17 Burst results for "Bella Abzug"

"bella abzug" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"War. Not too far from my house, then my bicycle path. They were Nike missile bases. That's right. You could bicycle path. An active missile base. You could see missiles behind some kind of fencing. Or aimed to the sky. We all knew what they were there with the shoot down enemy bombers. We didn't die from it. We weren't frightened from it. Just figure that's part of life. There's always enemy's life is like that. There's always enemies. Always enemy, but we knew we could defeat anyone. We had just defeated Superman. Our fathers and grandfathers had just come back from mopping the floor with Hitler's golden Youth. Japan was smoldering in ruins. After trying to turn this nation into a sin the box they became the send the box. And there was the pop culture of the 19 fifties. Television just appeared really Television became something that the average person could afford. 1954.4 million U. S families had won in their home. There are family friendly shows. Can you believe it? Not produced by vermin like Katzenberg, Katzenberg, Massenburg and rats and Berg. You had. I love Lucy, The Honeymooners, The Twilight Zone and leave it to Beaver. There was nothing filthy dirty. There was no suggested material. Ah, woman didn't have to exhibit her disgusting creature like horrors. In order to get attention like that filth, the Kardashians and all of the millions of vermin who follow her. In movie theaters. We had heroes like John Wayne, James Stewart, Charlton Heston, Marlon Brando, Grace Kelly, Jerry Lewis, Dean Martin, Elizabeth Taylor, Marilyn Monroe. We all love them. We all love them are baseball players like Mickey Mantle. He didn't feel he needed to have drugs up his nostrils or a tattoo on his behind to get our attention. He didn't have to beat anyone up after the ball game to get our attention. I have to appear showing his abs after the ball game to get our attention. All we gotta do is play ball and play it well, and we the kids loved him. We loved our heroes. We had playing cards with them on it. Not the degenerates of today and then the music of the 19 fifties. What a great time. Names like Elvis Presley, Sam Cooke, Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, Buddy Holly. Rock and roll new sounds swept the nation. Helped inspire a rockabilly music from people like Johnny Cash. Jerry Lee Lewis. Then came the platters. The drifters. Music was everywhere and it was beautiful. The lyrics were clean. Encouraged the boy to fall in love with a girl to get married and have Children, not like the filthy vermin of today. 1959 American musicians, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J. P. Richardson. Dining plane crash. Over clear like Iowa and that became known as the day the music died. Day the music died. What happened after that, with the 19 sixties splinted forever as I said to you. Three or four people, Timothy Leary, who pushed LSD onto unsuspecting youth. Bella Abzug, Low life butchers type Butcher's daughter, Hater of Men, A Hater of America, hate of hater of Christianity, pushed her brand of radical feminism and destroyed an entire generation of women. We have never recovered from her. William consul who took the law and twisted the law to destroy America, and then Allen Ginsberg again. Howard, who pretended to be a prophet. He was not a prophet. He was the devil himself, and that my friends is why the music of the fifties. It's so comforting to me, Michael Savage stability. Contentment and consensus. And now we come to today, the year 2020. The year 2020 when we stand on the cusp Of an administration that is already bringing back and out of the woodwork. The very same boll weevils that undermined and destroyed this nation at every turn. Going back until the 19 fifties. It's a so it's an intergenerational hatred for everything American, which is what.

Mickey Mantle Buddy Holly Jerry Lee Lewis Nike golden Youth Katzenberg Bella Abzug baseball Johnny Cash Timothy Leary Japan Hitler Michael Savage Elvis Presley Kardashians Lucy America Beaver John Wayne Allen Ginsberg
"bella abzug" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"I mean, it Z. I just ask a rhetorical question. Do you guys understands? Does anybody understand why Governor would turn this into a political statement? It's about patriotism here. That's about being patriotic wearing a man now it's patriotic Uncle. That's not hyperbole. It's about being patriotic. I'm serious. We're a mask. You'll be arrested for being AH spy. No, no, that's that's Uncle Joe. Now, this is the moron who they want to usher into the White House. It's patriotic to wear a mask. So in other words, if I don't wear a mask what I'm gonna be like a Communist in the 19 fifties, the police looking around me up. There's a man walking on the bicycle trail over there without a mask, or I call out the helicopters. That's that's the Joe Biden America that you left this wanna live in or you're wild and free. Crazy left. This is patriarch to wear a mask now. If the wipe you behind while wearing a mask. Now sleep with a mask on have sex with a mask on Killed chickens with a mask on what's wrong with you people. Forget about it. I saw a country I don't even understand. Wait till you see what happens in a year. A year from now you'll look back and say, How did this even happen to us? You see the goons he's bringing out from the woodwork. I don't I could talk about chickens instead of this for about five minutes, so going back to the chicken yard when I was a little boy. The trauma of seeing a chicken having its head cut off and then running around and ran away from the grandmother. It didn't want to get killed. Naturally, she picked the healthiest chicken the Kills. You want a week, which she pick a little great chicken laying around didn't move. Give me the sickest one and kill it. No. The healthiest Chicken. She wanted the one that looked most of the eagle eye alive. She's get that one said running after the butcher dirty on April full of blood. Not the thing's head off. And the blood smarted. And they remind me today of the Liberals today is like a chicken without it without heads like chickens with their heads cut off running around Colvin, Colvin Coleman Trump called Costco, Vin. Trump Evil Orange Man, Cause Cove and Russian collusion. Colvin, Russia Russia Cove in Russia, Colvin Chickens without hands. It is the savage nation. So we're not going to talk about chickens. If you missed my monologue, which was very serious. It was the whole gestalt of the show. It was about the 19 fifties compared to the 20 twenties. How we went from stability. Contentment consensus splinted forever in the sixties by Timothy Leary, Bella Abzug, William Coaster, elegans work and where we are today, and you don't want to miss that. Honestly, it could be a great great podcast one of my best Some of them are topping 200,000 downloads. That's gonna be one of the Big East. I know that I could just sense it. And here we are now getting ready. We're building up for the turning of the tide here. On the savage nation, which is at the bottom of the hour. We're going to play that little piece I did on the Twitter last night actually was during lunch because I couldn't find the restaurant was open in California. And I drank and talked. We met talked a little too much. That's where they took it down. I don't know that God, I know they bounced it in the middle of it. Then they let it back up and it disappeared altogether. But I was not wearing a mask while talking because I was alone in my house. And then we have Fauci doesn't want us to get together for Thanksgiving. This the Grinch who stole Christmas is now Anthony Fauci. I need you to stay home, though. He's not even to see his own Children. He just wanna touch. Probably his own Children don't want to see him. Make sure he's not going to see them. He's doing them a favor. Would you want to go to Thanksgiving dinner with Anthony Fauci? Could you imagine anything more depressing in your life? I don't I can't imagine anything worse than a eating a frozen defrosted pangolin. With Anthony Fauci. Now he's pushing up for smooth transition. Don't you love it? All of these. Brutus is now want to smooth transition. The Uncle Joe Here. Oh, listen to this. Somebody is CNN's Christiane A. Amah pour the Mata Hari of our time. Who was slammed to the mat on this show and others for comparing Trump to the Nazi Kristallnacht. Listen to this piece of garbage and clip 21, listen, and finally tonight a comment on my program. I think sort of last show much stuff. Anyone's six has up stop anyone speaks that fake British accent Enough. Follow you? You know that Breezy Oxford like it If I look, Hallman, you know they're dirty is come, be filthy lowest of types. The higher the fake British accent, the lower the type, that's all I could tell you say is she is with the highboy. The fake action here in the air in 21, Listen, and finally tonight a comment on my program at the end of last week 50 82nd anniversary of Kristallnacht, as I often do. It is the event that began the horrors of the Holocaust. I also noted President Trump's attacks on history Facts. Knowledge is doubling down. I shouldn't have juxtapose the two thoughts. No, his evil stand alone, of course. In history. I'll read any pain. My statement may have caused. My point was to say how democracy can potentially slip away and how we must always zealously God, our democratic values. The best way to go on our democratic values is to take the main air on CNN and put him into a prison. I'll be the best way to go on our our our democratic value If he lets a witch like this. Ah, lying which, like this to get away with what she just said she just doubled down. She attacked Trump.

