31 Burst results for "Belton"

"belton" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"belton" Discussed on WTOP

"Classic. Find out more on WTO V dot com, Jason fraley champion news. But Thursday morning September 1st at what 18. Rich owners in the WTO traffic center. All right, yet another crash on the beltway this morning in a loop before you get to Eisenhower avenue exit one 74 crash takes up the left half of the roadway response unseen two lanes to the right get you by. Still with the crash on the outer loop approaching central avenue again, getting by single file to left they have stopped traffic there are a couple of times so be aware you may want to reconsider your options to avoid that stretch of the bell again, out of the central avenue, crash that way has been with us since the 11 o'clock hour. This one involved a motorcyclist. On the adult just passed river road, crashed there also takes up the left side, two vehicles, including one on its side, stay right to get past fat. Down in fog here counting cleaning up the crash on route 17 at route 28 in belton again down to a single right lane in each direction past the crash cleanup, hopefully they'll be getting that cleared soon, but for now just be careful. 66 eastbound, again, work sounds. Between haymarket in 29 Gainesville, single riding, get you by, then between centerville and fairfax, single right lane past the work, once more route 50 single file right in the national approach and pass nutly street, stay left past to construction, rich hunter WTO traffic. Storm team four tracking the start of September, we call that meteorological fall, September, October, and November, those three months. It's not going to feel like fall, though, high of

Jason fraley WTO belton centerville Gainesville fairfax
"belton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:55 min | 7 months ago

"belton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg opinion informed perspectives and expert data driven commentary on breaking news It is 9 20 in the City of London time to check in with Bloomberg opinion we are joined by opinion columnist Therese Raphael who asks in her latest column why not just cancel all the oligarch lawyers She says a U.S. congressman Steve Cohen and others have noted that Britain's laws make it too easy for the rich and powerful to shut out the truth There is just walk us through what is happening and what has been happening Historically in London Vis-à-vis lawyers the legal system and oligarchs trying to defend their reputation and in many cases attack writers and journalists trying to bring attention to some of their misdemeanors Yeah so what we're talking about is defamation which includes liable And the big difference between the U.S. and the UK is that in the UK the burden of proof is on the journalist or the media organization that is being accused of lively someone So they need to prove that they haven't in 2013 there were a bunch of reforms to basically raise the bar for claimants to make it harder to prosecute these kind of spurious or vexatious claims which was the threatening to make London had made London a big center for libel tourism The problem is that those reforms lawyers who have been defending journalists such as Catherine belton author of Putin's people Tom Burgess author of cryptopia those lawyers say that they were formed didn't go far enough oligarchs have had a field day using the UK system to go after journalists So in many cases the claims have been thrown out of court or they've been settled with minor changes but the overall effect has been to discourage investigative journalism to discourage these kinds of revelations Yeah I mean we've spoken to Tom Burgess a number of times on Bloomberg radium He's totally fascinating and quite dedicated because the risks of doing investigative journalism As Tom explains are so severe to have to go in court and he always talks about how lucky he is to have a big publishing house with money to back him I guess is how he explains it is there really any change that we think is actually going to come now in terms of these slaps these lawsuits It seems like we've reached a point where that issue has been brought to the awareness of the government It's now become a transatlantic issue to the extent that you have a U.S. congressman writing to the Secretary of State and naming lawyers who have been working for the main oligarchs for Roman Obama for Mikael Friedman for Peter avin for these for many of these sanctioned individuals The government has launched a consultation some of the recommendations are really very feasible tweets to the law that would allow for example a judge to throw out a case if it didn't meet the threshold for reasonableness forcing claimants to really show that there has been serious harm and damage done to them by the alleged libel right away Strengthening the public interest defense that media organizations and journalists and other defendants can raise So those kinds of changes would enable the enable media to have a little more of a defensive wall because as I'm sure you've heard from Tom these are enormously.

Tom Burgess Therese Raphael London Bloomberg Catherine belton Steve Cohen UK U.S. Britain Putin Roman Obama Mikael Friedman Peter avin Tom government
"belton" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Dad's woodwork shop. Typically this is a building made out of beams and columns. So that's very like a steel structure. Slightly different to a usual concrete structure. So a concrete structure would normally have columns. It just needs a flat slab. Now, the center of the building deals with the horizontal movement. All buildings move horizontally with the load of the wind if they don't have something to stop them. So here, actually, what we use is CLT. CLT is quite thick. You can see them on the edge there. Average everyday chunks of spruce cut into planks and then laid in 5 layers each layer at 90° to the next. And that allows it to work a bit like the slab you will see in a concrete building. So it spans in two directions. I suppose fire is one of the biggest concerns that people have with timber. Is this building going to be safe against fires? All building materials suffer when there is a fire. When we have a piece of steel and we expose it to 300° of temperature, it also is very likely very quickly to start to fail. But we do things to protecting from burning in a way that is dangerous to those fighting the fire or those being in the building at the time. So our approach to wood is pretty much the same. We know exactly how timber performs how long it takes to degrade. So we know that this building can be on fire in certain places, for a certain amount of time, which should be long enough for everybody to evacuate the building. And if they decide to do so for the fire brigade to put it out, how long is this building on a last? Well, I mean, it's a really sensible question. I'm going to give you the politician's answer first. It comes with a warranty for 60 years. There's absolutely no reason wooden buildings can't last forever. We just need to look after them. So the principle with wood is, it's great if it gets wet and then dries out again. It's only when we start to trap water in certain places that we start to get problems because then we get a cycle of mold and fungus growing and rot and those sorts of things. All of this wood is really, really carefully treated in the way it's manufactured. It arrives to site at 14% no more moisture content. That's monitored. And then we tested again before we put things like waterproof membranes on the roof. So that we know we're not trapping water inside. But beyond that, belton braces, you may even see someone we go downstairs. There are some little tiny holes in the roof. So we got close to a square column here, and we're just going to touch it to see what kind of sound it makes..

CLT belton
"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"My taxes fine to me but for most people like if they really wanna know something like there are countless other sites that will aggregate. The story will pop up and other different verses and other places and so people are going to get the information. But you didn't get that click so it's like yeah you wrote this huge expose. It was amazing and then like a bunch of other. Smaller websites are aggregated and people. Just read the aggregation and never actually read your piece because it was behind a paywall. So i mean what did you really do there. I used to have like this big contributor network. Those kind of my exposure to huffpost person early on celebrities are writing their medium. Posted for medium came along and replace tribune. Or what have you. How are you thinking about like the contributor network to what extent you do or not want to be open to people outside your newsroom. Having on the site. Oh i mean we get rid of the contributor networking before i came on board so it hasn't existed for a minute now but the way i kind of always felt about it like i was like. Wow this is insane anybody just right on your site like seems like a ripe for lawsuits a lot of problems because they don't have any control and it's it's seems chaotic and like i was one of those people like i was one of those contributors like just blogging away on huffpost. Now mind you. I was professional journalists. So i was very careful about the things i've put on. How like during those free willing see wheeling early internet days. I mean people were just doing everything it was. It was a wild wild internet time. And so i don't think a contributor network could work the same way worked back then also don't think it's responsible for to work that way that it did back then. I mean the fact that you had people who just contributed greatly to the traffic of the site is is not good. I feel like if you write a story if especially if something that somebody asked me to write for them you should get compensated for it in some way shape or form unless you're like riding an op-ed because you're senator from new mexico. Everyone else should get paid. And so the way. I kind of look at contributors as much more than a traditional way where we're reaching out the freelancers were soliciting high profile individuals to write pieces blah blah. Folks who deserted become stated are properly compensated. Because that's the right thing to do. Definitely interesting opinion given buzzfeed's community kind of contributor system as well i know myself. I did write several quizzes when i was in college on buzzfeed's community page and some of them actually did well. I did not get paid. But i had a blast doing it. And i all my social media but Yeah that's an interesting interesting opinion. I think considering buzzfeed's approach to that projects the physician. I mean everyone has their own approach to these sorts of things and some people like love contributing like i used to when i was trying to gio media which owned on former gawker websites. The the thing that attracted me the most of the site. Sometimes it wasn't necessarily the stories that were being posted with the competent section. The commentators were so creative and funny and angry. Interesting that something. I would spend hours just going through the comments on a post. The post could be like two words. And there'd be like two thousand comments to comb through which we're all fascinating. But do i think that the commodores should get paid like now. You know but they contributed greatly to the success of gawker and the historic gawker websites. So to me. It's like gives you the side of the sign that balance but we were user generated content makes.

new mexico ed buzzfeed The post
"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Reported and it's still well source but it's always helpful links so if you decide you like you like all the suggestions like you know the best things by the help cure your snoring problem like. Oh wow i snore. This can be really helpful to me. Let me go through and click liquid quickly. So it's really about looking for what people are searching for online at answering their questions through a posed is something where you all are having to have. Maybe someone from the news side kind of like monitor for standards or even like thinking of going back and like check like you wouldn't want at this point a juice to be juice juicero on the commerce given everything that happened there. You can't predict that necessarily ahead of time as that example showed you need actually reporting of let me by this thing realize you squeeze the pouch and you're good. You got juice. How'd you manage like hold up to. What extent do you up all journalistic standards to the commerce there. We always put apply journalistic standards to everything we put on half-posts so even the commerce post you know. They go through copied They have editors the people who write the post have journalism background or communications background. So it's really important for us for people who are able to actually do research we can do fact check Who know what they're talking about about the items you know that are so. It's such value to our readers. May what makes people trust. Commerce is if it's actually coming from a place of real information and understand it you know. It can't just be like not. Does anybody can just throw together. Elliptical of like you know the top air conditioners like. That's nice but how do we know that you know. What the top air-conditioning. Why should we even trust. You like anybody can do that. So it's really about doing the research during the work and it happened just same rigorous fact checking and copy process that we have for everything that goes on the side. I'm curious about some other like reader. Revenue focused Editorial products like. So what is your kind of thoughts on a paywall or like Subscription model. Is that something that has ever been talked about for huffpost. Is that something that you're kind of against in general curious. Maybe like a paywall is something that you'd ever imagine going up. No i n t pay walks. Information should be easily accessible. And i think it should be free. I think when you put an important story behind a paywall you basically just told huge swath of the american population. You don't get to see this story. You already paid like thousand dollars for this apple. Mac book got sitting on your desk but now you need to go ahead and pay me like another. You know ten dollars a month if you wanna actually read this thing. That's going to impact your life and that's to me like i know that we have to make money. I support journalism making money in order to stay in business. But i just feel like a paywall. In some cases it takes away from the democrative. Nate domon democrative nature. I'm i think. I just made up a word. I'm right though. Felt vong though coming out of my mouth and takes away from the the free nature of the information our society. I would hate for as google came up with a bunch of tears. When i would search for like but if you want these a one search results you got to pay me. This is like our already paid for like what order four. So i'm someone who really values information. I'm someone who growing up went to the library. Literally every weekend of my childhood where. I read magazines and newspapers for free as well as any book that my little child part desired and that had a huge impact on me. I want the same forever. Once acquatic think democratic democratic makes more sense. You've said it and our producer can go in for the next week dubbed bet in this podcast is made. I'm only chief editor in chief. Of course. I can't talk. It's that co-hosts podcast. I struggle to reedit all the time. I mean that's hard stance on a paywall and buzzfeed's about to go public. They're going to have now public investors they're going to have those quarterly earnings calls. They're going to be asking about a buzzfeed prime type thing. Some sort of paywall. Like how has that sense gone over with the higher ups at the corporate level that you don't wanna pay whatever. I think it's pretty well supported at buzzfeed. I feel like i'm on the same wavelength as joan mark here because they have said to me that they don't feel very interested in a paywall in many aspects so there's also again there's never been any pressure like danielle. I think we're we're going to pay like these are not things i've ever come up at all. And and when i gave my no paywall stance nobody blinked. So what about registration l- registration law to read this article. Give us your email address and we'll send you a link even had the conversation but yeah. I was like sign up for my newsletter. And if you don't sign up for my news can't read my article like give us your data and we'll give you this article okay. So that's i just want people to be able to read the articles. The articles imported. It's also in general a younger audience. And i feel like am trays. Maybe this is a topic that gets discussed during gps. But i feel like younger. Audiences might be a little bit more resistant to paying for news just by nature of not having as much money to spend on so i guess i could see that being a serious consideration for buzzfeed in huffpost the way that i kind of look at it as like if i want to know the information. I'm going to get this information. So it's like you can put it behind a paywall. Like i'll i'll pay paywall i popped up and i was just broke writer. All we'll to figure out how to get around the paywall. Like how many email addresses do i have to come up with a fake doing subscription would renan like it real quick. It's are taking the money out of the account like people want me information and they're going to try to get it while i would hope that the because that's what sad for me. Someone doesn't try it all they just give up and they don't need to know what.

