11 Burst results for "Believer Magazine"

"believer magazine" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

08:41 min | 2 weeks ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on The Watch

"Anyway sending out the the sonar ping to be like. Maybe this is worthy of exploration. And you'd get it back you know. That's the one good thing about this instant culture that we have right now and so yet to your point. We talked about this a couple of weeks ago. But i weirdly became a jazz guy which ed expect but like and i turned chris a little bit too and i got. I saw fantasy repping as well. But like i got super into pianist. Bill evans and like the lovely like hammond. You know records from the seventies. And i i could talk about bill evans for the next five hours Did you read the believer article about the song artists. No i'm going to send you an article and every i encourage everybody to track down. It's i can't remember what the name of the article is. But it's a the believer magazine. Put out an article about the bill evans song artist and his relationship to it. And how it's a song that throughout bill evans's career he continues to work and rework record in rerecord. Because it's it's a song that has so much that so rich and so emblematic of somebody trying to conquer and figure out a song for himself. That song i now have a playlist on spotify. That is just all the iterations of artists Bill evans there's a. There's a mediocre documentary on. I've also consumed hundreds of hours of music documentaries of documentaries a lot of the music documents. There's a mediocre on. Bill evans on on on prime. That is okay but it really has is really good footage of bill evans. Actually playing the piano. Which there's not a lot of so that's very compelling. I also will recommend. Have you seen a documentary. Also on prime called the jazz loft resorted guys look to the jazz loved It's about this guy who is a one of the most you know well known photo journalists of his time You know we're talking thirties. Forties new york moves into a loft in the flower district and rents the above floor where he does all his photo stuff. Rinse the above floor to a jazz musician. Who starts holding like jam late night. Jam sessions there and it's like all of the scene of that time including monk including like mingas including all these interesting people who are on and the photographer wires the whole place for sound and just starts recording everything and so the documentary. Is this kind of simultaneously beautiful Idi is an exploration of his art as seen through his photographs of new york city of that era. But also all of this Audio footage that he has of these incredible musicians like they have monk rehearsing for the famous monkey town hall concerts that that become very seminal thelonious monk record like they rehearsed all of that in the jazz loft so it'd be incredible audiovisual sumptuous documentary. That's great yeah so far. Be it for me to put lipstick on the pig of this year but like it's kind of maybe a quasi positive that this awful circumstance in many ways caused us. This is the best case scenario. I guess to kind of question who we are. You know in the sense that suddenly okay. Maybe i'm a jazz guy or as we alluded to at the beginning. Maybe i'm a short guy now. You know that was really big for me. You know these knees. They didn't he didn't see the cover of darkness for like six months this year. And yeah maybe pay him now. That's interesting about that though. And i don't mean to be dark at an ad hoc. This doesn't come off as too abstract but so much of the stuff that i've loved over the course of my life whether it's chicken nugget like it is intrinsically wrapped up in my social experiences so whether it was like punk rock and i was finding a community when i moved to boston of people who were having like basement shows. And that's how. I got into the music that i got into the nineties or you know meeting people. You're just going to mighty mighty boston show exactly. It was just like skateboarding across massachusetts avenue for life or meeting people who are really into the same kinds of movies as i was and experiencing we gotta go see morphine at the middle east scott documentaries at the battle rattle watching the deck log and meow steven wright was there and it was that was. I was like this. Is everything my it's interesting. What happens when you when you strip away so if you are really only purely. Here's what i'm going to say to that too. Exactly your point. Chris ryan and i'm curious to hear what you guys think and chris based on what you just said. You might feel a little differently about this. I have felt very acutely that this period of time for me has felt like a second childhood like this to me has felt like the echo of a period in my life when i felt trapped in my house where i felt like i didn't have friends and i couldn't leave i couldn't do anything and i couldn't affect change As an individual to alter my life and so my childhood really was spent in solo exploration up until a certain age you know and so me this time spent locked it home reading comic books listening to music. Discovering new artists mice spotify analysts said. I discovered seven hundred thirty new artists this. That's that's that's two a days. Yeah that's worth two day. Razi has felt to me and watching. Movies has felt to me very much like that period of my childhood where i was exploring and finding new things and being obsessed with things i've also been like not not for nothing. A huge portion of my list is also. I've spent a lot of this year watching a lot of the film and tv of my childhood of that era. You know You know i've watched. I've watched probably four complete seasons of magnum. Pi wow that's a lot of seasons are longs. He's to these are twenty four episodes season and they're like forty five minutes each right though and they're and they're slowest faulk. But here's the thing. Here's the thing. Because i've also watched like a whole shitload of weird eighty stuff which i keep thinking about in terms of how we deal and how we are going to deal with the future of what we consume After we kind of pull ourselves out of the situation. We're in magnum. Pi a tv show set in the eighties along with almost all of the tv shows set in the eighties feature men primarily who are still working out the issues of the vietnam war. he is a hunky handsome pi. It's a case of the week. Show not unlike a mandalorian or something like that but he is like he and and his friends are consumed by and haunted by the vietnam war. And what they did there. And what happened there and the events there and and i and and it. It's throughout like lethal weapon. Yeah vietnam war. Both both riggs and murtaugh vietnam war vets. Everybody every everybody in the eighties is still working out. The events of that war and what it its long tail in their lives. You know like he's he's greg's is crazy because of what he saw and then what happened to his wife frank. Will we see a period of pop. Culture that openly exists to examine. What are post this life. Looks like but assuming that all of this chaos has in fact happened to all of us that that these hundreds of thousands of people are dead. You know and that how much that is impactful on the world that we will all emerge into. This is come up a bunch of times. Because i was reading about the next season of succession and i guess sarah snooka came on. The show mentioned that..