Colvin Coleman Trump Anthony Fauci Uncle Joe CNN Joe Biden White House Russia Russia Cove Twitter Timothy Leary California Russia Costco Brutus Breezy Oxford Bella Abzug Mata Hari Christiane A. Amah
"bella abzug" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Love them are baseball players like Mickey Mantle. He didn't feel he needed to have drugs up his nostrils or a tattoo on his behind to get our attention. He didn't have to beat anyone up after the ball game to get our attention. You have to appear showing his abs after the ball game to get our attention. All we gotta do is play ball and play it well, and we the kids loved him. We loved our heroes. We had playing cards with them on it. Not the degenerates of today and then the music of the 19 fifties. What a great time. Names like Elvis Presley, Sam Cooke, Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, Buddy Holly. Rock and roll new sounds swept the nation. Helped inspire a rockabilly music from people like Johnny Cash. Jerry Lee Lewis. Then came the platters. The drifters. Music was everywhere and it was beautiful. The lyrics were clean. Encouraged the boy to fall in love with a girl to get married and have Children, not like the filthy vermin of today. 1959 American musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J. P. Richardson died in plane crash. Over clear like Iowa and that became known as the day the music died. Day the music died. What happened after that, with the 19 sixties splinted forever as I said to you. Three or four people, Timothy Leary, who pushed LSD onto unsuspecting youth. Bella Abzug are low life butchers type Butcher's daughter, hater of Men, A hater of America, hate of hater of Christianity, pushed her brand of radical feminism and destroyed an entire generation of women. We have never recovered from her. William Country who took the law and twisted the law to destroy America, and then Allen Ginsberg again. Howard, who pretended to be a prophet. He was not a prophet. He was the devil himself, and that my friends is why the music of the fifties. It's so comforting to me, Michael Savage stability. Contentment and consensus. And now we come to today, the year 2020. The year 2020 when we stand on the cusp Of an administration that is already bringing back and out of the woodwork. The very same boll weevils that undermined and destroyed this nation at every turn. Going back until the 19 fifties. It's a so it's an intergenerational hatred for everything American, which is what Biden and his team is digging up from the crypt of anti Americanism. Join those savage nation, Cole.

Mickey Mantle Buddy Holly baseball Jerry Lee Lewis America Bella Abzug Michael Savage Johnny Cash Timothy Leary Elvis Presley Allen Ginsberg Biden Chuck Berry Iowa Ritchie Valens LSD Cole Howard William Country J. P. Richardson
"bella abzug" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And now I'm going to kind of a nudge in the ribs to show you that I just scored. I didn't know that Michael Pence is it's not only Mike Pence's style to do that, obviously. A couple of descriptive months ago. Our weeks ago, somebody did an analysis of both plants. And they found that they're very similar. Somebody thought two pence. Why'd you throw the Plage religion line in there? And I mean how many people I mean, my God. What is going on? Seven? Yeah. Get the reference. You are going for the 70 year old voter. Come on, And I didn't even know Harriet this Harris. I didn't see her facial expression. One drawback of radio. But, you know, obviously, reaction was that in there, Her reaction was Really? You're going to throw that in? I mean, it was perfect, but I thought it was a good dig. So from somebody who can a CZ partisan as I am, it is politically interested as I am. I appreciate a good rhetorical crack, and I thought that that was they either. They both came out of the chute really strong, because, remember again. That was the first response. I think we heard from either of them. I'm not a farce, appointed that they didn't answer any of the questions because there was a couple of really good ones, like Have you spoken to your fellow candidate regard After all, they're both very late seventies and going on and then, like answering questions about, you know, just court packing to ignore that one. I mean, that's a huge one to talk about taxes. It's just just like I really At one point I was yelling at pence shot up just because you can't shut up talking. Oh, yeah, It's like, Yeah. Okay. Solis has all the warmth of a mortician the having buried both of my parents and dealt with the same undertakers And the guy's like, Okay, I understand the difficulty that you're experiencing. These are hard times for all of us. He says they care about me the words she doesn't care about this. During the way your father's here with comb. I don't care about my dad's hair. Just pence has got this sort of. It's a kind of bedside manner, huh? Yeah, both time and then she's like, you know, Look at me. I'm cool because my mom's Indian in my dad's Jamaican and the last Wrapper I could think of that. I really enjoy living right now is to pack so anyway, you know, I got a bunch of other cuts. What do you want? Okay. Track. What do you want? Healthcare. Okay, listen rather than something I'd like to talk about a couple of other aspects because we we experience it a little differently, and one is the gender dynamics. Do you think they played Into any part of the debate and the reason I'm asking. I'm not saying they did or they didn't. But there's a lot of discussion online. There's the discussion on cable news and in print about whether Trump I mean no, whether Pence came off. It's kind of like mansplaining and that when Camilla says, you know, I'm still speaking where those gender dynamics would he have spoken over? If that had been Mike Wallace were than Susan Page? You know, would he have spoken over his much as he did or by comparison with You know, he was a saint rhetorically. Where do you stand on that? How did that? How did that come off to you? Well, to Susan page to Susan Page, he just was going to keep talking. Regardless of who the moderator was. He obviously had marching orders, which was, you know, to not answer the questions. They both did that. Don't answer the questions. They didn't answer the questions and keep talking until finally they have to do something to cut you off. But Trump Set such a standard by just continued to blast over people that even pence kind of just continuing to go, even though she said, that's enough. That's enough. It didn't seem that outlandish. You want to compare the two. I know you had just watch the governor and Culp did a great job. As soon as I said, That's it. Your two minutes are up. They were very, very obedient. I mean, it was like that. Isn't that nice? And at one point, I think he's Brady Cruise goes well, Our time is up. Thank you, and they both stopped. It's like there you go. Okay, We're all obey. Saying the roles that was right wasn't in pence going on. It's like just quiet, isn't it? If somebody else something to talk about 00? Yeah, he was mansplaining to hurt. He wouldn't do that. If she was a woman of please. So, yeah, you didn't buy. That s so interesting was that I heard from a number of people again on the cable shows that this would Primarily beyond CNN. Now they're not necessarily employees, but they are on CNN or MSNBC, the women said, and including SC SC Cup. I don't know if you know s e Cupp, but she is a Republican strategist using her, you know, maybe early forties or something, but she does not like Trump and she came on. It was talking about pence and says, I've worked with Mike Pence. I used to actually be impressive Mike Pence, But tonight he made my skin crawl, he says. I couldn't stand his kind of condescension. Nding take on Ah, Kamala Harris So, and the only people that mentioned this were various women on that responding. And so I think women were more sensitive to the gender dynamics may be involved in Men are or who might have been. You know, Tom, he might have been opening the door for her in metaphorically speaking on DH, holding the door and trying to be almost obsequious Lee respectful for her and her gender because Donald Trump has lost the female suburban vote. Kamala Harris is the choice for the female suburban vote. And you get pence to be able to come on there and be a real gentleman. And I would like to say, Senator I'm for the you to be on the stage. Congratulations. That's right. That work. This is wonderful Sea does that And then it was a good move. And then I don't know. What does he know? Howto talk to women and make them feel like equals. And you know that back and forth. I just I'll go back to Margaret Thatcher. Give me Margaret Thatcher watching market doctor talks is, but I know what we say. Jean. Let me see Jean Kilpatrick, the relating to Patrick talk. You want to see people that are able to present themselves and their ideas and their female and ask, Give me those two female any day. Okay, But keep this in mind, Margaret Thatcher had to take voice lessons. So lower her voice that when she became prime minister, she had to actually be take in order to be taken seriously. She had a work on her voice because her voice was too high pitched. She was told, and she worked on lowering your voice, so their gender dynamics, you know, no matter. You know, when the era and what the politics are for Bella Abzug. You think Bella Abzug ever had to change your voice down the trouble my hat? You had an idea. She was a New Yorker from York, right? Yeah. Ifyou're strong female, you're strong female people. Just forget about the fact that even need to say the way word female. You're just a strong individual who presents her ideas in a strong way. Don't fall back on. Oh, I'm strong. I'm a woman. Oh, but now you're speaking to me, Tio. You know, I hate that. Yeah, that's What I meant was that's that's not what Harris did. No, That's what people said about her..