Nate domon vong joan mark apple google danielle
"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"You want out of your journalists or what. You don't want. What i want is just honesty if you have a background that are part of your life. Then my 'cause you think one way more than the other just be honest about it. Just put it all out there and let the reader decide now. There are certain things that obviously like i could never write a story about the groups. I used to work there so that'd be someone else enough post job if something happened at the rude or something happened. Geo media which was our parent organization. Somebody else probably should write that article. That's not me. So i do believe that there's n- it has to be a line. You know like you can be like the daughter of the bisco heiress writing in journalism. But she probably shouldn't about nabisco ever so that's My wife point there but everyone has biases. Everyone has opinions. Everyone has these thoughts and to me. It's better to just be upfront about where you're coming from. The pretend like they don't exist. I felt when you pretend like they don't exist. You fall into this trap impart of this idea. That unbiased thinking is only one type of thinking and historically the united states. That's been basically where it's like. Well whatever white men think is unbiased. Everyone else's buys if you're a woman you can't write about rape you've been raped before. So what are you know about it and what you might have an opinion. And it's like what like. I could see a lot of value in someone who actually have experience with sexual assaults and the history behind it and lives in their lives as a woman in writing about this experience and then they can write about it from away. That's factual and informative and that's well sourced and well reported out but they can also it's like it's to me. It's silly just pretend like everyone just comes into journalism like some blank slate. Like we're just own program computers. They're just waiting for the data to get typed in. It's just that's not how people work. I guess it makes sense to then have those twitter bio saying you know my tweets are my own opinions. They don't represent my publication. But you do get to know the journalists. Yes i think is always a a very nice thing. But i'm kind of curious to so a lot of newsrooms have been dealing with this kind of host trump slump in coverage the past eighteen to six years or take There is a very tumultuous new cycle. And you know a lot of it was hung up around politics now. You're dealing with the newsroom. In this post trump era are there any topic areas that you're particularly focused on to try to combat any maybe slumps audience. Are you even seeing any kind of dips in an audience at all or is that not something you're seeing even i mean we've definitely seen some tips but i don't call it a post trump slump. I call it like a return to what it was like before trump. There wasn't literally something crazy happening. Every day that was called every other president before the presidency of donald trump. We're little you have like nothing really spin pinned in things and should have never been national story would become a national thorough. And you'd be like wow everyone's talking about la la. I'll tell you why it was a magical time. It was called a slow newsday away. Suddenly you know someone. We're saving like a squirrel from a pond with the thing on cnn. So our alpacas llamas a couple of years. It was balloon boy. Oh you know that was like a whole thing. There was a boy and a balloon await. There actually wasn't that was amazing. An amazing time so if anything what we're seeing is like A correction from a very news heavy scandal heavy activity heavy outrage heavy time when people were really key because it was just so much going on and so much to absorb that kind of slowly trickled back into some level of normalcy. Like we're still not back. Pandemic we still have thousands upon thousands of people getting sick and in many cases dying every day from a global pandemic. And so it's like we're not quite back yet but we are at a point where the new cycle is starting to get back to how it used to be before and so for me. You know the i kind of want to our newsroom. To focus on is talking about how what the last you know. Four years the trump presidency. And how the current republican party how it's structured. How is that impact people's lives future. We have a huge problem with voter suppression. You know we have huge problems with the fact that you have several members of congress pretend like january sixers didn't happen and then nobody should be held accountable for it and so we try to focus on again like signing ways to bring things to light and really push these points that are a threat to our. Democracy are a threat to our free press. We wanna bring those issues to light and really highlight them and showcase them and get people talking about them because they're really important to us. But i've always been the type of person where it's like. Even though traffic is great. I love traffic. Got no problem with traffic. I mean at the root. I got traffic up by three hundred percent. Amazing but i don't live my life by it because i feel like that's a fool's errand. If you get caught to the ebbs afloat in your you'll just change your coverage for just about anything that you have to have a true north star you have to have a soul you have to have a core of what you will will not report and to me. That's more important to have a core that she believed because people will come back for that. People will invest in your news organization for that. You'll gain the respect that you need and eventually get the audience that you want because but at the same time like you also have to be your overseeing editorial but you have to be mindful of the business side of course kelly when he spoke to jonah last year for the podcast about the half sale. He said what he wanted. Huffpost to be profitable by the end of this year. Yeah i think that was the annenberg So how are you managing the cost or you know. Kind of managing the cost of huffpost against traffic being down in whatever impact that has on revenue. Because you all are primarily ad-supported. Well the the thing is is that. I tried to look for different ways that we can invest in what we already have our maximize what we've already have historically have done in order to increase revenue. So we talk a lot about different ways to packers things different audiences that we can reach out to. I mean when. I was at the root We went through this amazing period. Which i believe is still ongoing. Air people finally start to pay attention to divert your media and we're willing to actually invest in it. Spend their dollars in our in our in our journalism and so those that same curiosity here have post because we have these legacy brands and so there's a lot of curiosity and a lot of interest from advertisers and how they can reach diverse on as to our legacy diverse brands and so I've done a lot of thought and a lot of work on how we can help enhance and bolstered that as well as create content. That is attractive advertise which darby up to that strategy because like oh always something. That's been surprising to me. Because i again i think of huffpost. I just think that supported new site. So you know we have this amazing shopping section which is doing really well. We're actually hiring right now for it and we have all these amazing writers who are like like like prime day was huge for us or we talked a lot about all the different son interesting products that were available like even i like because of our wonderful reporting like bought an ice maker that i did not even already device maker but it looks so cool you know and i mean that's the beauty of the commerce post where it's like it's still well.

Geo media nabisco donald trump la la united states cnn sixers twitter republican party Huffpost congress jonah kelly packers darby
"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Jona and mark you mention diversify and the coverage like i mean i imagine anyone coming into an iron chief role. There is that opportunity for it to be something of a blank slate. Obviously it's elegant balance because change is tough but at the same time sometimes changes is necessary. Oh are you thinking about like diverse in the coverage specifically and also like is there a relation where he also thinking of how do you diversify the coverage in a way to like also differentiate from buds fitness. Because i know as someone on the complete outside i still i still see both as about general news outlets. They're gonna be naturally competitive in the same way that any news outlet is competitive. Well bussey news very distinct and the fact that is only originally reported news. That's all pretty much majority of what they do whether it's entertainment news whether it's politics whether it's breaking news it's all originally reported out at huffpost. We do original report news. We also do lifestyle. We also do lots of fun things with their team but we have our historical legacy diverse officing offerings. Like black voices and latino voices. we have not just political coverage very robust that. We're really well known for but we have our breaking news coverage that does everything from original according to scouring the internet the most obscure stories that we can help amplify like they're really just amazing folks. And so i that's what makes it. Different is how huffpost is slightly more general. It skews more like traditional newsroom. In the fact that it covers so many different topic areas and so many different types of beads but what separates huffpost which additional newsroom is. Our voice is the type of stories we choose tackle how we address them and how we address our coverage you know. I always a since. I came on board. Huffpost is a reality based news organization like we deal in facts. When you have to say that i would say so and we We deal with how things are not how we would want them to be so even though you could say that we're progressive leaning in some aspects. The reality is it's not like we're like you know holding joe biden's hand the presidency like we're just as critical as anybody else would be. Sometimes we you know we. We've helped someone might even call us a little harsh. But it's like us. It's necessary to speak truth to power and to hold people accountable. No matter who they may be and no matter. What party is in power. And i think that's what separates the difference between someone or an organization. It's more of a cheerleader. And one that's more based in actual reality and facts. We're gonna take a quick break to hear from sponsor and we'll be right back. I'm james o'brien head of production at custom digital media's in house agency in this podcast interstitial story sponsored by mountain we're diving deep into a tale of marketing transformation as connected. Tv finds itself at the top of the heap when it comes to advertising with sight sound and motion the way advertising teams are working together is radically different than even several years ago. There's an evolution going on. What's interesting about connected. Television or performance television specifically is been that performance markers have sort of stumbled on something that's traditionally been viewed as a classic ran marketing channel. But now that it's been brought digital. And now that it's accountable. Performance marketers have connected television in their crosshairs Because it turned out that it's actually a highly performing channel we're talking with alli hairy vice president of marketing. Mount his team's spend a ton of time working with tv advertisers. He told us that. The dynamics between performance marketing and brand marketing are changing right in front of their eyes. Here's the story from a recent campaign with a well known national rental car brand which started with their branding agency but became performance moment. And so in this case the client was monitoring their google analytics account can started noticing that they were getting tremendous volume of traffic coming in by way of these television campaigns and the traffic was actually converting. The campaign was doing exactly what it should have. And so the the the client was so curious. They reached out to us directly. He reached out because they were fascinated that they were saying that. These tv campaigns that they're branding agency was actually reading for them was resulting in a lot of great performance for their brand. Evolution is a process of course in another example alley talks about a legacy industry and campaigns. That have been featured quite the same eyes open approach. Major movie studio was using our platform to run Campaigns in support for upcoming movie and during the on boarding process. We instructed them. Your are your pixels that you're gonna put on your website to track conversions and they said. Hey we don't we don't need that we just we just want the add to be seen by many people as possible so they were already in the frame of mind having no expectation from a measurability standpoint they really approached it from linear. Tv standpoint so yes change takes time however working with one of the world's largest financial services companies alleys teams are pretty well convinced. The evolution will be televised from flat screens to your mobile video player. The thing that really sold the brand team in this example was they They loved the fact that they could They could measure something like visit rate because in the past they would run. Tv campaigns linear tv campaigns. Ab throw up on the screen. Some sort of url l. for the website. That was customized for that ad campaign. But there's no assurance that who sees that ad is necessarily going to use that they love the fact that Through cross device measurement We were able to to Calculate a disarray of everybody. Who served the ad that went onto their website. That was really hooked in the the brand marketers. Now we're in a place where we've we've scaled up with his client considerably and now half of the budget that we get from. This plane is actually from the branding team. You've been listening to ali hairy vice president of marketing at mountain our sponsor on this episode and now back to the digital podcast. How do you strike that balance though. Where 'cause then you still have people out there who unless you're a purely objective journalism outlet and some journalist believe this to lake journalists shouldn't be taken sides anything like that but then we are seeing largely a generational difference then. There are journalists. Who just like no. I wanna be taken aside and trying to thread. That needle of i can still report the facts but i can also be the one making sense of the facts but for another cohort of journalists. That's just a no no because historically that's just been the know how you arriving at what.

