8 Burst results for "Belize Central America"

"belize central america" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 5 months ago

"belize central america" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Once again, , this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, , and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. . American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. . Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. . Thank you for having me. . Excited to be here is good to have you with us. . I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. . Once again, , the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. . So, with , that in mind, let , me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. . Yeah for sure. . So what envisioning <hes> what I was in? ? When I came up with the article title <hes> you know those with everything that's going on. . There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US <hes> I find a lot of conversations especially. . I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. . I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly <hes> an African American movement <hes>, , which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. . particularly in the US. . <hes> but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. . Caribbean. . <hes> Europe other places. . Outside <hes> saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. . <hes>. . So. . In the case, of , Central, , America <hes> you know black lives have always mattered. . There's always been struggles of <hes>. . On, the , ground with black people fighting again, , know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially <hes> what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? ? America. . <hes>. . So that's what I was thinking about. . That's what I had in mind when I, , came up with this article <hes> and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long <hes> history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. . Even. Delve . into <hes> what You, , know black lives. . Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. . Black Communities and black histories in the region I. . so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. . Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. . Belize as well. . So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. . But with that said, , there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, , there's some other groups that need to be recognized. . So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, , their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. . Correct. . Yes for sure. . And that's even including myself <hes>. . I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. . So depending on. . The vantage point, , but you look at central. . America play believes etc. . Gua. . Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. . Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. . <hes>. . So thinking about that identity <hes> in believes to historic. . Black Group <HES> are black creoles. . And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. . It's <hes> common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, , who visually looks why to also call themselves. . And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. . So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion <hes>. . So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. . And of course. . When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. . <hes> black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. . <hes> migration and group within believe. . So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. . You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. . So that's also present there. . <hes>, , and then recently you have a lot of immigrants <hes> from. . The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. . Think someone someone from Ghana, , and then of course, , <hes> from Haiti as well. . <hes> considering migration Haitians to central. . So there's like different levels of that. . But in terms of like historic, , it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. . Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. . It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. . Father vice versa <hes>. . So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct <hes> and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. . Experience within the country <hes>. . which kind of <hes> work to conceptualize <hes> how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important <hes> to also considering language racial formations. . So yeah. .

America Central America Belize Black Group Caribbean Latin America Europe US. Gutty Funez Duras Los Angeles Jamaica Barbados Trinidad Belizean Diaspora Gutty Fuda Nick Harnessing Rasiah A. Father Haiti Ghana
Black Lives Matter In Belize

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 5 months ago

Black Lives Matter In Belize

"Once again, this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here is good to have you with us. I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. Once again, the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. So, with that in mind, let me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. Yeah for sure. So what envisioning what I was in? When I came up with the article title you know those with everything that's going on. There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US I find a lot of conversations especially. I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly an African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah.

America Central America Belize Belize Central America Black Group Nicole Ramsey Latin America United States Uc Berkeley Department Of African Oscar Fernandez Caribbean Europe Gutty Funez Duras A. Father Haiti Ghana Jamaica
"belize central america" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