bill evans Bill evans mingas chris hammond ed boston Razi steven wright Chris ryan new york city new york vietnam massachusetts middle east scott faulk murtaugh riggs greg
"believer magazine" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

07:55 min | 3 months ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"To the airport just out of sight. She. She got ticket and she went to Venice and she was photographing him from a distance and it's all these sort of you know photos of the back of his head. and. So and you know her whole practice is very. voyeuristic it's about trying to get to know people based on the ephemera of their lives She has another piece from the following year called the hotel where she works as a cleaning person hotel in goes through strangers, things and tries to know everything find out everything she can about them. and. So these are these are like highly conceptual character based pieces about. I mean to me the longing to to no strangers stories based on the little pieces that. You see of them out in the world, and so I wanted I mean I've always been interested in audio as a format for performance art as the deliverable for performance art. and so I was interested in doing something similar where I also chose a stranger and followed them. and Veto County. Is famous performance artist. He also had a piece in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine. That was literally called following peace. And he has a quote about it where he says I almost not an eye anymore because I put myself in the service of this scheme and that was what I ended up achieving at certain moments of this piece where like I wanted to forget myself because I was so immersed in another person's life like I wanted that feeling 'cause being an I is so lonely and so by like committing to Sophia the obsession with Sophia for six months I did lose myself in it and I did need an obsession at that time and I do think of Obsession as a cure for depression. Is there anything else that you think of when you think about? What gave you fuel when you were working through this piece Totally I mean it's such such a private. It almost is a lonely experience until the pieces released because you're so alone in this obsession with this person. But the the book nausea came to me. Through an artist friend. Named nerve on Malek it's a bit of a cliche like a little embarrassing to be like reading I don't Know College Kid Discovers existentialism but like. It's we need that you know. It's very earnest. But, my Ervan Malek, his entire career has been based around an obsession of perfect moments and and he's been working on a one second film for twenty five years and. And he actually is the one who told me about nausea because it mentions perfect moments and in nausea there's a there's a thread of. Of Him trying to find perfect moments in the city and That definitely. Is Very present in the piece actually nerve I another friend we text each other perfect moment from every day as a practice Oh and So. That was definitely inspiring me because I feel like Sophia some people orient themselves their lives in a way to create and find perfect moments and the way nerve lives his life. He definitely does that and I try to as well because we have this practice and and Sophia does that too I mean she on the corner she's. Looking for perfect moments and she's trying to create perfect moments and I tried to capture those in the peace and a perfect moment could be you know someone it could be as simple as someone smiling back to her who had smiled the five days previously. Or? A moment of standing in the sun when the sun hits you perfectly. And there were a lot of those Najah and and so like and. Sophia and I had perfect moments in our conversation and so in a way that piece felt like stringing together the perfect moments. Create the ultimate perfect moment. What was your perfect moment yesterday that you texted? I can like literally can literally pull it up. I had so many had a few realizing that I. Don't like bananas finally like just admitting that myself like one of yesterday's perfect moments. Like this guy has small crush on like texted me saying I, did it like he liked a radio made. But a moment can be perfectly terrible as well. Oh. Yeah, like sometimes when things go so perfectly wrong like all at once it's like, wow, this is perfectly horrible but. It's still perfect. I have one more question for you and that is an. Are. You in. Sofia still in touch. We. Are Stone touch, of course. I stay in deep touch if that's a phrase with people when I do like really long. Pieces about them like this. She sends me photos of herself like all decked out like her latest outfits. You know. In all her P P for the pandemic updates on when she moves corners, I always hear about it. You know and just like being a crossing guard in pandemic as a whole new chapter, and so she tells me about how she's still crossing kids to come get their lunches from school, but it's not quite the same. That sort of thing. So yeah, we definitely like. Sh you know I think she still feels lonely. You know especially in the pandemic, it's really hard and she can't hang out with you know normally she sees kids and babysits and that sort of thing, and so we keep in touch, but it's not like it's not nearly to the degree that it used to be just like a check in every couple of weeks. Bianca. Thank you for making this for sharing with us. Oh. Thanks for playing it and thanks for talking to me about it. I really appreciate it. You can find Constellation Prize from the Believer magazine wherever you listen to podcasts. Crossing Guard was written and produced by Bianca favor. It was edited by Hayden Bennett Music by Zubin. Henseler and Stellwagen symphonic mixing. Zubin Henzler special thanks to lily. Allen. Jacob Bloomberg. Andrew Leland Irving Cobb as a heady Jay. Allison and to Sofia. If, you'd like to subscribe to the Believer magazine and we have a discount code for you to. You can enter Dsm for twenty percent off. Debts sex and money is a listener supported production of WNYC. Studios Annabel. Bacon, is producing our audio. We Love estival the rest of our team includes Katie Bishop. Efi Yellow. Duke Emily Team and Andrew. Done. Special. Thanks to Michelle Shoe for her work on the festival. The Reverend John Bloor and Steve Louis wrote our theme music I'm on twitter at Anna Sale. The show is at depth sex money on twitter instagram and Facebook, and don't forget to sign up for our weekly newsletter to get audio. We love recommendations every single week just text DSM, news two, seven. Oh One. Oh, one. There's even more audio. We love coming your way tomorrow. You've never told me this before. So you always wanted to be a Chilean. Look so cute with the leader skirt and there were popular. I'm ANA sale Ennis's.