Jona custom digital media alli hairy james o'brien joe biden mark google ali hairy
"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Being like some people like just like to be in charge. I guess it's fun for them. They just want to be in charge. It doesn't matter whether they actually care about people that i genuinely care about people. When i was in bakersfield i was a cub reporter there for five years and i used to talk to everyone. The news route would visit. Everyone's desk and check them all up and i used to tell my bosses interest payment. Be the newsroom. Therapists can just talked to everybody all day. Listen to their problems and help them figure out how to solve them and help them with their stories. And that that's basically what i'm doing now. I'm the newsroom therapist. And so i come at it in a self deprecating humble way where i really respect what they do and i know what they've gone through because i've been there before and you mentioned you didn't really want to come into this role having any like assumptions of how things were run right but you were previously editor of the route so you have leadership experience. Were there any learnings that you took from previous jobs into this role when it comes to maybe your management style or you know the way you like to lead a newsroom. I think for me. The number one thing i learned to lead with empathy. That's like i've had pretty much every job. You can have a newsroom. I've been a social media editor staff writer. I've been a blogger. I've even taken photographers and drawing illustrations. So it's like you name it. If it was a job in journalism at some point i tried to take it and do it and maybe i succeeded or failed. You know who knows. Just how these things go. I exceeded all right. So leading with empathy was one. The other was radical transparency. You know i'm very upfront about everything that's going on with me and everything that's going on in my newsroom. So people don't like it when people are surprised if he has the worst thing ever for an employee to be shocked the like. Oh my god. I didn't know i wasn't performing up to snuff. I'd rather have these regular conversations with you so you know where you stand and so like at the root like every weekly meeting. Since we were a small team. I would do like at the end of the meeting. I would always do a series of shoutouts to everyone who did exemplary work over the past week and it was it was anyone you could just helped a staff writer. At philip staff is one of the story you could have launched a massive projec- you could have written the most popular story on the site that day or you could have just helped me with a task. I couldn't have done without without your support. And so i was shocked that out and it was important for me to shut up. Not just the people who are on the frontlines are writers. But also our editors copy editors anyone who really pitched in and went above and beyond the call of duty. So it's really important to me to give feedback and so at huffpost. I do a monthly email. The second round up that need to actually write soon in the month. Talk about what i liked. And what great work that individuals are doing and really try to phrase people but i also try to take time out during the month. Reach out to people individually and let them know if i really like something that they did. So that's really took away from the root and also just being honest. I feel like far too often. People think that if you admit to a mistake it's a weakness when actuality it's a strength it's very hard to admit when you've messed up and me and my staff at the route. We really grew together. This was my first major editorial position at a large pop eleven medium sized publication when a large audience and so there were times in the beginning. Where it's like. We were growing so fast and we were moving so quickly that i had to learn some lessons the hard way and i will just have to level with my staff and just be honest with what was going on with me so they could understand how best to support the organization and ensure our success and so i really encourage other people were management positions to not feel like. They can't be honest with their staff. Go back to newsroom therapists because coming in as the newsroom therapist zooms needed a lot have needed a lot of therapy lately. But then huffpost in particular coming off the sale to buzzfeed or is like a little over a month before you came on there was round of layoffs. So what were the things that you were hearing from staff when you were initially on that list. I think the main concerns were how separate where we're going to be from buzzfeed overall and will there be more. Layoffs you know hus- host had really a bled a lot under its ownership with verizon where they weren't allowed to really replace staff and then have the layoffs was like just a gut punch for a lot of people even though they were necessary for the financial health company so when i came on board the main thing that i wanted to project a calmness that we're past the worst of this and now we're going to enter a period of growth because we've proven that we're a valuable platform to the larger buzzfeed family that we are growing. We are relevant. Where breaking stories you know and i want our team to continue to grow and to glance branch off the different avenues in areas of coverage. 'cause i think that's really really important to not only have a more diverse news room. And i'm talking about diversity in terms of race ethnicity differently able people etcetera etcetera the not just having more diverse newsroom but had more diverse coverage on top of that. Because i feel like that's the best way to grow. Our audience at huffpost is to have a diverse set of talents and coverage areas. So we can just bring it into why the subway. It's possible. I'm going to ask one of the questions that your staff had been asking too because we had already on when the announcement came of buzzfeed acquiring huffpost and one of the things he had said was that there was going to be a very. You know i guess. Delineated distinct separation between the huffpost and buzzfeed newsrooms. Is that kind of the vibe that you're getting now like are they two separate entities or is there kind of any overlap. That you're sensing we're definitely two separate newsrooms in my times i've been it's been six months now not once. Has you know my direct. The person i directly report to mark shoes over. Let's has never told me what we should or should not be doing. Post is completely trusted. Me with this organization. And i've had the full support of buzzfeed behind me for everything i've wanted to do so far. That's what amazing. I wouldn't have taken the job. If i didn't think and.

bakersfield philip verizon
"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Back pretty excited session coming up. What are we got kayla. Yeah we're doing a live recording of the digital podcast which is really exciting because both of us took over the podcast during the pandemic so we haven't even recorded like a single session in person yet so now we're doing it in front of whole crowd which is really exciting and we have a great guest. We are joined by daniel belton. Who is the editor in chief of huffpost and this session is rounding out our mini series on editors-in-chief newsroom leaders. People like danielle who have taken over large news newsrooms during the past year year and a half. So welcome dan. Yeah thanks for coming on the podcast. Thanks for having me so as we mentioned. This is the final episode in this series that we've been doing on people who have taken the reins of newsrooms over the past year and a half. You obviously have pretty good size newsroom. But also really interesting newsroom. At the time when he took over where it didn't have in editor in chief for more than a year. So what was that like coming into an environment. Where not only are you the new editor in chief and so they're naturally going to be some skepticism because these are journalists but also these people who haven't had that leader. Well you know. I think in the case of posters. They went so long without netter chief the fact that there was going to be one put into place and that they were going to have their own leader independent of buzzfeed and buzzfeed. News meant a lot. So i felt like the reaction i got was actually more warm. Anything else and one of relief where it was like. Oh we're going to be our own still are independent newsroom. We're going to have someone who will champion for us within the company. We're gonna have like our own team our own set of values our way of life. That's all going to continue so if anything it was more of a sign of stability and so everyone was really nice. Thank goodness my previous staff at the root basically saying my praises to anyone who would listen those references. It was good references. I checked out everyone. One went through my twitter feed. Didn't see anything too crazy and we're like okay. She's probably cool so if anything the only thing that's been awkward as starting in the middle of the pandemic where everything's remote you know you don't see anyone and then then that's very awkward for make some people person. I get a lot of my energy from being around other people so that was a big adjustment for me. How did you go about that. Because i think i heard that you did this kind of lake listening tour. You really wanted to hear what your newsroom was. Asking for. And looking for a new leader i guess. Can you talk about those first few weeks in trying to make a good impression and meet the people that you're now leading sure so i am acted a ninety day plan the first thirty days of night as i was listening to her which i extended for video must've duration of the ninety plant into infinity. People still can talk to me now and forever tour and idea behind it was was that coming from the rule where i'd been there for over six years so like i knew the newsroom. Like the back of my hand. I'd started out as an associated editor before that. I was a freelancer. So i knew every aspect of what it was like to work at the route from just being like someone who was i getting paid per storage is trying to meet deadline to all the way to someone who was an editor working with a staff and a team so i knew everything from the cms. You know how people filed the structure was like. I'm going to this blind. I know nothing. And i'm like. Wow this is. This is a brand new experience and the last thing i wanted to do was to come in and start telling people and changing things started just ordering people around without having any idea of how things historically have been done at the organization and so i was like what's the fastest way i can get up to speed. I can literally talk to everyone. And so i spoke to teams spoke to individuals spoke to staff writers as the people the audience team people in sales every one and one of the wonderful things about huffpost. We have quite a few team members who've been part of the organization for over ten years. So they were able to give me like a great overview of the last of the history going back to the ariana days. Know what it was like at huffpost. So i got a really good crash course in the history of this. You know very legendary. You know well respected organizations. I was really excited. Plus gave me just an excuse to talk which i love to do that was fun for me but it was also fun to just have facetime and so i am joined it so much that the end result was in the last this last month doing team dinners where for my team. Members were in new york. I'll take like ten seven to ten of them out to dinner. Get to know all of them. Actually get in some face time. And that's been that's gone really well as well. And so it's like the reason why like i just kept. The policy opened forever. Because i have not your boss for like ninety days. Hopefully going to be the editor in chief for a good amount of time. And i always had an open door policy where i was before because i felt like that was the best way like. I'm not someone who has a chip on their shoulder or is really particular about who gives me feedback. You know i. Everybody has valuable feedback. They're part of this organization and when you're listening tour 'cause i can imagine if i'm an employee you're coming in. I'm talking to that and she. I may be a bit reserved like. I can't tell her everything. Or i'm not sure how if i do tell her out. I really feel how that's going to go over. Like how do you warm them. Up to trusting you to actually give you the real feedback. Well i try to be as transparent as possible about how i feel about things about why i wanted to come into the role about why i value has posted the people who work there and i would just talk about how much i've really respected. Everyone you know. These are seasoned professionals who have built their careers around the craft of you know creating stories and content and putting the facts out there so people can make the best decisions for the world around them. So i have tremendous amount of respect for this newsroom and so for me it was really more about just not.

daniel belton huffpost kayla danielle dan twitter new york
"belton" Discussed on John and Ken on Demand