08:12 min | 8 months ago

"belize central america" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Guess which is the guy that like breaks, train, in win a Muka when a Muqata Gosh is, we're going to get emails about this. I'M GONNA to win a Muko. Nevada that's in the desert, so he got put again. You're right Ben. We gotTA keep taking grains of salt with this stuff, because like bill idea of and then I was ojected from the train in the middle of the desert, and I had to fend with nothing, but my pocket knife, and I traded my rifle, and I had to know wrestle giant Scorpions with my bare hands. That's not in here but I. You know well. Let's just double down on dudes fantabulous. so around four hundred and fifty miles from San Francisco is where he was led out here so he decided that he wanted to kind of hone his survival chops even further, so you know. He didn't have the best luck in this first run. He realized he was you know he was caught and he needed to do a better job of hiding himself and kind of learning. Learning. Some of the rules of the road are the rails as it were but he liked it. He got a taste for it, and he decided that he this is the life for him. He was going to start in earnest a career. I guess as as a Hobo and that's when he really just went ham on hopping the rails and writing all over creation. Tenor jobs that we talked about crossing the country right as the industrial revolution was really taking hold again, a lot of his braggadocio would come out in in his writings, and he did boast that he travelled five hundred thousand miles. On trains well only spending a little over seven bucks on Fares Five, hundred thousand I. Don't know about that. What are you GonNa? That's wow, yeah, yeah, that's the thing. His experience was not the average experience. You know a many itinerant workers many migrants. But you're right knoll. He spent decades on the road. That part is true. He also took to writing about his Writing Fanciful stories about his time on the road ed he eventually published about. Baker's dozen books concerning his travels the most thorough one guest. The compendium is a book called life and adventures of a number one. America's most celebrated tramp. This was published in nineteen ten at that point he had been on the road for almost thirty years, and it includes a lot of early tales of his Hobo origin, and if this were an album, one of the breakout tracks of life and adventures of Eight. Eight number one. Is this story about him? Working on a British trade ship that left new. Orleans for believes and the idea here is that he took the job, but then he eventually jumped ship and began working at a Mahogany camp meaning camp that was set up to harvest. Mahogany Wood I, also going back to what we said. In the beginning of this episode, a number one is his Hobo name. And it please a big part in our ability to prove that. At least some of his travels, in fact, many of his travels actually happened, so the guy is not just sitting at home in San Francisco writing some sort of fan fiction about an alternate version of himself. He really is on the road, and some of his details actually make sense even if they are fabulous as you said, even if they are bit embellish, but Belize Central America. That's pretty crazy. Right to get there. In the late eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds a man after your own heart Ben I mean you had some kind of. TRAMP like days in Central America yourself or South America you tell some great stories about about those years in your life that I don't know. It seems like you've got a kindred spirit here in Mister Livingston no comment. No comment okay fair enough. And this period in Livingston's life, really made for some fantastic tales his time in the British Mahogany camp he even was able to kind of report on some of the conditions in these camps. which as we can imagine you know if you know anything about this time in the history of Labor not good, not a lot of oversight and he was able to Kinda report on some of that, he apparently a multiple times attempted to desert his employers and and kind of extort them. For the money that would get him home. talked about things like eating roasted baboon and a sort of a navy drama to overdramatize version of malaria that he referred to as the black swamp fever. never heard that used anywhere outside of this. This gentleman's writing and you know again. It was all this kind of really. You know cartoony. romanticize really flowery, writing a very self-aggrandizing who knew that a guy that dubbed himself the Hobo, King and a number one would potentially have an over inflated sense of. Self but it makes for some really entertaining writing, and this is some of the stuff. He wrote about some of the really tragic socioeconomic conditions of life in this Mahogany camp We're making references to the the food that he was forced to eat as well quote I became acquainted with roasted babboons, Fried Parrots Turtle, an Armadillo stews tap steak tape. Taper T. T APR I duNno that adhere to appear cool should a just quit while I was at Iguana an enormous and ugly tree lizard. He says monkey soup et Cetera, and he describes one particularly Let's see treacherous journey that he took up river he says we embarked in dugouts, canoes straight, men, women, children dogs household effects provision. Etcetera fond of this etc.. And paddled up the Rio Hondo after several hours passing through mangrove swamps, we came to higher ground, and then we only could use polls as the river became crooked, shallow and full of rapids, alligators and enormous turtles slid from the banks as we approached them and at night when we camped on the riverbank around the fires we could hear the cries of Panthers Mountain Lions wildcats monkeys. In coyotes in the dark jungle. Good stuff so the problem. With a passage. Read starts with we embarked in dugouts and ends. It coyotes in the dark jungle, so that whole thing is is is one quote. The problem with that quote is that it I'm not gonNA. Say Plagiarize is, but it echoes on earlier account May by him trader horn a about a river trip in Gabon in the. River or on the go a river interesting, so we don't know how true it is we. We know that he went to Belize. Probably, but we don't know if he actually ate monkeys soup, or if he's quoting another book that he read according to the story. While he's in this Mahogany.