Michael Pence Kamala Harris Margaret Thatcher Bella Abzug Susan Page Donald Trump CNN Jean Kilpatrick Solis Camilla Mike Wallace Harriet SC SC Cup Culp York Senator prime minister Tom
"bella abzug" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Weaver. Nurse jacking Competitive nomination for Merit lever that LaGuardia Arts public School in New York City. Thank you so much. Um, thank you so much. I gotta go Buy your background is LaGuardia High School yet? Everyone else's Juilliard in this rag, right? And you're getting her mixed up with Margot because she was in nurse Jackie and houses. Mayor Weaver Been well? Yeah, if you remember this show you guys studio 60 on the Sunset Strip. Yes, with the Aaron Sorkin Show, Harry. So she was on that show in a supporting Girl. Then she was in that movie Michael Clayton. She'll just sharpened stuff. She was in marriage story. Yes, she will, and she also had a small part in for a season on walking dead. And and then also, she, um Godless is the other shit We can really liked her in with. Um, but she was so verklempt. She's just thank you so much. Thank you so much, because she's kind of always in like a supporting yang of a role and even nurse Jackie, like if you watch that show like I absolutely I want to go back. I love you Watched all you never have. Well, um, What's her name of plays? Nurse? Jackie, Did you ever watch out Holly, The Lady from soprano Edie Falco. I watched some like he's very unlikable. Edie Falco's character and her friend. Played by Merritt Weaver, who is a nurse. She to me was like, really the The just the everything on that show that was just showing the other side of what it is to be in the whirlwind of somebody else's addiction or whatever. Okay, Israeli really good in it. Oh, I think the front of her. I was so excited when she won that year because I was like, finally end like Margo Martindale finally won something for justified. I believe, because she was scared. She was dominated for the American. Okay, shows up in things. She was, of course in Bella Abzug in Mrs America, and who, Lou. Oh, that show's so good. Bette Midler is gonna play Bella Abzug in thee to Gloria's in the movie in the movie, Baby. Perfect. He'd be perfect. Okay, so then this this one is one. It's Viola Davis. Okay, It's when she won and she was the first black woman to win a leading Emmy will ever in 2050 drama to get away with murder. We're not going to be able to start a whole thing. Okay? Just a little bit. Emmy goes to Viola Davis.

Jackie Edie Falco Viola Davis LaGuardia High School Bella Abzug Margo Martindale Merritt Weaver LaGuardia Arts public School Mayor Weaver Emmy Aaron Sorkin New York City Sunset Strip Bette Midler Michael Clayton Margot Weaver. murder Mrs America Harry
"bella abzug" Discussed on Sleepless in Los Angeles

Sleepless in Los Angeles

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on Sleepless in Los Angeles

"Why I don't WanNa hit your friggin join. That is a gateway drug. We need it. It's just does anyone but me find it depressing that here. We all are over fifty three sound okay. I actually just turned sixty four. Okay you can call me an angry old feminist a paleo feminist a big nose feminist of big nose feminist betty for Dan and Bella Abzug pushy Jewish women with big noses. Big Cats Abdus arms. It was the seventy S. No apologies. Big Nose feminists were equal. Pay For women that was it. And then the camera ready choice. Feminists came along like Gloria Steinem. And now everyone's issues are women's issues that expands and now women have to take on the fight for native Americans and utterly abled people and polar bears in Greenland right. Okay and the problem. Why are these women's issues? Why aren't these men's issues while demented on the polar bears? What exactly are pointing even have lost their focus here. This path is going to be president. The apocalypse is here and in response. We women are what knitting hats really. It's radical policy. Gosh I got so mad. I name all at in southern California Amending. Such hot flashes fencing. None of this makes sense. This is a feminist progress. What's next around go? Quilting circle awoke penmanship cores. Mindfully journey butter a.

Gloria Steinem Bella Abzug president Greenland California Dan
"bella abzug" Discussed on Q95

Q95

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on Q95

"My money. Okay. Sounds good today. Fact, I think you're gonna like these the car horn Kiev, that's great. All of that to the list here. Josh, yes. The reason vampires can't see themselves in mirrors is is because mirrors used to be made with a layer of silver. However modern mirrors are not made that way meaning that today's vampires could see themselves in a mirror. Ignored by many Bella. Look so good in all the movies, then she could go makeup on. Oh, Bella in Dwight, Bella Abzug. We're going to go with a New York, politics vampire? I was thinking Bela Lugosi, that's Bela. Oh. Sorry. So even in normal conversation, which is what that was. He's incredibly hateful. I don't know. I. Bela Lugosi, did you did you lawyers to be in the Maltese falcon is that true? He wasn't fat. Here's your winnings, generally, Peter Jennings. Jenner. Laurie. It's a great job. There's no Campbell in here. Here you're winning. Rian hetero. There are no homosexuals in this movie. Rick. Really closely. We do we have this that show. We were doing ain't gonna learn in Yangon..

I. Bela Lugosi Bella Abzug Bella Yangon Kiev Peter Jennings Josh Jenner Rian Rick Dwight Laurie New York Campbell
"bella abzug" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:34 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KTRH

"Ted and Arbor, Michigan, Sirius satellite. Go. Hey, mark. So in this case to me, I feel like you're you're acting Moore's lawyer, why don't why don't you stop telling me what I am. And tell me what you think. Okay. Stop acting like a liberal. You'll see what I'm getting at. So in this case, you know, what I want when I say lawyer versus a judge you spent hours, and you mentioned on the constitution. Yo gun control abortion. You spent whole shows books hours going into the intent when they passed that. What did they mean deliberations before and after writing they did everything? So why would you not dissect this national this? This emergencies are the original intent of the constitution. You wanna talk about or what party talking about article too. Stay on the Navajo know what's an originalist. Stay I'm educating you. It's impossible for you to educate me about this. You're the student. I'm the teacher when you talk about originalism telling about original intent when it comes to the constitution article two of you read article to the act that Trump is declaring that I'm happy to talk about the act that you have clearly not read and I've read it on the air. Tell me what is the original intent of the national emergencies act of nineteen seventy six I don't want. What I said I want to know the congress Powell what you call me. And you say you talk on and on and write books about original intent we've gone through the statute, I've gone through article two over a period of what six weeks now. And you challenge me and say, you know, you get on here. And you talk about I said, okay. Let's talk about it. What's the original intent the national emergencies act of nineteen seventy six? You can read the Bill of rights, but what I'm asking you for it. I'm not talking about the Bill of rights. I'm talking about the statute that you just raised you call me. And you haven't even rented help what I'm saying is why can't you apply? What the congress when they deliberated this act? Why don't you get into all that and really devote some analysis because if you understand how this works interpreting a statute is different than interpreting the constitution people put stuff into the congressional record. And the supreme court has talked about this many times to as people stick stuff in the congressional record to want you to create a legislative intent including people who vote against the statute. So statutes looked at differently. You only go to legislative intent as a last resort. If the statute speaks for itself as this one does you don't even need to look at legislative at ten same with the constitution in some respects. If you're thirty five years old, and you're an American naturalized American citizen or an American citizen, and you wanna run? In the United States. I don't need to look at the original intent there it is now. Get off the air. Why all you do is talk over me. You don't even want to hear an answer. I know I'm a lawyer. You don't need to keep telling me, I'm a lawyer. Acting like a lawyer not a judge. I'm not acting like anything, I'm explaining how it works and your argumentative. And you haven't read any of it. You don't even know what the statute says, you don't even know what? Article two sets. The president is well within his power. This is not a violation of separation of powers and has nothing to do with quote, unquote. The original intent of the national emergencies act of nineteen Seventy-six. It lays out what the president can do. It doesn't matter. What Bella Abzug said in one thousand nine hundred seventy six by submitting a speech for the record. That was never read on the floor. And maybe she was the minority and majority that's your relevant. That's your relevant. We look at the original intent of the constitution. In order to ensure that we're following the constitution. But a statue. Statutes changed. They're not, you know, it's not like going to an amendment process to the constitution statute is a statute. It's not our our governing overarching law. But I'm happy to look at the original intent of the statute, we've talked about this. The statue was passed in one thousand nine hundred seventy six why? Because before it was codified by congress presidents were using their implied. Power implied power as the head of the executive branch to address emergencies their own way to declare emergencies their own way. Who used much more authority. And Houston it and you're much more flexible way, then this statute permits. This statue was intended in some respects tobacco president to make it more difficult for a president to act unilaterally. That's the joke here. Look at this. He's acting like a dictator. Well, Lincoln was he a dictator was Eisenhower dictator was Truman a dictator in go right down the list. So congress said, you know, what we're gonna pass this national emergencies act. We understand there are occasions when a president has to act when congress cannot well, not it could be a timely thing. Whatever it is. He's got certain powers under article two that we don't have. And sometimes he or she has to act. They didn't say in the national emergencies act. Every instance, except when Donald Trump is president or any instance, except that deals with securing the border on immigration. That's not what the statute.