John and Ken on Demand

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on John and Ken on Demand

"Johnny bench kill and ken chiampou. Kfi am six forty live everywhere on the iheartradio app. I we did have an interview. Last hour with brandon judd. He's the head of the border patrol council. That's the first union for the agents. And he was in texas. That situation in del rio texas with over twelve thousand migrants over underneath that international bridge mainly haitians. We're going to replay that five o'clock you got to hear it a lot of good insights there from somebody right at the scene. Somebody at the border unlike president to may have ever been to the. Us mexico border as far as anybody knows but then again why should he. He enjoys the delaware and washington. Dc his favorite spot says back. That little shooter train ride. He takes what he does like every weekend or tiny just turning back off the delaware to go sitting bunker. That's what he's done every the whole campaign to since he got to the senate in nineteen seventy two back and forth on it little churches. Didn't he get an award for trips. Yeah on amtrak with a ten billion forty one. oh it's time for a public service announcement. What what what's your guests john. Koh belton debra mark. How many polyps did i have in this colonoscopy. I had today wow okay. If you're right you win one. Oh god i do have them here in a bar that's disgusting. I'm gonna say four okay. Too right between three three. yeah three. That was weird yes threes it are they flat polyps or i didn't see them deborah. I was knocked out. Oh they didn't they didn't let you take them home no they offer them. It's not what a parting gift. I think you have to ask. Do.

ken chiampou brandon judd border patrol council Johnny bench texas del rio delaware Koh belton debra mark mexico washington senate Us john deborah
"belton" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

Project Upland Podcast

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

"Yep yep so that that's important up your dog like to swim. He does actually he does. And he's we've got quite a bit of water work this summer. I think that. I think that played a lot into his one thing. I've heard is the underwater. Treadmill is one of the most effective rehab techniques for the teepee yellow. And we just so happen to have like go to my cabin. It's just a shallow sandy beach. There's it's sandy. Bottom water and hartley. Just it's just him. Rose doesn't do it but hartley is obsessed with the blue gills and he will go down there for hours on end. I mean unless. I literally pull him out of the water. He will wade up and down the shore on the saudi sandy bottom through the water chasing blue gills and. He's he did that all summer. And i think that really helps. This is basically an underwater treadmill. I mean water. is there a speaker. Quick story Sled dog gets hit in the back. standards the po- vist They had to cut the head of the femur off or the fault socket played between the pelvis. The whole together ins screws the whole nine yard And i did. It was still cold in march. Where i was at and i was doing water therapy Swimming the dog in the finding had chest waders on and swimming that dog over and over and over again because it just helps them because they're not king against something else just a lot easier for them. You know and back that you know. You're looking into the shots. You know i would use some X rays the c word. Where you stand. You have a baseline right now. So then you're going to want to just keep up on that and you're feeding the postman. Drayton is good. I don't know if laser therapy would help on anything like that or not. I mean ask her that this belton thing that's causing now granted. I had laser therapy down on a live dog sitting in small tears muscles or like strained hips and things like that but you know hurt down there. You hurt down there. Yeah yeah got it. Yeah i just wanted to run that one by you and get your thoughts. And i've got a got a call into my vet. We didn't connect last week. But i'm gonna call again tomorrow and just kind of go over. That said just come across adequate and as far as i understand you know i will. I will certainly consult with that but it seems to be a very low risk high reward possibility. There's there's really not really any side effects from it and a lot of anecdotal stuff. That i read it on the internet. So it's got to be true and right. They have a lot of people's seemed add. Good results and for me. You know i'm committed to this recovery and to see him to see him bounce back so quickly on the left side you know. It's just it's a bummer. To see the his right side holding them back so just kind of looking into stuff there but the other thing. I wanted to ask you about not to have the last question. Be like a downer thing. But i just wanted to. You mentioned something earlier that made me think of it. But i didn't have this written down or anything but wolves wanted to get your thoughts on. How do you think about going into wolf country. Which you know. I've said this many times before. There's not a place that i hunt that isn't wolf countries so it's just something i live with. But what are your thoughts around that and do you take any precautions or do you do anything in particular to avoid encounters with wolves. Well i honestly moved to. Bigger dogs runs with higher. Your chances of having something happened. Yeah are not to. I'm just saying that's just the way it is going to happen to bear dogs. Yeah you just don't realize that these animals are very territorial and if you happen to be going through an area that they have young pups well it will be good. I think a lot of hunting is slowing watching. The dog is watching everything around here. And i'm not saying i'm not working. I'm looking for war signs. Yeah you know and you start to see you know the scott with the firm the bones in it in the size of it and you consistently seeing in your you bumps and out here. I leave aspect twice. I don't care how many birds we'd be putting up. I would leave. And i'm looking for tracks in that i mean had a friend fly in from pa and We were looking around. And i said that's an awful lot of bureaucrats is the running the house right now. I know they're pushing the bear. But i said look at multiple bear tracks on it. That's country there too. Big is big blocks in you can have. It happened anywhere. Yeah there isn't a cut that you can go in that you can't say hasn't gone through it right. I think it's knowing where your dog is. I think it's the other thing i know i won't do. This is just me. You know maybe you wanna call me chicken and there's part of me that there's a chicken so i i write till dusk because things start to change. Go bump in the night. Yeah yeah well. And i try to be back when it's you know you'll start to hear the owls. Can't the coyotes and all that or whatever you know. You know here. Coyotes on fine. It's when i don't hear it kayo said i wonder okay. This is more wolf country. This is the coyotes. Wolves don't like to be on friday. Yeah i've heard that won't just Make decisions on how you would handle your own situation. But i just be very aware. Yeah different than looking for tracks. Yep you know you just have to be aware of your surroundings and you looking for science and you wanna signs. That people don't really know is if you go through a high grass area in say they're cutting you know in high grass fourteen but if you see tunnels that are two and a half to three eight high. That's waltz orcades usually higher and it's like oh that keeps going to because they they just go from one side of the trail and cross running. Then i start to worry about things Because i know i'm crossing paths with their running from one side to the other you get there. Those are things more than just scat in smarter than just you know in sandy areas a lot of times on a little bit of butto be like around rendezvous area so since things with look at. Yeah i think. I had told the story on the podcast before but we had a day last fall where we basically just did everything. He told me to where it was our last day. We were walking down this road. I had my puppy as with my buddy jay from michigan and there was two other guys they went another way and we saw three or four piles of wolf scattered on the ground and kept on hunting and we had an uneventful hunt. Got it in some birds and except for the fact that my puppy rose who gosh she was probably three or four months old at the time. It was right when she was she was sort of becoming. Very independent and confident. She had two instances where she was four. Hundred yards away from me during this hunt and i was kind of and that was. It was so uncharacteristic of her up to that point and got her back and she was there for a minute and then she was gone again and then she was like six or seven hundred yards away for me and like one of those things. Where if if i don't if you don't have a gps caller. I mean like i would have had a heart attack. Probably but like just the fact that i could look down and see where she was was the only reason that i was able to halfway. Keep my cool. And what are you going to do. It's not like she can hear you..

shallow sandy beach hartley belton Drayton coyotes Rose Swimming swimming kayo Coyotes pa jay michigan heart attack
"belton" Discussed on John and Ken on Demand

John and Ken on Demand

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on John and Ken on Demand

"This is our of the long slow march. Let's start converting the single homes into duplexes. And now you've got four or six homes on a one home lot that's beginning of it. Next thing will be okay. Well let them build a whole apartment building. Be eight stories in the air and suddenly every other lot in the neighborhood is an eight story apartment building and and you know over ten twenty thirty years time everything gets gets transformed. And that's what they want. And the and their unholy alliance was with developers because developers and the construction industry. They gonna salivating for a fortune doing it. So they had their wacky progressive ideology to get us out of our cars and make us live urban style and at the same time you got developers and those those people are completely amoral. They had the politics. All they want is is the catch and you know they. They bribe politicians of the number one. Bribing industry baby second next to the teacher's union is are these construction and developer interests. We got more coming up. John and ken. Kfi turn on the microphone. John and ken show john belton ken. Chiampou kfi am six forty five everywhere on the iheartradio app. The popular podcast. Joe rogan a vaccine skeptic announced that he was tested positive for covert nineteen. That's hope he doesn't join the.

john belton ken ken John Joe rogan
Gordon Chang Explains China's Massive Belt and Road Initiative

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Gordon Chang Explains China's Massive Belt and Road Initiative

"Or tributary nations. That will be simply vassals. Is that an over-simplification. How does one belt one road work. What is the global vision for china as it looks at the world coming up to the hundred anniversary of the communist revolution the belton road initiative as it's now called is really started out. As to initiatives there was a belt and these were announced the in september two thousand thirteen there was a belt which was to connect the east coast of china to europe and it was a road which was a water route connecting both locations east coast of china and europe since then Dalton road has been extended around the world and they've added the digital silk road which started out life in two thousand fifteen or so as a separate plan but was incorporated into belt road so belton road is really an attempt to build the infrastructure to tie the world to china now. This gets a little bit complicated. I've never really been too worried about belton road largely because i've tracks long hong kong. I didn't do infrastructure work but my firm did and i can tell you that. All of the economically justifiable projects in the world were being handled by the private sector. What china's doing is building the infrastructure. That nobody else wanted to. Yeah and so and subsidizing it been below market rates. Yes there is a danger. Though and that is we have seen What's called dead trapped diplomacy because these projects are not economically justifiable for the most part but what china has been able to do was to uses position as a creditor to take over control of facilities so for instance it took control of hambantota which is important sri lanka. We know that china has used. Its colombo international container terminal also sri lanka For military purposes djibouti china's really offshore military installation is in a country that has a debt to china that is probably an excess of one hundred percent of its gross domestic product. So that's no coincidence. But the reason why. I've get really worried about belton. Road is because of the bahamas. Yes in the bahamas. Hong kong firm is pouring something like three billion. Maybe a little bit more into the freeport container port. It's also there's a

China Europe Hambantota Hong Kong Sri Lanka Colombo Djibouti Bahamas Belton
"belton" Discussed on Morbid: A True Crime Podcast

Morbid: A True Crime Podcast

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Morbid: A True Crime Podcast

"They had to get charles and ritchie warned. Now they just had to get charles and ritchie warned them that they would never get a confession out of him. Because he had told richie quote. If i'm ever caught. I'll never confess that way. They never know and the not knowing will torture them. Why like he said what we always assume literally told us like hey insider tip from psycho crazy evil faster ages. Yup this is why we do that. Like guys how many times have we said like they definitely do that. Just to make the torture last forever. And he's like yeah he's like no that's literally what am i. Coined that term. I did it for him. I like i like whoa literally said according to ritchie that's wildly evil so remember mary. French ya yes. She was arrested on november. Fifteenth nineteen sixty five in belton texas good ritchie had said that she was lying about a leans murder and he knew for a fact that she witnessed the entire thing that she hadn't been so i i do too but ultimately she was charged with concealing and compounding felony and being cesary to elise murder the arizona daily star reported on december twenty first nineteen. Sixty five quoque displaying. Not a flicker of emotion. Mary ray french slant a slender nineteen year. Old brunette heard herself sentence yesterday to spend four to five years in state prison. She was out of prison within three years for good behavior. Staw for good behavior and for working in prison staw three years. That's a travesty. John saunders pleaded guilty to second degree murder and he got life in prison good. He was nineteen years old when he was sentenced at his sentencing. He told the judge. I dedicate the rest of my life to make myself a better person to live with cool. It won't matter. The judge allowed him to have christmas with his family and he was sent to prison the very next day..