San Francisco Muko Nevada Belize Central America Belize Gabon Rio Hondo malaria Mister Livingston America Livingston Baker Orleans Central America South America Panthers Mountain Lions
"belize central america" Discussed on Photofocus Podcast

Photofocus Podcast

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"belize central america" Discussed on Photofocus Podcast

"A joint effort brought to you by Focus and Skip Cohen University this Shamir young and I'm joined actually getting all the rain that the rest of the country's been getting down here in Florida so visualize the day is just a little bit grey and cloudy but boy I got story his and our guest today has got stories in fact wall all our guests on mind your own business have been great today's re continues to show there is simply no boundaries whatsoever to creativity Rick Salmon is with us and he's a photographer he's an artist a musician a scuba diver a podcast or an author educator also a husband and he's a great friend so many of us in the industry and if I spend amount of time his accomplishments deserve we won't have a podcast today it'll just be talking about everything rick has done in his life but the short version. He's all about setting the standard for passion for life and intern imaging now I know that at least are coming up on close to forty bucks out there with his name on them and often his favourite co-authors wife Susan and it's such a kick to get a spot in his schedule to join us today now with so many years and incredible experiences and photography we're GonNa talk about some of the best lessons rix learned over the years he's also working on a new book that I know is going to be remarkable it's called phototherapy and it's the perfect foundation to set the stage for today's podcast so hey buddy if you're still here this is be the cue for your lips to move welcome to mind your own business well thank you guys for having me on the show and skip thank you for reading that a great introduction that my mother wrote before she died I mean it was perfect what's funny about it like three things I always write an introduction out so I don't forget them yea don't forget what I want to say so I'm glad because your your mom sent it over to me and much appreciate it and for checks in the mail ah okay but seriously thank you guys so much I follow your podcast I follow your work I've known skipped for a hundred years so it's really a pleasure to be here yeah didn't we both intern with Matthew Brady Yes yes the great civil war photographer he claimed to be a journalist but for the list is who don't Oh you know he was billed as a photojournalist during the civil war he would actually move cannons and guns and bodies around he would make the picture yeah I tell people there's a big difference between you know being a travel photographer like I am and being a photo journalist right the photo journalist should tell the truth well I just read my I I read a quote the other day that was just great it just said don't believe everything you read on the Internet assigned Abraham Lincoln so that that's another statement all right so Chamara we could get this party B. of fun one I can tell Rick in is such an honor to have you on the show and we always kick off our first question with just asking you to tell us a bit about yourself your background you can fill in some of the holes from the the Intro that skip gave you the amazing intro could you really kind of tell us how you ended up doing what you're doing today well it's a very long story I started out I went to Berkeley does your music in Boston I wanted to be a musician after After I got out and I was teaching piano and guitar lessons there was a lot of downtime so during that downtime I would take pictures and then I saw a photo magazine sent in skipped you remember Rudy Mashpee sure do I sent in the median and Ed and at Wagner I sent in this picture to Studio Photography magazine I picture of his sent anywhere by mail by the way this is in nineteen seventy four live in one thousand nine hundred seventy six and they published it then they asked me to ride an article and they published it and then skip you like those Rudy Maske with experience asked me to be the editor of the magazine editor of Studio Photography and photo processing and the photokina daily and the P. daily with no experience so he gave me a chance and I said okay you know 'cause you don't make a ton of money teaching guitar lessons in one thousand nine hundred ninety five or seven dollars a half an hour so then Minolta got to know me did you ever know Al Shapiro sure he was at basell Jacobs became bozell Jacobs Kenyon in that car and that's where Steve Rosenbaum was you and Steve Rosenbaum was there and Minolta needed someone to head up the account that Bozell so with no experience in ties and PR L. Shapiro hired me to be vice president groups supervisor of the account and I was there for ten years but just backing up a little bit when I was at a studio photography magazine Photo Processing Magazine one day the boss Mr Mashpee asked me to fly to Texas to do a story on a photo APP the last thing in the world wanted to get on a plane and go around you know and look at all the people in the photo fought a lab putting film in envelopes and stuff like that well it turns out that the head of that photo lab was then was Bernard McFadden he was ahead of a marine