaissance novel called home to Harlem, and it's full of sentences like to pick one of the ones that's better for general consumption. Oh, these here different ships. I tell you so chip, I guess is roughly honeys girls, whatever. And so these here and different chip's. I tell you and how the Brown skin babies am humping it alone, which I openly admit sounds like some great song from the time. But the thing is this book is anthropological. This man is writing about these people with serious perspective. He's trying to describe the lives of southern migrants to Harlem in the nineteen twenties. So it's unlikely that he would have them talking like minstrels, you get the feeling that these men really did say and like that at times. And it's in books. Thank you to my research. Assistant cash Chaman for digging some of these up it's in a lot of serious literature written by black people in for example, the late eighteen hundreds so there's a novel called imperium in Imperio, by Sutton Griggs. This is a black person. And at one touching point a mother says about her son his name am Belton, Piedmont, arteries, granddaddy, so do that. Again, his name in Belton Piedmont actors, granddaddy, Artor, you know, what that is. That's after in black dialect of the time, which you can also find in England in an answers a question, which is why Jack and Jill sucks, so Jack. And Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water Jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling after that doesn't rhyme. If it's water than what after is that the best that they could do. No. Of course, not it's because the way they composed. It was Jack and Jill. Up the hill. The fetch a pail of water Jack fell down broke his crown. Jill came tumbling ardor and rhymes water otter. So here's this person saying his name Belton Piedmont. Now, we're back across the Atlantic artery. Granddaddy. Now, if this is accurate enough to get that ardour, and you can also see that ardour used by Jim in Huckleberry Finn and other places that is genuine old tiny black England's well, why is the am wrong..

Jill Neil hurston Jack Belton Piedmont Harlem Zora Neale England Belton Haitian government Lillian Carter Piedmont Sutton Griggs Brooklyn Imperio Boivin Huckleberry Finn Jim Artor three years