ritchie charles richie Mary ray Old brunette belton arizona daily star elise mary texas John saunders
"belton" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"It's it went strikeout. Single strikeout okay. So we've got point. We're totally fine. We got a tweet from a guy named corey barack he says i haven't looked this up. So i'm trusting corey. He says ten straight kenley jansen appearances that have not been clean. Fifteen hits and seven walks with only ten strikeouts. You know once he gives up a hit where this is going wild. That's true but i'll check it. Yeah i mean if he says he says fifteen appearances without oh no. He's given up fifteen hits in his last ten appearances. Which you can't do closer because you're either coming in with a one or two or and lead it just doesn't make sense to keep going to the same move. Yeah i think that's look. He's got a role he's got play it. He's the reason why they've won nine games this year. It's the reason why. I've got the second best record in baseball. He's been great all season long. And you've got to be able to suffer through a bad week. Which is what the dodgers are doing right now. But i i. We're gonna put him back out there. Dave roberts is right saturday night. We will or sunday. Whenever we're in a close closer situation to save situation we will see kenley again because he's critical especially prior to the trade deadline. It's critical that they find a way to protect kenley jansen to get them back right by the way going back to something. Plunkett brought up after this four-game series which the giants won three out of four. Can we now say. The giants are for real. That they're going to be there in the end and probably be in the postseason or do you still think they fall and fade away. You don't want it's a very well constructed team you know just haven't seen it up close for the last couple of days. We like is far as their defense is absolutely lockdown. They do every little thing right they. They've all the intangibles because they've got veteran guys. That have been there like brandon crawford and buster posey and brandon belton. Those guys it really is kind of a team of journeyman but it has added up to more than the some of its pieces. Is that a correct expression. It's more than the sum. Some or the whole is more than the some of its part yes. That's exactly what they've got going on up there and they've got an completely locked down bullpen. They actually have to closures. I think we've seen both of them. Tyler rogers blew up in one of those games. He blew up in the. Will smith walk off so they went to jake. Mcgee the former dodger last night and he was able to shut him down. They've got they've got just a lockdown bullpen and the makes a huge difference by the way dodgers bullpen. I just looked up three point. Seven three e. r. a tenth best in major league baseball so their upper third bullpen. And i questioned that stat about kenley jansen. The one ten straight appearances giving up fifteen hits in seven runs fifteen yeah prior to but it makes sense because over the last two games. He's giving up seven runs on seven. Hits yeah prior to sunday. Gone fifteen appearances without giving up a run. So he was. He was rolling going into that colorado game that that he blew the save and of course the hit the terrible blown. Say that that. I read that guy sent in is heavily swayed by the last two games correct because prior to that know the kennedy thing.

kenley jansen corey barack giants Dave roberts corey dodgers brandon crawford brandon belton kenley Plunkett baseball Tyler rogers buster posey dodger Mcgee jake smith colorado kennedy
"belton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Years we've had Texas Department of Public Safety officers patrolling the border. I've been out on them and I'll tell you, you know what's crazy. The Texas DPS has better equipment than the Fed's. Their boats are better. Their planes are better. I've been up in the DPS plane. It's got incredible infrared technology where you can, It can go eight miles away, and you can spot a bit up in the air and you can spot and they'll say, Okay, there are two or three coyotes. There's a group of illegal immigrants. They're getting ready to smuggle across and what they do is they call the customs and Border Patrol agents and say, all right there crossing right here, and when you have border patrol agents able to do their job, they can stop an intercept. There you go. Ted Cruz just a few minutes ago on Fox, and he's right. Those boats are pretty cool, man. They are really cool. Amazing. Let's see. Let's squeeze in James checking in on the top of Don show, James. Good morning. Yes. Good morning. Todd and don has come with you 100% in time, but we got to reflect on this. There's other towns in the state that are not like Austin. They're not run by some kind of liberal agenda, putting false information and kids minds they teach. They teach mouth they teach science. My wife is an admin and Belton Belton is a good example of sticking to what a school is supposed to be like. And there's still plenty big towns like that. Yeah, well, you're you're right, and they're placing this crap on kids. And it's unfortunate. And it's also an example of what happens when Democrats lead a certain town. Yes, yes. The perfect example. If anything, this is all good. We'll also is doing because we learn from example of what not to do the damn future that's getting sick. No, You're right, James. I hear you, man. But there they still got quality education in Belton is what you're saying. Big time. Big time. Thank you, man. I appreciate that. And a damn good dairy queen on my They do have a great very solid is it that the belt and dairy queen is so nice? They care more. They care more. You think that's what it is. They put love into a country basket like nobody else. I don't know, Man we got we got a couple of new dairy queens.

Todd two James Austin 100% Ted Cruz Belton eight miles don Fed Texas Department of Public Saf Democrats three coyotes Fox Belton Belton few minutes Don Texas DPS
"belton" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Dick rowland still secure in his county jail cell and now turning to fight with they believed was a negro uprising. When the shooting began it seemed to be everywhere at once. The police force with wholly unprepared. For some reason. There were few police officers on the street that night. The normal patrols were missing. That laps was part of a broader pattern of actions either intentional or due to incompetence that would eventually see police chief. John gustafsen convicted for neglect of duty. Gossen had just been appointed to his position the previous year. He had a dubious history. Sheriff mukalla despised him. Shortly after gessen's appointment mccullough complained to the city. Commissioner of the new police chiefs decades long ball met with switches and crooks mukalla direly predicted. The gulf system would be counted on to higher that same class of people as his new police. Officers and mccullough was right. Only two weeks before roland was arrested. The city concluded an investigation into the force prompted by numerous complaints of ineptitude sexual abuse of female prisoners and corruption officers were known to confiscate illegal alcohol and either use it themselves or sell it. Sometimes to their prisoners the investigation went though and world. Newspaper headline may had reported impeachment of falls flat but perhaps gusts of sins. Worse violation of law and order had come earlier when roy belton was launched. A line of hundreds of cars had followed the mob out to the remote location. Where belton what's to be hanged rather than trying to stop the beach landings and save belton justice and directed traffic after the murder gossips and said he didn't condone mob law but he added. It is my honest opinion that the lynching of belton will.

John gustafsen Gossen Dick rowland mccullough belton hundreds of cars roy belton gessen mukalla roland Sheriff negro officers previous year few two weeks that night
"belton" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"belton" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Where it pays to fight crime. Here's Jamie West. This is a true nightmare. On Christmas. It was December 25th 2007 when 36 year old Aaron Taylor was found severely burned outside the subway restaurant. At Cactus and 44th Street. Aaron had not torched himself absolutely believed at the scene that he was set on fire by someone else. Phoenix police Sergeant Jamie Rothchild says Aaron didn't survive his injuries and was apparently hanging out with a group of teenage boys that he knew knowing that teens were seen running from the area leads us to believe these air very strong suspects. This isn't a case that detectives are going to give up on one of the things that really sticks out about this case is that it occurred on Christmas Day. But also that he was burned to death, which is an incredibly painful way to die. Next 69 year old M Adult in can be seen on video arriving at his condo It's Central and Encanto just after eight on the morning of April, 24th 2011 Get a guy with him. About three hours later, he was discovered in the hallway of the building with an obvious head injury for Mr Belton passed away from his injuries. He was able to give police a little information. The man who was with was in his early twenties White average build and was carrying a tan colored messenger bag. He's seen on video, leaving a Mr Bolton's SUV, which was later found your 35th Avenue in Glendale. So we're hoping between one of the two locations whether it's 35th Aven, Glendale, her central in Encanto, It's somebody who knows the suspect or had talked to the suspect and can give us more. Formacion on this case, find the link with pictures and more details about these cases and Katie are Com Click Menu, Scroll down the blog's and silent witness. I'm Jamie West, Katya Our news. If you have information about a felony crime and wished to remain anonymous contact, silent witness at 48,.

Aaron Taylor Jamie West Encanto Mr Belton Jamie Rothchild Glendale Mr Bolton Phoenix Katie
Chadwick Boseman buried near South Carolina hometown

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Chadwick Boseman buried near South Carolina hometown

"Boseman was buried near his South Carolina hometown six days after he died at his home in Los Angeles that from a death certificate obtained today by the AP. The Black Panther's star was laid to rest September 3rd at Welfare Baptist Church Cemetery in Belton, South Carolina. That's about 11 miles from Bozeman's home town of Anderson. They held a public memorial for Bozeman. A day later in Anderson, Very few outside of his family knew that Bozeman was fighting colon cancer. He played Black Panther in four Marvel movies. He started the Jackie Robinson biopic 42. He also portrayed James Brown and Thurgood Marshall in films. Chadwick Boseman was 43.

Bozeman South Carolina Chadwick Boseman Anderson Welfare Baptist Church Cemeter Thurgood Marshall Jackie Robinson Belton Colon Cancer Los Angeles AP James Brown
Shinzo Abe: Japan's PM resigns for health reasons

Between The Lines

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Shinzo Abe: Japan's PM resigns for health reasons

"Well Shinzo Abe was Japan's longest-serving later and he surprised the world last week with his resignation. Now, alibi had been in power at an early stage in two thousand and six, hundred seven, and that I turn was cut short by the same illness that prompted him to leave power in late August. Now, when he departed politics the first time this is in two thousand and seven virtually all the experts they will wrote obeys political obituary however, one Australian diplomat who has fallen Japanese politics closely for half a century he didn't off by indeed he predicted a remarkable political comeback any kept in touch with our by during his wilderness years. When I buy shocked the political world bartending power five years later in two thousand, twelve that Australian as it happens hit become ambassador to Japan and relations between our two nations became close them. Bruce Miller was Australia's ambassador to Japan from eleven to twenty seventeen bruce welcome to our in. Lobby to be here. Join you. Now tell us more about the night show of your relations with. Well look thanks for the very generous comments. Just made just doing my job and that is getting to know everyone matters and bring influence to ban to advance Australia interests now. I had known since I bet a previous postings in Japan had forty association with the country but I suppose it was when I ride back in. Japan in two thousand eleven as ambassador. That I actually sought him out at a time when he was a down and out he was as you said, he'd step down for the prime ministership in two thousand seven a know what he's going to be pm again now I went around calling all sorts of people in my first few months in the job as ambassador and one of the machine. So I've. Talked to him quite a bit of the year or two between my rival and him returning to the Prime Ministership and where Abbott cover all sorts of things in those conversations. Bilateral relations a free trade agreement trans-pacific. Partnership. Even things like immigration and how to handle the US and how to handle. China. Now, that was a golden opportunity for. But as a site was what any of us would do presented with those those very same circumstance. Yeah. Putting comebacks are fascinating story. you think of Churchill Men's as Nixon Howard Netanyahu and of course, Dr Mahalia what kind of characteristics did obey display that made you think he could defy the odds and mount has spectacularly. Was a capacity introspection for for reflection and for pragmatist dressy learned from where he'd gone wrong and realize it was actually okay to change your mind about how you do things to show that sort of flexibility and you know he reflected long and hard after his failed attempt prime minister as to what had gone wrong. And I think he knew he realized he needed to get the economy right and didn't pay that much attention in two thousand, six, seven also realized I. think he needed to have the right people around him to get things done even if they weren't longstanding loyalists that's where it gone wrong in two thousand six too many loyalists and not enough competent people around him. And I think the last thing he realizes he need to centralize more decision making in the Prime Minister's office. And because again, he wasn't in control controlled with things the time round, those three things I can now let's turn to his record empower in Japan now, this was the Wall Street Journal editorial page quote Abe's i-it's office were characterized by he's multi-front campaign to turn Japan into a more normal country. Now, they go on to talk about domestic and foreign policy is that you'll since tubers. Well third not to use the term normal country it was coined by one of his political enemies isn't used matching inside Japan Americans like to use. But as undoubtedly true, he's done an awful lot across the board As the Wall Street Journal. said to change Japan he's is domestically lay studied I is. Mix. Of made a real difference, they can't call the nominee on a Lloyd success at all deregulation has been slow and monetary policy under Kuroda the Bank of Japan another Arrow. In the in the the three hours in. Avi. NOMEX hasn't achieved its goals of two percent inflation or let alone has Japan achieved its goal of two percent growth. But you'd find you'll find that most senior Japanese business people will sign it as stewardship economically has been good enough and look by Morton international standards the Japanese government doesn't have a bad record frankly every year and has being a signature economic reform but had big trade liberalization with had reformer the agriculture sector We've also had some improvements in corporate governance, more independent directors that sort of thing. There's been some progress on female dissipation in the workforce and more recently a more organized prior grandma foreign labor mobility. Down I call it immigration although that isn't the terminology used by the Japanese government. Now, those things seem participation, the workforce and. Immigration they're only stops they should have been started the years democracy doesn't catch up on you quickly it's a long it's a long term process, but it's still a great thing has kicked off with was. The last ten years with those those policies.