conservation organization called seat in on the side the prophet five Oh one eight three called C. Damn international which is an an acronym for Conservation Education Diving archaeology GM museums so the guy likes the article that I wrote Bernard McFadden likes the article he says well you know what we need an editor for the newsletter I said well do you need he says well you have to learn how to scuba dive take underwater pictures and you have to go to Belize Central America in six months make a long story short I did all that and two years later I'm president of the Marine Conservation Organization seat him into national and which took me all around the world So then I got out of the Advertising Agency at Ninety and I started doing what I'm doing now writing books I've condensed the story there were a lot of things is going on between but you know forty bucks later eighteen Calvi one classes seminars workshops being a dad is my number one actually having my son be proud of me as my number one priority in life it's a good one well I know I have caught up to you over a years at virtually every photo show I think we caught up at the demon show once when Bob Rose and I were walking around the show and if it's got anything to do with anything with a camera in your hands odds are you have been there or written about it and in speaking of writing about it let's set the stage and talk a little bit about phototherapy and all the components of the last few years well of your career in this industry and how it ties in with some of the lessons you've learned which is something we talk not long ago about on your podcast right well I'm on twitter and I see this book on twitter it's called bird therapy and it talks about the therapeutic value of watching birds and we have a lot of birds pair where we live in Florida skipped you have great birds down there right on the East Coast and this goes so it just popped into my mind if you know phototherapy 'cause you know a lot of my friends Feel that you get in the zone you know that taking church is very very therapeutic making the picture is very therapeutic so I came up with this idea so now I just finished the book I it's thirty five thousand words so my finger my you know my fingers hurt a little but I really think this'll help people I think it's has no pictures in it so in the front of the book I have a spoiler alert and I tell people that there are you know there's thirty five thousand words in here in no pictures I say to myself Fleiss said if if it's going to have no pictures the writing better be pretty damn good so I put everything I have into this my son has dad how long did it take you to write I I said well it took me three months writing three to four hours a day but then I realized that took me seventy years because I'm seven the next year almost seventy years because this is really a lifetime of experience you know one of my favorite chapters in there is called emotional intelligence for photographers Daniel woman has this book emotional intelligence which is a a bestseller and what he talks about and that is we have to be aware of everything that's going on around us and our effect on other people and I think as photographers we're photographing people right we're photographing people we have to be aware of our body language expression or mood or feeling you know there's an old expression that the camera looks both ways in picturing the subject we're picturing party itself it's a Freeman Patterson photographer list in Canada expression so I talk about that in the book and I talk about a another chapter is it's never it sounds funny it's never too late to be what you might have been now I sure none of us on this podcast I'm going to be brain surgeons but we could be better photographers we could be better people we could be better right there's and I think if we believe in ourselves and which is just so important you know getting back to my son when he was growing up I think in in instilling a sense of self esteem and a person is like the most important thing you can do I think if you believe in yourself you could really do anything so anyway I put all the experiences together I have some technical information I have a chapter in there on light therapy in color therapy and I talked about color blindness in the yeah but I think someone reading this at the end of each of the I think it's twenty two chapters itsel I have a mission skipped remember mission impossible for yeah okay so wait a minute wait a minute I'm not you know you and I are pretty much the same age but just because Camaros alot younger than we are she knows mission impossible I just know the she may not have seen the original one right and TV I'm black and white TV right now black and white tv not seen that one and lassie ask lassie on twitter he looks just the same but anyway you know getting back to what we were talking about it's really never too late to be who you could have been if you believe in yourself it's just so important but the mission of possible thing actually old emissions in chapter and I have a mission at the end of each chapter in mission impossible Mr Phelps Choose to accept this mission right so I challenge the people to follow these missions if I could give you a funny one I'll tell you if I have time we're go okay some of our some of your listeners probably don't know of Edward Weston skip I.