president congress Donald Trump Moore Bella Abzug Ted United States Michigan Sirius originalism Lincoln Arbor Powell Truman executive Houston thirty five years six weeks
"bella abzug" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

06:08 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Ted and Arbor, Michigan, Sirius satellite, go. Hey, mark. So in this case to me, I feel like you're you're acting Moore's lawyer, why don't why don't you stop telling me what I am. And tell me what you think. Okay. Stop acting like a liberal make your you'll see what I'm getting that. So in this case, you know, what I want when I say, a lawyer versus the judge is you spent hours, and you mentioned on the constitution your gun control abortion. You spent whole shows books hours going into the intent when they passed that. What do they mean deliberations before and after writing they did everything? So why would you not dissect this national this emergencies? The original intent of the constitution. You wanna talk about it? What are you talking about article to stay on the Napa know what's an originalist? Stay on I'm educating you. It's impossible to educate me about this. You're the student. I'm the teacher when you talk about originalism telling about original intent when it comes to. The constitution. Article two of you read article too. To the act that Trump is declaring that same. I'm happy to talk about the act that you have clearly not read and I've read it on the air. Tell me what is the original intent of the national emergencies act of nineteen seventy six I don't want. What I said I want to know the congress Powell what you call me. And you say you talk on and on and write books about original intent we've gone through the statute, I've gone through article two over a period of what six weeks now. And you challenge me and say, you know, you get on here. And you talk about I said, okay. Let's talk about it. What's the original intent of the national emergencies act of nineteen seventy six you can read the Bill of rights, but what I'm asking you for it. I'm not talking about the Bill of rights. I'm talking about the statute, they you just raised you call me. And you haven't even read it. They must be what I'm saying. Is why can't you apply? What the congress look when they deliberated this act. Why don't you get into all that and really devote some analysis because if you understand how this works interpreting a statute is different than interpreting the constitution people put stuff into the congressional record. And the supreme court has talked about this many times to as I people stick stuff in the congressional record to want you to create a legislative intent, including people who voted against the statute. So a statutes looked at differently. You only go to legislative intent as a last resort. If the statute speaks for itself as this one does you don't even need to look at legislative ten same with the constitution in some respects. If you're thirty five years old, and you're an American naturalized American citizen or an American citizen and you want to run for president the United States. I don't need to look at the original intent there it is now. Get off the air. Well, all you do is talk over me. You don't even want to hear an answer. I know I'm a lawyer. You don't need to keep telling me, I'm a lawyer. Acting like a lawyer not a judge. I'm not acting like anything, I'm explaining how it works and your argumentative. And you haven't read any of it. You don't even know what the statute says, you don't even know what? Article two sets. The president is well within his power. This is not a violation of separation of powers and has nothing to do with quote, unquote. The original intent of the national emergencies act of nineteen Seventy-six. It lays out what the president can do. It doesn't matter. What Bella Abzug said in one thousand nine hundred seventy six by submitting a speech for the record. That was never read on the floor. And maybe she was in the minority and majority that's your relevant. That's your relevant. We look at the original intent of the constitution. In order to ensure that we're following the constitution. But a statue. Statutes are changed. They're not, you know, it's not like going to an amendment process to the concentrated statute is a statute. It's not our our governing overarching law. But I'm happy to look at the original intent of the statute, we've talked about this. The statue was passed in nineteen seventy six why? Because before it was codified by congress presidents were using their implied. Power implied power as the head of the executive branch to address emergencies their own way to declare emergencies their own way. Who used much more thirty. And you sit and you're much more flexible way, then this statute permits. This statue was intended in some respects tobacco a president to make it more difficult for a president to act unilaterally. That's the joke here. Look at this. He's acting like a dictator Lincoln was he a dictator was Eisenhower dictator was Truman a dictator in go right down the list. So congress said, you know, what we're gonna pass this national emergency. Zach we understand. There are occasions when a president has to act when congress cannot will not it could be a timely thing. Whatever it is. He's got certain powers under article two that we don't have. And sometimes he or she has to act. They didn't say in the national emergencies act. Every instance, except when Donald Trump is president or any instance, except that deals with securing the border on immigration. That's not what the statute says. All right. Originalism. Okay. We went on originalism too fine. Whether it's originalism, the plain text tradition will apply at all. I'll be right back. Traffic all day. News.

president congress Donald Trump Moore originalism Bella Abzug Ted Michigan Sirius Napa United States Arbor Powell Zach executive Lincoln Truman thirty five years six weeks
"bella abzug" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"To the active Trump is declaring do that same. I'm happy to talk about the act that you have clearly not read and I've read it on the air. Tell me what is the original intent of the national emergencies act of nineteen seventy six I don't want. What I said I want to know the congress power what you call me. And you say you talk on and on and write books about original intent we've gone through the statute, I've gone through article two over a period of what six weeks now. And you challenge me and say, you know, you get on here. And you talk about I said, okay. Let's talk. About it. What's the original intent the national emergencies act of nineteen seventy six you can read the Bill of rights. But what I'm asking you for it. I'm not talking about the rights. I'm talking about the statute that you just raised you call me. And you haven't even read it. What I'm saying is why can't you apply? What the congress when they deliberated this act? Why don't you get into all that and really devote some analysis because if you understand how this works interpreting a statute is different than interpreting the constitution people put stuff into the congressional record in the supreme court has talked about this many times as I people stick stuff in the congressional record to want you to create a legislative intent, including people who voted against the statute. So a statutes looked at differently. You only go to legislative intent as a last resort. If the statute speaks for itself as this one does you don't even need to look at slate of at ten same with the constitution in some respects. If you're thirty five years old, and you're an American naturalized American citizen or American citizen and you want to run for president the United States. I don't need to look at the original intent there it is now. Get off the air. Why all you do is talk over me. You don't even wanna hear an answer. I know I'm a lawyer. You don't need to keep telling me on a lawyer. Acting like a lawyer not a judge. I'm not acting like anything, I'm explaining how it works and your argument of and you haven't read any of it. You don't even know what the statute says, you don't even know what? Article two sets. The president is well within his power. This is not a violation of separation of powers. It has nothing to do with quote, unquote. The original intent of the national emergencies act of nineteen Seventy-six. It lays out what the president can do. It doesn't matter. What Bella Abzug said in one thousand nine hundred seventy six by submitting a speech for the record. There was never read on the floor. And maybe she was in the minority and majority that's relevant. That's irrelevant. We looked at the original intent of the constitution. In order to ensure that we're following the constitution. But a statue. Statutes changed. They're not, you know, it's not like going to an amendment process to the constitution statute is a statute. It's not our governing overarching law. But I'm happy to look at the original intent of the statute, we've talked about this. The statue was passed in one thousand nine hundred seventy six why? Because before it was codified by congress presidents were using their implied. Power implied power as the head of the executive branch to address emergencies their own way to declare emergencies their own way. Who used much more authority. And you so much more flexible way, then this statute permits his statue was intended in some respects toback Senate president to make it more difficult for a president to act unilaterally. That's the joke here look at this. He's acting like a dictator Lincoln was he a dictator was Eisenhower dictator was Truman a dictator. He can go right down the list. So congress said, you know, what we're gonna pass this national emergencies act. We understand there are occasions when a president has to act congress cannot will not it could be a timely thing. Whatever it is. He's got certain powers under article too that we don't have. And sometimes he or she has to act. They didn't say in the national emergencies. Every instance, except when Donald Trump is president are any instance, except that deals with securing the border on immigration. That's not what the statute says..