Japan Japanese Government Shinzo Abe Bank Of Japan Australia Prime Minister Bruce Miller United States Wall Street Journal Nixon Howard Netanyahu Abbott Morton International Wall Street Journal. China Dr Mahalia Lloyd
This Am a Minstrel Stereotype, Right?

Lexicon Valley

07:07 min | 2 years ago

This Am a Minstrel Stereotype, Right?

"From New York City this is Lexicon Valley. A podcast about language I'm John Mc, water and this week you know what I'm going to do frankly what I usually do, which is just bring you in what was I thinking about over the past week or two? And it was a bunch of things but I happened to be revising an academic paper that I'm writing and that paper happens to be about black English I don't usually do those but I mean exception with this one because it's a topic that really grabs me and you know when deciding what to do the show about I thought you know I'm going to do what I'm thinking about I. Don't WanNa, do it about Comma Harris or something like that I'm not. Sure. What I could get out of that I wanNA do me and so I'm gonNA share with you some stuff about the always fascinating dialect of American English black. English. It's called by academics usually. African American vernacular English but I have a hard time saying that so we're just going to call it black English and we're GONNA, look at it from various angles that I have been sitting around laying around still in semi quarantine these days and one of the things is. GonNa be the lost. Am That's what my papers about, and this is something that I've brought up on this show before, and that is the question as to whether actual black. American people ever as linguists call it over generalized an in two persons and numbers beyond where it would go and standard English and so for example, I'll tell you I am a person but in characters of black speech back in the day, the idea was that black people used am with all. Pronouns, and so you am this he am that we and the other thing that's something associated with minstrel shows and comic strips, and you would think you would quite reasonably think that that's something that white performers made up as a way of making fun of black people. That's what I thought for a very long time. But after a while various indications seem to suggest to me that actually wait a minute black people did once us am in a different way than mainstream. English does, and of course, it wasn't all black people but there have always been different ways of speaking even here in America and it seemed to me that well, you know as I'm always telling all of you language always changes and black English is no exception and so it seemed to me maybe actually the minstrels overdid it they were characterizing but maybe there was that different usage of an because all these things seemed indicated and in a show that I did. Probably back in about nineteen forty seven remember when I used to be sponsored by kraft macaroni and cheese way back. Then I said that one evidence of this is that there are vernacular British dialects. The US am in just that way you am we am the black country in Britain is sometimes called the people who are the Yam yams and what they mean by that is that they say you am saw gave you some evidence of that but that was that was. Back right after the Second World War and so what about newer evidence? Well, first of all, what do I mean by this as you might call it over generalized am well, here is one of the latest examples of it in pop culture. This is a highly insignificant. Hollywood. Cartoon from the studio that gave us such indelible characterizations as Casper, the friendly ghost and Herman and Catnip who were about the closest thing in real life to itchy and scratchy on the simpsons in. Any case, one of their other indelible characters was buzzy the Crow Buzzy. The Crow was supposed to clearly supposed to be this this black American little character remember the Dumbo crows while Buzzy was an extension of that, and so buzzy uses reflections of the old minstrel dialect. This is a cartoon called no IFS ands or buts, but spelled with two t's it's about smoking and this is what buzzy says about a cat who seems to have a smoking addiction listened closely. Tobacco smoking. To know. That Cat am Am Can am smokin fiend. Okay. So that's the character. But what's interesting is how often you see black American people depicted as speaking that way in many sources that you might think of authoritative and I have something even better than this is going to build up to a big fine. We're we're circling in. We're we're about to find the real thing but some other stuff. That I've found. So for example, there is a novel written by a Black Man, very conscious as we used to say black man eighteen, ninety, nine it's called imperium in Imperio, and the guy's name is Sutton griggs and for whatever it's worth his father was a Georgia slave. So Sutton griggs eighteen nine, he's post emancipation but he would have heard authentic black speech, the speech of. People who were denied education and what's interesting is that in one of his novels he is writing in very serious vain. We would today call him a black nationalist and he has seen where there's a black mother who is being humiliated by a racist white schoolteacher and she's trying to present her child and defend her child and what she says, and this is a black. Writer of black nationalist stamp who grew up with a father who had been at slave and not in New York City but in Georgia so we're talking about wear black English really arose and I WANNA say throws but that's not the were because it's thrived and so he has the mother saying about her child her son, his name and Belton Piedmont arteries, granddaddy arteries after so. Not His name is built in Piedmont his name and Belton Piedmont and she's a character of dignity. His name in Belton Piedmont not is built in Piedmont am. Arteries. granddaddy. What's Ardour ardor is after and shows how authentic this depiction of speech is in that we know that not only black people but also again regional vernacular speaking British people used arter and explains that problem with Jack and Jill. So Jack and Jill went up the hill to get a pail of water jack fell down and broke his Crown Jill. Came Tumbling after what the Hell is. That is that the best they can do of course, not it was Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling out. After, because, after can become after. After that is the way many people in for example, Yorkshire still say after October it's dialectal after and so they're always many people who said after and he came here and often they were either slave owners or they worked alongside slaves and so early biking, which has

Jill Belton Piedmont Buzzy Sutton Griggs New York City Jack Comma Harris Georgia John Mc Lexicon Valley Piedmont United States America Hollywood Casper Yorkshire Imperio Britain
Atlanta riots ensue after fatal police shooting of black man

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:07 min | 2 years ago

Atlanta riots ensue after fatal police shooting of black man

"Snyder protests in Atlanta following Friday night's police shooting of a black man at a Wendy's drive thru police announced overnight that the officer involved in the shooting death of twenty seven year old ray shard Brooks has been fired and others been placed on administrative leave and the police chief has resigned from member station W. A. B. E. lily Oppenheimer reports of Wendy's where Brooks was shot was set on fire last night we by the time firefighters could get to the scene flames had broken through the roof of the Wendy's protesters also blocked and shut down a major interstate nearby for hours police arrived and formed a line to push people back from the flames and make way for fire trucks when officers put on right here protesters started throwing bottles at the line officers responded with tear gas Atlanta protester Damon Belton raised his fist as the Wendy's was engulfed he says the burning is justified what other way is there to get a point across then decided we tried everything yes and it doesn't work that came only hours after it land as police chief Erika shields

Atlanta Officer Brooks Wendy Damon Belton Erika Shields Snyder W. A. B. E. Lily Oppenheimer
Being a Blockchain CEO in 2020 with Algorand CEO Steve Kokinos

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

07:12 min | 3 years ago

Being a Blockchain CEO in 2020 with Algorand CEO Steve Kokinos

"Everyone welcome back happy new year. This is Brian Circus at two. Bit Idiots for our first edition of Missouri's unqualified opinions new decade. And I'm excited to have Steve Kookiness. Who is the CEO? At ALGA rant. UP IN BOSTON We realized too late that he's actually going to be in town in just a couple of hours but that were still doing this remotely because such such such as like but you should notice new and improved equipments in sound quality. These things coming out of my ears Ashaninka Ashaninka will but easier to hear without much of a den and certainly be a marked improvement from twenty nineteen version of qualified opinion so Dive into of course but For starters See if you know. I always like to dig into the origin story of the people that were speaking with Before we get too deep into the weeds out rand and her answer twenty twenty. How did you fall down the rabbit hole and get sucked in with with this crew? Yeah and by the way. Thanks for having me happier. So in terms of In terms of Crypto I I insertive had an interesting enter to which is. I'M A serial entrepreneur by By trade and was giving a fundraising talk at ABC's events in Boston a couple of years ago. So I think this is assertively sixteen and it was all sort of normal stuff but a guy in the corner sort of spoke up at the end and said well I have surveys slightly different problem about money have issued this cryptocurrency e end have blockchain that we've created in applications around it and we're thinking we'll just sell some tokens to fund our business and I started like. Wow that's that's interesting. You're staying in had been introduced to Bitcoin Over the few years before I had some friends who are doing mining and and are really passionate about but it just never really had a lot of time but I kind of sort of my eyes opened at the idea that you know could represented differently of of funding and and kind of thinking about How businesses evolve and from there Really dove in was doing with pillar which is Boston. BCC that's one of Belgrade's investors and also union square ventures And I was introduced to several folks in the community Sort of hobbyists mining with my kids and just basement of my house. Just learn about different parts of the tech but I think what really struck me was. I started my first business in the mid nineties in the early days of the Internet and I was a very dynamic time had a lot of libertarians in underpinnings very anti commercial and really about decentralisation that was Asian at tech ironically which doesn't necessarily seem that way now I'm was also just very vibrant community out. A lot of people were really fascinated by the tech in the Philisophical underpinnings of what could happen and it was the first time I had seen anything in twenty years since that really had some of the same feel to it And and so you know more and more as I again just found the space to be fascinating and there's so many different elements to it. So it's it's been it's been an adventure for sharp. How so How did you get excited about the algorithm project in particular because One of the common themes that. I think you're quite quite a bit about this year is a quote unquote eath killers or like new and improved versions of x blockchain at an unusually. It's around around optimizing for new feature or or a new use case were some of these teams are trying to develop a wedge and make sure that they're able elect to penetrate the market and Siphon off some of the developer interest ecosystem interest from from different existing blockchain's That's a tough sell right. But but how do you see Iran position as as unique in this regard income. What's the path to success or moving up the ranks? That's all Oh yeah. So what Ella loamy kind of hit the first one I part I in that I think sort of this discussion about how sort of the cryptovest base needs to evolve twelve. I think is a really important important area. I was introduced to Silvio Through pillar and and Union Square And really fascinated me about him. Was that one of the observations I had about the space is that a lot of the tech is derivative tech. Came before it But what it really felt like there needed to be a big step like a big leap and I think using the Internet analogy again. The blockchain space felt like you know the Internet when people were still using using dialup modems. And you know there needed to be Bigger Highways Belton and better better sort of fundamental tech. And what really found found. was that Silvio Ed along with really a group of researchers here reimagined attack from the ground up and to me. That felt like it could good if you if you kind of fast forward. A couple of decades Could have the same impact of something like a google. I think really there's is kind of an inflection point I think in the market that sort of leads to to what you were suggesting about a theory I over here. We're not necessarily all that worried about being in the theorem killer. I think the space has room for multiple players. I think also our point of view is that there's GonNa be multiple chains that ultimately can focus on different areas areas One of the things that we are very focused on though is if you look at the developer community on there's about twenty million developers world less than one hundred thousand of them are building building building boxing applications every day and the other nineteen point. Nine million are the more likely place. Just statistically where the killer APPs are gonNA come from and so really making it simple oh for for those people to engage with think is incredibly important and so I think if you look at kind of the way we focused our energy it's one really softbank onto the hard fundamental computer science problems and billing platform that can be used at scale and the has Good underlying mental properties for people who are issuing financial assets. That's an transacting with each other and anyway but then the second part is making it really simple for people to get their work done In example that is is Part of outgrown two point. Oh we released -til which is a smart contract language and a lot of interesting possibilities there but what I think is Exact excellent example. Something that's even more interesting. Is We have a python interface so that anybody who writes a python script can automatically GLI compiled into its yield script without having to ever learn anything about our smart contract language. I think that's where we need to get is really take some inspiration from places like stripe and make it really easy for people to add. Decentralized elements blockchain elements to their applications without needing to learn all the underlying technical details of course online the