Rick Salmon Skip Cohen University Florida intern Susan seventy years hundred years seven dollars three months four hours six months ten years two years one day
"belize central america" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"belize central america" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"With one of his best, friends and then. On purpose. It just kind of happened. Falling back to me. Like, I can't believe you do that to me. And I thought Excu. What world do we you're upset by my behavior stoop to his level? I didn't know I. I like your style. Are we had a tweet that went out from a stranger? She her overheard a guy bragging about. Oh, yeah. Cheat on my girlfriend all the time. She's like, all right. So she tweeted about it. And luckily, the guy's girlfriend saw and broke up with him. So we're taking your stories on how you caught someone cheating. I know intern hugs dying to tell us something. Oh, yeah. One time. I went through my ex's Facebook messages. I know that was really shady, but I had a bad feeling just a feeling came overcame said. Let me check her because her Facebook was open check these messages and sure enough. The first message on there. The guy the actually lived in Belize Central America. Because she does of course, a notional team. It wasn't physical. But her message was so crazy. It was like this long novel and going into how much she was wrong with him and missed him. And that you know, my boyfriend which is me ton has gone to work in your. I'm gonna call you later. And wow. Ranji stuffing hurt me. Yes. We met her man. You just never know. You never ever. That's her. No it is. It was hurtful as hell. Now, speaking sorry. That's not funny. No, let's all leads. We met heard. And that's actually surprising to me. Yeah. That that that there were two. Enter surprising, right? Speaking of surprising. I've always wanted to do this this might sound odd. I've talked to Kate off. There are no you're interested. Yeah. Going whale watching. They seem super cool to be that close to wild animals. Yeah. In in the beyond the ocean and the see something so big and majestic are. But when whale-watching goes wrong. We'll tell you what happened.

Facebook Belize Central America intern Kate
"belize central america" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"belize central america" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm john batchelor john batchelor show we welcome bob zimmerman keeps the website behind the black back from belize is cave exploring and topography inside a limestone caverns of belize central america this is happy birthday behind the black and i remind all of us that your contributions your generous contributions to behind the black are most appreciated two dollars or five dollars a month or a a single some to keep bob not only in cave drawing materials but also watching the skies for us we begin in caves however because bob has thoughts about the now successful rescue of the twelve young people and their coach from the caves in thailand bob last week when we talked in belize you said this is very scary stuff very dangerous they have to move now because the water's can rise quickly in the monsoon season they've now rescued them all is this something you expected to happen good evening to you bob good evening i wanna thank all your listeners for their really generous donations to behind the black i really do appreciate it it's it's it's really needed and appreciated beyond words i did i was actually horribly pessimistic about this i want i posted some comments about it on behind the black as a keva i'm very wary of what the dangers of cave diving cave diving is more dangerous than being an apollo astronaut on the moon because then apollo astronaut has the full force of the us government supporting him cave daiva has very little margin of error small amounts of oxygen you make a mistake you die which is why one of the rescue divers died ran out of oxygen extremely dangerous you have no visibility in a cave that's why they lot of the layout a lifeline is a miracle divers themselves found the boys because they were moving lane dive line is they go blind and that they managed to find the passage where these boys were is pretty remarkable and then to train the kids some of them couldn't swim to swim and then to dive back in zero visibility with no losses this is an absolute miracle is a miracle it is is spectacular and we should all thank the heavens this has came out so so so well is a tragedy one of the divers died in pressuring the the the rescue but then again his his sacrifice helped bring about the rescue of twelve children and their soccer coach we go from thailand north to china china's setting records for launch has bob has been keeping the launch charter everybody together and you said that china is leaping ahead does this mean that space x in the us can catch up bobber they take in such a lead oh no what's interesting china did since china's done a bunch of launches in the last week and they've now completed today their twenty s they've now completed their twentieth launch for twenty eighteen which matches their previous annual record for most launches in two thousand sixteen to twenty launches for the whole year while they now in just over half the year have done twenty launches they predicted they were going to do forty launches almost forty launches this year and they're right on track to do that unless something goes wrong now can the us match them well you know i think this is going to be at the head neck and neck for the rest of the year because you know there's lots on the us launches planned russia trails and they'll they'll they'll be i think end up third europe is is you know disappeared from the listening they'll eventually catch up a little bit but right now china is demonstrating that they are major day they intend to be a major player for years to come right now china is also boasting that it has a heavy lift project on the the drawing bars i guess anna reusable rocket program where did they get these ideas from bob well you you love to talk about how they feel a lot of their.