president congress Bella Abzug Donald Trump United States Lincoln executive Senate thirty five years six weeks
"bella abzug" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I'm gonna tell you those wheelbarrows of the Weimar Republic people walking around. With a paper German currency because inflation was changing every day. Hundreds and hundreds of percent, you see what's going on in. Venezuela. Went on in Zimbabwe. This is what we're turning into its third world crack country with these leftists. The post put the fact that I get into cars while proposing a plan to invest in better car technology on their front page. So what exactly has this twenty nine year old never did anything substantive moron done to put a plan forward to change Does none of this strike you as absolute insanity. She put a plan forward to change cars. City controller Scott stringer. Also, like an Akasha Cortes to his cousin. The light US Representative Bella Abzug. Oh. Saying that when she got elected they said the same things about her and they tried to slow her down. Oh belly member? Bella Abzug know who they're talking about Mr. producer. You're very lucky. And she never gave up she fought. And now we see what happens when the next generation goes to wash. Oh, she's the next. Bella Abzug is added more like Bela Lugosi as far as I'm concerned. Who's that? Look it up. All right. Let's take some calls here. Let's see two regular Americans real Americans. Candice, Houston, Texas, those call letters aren't right. How are you fine? How are you? I I had to tell you that I recorded life liberty in north end last night. And I woke up at two o'clock in the morning. Couldn't sleep turned it on. What's not what twice in a row? I couldn't believe how fantastic Brandon struck is. And for you to be able to let him speak. Let him tell his story. It's journey of how he came to conservatism. It was genius. And I had kids about his age. Probably don't know. How old he is? Both of mine are in New York, and I'm going to send them his website. To see if I can open a glimmer with with them, and their wives. Thank you so much. It was amazing. Well, thank you. And he deserved all the attention. And and I did that specifically for parents and grandparents with children and grandchildren who may be moving in the wrong direction. Thanks to the Marxist tenure professors and the endless propaganda and the media among other things they should look into his group the walkaway movement. My boys were were either league. So I'm sure that they're willing. But there's thinking people, and they came from Texas, and so they had to here. Anyway, thank you again so much it. My pleasure. Shows are wonderful. But that one just blew me away twice. Thank you. Thank you. I appreciate it. And that's the key to this show is to let the guest speak. That's why I do do that format on FOX. And that's why I picked against high pick guests said I pick and we would love to have a on the program. She won't I come on. We'd love to have Bernie Sanders on the program. He will not come on. We'd love to have Elizabeth Warren on the program. She will not come on down the list. I'd have a very civil debate with them. But it wouldn't be like going on CNN and MSNBC and NBC ABC CBS and all the rest of it be dealing with me. And I know who they are. And I know how they think. And I would like to address them and debate them, but they will not do it just so you understand they will not do it. All right. We'll be right back. Mm-hmm. With a look at the roads, here's Nippon Santo from the one zero one five seven twenty AM traffic.

Bella Abzug US Candice Brandon Texas Zimbabwe Elizabeth Warren Scott stringer Akasha Cortes Bernie Sanders Bela Lugosi Venezuela Nippon Santo Houston CNN Representative producer NBC
"bella abzug" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Let's just go right to South America because we've had people like Alexandria, Cossio Cortes, and retreated to leave and Ilan, Omar and Bernie Sanders and Keith Ellison, and all these people who think socialism is just the greatest way to go by the way is what I call her. She she keeps saying she doesn't want Venezuela socialism. She wants Swedish socialism, Sweden, actually turned away socialism quite a few years ago and the lower tier workers pay a higher percentage rate in taxes than the rich people. Do she has no clue what she's talking about? That's obvious. Except Michael that a lot of people hear what she's saying. And they believe that. She's speaking. Truth. What do you make this as we watch Venezuela crumble because at ten thousand percent inflation rate and people dying in the streets, and we've got actual idiots here that are getting traction promoting socialism here. Well, I think that there is some distinction. I I don't think it's necessarily slippery slope between Sweden and Venezuela. I think that is a well from the beginning was regarded as this. Castroist communist regime revolution of people. They don't use that kind of language Sweden at the same time. People like Bernie Sanders. I think is a better example because there's a long track record than he traced as well. And there's a video you can look it up where he's talked about the bread lines in Russia. And he said it was good that they're bred lines. Because that means people are waiting for food, and when someone having their being too, many kinds of deodorant this is that kind of mentality where it's like. The the the idea that having like too much of something that's affordable is crazy. And a complete misunderstanding of how markets work. It's either too. When you rather have too much food, and you're throwing some out that people are hungry. I mean, these are the alternatives, and that's how they think they think everyone has to answer to them for how to produce. It's like you. Maybe if you were owned a bar, you're a bartender and no disrespect the bartenders. If you've never run a business. How you in a position to tell every business how their business should be run. It makes no sense on an economic level. She's an economics degree. Well. Listen, I have no clue how she got the degree. I'd like to talk to somebody who's handed him out. There was at Boston College or something where she got. So she's got an economics degree doesn't realize that people working two jobs is not helpful to the unemployment rate. Although she said that's why it's so low because people are working two jobs that's actually dumb. But also, she said she wants to turn seats read. She meant blue. She now is is saying that the world is going to end in twelve years if we don't spend trillions of dollars in carbon offsets on climate change, which she doesn't seem to realize is she's promoting an overwhelming power and control grab by central government. That's exactly what Venezuela. Did. That's exactly what Cuba. Did. That's exactly what the USSR. Did. It is not been successful yet. Why do you think you look you? And I know why she's wrong you, I don't even agree politically. But we know why she's wrong. So why do you think so many people lined up to say, oh my gosh. She's great. Why are people voting for somebody like that? Oh, that's easy. Because if you look at the three democratic leaders in the house, Nancy Pelosi, Steny Hoyer, and Jim Clyburn their average age is deceased so when you have someone who's under thirty. Age if your disease, but go ahead. You have someone who's under thirty who knows how to use social media who's a fresh face. Of course, people are gonna get all excited. People paper excited about Sarah Palin for a brief Drake. We've never seen something like this. But I would remind people that you, and I remember this. We have seen something like this in the seventies. There were three women named Bella Abzug, Liz Holzman, and Shirley Chisholm bright young very bright articulate, they were the next big thing. And they upset the apple cart with the Democratic Party establishment six years later, they're all in the history books. So Nancy Pelosi is not a nice person. She knows how to cutthroats when she needs to the tough lady say you have AFC on Stephen Colbert. And you tell us two hundred thirty other Democratic Congress people why is this woman getting airtime and not you you see how quickly the nice I was wondering do you think that.

Bernie Sanders Venezuela Sweden Cossio Cortes Ilan Nancy Pelosi South America Democratic Party Bella Abzug Michael Keith Ellison Alexandria Sarah Palin Boston College USSR Russia Stephen Colbert apple
"bella abzug" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Since the mid nineties. Way back in the day. And. On the same plane has come up with this. I don't know. But I think it di- died in the seventies. Maybe an okay, no. That's a great question. And I want to talk about it. I think three men three people destroyed America and here they are Timothy Leary by drugging America with LSD. He did that Allen Ginsberg by poisoning the minds and millions of us into thinking that his psychotic sick. This his perversions were normal that was number two and posing as a holy man. So be leery with drugs Ginsburg with lies, and then there was the women's movement by Bella Abzug and heart and her cohorts, they perverted the mind of women and turn them into man, hater's, not lovers of woman. So those three in my opinion killed America. Michael I live here in Texas. And I I, you know, people they look at me and the way I dress. The way I thought and I'm Joe every day. But I don't care because I what are you like a cowboy with a Big Hat. No, I'm not I'm the short fat white guy with type two diabetes. But what? So who laughs at you? Oh, you know, the one, you know, I I really don't laugh at a show white guy with diabetes. Me either. I don't agree with me that can tell by the way, I dress. And but how do you dress? What are you aware were gene baseball cap usually has some kind of hunting in, you know, usually conservative stuff patriotic set. Okay. So people find you a weird like a weirdo. Maybe they see me as a conservative and. Truthfully. Being a conservative in Texas is an odd thing in some areas where I live. Yeah. You'll where do you live in Austin? The college town I live in sixth district of congress, Texas BMW area. So you know, what shocked me when my good friend, congressman the congressman from Houston lost in this last election. I was shocked one of the greatest guys in in in the congress replaced by a far-left liberal. I thank you for calling a program. Now, look there's a lot of stories. I want to get to today. Here's a headline that I haven't seen anywhere else that we put up on michaelsavage dot com. Opioid crisis brings unwanted attention to wealthy family. Oh my God. What a story that has the Sackler name. Now, the Sackler is make Oxycontin. They made their fortune well before Oxycontin, but they're making a bigger forks a fortune because the family's name is tied to Oxycontin. And the painkillers rolling a deadly opioid crisis. Now, the Sackler name can be found on the walls of some of the world's great museums universities, including the Smithsonian the Guggenheim in Harvard, but my friends the Sackler family owns Purdue pharma, the privately held drug companies made billions from Oxy, and and the Sackler hold most of the seats on the board. There is nothing illegal in this. But people are saying the following the Sackler name is becoming synonymous with the opioid epidemic. And it is damning for these institutions that have their name upset an golden a photographer whose works displayed at Harvard Sackler is AM at New York's Metropolitan museum of art, which has Sackler wing. I actually don't agree with her. She probably NAN Goldin hasn't given ten cents to the museum. But if she is attacking those who gave a fortune to the museums where she exhibits a crappy photographs it just shows you, okay? So let's go for some of the questions number one. Let's stick to the hard stuff, which is when did America die. And how would you end the shutdown? This has to end I'm sorry. It's gotta end Trump has in fact, built a wall around himself. He's not winning this. I told you this yesterday. He is not winning this showdown. Pelosi looks like the thing that she is. But that doesn't matter the buck stops here. He's the president. He's got to put an end to this. It's not good for America. America's having a nervous breakdown over this. There's too much drama every day with Trump, and he's got to figure a way out of this. And when I come back, I'm going to put out some ideas on this show that I think Donald Trump should use to put an end to the shutdown next week..