Boston Silvio Ed Developer Ashaninka Ashaninka Steve Kookiness Missouri Brian Circus CEO Alga Belgrade Bigger Highways Belton Google Iran ABC Union Square Softbank Ella
Jim Belton, Jim Bowden And Baseball discussed on Radio From Hell

Radio From Hell

01:35 min | 3 years ago

Jim Belton, Jim Bowden And Baseball discussed on Radio From Hell

"He was one of a kind an original he will be missed former Yankees pitcher Jim Belton has died at the age of eighty Jim Bowden a picture of modesty treatment was celebrated iconoclast who left a lasting mark on baseball as the author of bowl for a raunchy shrewd irreverent and best selling players diary the tainted the games wholesome image he died on Wednesday at his home in the Berkshires in Massachusetts he was eighty years old even if you don't follow baseball I so for some reason somebody handed me a copy once a ball for and I read it it's hilarious and the ideas and he names names he played with he played with Maris and mantle he said Mickey mantle was drunk or hungover every time he came to bat yeah he talked about a better that way Mountbatten was blackballed among baseball for years after they hated him because he because he because he named names did you make a movie about it and it it it it it made it a shortlist sitcom he was on it too for life it may elect to five episodes anyway it's if you ever get a chance if you ever just you know pick it up and read it some time even if you don't like baseball it's a funny funny and kind of kind of their Revver I mean very irreverent book he talks about Elston Howard the catcher for the Yankees swapping wives with another player and on it goes on and on and none of the players are faithful to their wives on the road you know all the ins including him bounces including me I

Jim Belton Jim Bowden Baseball Massachusetts Maris Mickey Mantle Mountbatten Elston Howard Yankees Revver Eighty Years
 Pakistan secures preliminary deal for $6B IMF bailout

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Pakistan secures preliminary deal for $6B IMF bailout

"Pakistan, and the IMF have agreed on the terms for another bailout. Details from Bloomberg's Denise Pellegrini. The preliminary deal involves six billion dollars over a three year period that's less than the eight billion the country had asked for to deal with a long-running fiscal crisis. The IMF executive board has agreed to meet to approve this deal, and it will be the thirteenth bail out for Pakistan since the late eighties. US officials objected to parts of this bailout saying the IMF could essentially end up funding, the tens of billions of dollars in loans Pakistan has taken from China as part of Beijing's Belton wrote

IMF Pakistan Denise Pellegrini Bloomberg Executive Beijing Belton United States China Six Billion Dollars Three Year
What is China's Belt and Road Initiative?

Nature Podcast

04:03 min | 3 years ago

What is China's Belt and Road Initiative?

"Over the next couple of weeks nature is publishing a series of feature articles that focus on China's massive belt and road initiative. This project will connect the country to others around the world by building infrastructure, including high speed rail networks, airports and even whole cities to date one hundred twenty six countries from Africa, Asia Europe and South America have signed up to the project, which is designed to transform the global movement of goods and services. The features in nature are looking at the effect that the Belton road initiative is having on scientific research and different parts of the world. The first two of these features are written by science policy journalist s and Massoud who dropped by to tell us more. So the Belton road is six years old when he finishes it will be the largest infrastructure building project coming out of one nation since probably the Marshall plan in which the United States. It's mostly financed. The rebuilding of Europe. After the end of World War Two. It was a mix of grants and loans to European nations. This is mostly loans and some grants from China to the nations that go towards its west and leading up all the way to eastern Europe conservative estimates. Put the cost of the Belton road initiative at over a trillion dollars on the project, which was launched in twenty thirteen by China's president Xi Jinping is designed to connect China to countries around the world by an expensive network of land and sea routes. It's about building railway lines. It's about building motorways. It's about building airports, and it's about either building newports or Chinese companies taking over the management and the running of seaports the Belton wrote initiative or be R is is sometimes known aims to transform China's global trade networks and access to markets. But shortly after its launch it became clear that science was going to be a big part of the initiative as well. This aspect of the Belton road is overseen by the Chinese Academy of sciences president by Choon Lee who last year roads in the bulletin of the Chinese Academy of sciences that quotes science technology and innovation of the core. Driving force for the Biaro development. The Chinese Academy of sciences as invested over two hundred fifty million dollars into Belton road signs and technology projects opening centers of excellence in China and building research and training centers across the world. His also setting up the digital Belton road is data sharing platform for participating countries alongside all of this comes a big investment in the training of PHD students from Belton road countries. Just in Pakistan's to one country right now, the total numbers of scholarship holders masters and PHD scholars is about seven thousand a year. Now just a few weeks ago, the Chinese ambassador to Islam abide said that he wants to increase that number to twenty thousand and this is just like one country. So you're looking at quite large numbers of people who right now, very young going to go to China going can do that PHD's learn Mandarin when they come back. They will outnumber the English speaking community of scientists in PHD Holden and say China's really looking to the long term in terms of both building capacity, but also making a sort of very strong case for very China friendly. Scientists into the future. The majority of these students studying in applied sciences or engineering and being trained in areas, particularly important to their home countries. It seems like a win win China build his global research networks and the country's build relevant research capacity within the countries themselves and particularly at the level of the early career researcher. There is hardly any criticism of what's happening here. I think people are genuinely surprised, but in a good way that a superpower like China is suddenly interested in the training of scientists.

China Belton Chinese Academy Of Sciences Asia Europe Choon Lee Africa President Trump South America Massoud Europe Xi Jinping United States Pakistan Researcher Holden Two Hundred Fifty Million Doll Trillion Dollars Six Years
China's Xi touts more than $64 billion in Belt and Road deals

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

China's Xi touts more than $64 billion in Belt and Road deals

"A summit this week on a signature Chinese foreign project was a big success. According to China's president Xi Jinping the multibillion dollar belt and road initiative. A two day forum some more than sixty four billion dollars worth of deals signed in China's global infrastructure program, the US is not pleased. Well, the BBC's Michael Bristow reports G is urging more countries to join in nearly forty leaders in Beijing. Summit to discuss the scheme to build ports roads and railways that will connect China to the rest of the world, many of the richest nations of being reluctant to endorse it speak in. Beijing. Britain's Chancellor of the exchequer Philip Hammond said the Belton road program showed truly epi Cam Bishen, but Britain is just one country expressed concern of issues such as debt transparency and the effects on the environment. United States goes further it thinks Belton roadies mainly about spreading Chinese power and

China Beijing Britain United States Belton Cam Bishen Xi Jinping Philip Hammond Michael Bristow President Trump BBC Chancellor G Sixty Four Billion Dollars Two Day
China, Sri Lanka And Chinese Government discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:40 min | 3 years ago

China, Sri Lanka And Chinese Government discussed on PRI's The World

"Leaders gather in Beijing for a summit on China's belt and road initiative. It's a development strategy aimed at expanding China's links with dozens of countries through investment and infrastructure, but China is facing growing criticism over the initiative says Mary Kay, MAGS dead. She's the world's former China correspondent and host of the podcast whose century as one big case that stands out that was sort of a warning signal for everyone else that was considering belt and road cooperation with Sri Lanka. It had a big deal with the Chinese government to build a port and build an airport and when Sri Lanka could. Couldn't make its payments. The Chinese government said, okay? Well, one of the clauses in the loan was that if you couldn't make your payments. We would basically take possession of the port for ninety nine years in about fifteen thousand surrounding acres of land, and that'll repay some of your debt, not all of it. But some of them so I was actually in Malaysia last year just before the elections and what I was hearing. I mean, people were sort of coming up and talking to me, not even realizing I was a journalist and saying this election is really important because we don't want to be a colony again, you know, they saw what happened in Sri Lanka, and they thought okay, we got it. We need to be a lot more careful about not overextending ourselves. So at this belt and road initiative summit in Beijing thirty world leaders and Washington with hoping its allies would steer clear of the summit. So who's on the guest list, and what does that list? Tell us. The guest list is interesting. So it includes Russian President, Vladimir Putin Pakistan's, prime minister, Imraan Khan, the Italian prime minister Jessup. Kante Germany and France are sending ministers lower level ministers. Basically what it tells us is. There are a lot of countries in the world that are interested in infrastructure cooperation with China as long as the terms they can come to terms that are mutually beneficial. That said, you know, European ambassadors to China last year wrote a letter to the Chinese government saying your approach to the belt and road build out in Europe is Paik it's not serving the interests of European countries. And this isn't the way we do business. We would like to be involved in, you know, being able to bid on some of these contracts since that letter was written and only Hungary abstained from it out of all of the European Union ambassadors. Italy has signed on Portugal has signed on Greece and Hungary had already come to deals with China, Switzerland is interested. So, you know, there will be some cooperation with China and the United States sort of the best. Way to deal with that. If you wanna keep allies on side is to offer something better not to say, no, you can't do that just back away from that. But we're not gonna do anything to help you. So what can the US and other nations do to counter this one trillion dollar initiative or is Washington? Wrong to fear the belt and road project. Well, look, I mean, this there's definitely competition between China and the United States right now trying to as a government as an entity as a political entity has really not made much of a secret of the fact that it sees this as being it's time it's century that said I don't think that it needs to be zero sum game. I don't think it needs to be go with China or go with the United States and many countries in the world are basically voting with their feet and saying we don't wanna have to choose when we see a good deal coming from China. You know, we'll check it out and make sure it's actually a good deal. But if it works for us, we're going to do it and dozens of leaders of those countries have come to the Belton road summit and wanna show the Chinese government. You know, we're actively listening show us what you