bob zimmerman belize john batchelor five dollars two dollars
"belize central america" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"belize central america" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To get the stories of the immigrants such as yourself out there you came to the us from the lease at the age of seven how did you get to this country i came to this country because my parents wanted me to have access to opportunities that i otherwise wouldn't have had if i remained in belize central america you know it was one of those experiences as the eldest child they knew that i would be the closest one to be able to access institutions higher learning and they wanted me to get opportunities that dade themselves didn't get so as a result of that they sent me to live with my maternal grandmother in the united states you part of the un's active lack network and is an advocacy group that serves undocumented black immigrants how big is that population and how are you going about getting your message out we actually have six hundred and nineteen thousand anjar you black people represented in the united states and as a result of that we at the undock you black network seek to send our message by making sure that our voices are amplify both locally state wide and nationally so we go about it by doing interviews do an op eds doing videos that showcases the diversity of the immigrant community something that we often don't talk about enough so when you have comments that are made by the president and his administration about blink coal countries and he's refer into haiti and countries on the african continent that's what it took in order for a lot of people's i understand that immigration is a black issue what has sliced men like for you as an undocumented immigrants living under the trump administration chaotic would be an understatement in that each day we definitely do not know what's going to happen a few weeks ago we had the trump administration as well as leaders from both parties give a press conference or have a meeting in the midst.

america united states un president haiti belize
"belize central america" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"belize central america" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A lot of this you know full big vitriol about was being spread as the state of the union by president trump well well we'll tell us a little bit about your personal story because i know with the undocking plaque network wanted your mission is to get the stories of immigrants such as yourself out there you came to the us from the lease of each of seven how did you get to this country i came to this country because my parents wanted me to have access to opportunities that i otherwise would have had if i remained in belize central america you know it was one of those experiences as the eldest child they knew that i would be the closest one to be able to access institutions higher learning and they wanted me to get opportunities that dade themselves didn't get so as a result of that they sent me to live with my maternal grandmother in the united states you part of the undrafted black network and is an advocacy group that serves undocumented black immigrants how big is that population and how are you going about getting your message out we actually have six hundred and nineteen thousand undocumented black people represented in the united states and as a result of that we at the undock you black network seek to send our message by making sure that our voices are amplify both locally state wide nationally so we go about it by doing interviews do an op eds doing videos that showcases the diversity of the immigrant community something that we often don't talk about enough so when you have comments that are made by the president and his administration about blink whole countries and he's refer into haiti and countries on the african continent that's what it took in order for a lot of people to understand that immigration is a black issue what has sliced men like for you as an undocumented immigrants living under the trump administration chaotic would be an understatement in that each day we definitely do not know what's going to happen a few weeks ago we had the trump administration as well as leaders from both parties give a press conference or a have a meeting in the midst.

america united states president haiti belize