Sackler America Donald Trump Harvard Sackler Sackler wing Texas Timothy Leary NAN Goldin president diabetes Bella Abzug congress Pelosi congressman Ginsburg Allen Ginsberg BMW painkillers Michael Purdue pharma
"bella abzug" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

06:58 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"It kind of makes me wish that Barbara Boxer was still around just a chatty. Oh, leftist boy have things changed. Now. If I've made any give us a call eight five five four seven to eight two we got great callers. I'm not gonna read any of the stories. Anyone could pull stories I got lots of stories, but let's get some calls Al in Ontario. I don't know if that's on -tario, Canada or on -tario, California, allies down tarot, California or on -tario Canada Windsor Ontario, Canada, Dr savage love your show. I gotta tell you. This is a moment right now to support Donald Trump. You're the godfather of borders, language, culture. And he's fighting for all three and Rush Limbaugh. Getting all the credit you supported Trump. They want. Why not well, I don't want to knock limbo? He doesn't need it. Because he's he knocks himself every day every time he fakes it. Well Limbaugh, women's holdings. Only things Trump gotta stay strong and love to hear that. Where would you bring? You know, you hit a hot button issue with me Limbaugh, stab Trump in the back for years straight before he was elected. But remember he was referring to everyone is Trumpers, trumpet, tears trumpets. Don't remember that. I do remember. That Limbaugh puts his finger up to the wind and whichever way the wind blows. He goes Limbaugh would be terrified if he ever had an original thought with Dr savage, you should be getting the credit. I don't need the credit. He needs the credit. He's the one who has to worry not me. I don't need the money. He does is not the most important time right now to support Trump and what he's doing. And what do you want me to get my hands in these and say, I support Trump? There's like a communist, Sal, you're trying to run here. What I I have not have never been a communist. What are you? What are you doing to me here? What I support Trump? What do you want me to say to you? This is the biggest threat walk take a walk. What was he calling from the White House press room? Why don't you call Sean Giuliani on that one? Oh, here's a great one win America. Di-? Did I asked the question or not Jim how did this guy? Get that question. This is weird. Now, this is a little weird because I said I was going to ask a question today when did America die, then I was gonna talk about the coming civil war. That is going to say, how would you end the shutdown that I was going to promote the podcast, but I didn't say when did America Di I didn't put that out on the air. How did this guy get this? What does he a mind reader? Hey, frank. How did you come up with Wendy in America dye? Well, I've been listening to you since the mid nineties. Way back in the day. And. You're not on the same plane headed I come up with this. I don't know. But I think it got seventies. Maybe an okay, no. That's a great question. And I want to talk about it. I think three men three people destroyed America and here they are Timothy Leary by drugging America with LSD. He did that Allen Ginsberg by poisoning the minds of millions of us into thinking that his psychotic sickness his perversions were normal that was number two and posing as a holy man. So be leery with drugs Ginsburg with lies, and then there was the women's movement by Bella Abzug and heart and her cohorts, they perverted the mind of women and turn them into man hater's, not lovers of women. So those three in my opinion killed America. Michael logical looks I live here in Texas. And I. You know people. They look at me and the way I dress. And here the way, I talk, and I'm Jerry every day. But I don't care because I know what are you like a cowboy with the Big Hat. No, I'm not I'm just your fat white guy with tattoos diabetes. But will what? Who laughs at you? Oh, you know, the one, you know, I really don't who would laugh at a short white guy with diabetes. People that don't agree with me that can tell by the way, I dress. And so, but how do you dress? What are you aware were gene baseball cap usually has some kind of hunting in bloom, bonnet, you know, usually conservative stuff patriotic. Okay. So people find you was a weird like a weirdo. Maybe they see me Rodway, conservative and. Truthfully, being a conservative and Texas is an odd thing in some areas where I live. Yeah. You'll where do you live in Austin? The college town district live in assists, six district of congress shouldn't Texas in the DFW area. So you know, what shocked me when my good friend, congressman the congressman from Houston lost in this last election. I was shocked one of the greatest guys in in in the congress replaced by a far-left liberal. I thank you for calling the program. Now, look there's a lot of stories. I want to get to today. Here's a headline that I haven't seen anywhere else that we put up on michaelsavage dot com opioid crisis brings unwanted attention to wealthy family. Oh my God. What a story that is the Sackler name. Now, the Sackler is make Oxycontin. They made their fortune well before Oxycontin, but they're making a bigger forks a fortune because the family's name is tied to Oxycontin. And the painkillers rolling a deadly opioid crisis. Now, the Sackler name can be found on the walls of some of the world's great museums universities, including the Smithsonian the Guggenheim in Harvard, but my friends the Sackler family owns Purdue pharma, the privately held drug companies made billions from Oxy, and and the Sackler hold most of the seats on the board. There is nothing illegal in this. But people are saying the following the Sackler name is becoming synonymous with the opioid epidemic. And it is damning for these institutions that have their name upset, and then golden a photographer whose works have been displayed at Harvard Sackler Ziam at New York's Metropolitan museum of art, which has a Sackler wing. I actually don't agree with her. She probably NAN Goldin hasn't given ten cents to the museum. But if she is attacking those who gave a fortune to the museums where she exhibits a crappy photographs it just shows you, okay? So let's go for some of the questions number. One. Let's stick to the heart stuff, which is when did America die. And how would you end the shutdown? This has to end I'm sorry. It's gotta end Trump has in fact, built a wall around himself. He's not winning this. I told you this yesterday. He is not winning this showdown. Pelosi looks like the thing that she is. But that doesn't matter the buck stops here. He's the president. He's got to put an end to this. It's not good for America. America's having a nervous breakdown over this. There's too much drama every day with Trump, and he's got to figure a way out of this. And when I come back, I'm going to put out some ideas on this show that I think Donald Trump should use to put an end to this shutdown next week..