China Sri Lanka Chinese Government Beijing United States Mary Kay Malaysia Prime Minister Hungary European Union Washington Imraan Khan Germany Europe Vladimir Putin Pakistan President Trump Italy Jessup France
China's Belt and Road Initiative goes to Italy

FT World Weekly

07:20 min | 4 years ago

China's Belt and Road Initiative goes to Italy

"We're discussing China's belt and road initiative. Joining me in the studio is Kristin Shepard soon to join the staff of the tea in Beijing and on the line from Rome is our correspondent miles Johnson. And the point of including somebody in Rome will become apparent in a moment but Christian first Belton road initiative briefly. What is it known tiv- is seizing pains grand vision for a new form of trade and infrastructure networks across Eurasia that will tie China to surrounding countries through road through railway through dry ports through special economic zones. And then boast the trade relationship, but also increase China's geopolitical clout within the region, it's a very big project has nominated. We're talking up to a trillion dollars. We over the course of many years. So some of the estimates suggest that we'll get up to around. Trillion dollars around twenty twenty five current figures thought to be around two hundred billion. Yes, it certainly is a very big sweeping vision. Much of this was happening before there was already interest for Chinese companies to go out and to invest overseas. But then there was this new branding, and this new push to really strengthen these particular routes throughout southeast Asian central Asia. And why do you think she has made it his signature initiative? What's the underlying motivation is to do with the phase that China's economy has reached or is to do with the phase, it's geopolitical ambitions of regional some combination. It's a combination and the economic impetus is logically do with excessive capacity within China. China's economy is slowing and for many years, it's been building bridges high rises all these construction companies. Well, they need something to do. They need somewhere to go. And it makes sense for them to build these new trade routes for. China. But then there is also a much broader vision, which is about a rising China one that is strong in its region. This is a move away from some of these predescessors who are more into the idea of hiding and biding. But instead there is this desire to really step up into nationally to rework, some of the international order, the trade order and also international institutions and one way to do that is through this platform of the Belton road and miles. I mean when the Belton road, I started emerging those concentration on China's near if you like on central Asia Kazakhstan on so on. But it's now clear that the belt will the road reach all the way into western Europe that she shouldn't pingers indeed appearing in Italy tomorrow. We're talking on Wednesday. He'll be there tomorrow Thursday. And Italy, I gather is points to become the first major EU country to sign up to Belton road. Is that what's? To happen. Do you think? Yes. That is what is expected. It's expected to become the first G seven country to officially endorse the bell Thom road, and it's sort of an interesting development from an entirely in perspective of European perspective. And a NATO perspective in the sense that Italy has long voiced desire like most developed countries to work closely with China to sort of re economic benefits from collaboration with China Chinese investment, but as always sort of toed the line and not breaking away from it sort of allies and getting too close to China. What we've seen is lease car Carin populist coalition government, which has markedly different approaches to international organizations and its predescessors because if we just said, we're going to break away and cozy up to China, and that is something which is long and some of Italy's traditional allies in a way. It's not that surprising that this populist nationalist government should be willing to stick a finger in the eye of Brussels. Even that's a member of the EU. But this. Is also something that Washington has lobbied against an people. Like, my Taylor Savini. The deputy prime minister, I've been very very close to the Trump administration. Does that surprise you? That is where it gets complicated. Because matters Vini is very expert is sort of hoovering up a lot of the sort of international attention, and so almost being portrayed, although he's only a deputy, prime minister minister of the interior almost being portrayed as sort of almost prime minister, effective, prime minister. But this China episode is revealed as a sort of multiple law nature of the Italian government in the sense of Salvini as you say has halted Trump has been close to Trump visors or former Trump advisory Steve Bannon, and has very much cultivated this sort of of the sort of international populist and someone who builds relationships along those lines, but he's actually being sidelined in this process. He has come out and said, you know, it's okay, if the Chinese invest in all ports, but we don't want them investing in telecoms or any sensitive areas. And he tried to back a bit. Whereas the momentum of all the parts of the Italian government and the Italian state operates overruled him. This is really a process being driven by Matt Torella, the president who is the person who's going to be meeting g and Mattis avenue coalition partner. Louis the Meyer, head of the five star movement who said this is a fantastic opportunity to sell quote, unquote, made in Italy to China, and so this is actually something which is weaken Salvini and Just just. give us a sense of what the optimist in Italy hoped to see from this Chinese deal. I mean, are they thinking you mentioned selling stuff to China, but they're also hopes for infrastructure development? They've talked about the development of the port of Trieste, for example. Exactly the optimist on this is the Italy has several strategically important ports. They are currently stuffed of investment and sort of underperforming underinvested, and they could do with some inbound capital and then subsequently use by large Chinese companies. But then there's also this other element to this. Where Italy to a certain extent has for a while, and especially much more under this government, g to their problems with Brussels over the budget. And you know, Italy is the second most indebted country and the your zone off degreasers, the percentage of GDP, and it needs people to buy its debt and opening up a toss for Chinese capital to flow into it today and also to potentially buys government bonds is something which is strategically advantageous for the government by versa. Fis it's sort of funding sources away from what they see as Brussels, which is the sort of referee in this game done which has been hostile toward the Italian government's trying to do. But of course, I guess potentially get themselves hooked on a rather dependent relationship with China. Chinese essentially, what's keeping the Italian state financially afloat. That is the fear. I mean, all policy Italian government will the sort of figures in this from Kante, the prime minister to Salvini, everyone is busy being cleared to caveat all of their comments about Chinese investment by saying we have to protect our strategically employed in interest the architect of the Italian government's China policy who is a technocratic political figure who's physically apart the league, but it's gonna be categorized. She he's always said that he wants greenfield investment from China. He wants Chinese capital to come in and build things in

China Italy Prime Minister China Chinese Salvini Brussels Belton EU Rome Beijing Kristin Shepard Europe Eurasia Johnson Trieste Nato Donald Trump Taylor Savini Asia Kazakhstan
The complicated truth about China's social credit system

Triangulation

03:45 min | 4 years ago

The complicated truth about China's social credit system

"What Amy Webb is so good about at this. She's a futurist her author of author her new book, the big nine how the tech titans, and they're thinking machines could warp humanity. And she's talking about in some respects, the the the the six in the US the G mafia and the three in China the bat, so you've talked a little bit about what America. Is going to look like a little bit about what China's gonna look like it sounds like at some point. There might be a conflict between the two right? And I think again, you know, we're gonna know when the shots have been fired when you and I are chitchatting like this on Skype and the the lights start flickering intermittently, and there's no transformer that's blown anywhere and there's no storm outside, and it seems weird. And you know, we start to see ourselves locked out of our devices in strange ways, we start to see some of these automated answering systems in our inboxes go a little haywire. China doesn't have to shut off our internet, or, you know, screw with our financial systems to wreak havoc not just in the United States. But all around the world. Why would they what would be the net benefit to something like that? Exerting control and exerting global influence. Probably not be fought with artillery and. That'd be fought with code. Now. I have talked to some who say, and they were criticizing my understanding of China that China while it wants to control its people inside its borders is not as interested in controlling people outside its borders is actually interested in global trade free trade and an economic development. That's the whole point of the Belton road initiative. Right. But what's going to compel a company like the Philippine our country, like the Philippines, for example? Okay. Well, at some point the Philippines, isn't going to be able to pay back. Doesn't matter development deals. You become part of the greater economic co. Heck fear. Right. So that's so here's what's interesting to me. What's interesting to me about this is let's say that we fast forward a little bit. And the fifty eight countries that are currently part of the b R I pilot. All of the citizens in these countries have Social Credit scores or some kind of some kind of score. That that's a Kim to the Social Credit score. That would that that sort of functions as their ability to travel between those countries to trade between our two to purchase stuff. And let's say that companies wind up having a similar kind of rating score similar to the way that we score companies in the US so China could could do some damage by mandating that its partners that are part of the B R. I only do business with those countries companies and individuals who have a score like. Like. Interest in doing that. To push economic incentives and in different ways. But I get my point is that China's I understand why China would want to control people inside its borders because they want a stable economy, they want they don't want Muslims in the in the west getting, you know, causing problems with strikes and stuff. They want it to be orderly. But outside of that, I think they're a little bit more China's go ahead. Well, China was a little less less self sufficient. I mean, they they have considerable they own a considerable amount of foreign debt.

China Philippines United States Amy Webb Belton Road Initiative Skype America KIM
Chinese investment in Bangladesh rings India alarm bells

FT News

03:16 min | 4 years ago

Chinese investment in Bangladesh rings India alarm bells

"As part of its belt and road initiative to play a big role in world affairs. Justna sing talks to the South Asia correspondent Kirin Stacey about why India of used China's expanding footprint in the region with suspicion, anxiety. Sakina. Let's start with the scale of Chinese investment in Bangladesh. How much is China investing and what kind of things is it investing in the scale is absolutely enormous, and it's not been very well noticed. Most people talk about Chinese investments in Pakistan and to a certain extent Lanka. But Bangaladeshi is the second biggest recipient of Chinese money in the South Asia region. China has a global policy of building what it calls a new Silkroad of trade routes that go through Asia through Africa, through parts of Europe. It's known as the Belton road initiative, and it's being pushed by president Xi Jinping himself. The South Asia part of it is largely focused on Pakistan. Pakistan is receiving about sixty billion dollars worth of money, but Bangaladesh's not too far behind. China is planning to spend around thirty billion dollars on Bangaladesh's infrastrure. Lecture on projects like bridges on power stations on roads on railways, but also there's another twelve billion dollars worth of private sector investment going on as well. So there's a lot of Chinese companies that want to set up in special economic zones that the bungalow Desi government is promising to create, which will give them tax breaks, for example. And why does Beijing see Bundy as an important place to spend its money? So it depends you ask as to why China wants to do this. The stated reason is that it's part of Belton, right? It's part of this idea that it wants to open up trade routes around Asia and elsewhere. So what bundler Desch gives China is a port which is close to Jin Jiang province in China's west to make sure that goods that are made engine Jiang can get out to the sea much quicker than if they had to go all the way east to Shanghai. For example, another. The reason is that China's simply has a lot of money to spend and the seas fast. Growing economies like under dash is a good way to invest its money and make returns, however, speak to people in India and elsewhere as well. They see a more geostrategic reason for China's to spend this money in near in particular is concerned about China's designs on the bay of Bengal, which is an area that India feels is very much part of its own sphere of influence. And it has complained about certain projects threatening the undermine islands, for example, which are several hundred miles to the south, but which India thinks will be threatened. If China was to build, for example, a big deep sea port on the southern tip of Bangladesh, the island, particularly of consent, India, because they have a lot of military installations that so any is very worried about being encircled militarily by China, which is building ports. It is already taken over a Putin. Sri Lanka is building a deep sea port in guate- in Pakistan. And if it starts to do the same in Bangladesh, India is going to get very nervous. Has there been a formal

India China Bangladesh Pakistan New Delhi South Asia Indians Dhaka Stock Exchange National Stock Exchange Dhaka Asia Belton Shanghai Josh Naval London Kirin Stacey Sri Lanka Justna