Donald Trump America Rush Limbaugh Sackler Trump Harvard Sackler Ziam Dr savage Barbara Boxer Texas Canada California White House diabetes Allen Ginsberg Canada Windsor Ontario Al Bella Abzug NAN Goldin Sean Giuliani
"bella abzug" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:25 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Your show. I gotta tell you. This is a moment right now to support Donald Trump. You're the godfather of borders, language, culture. And he's fighting for all three and Rush Limbaugh getting all the credit you supported Trump day one. Why not well? I don't wanna knock Limbaugh. He doesn't need it. Because he's not he knocks himself every day every time he fakes it. Well Limbaugh, women's holdings only things so Trump's got to stay strong and love to hear that. Where would you bring about? You know, you hit a hot button issue with me Limbaugh stabbed Trump in the back. For years straight before he was elected. Remember, he was referring to everyone Trumpers, trumpet, tears, Trump trumpets. Don't you? Remember that? I remember that. It's Limbaugh puts his finger up to the wind and whichever way the wind blows. He goes Limbaugh would be terrified if he ever had an original thought, but Dr savage, you should be getting the credit. I don't need the credit. He needs the credit. He's the one who has to worry not me. I don't need the money. He does is. It's not the most important time right now to support Trump and what he's doing. And what do you want me to get my hands? And these and say, I support Trump is like a communist salad you're trying to run here. What I I have not. I've never been a communist. What are you? What are you doing to me here? What I support Trump? What do you want me to say to you? I'm saying that this is the biggest threat guy, walk take a walk. But was he calling from the White House press room? Why don't you call Sean Giuliani on that one? Oh, here's a great one. When in America died. I asked the question or not Jim how did this guy? Get that question. This is weird. Now, this is a little weird because I said, I was gonna ask a question today when did America die, then I was gonna talk about the coming civil war that I was gonna say how would you end the shutdown that I was going to promote the podcast, but I didn't say when did America Di I didn't put that out on the air. How did this guy get this? What is he a mind reader? Hey, frank. How did you come up with when did America dye? Well, I've been listening to you since the mid nineties. Way back in the day. And. On the same plane came up with this. I don't know. But I think it died down the seventies. Maybe an okay, no. That's a great question. And I want to talk about it. I think three men three people destroyed America and here they are Timothy Leary by drugging America with LSD. He did that Allen Ginsberg by poisoning the minds of millions of us into thinking that his psychotic sick. This his perversions were normal that was number two and proposing as a holy man. So be leery with drugs Ginsburg with lies, and then there was the women's movement by Bella Abzug and heart and her cohorts, they perverted the mind of women and turn them into man, hater's, not lovers of woman. So those three in my opinion killed America. Michael looks I live here in Texas. And I I, you know people. They look at me and the way I dress. And here the way, I talk, and I'm Jerry every day. But I don't care because I what are you like a cowboy with the Big Hat. No, I'm not I'm the short fat white guy with type two diabetes. But why will what are you? So who laughs at you? You know, the one. I really don't who would laugh at a short white guy with diabetes. Me. Don't agree with me that can tell by the way, I dress and. How do you dress? What are you wear jeans baseball cap usually have some kind of hunting in volun- it, you know, usually conservative stuff patriotic set. Okay. So people find you as a weird like a weirdo. Maybe they see me right away as a conservative and. Truthfully. Being a conservative in Texas is an odd thing in some areas where I live. Yeah. You'll where do you live in Austin? The college town. Hickory sixth district of congress in Texas in the DFW area. So what shocked me when my good friend, congressman the congressman from Houston lost in this last election. I was shocked one of the greatest guys in in in the congress. Replaced by a far-left liberal. I thank you for calling the program. Now, look there's a lot of stories. I want to get to today. Here's a headline. And that I haven't seen anywhere else that we put up on michaelsavage dot com opioid crisis brings unwanted attention to wealthy family. Oh my God. What a story that is the Sackler name. Now, the Sackler is make Oxycontin. They made their fortune well before Oxycontin, but they're making a bigger forks a fortune because the family's name is tied to Oxycontin. And the painkillers role in a deadly opioid crisis. Now, the Sackler name can be found on the walls or some of the world's great museums universities, including the Smithsonian the Guggenheim in Harvard, but my friends the Sackler family owns Purdue pharma, the privately held companies made billions from Oxy, and and the Sackler hold most of the seats on the board. There is nothing illegal in this. But people are saying the following the saquinavir is becoming synonymous with the opioid epidemic. And it is damning for these institutions that have their name upset NAN Goldin a photographer whose works have been displayed at Harvard Sackler is and at New York's Metropolitan museum of art, which has a Sackler wing. I actually don't agree with her. She probably NAN Goldin hasn't given ten cents to the museum. But if she is attacking those who gave a fortune to the museums where she exhibits a crappy photographs it just shows you, okay? So let's go for some of the questions number. One. Let's stick to the hard stuff, which is when did America die. And how would you end the shutdown? This has to end I'm sorry. It's gotta end Trump has in fact, built a wall around himself. He's not winning this. I told you this yesterday. He is not winning this showdown. Pelosi looks like the thing that she is. But that doesn't matter the buck stops here. He's the president. He's got to put an end to this. It's not good for America. America's having a nervous breakdown over this. There's too much drama every day with Trump, and he's got to figure a way out of this. And when I come back, I'm going to put out some ideas on this show that I think Donald Trump should use to put an end to this shutdown next week..

Donald Trump America Rush Limbaugh Sackler Texas Harvard Sackler NAN Goldin White House diabetes Allen Ginsberg Bella Abzug Sean Giuliani congress Timothy Leary Jim Pelosi frank Dr savage Ginsburg Big Hat
"bella abzug" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:11 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They switch from a cabdriver to Bella Abzug to Dorsey Pitman used a flow Kennedy to woman killer. They're taking on all these little roles and all these big roles all these kind of muses and mentors that were critical to Gloria. And then for me, the metaphor was the audience. It continues the circle continues to the audience so it feels intimate 'cause it's three hundred people total in one room. But actually for me this show felt ethic, you know, as complicated as musicals are this one was really complicated because we're covering so much history. So much time doing it in an hour and a half. And and my goal is the director was to make everyone have space to say, that's my life. That's where I was. That's where I remember my mother. That's where I connect. Oh, and that's what I missed. And now, I'm feeling this. You know, that's trying to make the audience feel like they are part of the story. And then literally we do that enact to where the audience is invited to share their stories and Christina. And I saw the other night. And Gloria Steinem came out for the talk back. We'll talk about that in a minute. And you made the point that, you know, you didn't wanna do impersonation. You didn't want to impression? But, you know, you're an actress you have to embody this person you have to let us the audience know about her life. How did you go about that? Well, my focus was obviously on her motionless journey, and I kept trying to get to the the darker underbelly of Gloria because we all know about the icon and be my friends three simply said, basically, Christine, you're playing Jesus. But, but I, but I said, no, I'm not I'm playing a human being who in glory was completely enthusiastic and embracing of this idea, which is to be as honest as she could be about her life warts and all in order to inspire others to accept their own imperfections. Because we we all are are full humanity is what we should celebrate. And that's what glorious stands for. And so she was elbow. She is. Can be a little guarded. It was like all of us were okay. Tell us go deeper go deeper, and she was so willing to do that. So that was my my focus was I want to tell a story of a of a flawed complex brilliant human being and starting from when she was completely unwound, and and the way the complex relationship, she had with her mother. And this to me, she was a woman who grew up feeling like she didn't matter. Her mother didn't matter who evolved into a woman who was determined to make sure all women mattered, and that drive that emotional drive is what to me fuels the journey of the play and the story of her mother's when I don't think a lot of people know that her mother had been a journalist had written under a man's name. And then wasn't able to fulfil her life and her potential and she began to lose her mind. Yes and glory was her caregiver. And that was a really I don't think I knew that part of the story and the age of ten. Yeah. Well, she. You know in the play Christine says as glory, you know, she had what was in those days called a nervous breakdown. Right. You know, but the, but the point really that. I think we make through the play is that it wasn't a personal fate Christine should quote along. Well, you wrote it. Gloria said, it wasn't a personal fault. It was a female faith. Yeah. And when she used to she would have beautiful piece called Ruth's about her mother and a song. Do sung because she couldn't sing it and often she'd be asked on the road. Well, are you afraid of inheriting your mother's illness? And she said well on the patriarchy is inherited. Right. She knew that her mother was broken that. It was not that she had a break down as one thinks of now in terms of of the brain chemistry and all of that. It really was that she was crushed. She was stopped from having the life. She wanted to have. And when you understand that being the core, then it becomes really clear what this is. But Gloria wanted this. She one of the impulsive she had for having the play done at all was she said, look, if I didn't get what can I was thirty five, and if I had the childhood I had and could still make a difference and somehow work to help others, you can do it too. She wanted to be able to inspire others through her story. You all mentioned, Gloria how involved was she in very you're part of the production. Emily in the last month. Part of the part of writing at did. She expressed to you themes. She wanted. Yeah. Do you have to point out to hurling things that were would work on stage that while might be dear to her not necessarily would work on a play? We talk all through right from the beginning. We started with mice. And do you mind if I actually do an old fashioned interview? And do it not the way you've been interviewed a million other times, but just through free associations that I might have a real a real conversation. And she was so game for it. So right from the get-go, we are two straight days of just talking with the tape recorder on trying to get out of that interview sort of not that not traditional format. Well, do so much documentary play writing, right? So I wanted to see if a form would reveal itself through our discussions. I had that with the Delany sisters to one hundred having our say once I spoke to the I realized oh, this is the play came really quickly to made because I'd had that experience of them telling me right off the bat what they wanted to tell. And it was interesting the stories that. Gloria lead with and they are the key stories in the play to this to this day someone to get past. What happens, you know, with the great documentaries done about her in the interviews about her, but to try to try to just get to on an emotional level. And that was so she's been fantastic. All the with you. It's been four years. Wow. He's also so great and smart because she she'll really defer to theatrical process. No, she she was so, you know, e eager to be there to help us. But really saying, you know, this is your area. No, you you show me what can how this can be made into theater, but it was so great to have her 'cause we'd be sitting rehearsal. And we'd be working on section is Emily said, do you mind meld something on the page? And then it was trying something Christine was wrestling with. And we'd be like wish we'd just go techs, Gloria. Texture or Christine was Albie Mailer. And then the next day response would come get information. There were lines that would come in the next morning from Gloria that would then go into the play. It was really an amazing process. Yeah. She's also, she's a journalist. So I'm sure she was curious about the process, what kind of questions did she have for you. I think she, you know, she she wanted to know about editing as she says, she's a fierce editor, right? And so I think what was a a learning curve was that, you know, in the theater you edit in space. So you do your first round of editing on the page, but it's not done when it's on the page. So you goes far as you can on the page. But then really things that don't even look like they're they're going to work on the page work in space through actors through time through music who all these things with a light you chef. So I think, you know, some some of it was just going back and forth to say, well, let's leave that with me because I think I know how to do that in time and space with theater, you know, and once we get into the actor. So I think it was just extending that at any process to live theater. Christine when you put on you got the look when you when you when you get the full costuming, Ana costuming is really great. Can you tell me about the way you studied, Gloria physically so that you could telegraphed people what was going on with her emotionally through your fiscal action? Yeah. I mean, we've been friends for many many many years. So that was another. I think asset to our collaboration was an ice. I remember a story. She told me fifteen years ago, and let's maybe we should put that in the play and. Yeah. We were very close. And we are connect emotionally on so many levels. We have similar had similar relationships with our mothers. Although my mother was not did not have anxiety disorder. But she was broken. I think her spirit was broken by the patriarchy and also being from the midwest and being the there's just a lot of emotional connections being activists, of course, she's way in another stratosphere compared to my activism, but physically I just after I got the part I decided to I I always work internally first to find what the emotional connections are. And then very last bit is to add in the physical changes the adjustments. And that's when I went out to dinner with her and just watched her. I said I wanna watch the way you eat your food..

Gloria Steinem Christine Emily Bella Abzug director anxiety Christina Ruth Dorsey Pitman Kennedy Delany editor Albie Mailer fifteen years four years
"bella abzug" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:14 min | 3 years ago

"bella abzug" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I don't know hundred different roles. They switch from a cab driver to Bella Abzug to Dorsey Pitman used a flow Kennedy to woman killer, you know, they're taking on all these little roles and all these big roles all these kind of muses and mentors that were critical to Gloria. And then for me, the metaphor was the audience. It continues the circle continues to the audience so it feels intimate because it's three hundred people total in one room. But actually for me this show felt ethic, you know, as complicated as musicals, this one was really complicated because we're covering so much history. So much time were doing it in an hour and a half. And and my goal is the director was to make everyone to have space to say, that's my life. That's where I was. That's where I remember my mother. That's where I connect. Oh, and that's what I missed. And now, I'm feeling this. You know, that's trying to make the audience feel like they are part of the story. And then Lou. Literally, we do that enact to where the audience is invited to share their stories and Christina. And I saw the other night and Gloria Steinem came out for the talk back. We'll talk about that in a minute. And you made the point that, you know, you didn't want to do an impersonation. He didn't want to do an impression. But you, you know, you're an actress you have to embody this person you have to let us the audience know about her life. How did you go about that? Well, my focus was obviously on her emotional journey. And I kept trying to get to the the darker underbelly of of Gloria because we all know about the icon, and you know, my friends three gently said, basically, Christine, you're playing Jesus. But, but I, but I said, no, I'm not I'm playing a human being who in Gloria was completely enthusiastic and embracing this idea, which is to be as honest as she could be about her life warts and all in order to inspire others to accept their own imperfections. 'cause we we all are are full humanity is what we should celebrate. And that's what glorious stands for. And so she was elbow. She is she she can be a little guarded. It was like all of us were okay. Tell us go deeper go deeper, and she was so willing to do that. So that was my my focus was I want to tell a story of a of a flawed complex brilliant human being and starting from when she was completely unwound, and and the way the complex relationship, she had with her mother. And this to me, she was a woman who grew up feeling like she didn't matter. Her mother didn't matter who evolved into. A woman who was determined to make sure all women mattered, and that drive that emotional drive is what to me fuels the journey of the play and the story of her mother's. I don't think a lot of people know that her mother had been a journalist had written under a man's name. And then wasn't able to fulfil her life and her potential and she began to lose her mind. Yes and glory was her caregiver. And that was a really I don't think I knew that part of the story at the age of ten. Yeah. Well, she, you know, in the play Christine says as Gloria, you know, she had what was in those days called a nervous breakdown. Right. But the, but the point really that. I think we make through the play is that it wasn't a personal fate Christine should quote the line. Well, you wrote it. Gloria said, it wasn't a personal fault. It was a female faith. Yeah. And when she used to she would have beautiful piece called Ruth's about her mother and a song Ruth song because she couldn't sing it and often she'd be asked on the road. Well, are you afraid of inheriting your mother's illness? And she said well on the patriarchy is inherited. Right. She knew that her mother was broken that. It was not that she had a break down as one thinks of now in terms of of the brain chemistry and all of that. It really was that she was crushed. She was stopped from having the life. She wanted to have. And when you understand that being the core, then it becomes really clear what this is. But Gloria wanted this. You wonder if the impulse she had for having the play done at all what she said, look, if I didn't get what can till I was thirty five, and if I had the childhood I had and could still make a difference and somehow work to help others, you can do it too. She wanted to be able to inspire others through her story. You all mentioned, Gloria how involved was she in very you're part of the production, Emily in the last month. And you're part of the part of writing at did she express to you theme. She wanted you have. Do you have to point out to hurling things that were would work on stage that while might be dear to her not necessarily would work on a play? We talk did all through a man, right? From the beginning. We started with my saying, do you mind if I actually do an old fashioned interview? And do it not the way you've been interviewed a million other times. But just through you know, free associations that I might have a real a real conversation. And she was so game for it. So right from the get go to straight days of just talking with the tape recorder on trying to get out of that interview sort of not not traditional format. Well, I do so much documentary play writing, right? So I wanted to see if a form would reveal itself through our discussions. I had that with the Delany sisters to when I did having our say once I spoke to the. Yeah. I realized oh this is the play came really quickly to me because I'd had that experience of them telling me right off the bat what they wanted to tell. And it was interesting the stories that glory lead with and they are the key stories in the play to this to this day someone to get past. What happens, you know, with the great documentaries done about her in the interviews about her, but to try to try to just get to on an emotional level. And that was so she's been fantastic. All the way through it's been four years. Wow. Is also so great and smart because she she'll really defer to theatrical process. No, she she was so, you know, e eager to be there to help us. But really saying, you know, this is your area. No you show me. What can how this can be made into theater, but it was so great to have her because we'd be sitting rehearsal. And we'd be working on section is Emily said, do you mind meld something on the page? And then it was trying something Christine was wrestling with. And we'd be like wish we'd just go. Text gloria. Texture or Christine would say I'll emailer. And then the next day response would come in to get information. There were lines that would come in the next morning from Gloria that would then go into the play. It was really an amazing process. Yeah. She's also. Oh, sorry. She's a journalist. So I'm sure she was curious about the process, what kind of questions did she have for you. I think she, you know, she she wanted to know about editing as she says, she's a fierce editor, right? And so I think what was a alerting curve was that, you know, in the theater you edit in space. So you do your first round of editing on the page, but it's not done when it's on the page. So you go as far as you can on the page. But then really things that don't even look like they're going to work on the page working space through actors through time through music, all these thing with a light Q chef. So I think, you know, some some of it was just going back and forth to say, we'll leave that with me because I think I know how to do that in time and space with theater, you know, once we get into the actor. So I think it was just extending that editing process to live theater, Christine when you put on you got the look when you when you when you get the full costuming costuming is is really great. Can you tell me about the way you studied glue? Gloria physically so that you could telegraphed people what was going on with her emotionally through your fiscal actions. Yeah. I mean, we've been friends for many many many years. So that was another. I think asset to our collaboration was is. I could I remember a story. She told me fifteen years ago, and let's maybe we should put that in the play and. Yeah. We were very close. And we are we connect emotionally on so many levels. We have similar had similar relationships with our mothers. Although my mother was not did not have anxiety disorder. But she was broken. I think her spirit was broken by the patriarchy and also being from the midwest and being the there's just a lot of emotional connections being activists, of course, she's way on another stratosphere compared to my activism, but physically I just, you know, after I got the part, I decided to I I always work internally first to find what the emotional connections are. And then very last bit is to add in the physical changes the adjustments. And that's when I went out to dinner with her and just watched her. I said I wanna watch the way you eat your food. Wipe your.

Gloria Steinem Christine Emily Bella Abzug director anxiety Lou Christina Ruth Delany Kennedy Dorsey Pitman editor fifteen years four years