Sophia Ervan Malek Believer magazine twitter Sofia Veto County nausea Venice Bianca Zubin Henzler Andrew Leland Irving Cobb Efi Ennis Jacob Bloomberg Hayden Bennett Henseler WNYC Katie Bishop Michelle Shoe
"believer magazine" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

08:19 min | 3 months ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"Hey I'm you. Can I'm one of the producers here on the show. Many things I. do here is put together our weekly newsletter each Wednesday we send out an email with behind the scenes updates from the show staff letters from listeners and story call outs for the episodes were working on. And of course, every week, there are new recommendations of audio we love and thank you will chew I'm just jumping in quickly to say it's a really good newsletter Africa's job so you should definitely sign up. Anna subscribe right now by going to death sex money, dot org, slash newsletter, Gorgeous Techs DSM news seven, zero, one zero, and thanks as always for listening. If you've been having a hard time customizing your workout to fit your new lifestyle these days you're not alone that sex and money is supported by bulldog online yoga the streaming platform that makes working out both fun and convenient build strength relieves stress and get your stretch on with easy to use APPs for your computer phone and Smart TV with classes that range from ten to sixty minutes bulldogs sets all online yoga classes to custom spotify playlists that'll have you smiling while you sweat it out head over to bulldog online dot com today and get thirty days free. That's bulldog online dot com to stream your first thirty days completely free. On September eleventh two, thousand, one, the world changed, but there were warnings. It's always easy hindsight to say it's a big mistake. I'm Jim O'Grady I'm a reporter WNYC newsroom and I'll be revisiting the evidence to understand why we didn't see it coming I serve i. told you his best. It's coming back blind spot the road to nine eleven a new podcast series from history and WNYC studios. Listen wherever you get your podcast. This is death sex and money from WNYC. I'm ANA sale and I'm now here with Bianca, gave her the producer of consolation prize from the Believer magazine. We heard the first episode from that show crossing guard before the break. Hi, Bianca hello thanks for having me. Congratulations on your show. It's such a special thing to get to listen to Thank you. Thank you so much when you think about how to describe this particular piece crossing guard people describe it as a profile. Do you describe it as an essay like what are the words you've found yourself using? Yeah. I do describe it as a bit of both I mean I've always been really interested in character overpe. Lot. Primarily, and so the CONC- of the story was that I would get to just really go in on character and it would be like a complete. Dissection of one character who I chose at random and so yeah, that's pretty much I. Don't know I actually don't need to describe it to anyone usually this is my first time. I'm just like listen to this please. And I've been pandemic. So it's just you know all over twitter. So it's it's an honor to even be able to describe it at all, but I do like what I'm describing the podcasts people I, guess I do I do use word performance art sometimes because. It is a highly conceptual episode in the sense that like I went into it with a concept, almost the way a piece of performance would begin with the concept. And you also talk about finding Sophie Sofia, because you were lonely and looking for other lonely people Are you feeling lonely right now? Yeah. I think I always feel lonely I mean loneliness anxiety are to constant themes in my work and it's a bit of an obsession and even when I'm around other people I feel lonely not in a like pity me way. But in a sort of spiritual way and I think part of that comes up with like comes from having grown up. In this time, you know like with atheist parents and like not a ton of not a strong sense of community or belonging, or you know no religion to belong to and so I think there is kind of searching to fill the void, which is loneliness is one word for it it's hard to fully describe and my work is constantly trying to. Describe it. But apparently start felt it to hundreds of years ago or not hundreds of years ago decades ago. So. Yeah. Yeah. I. Am interested that you said it growing up right now and then all it's it's both feels like a specific phenomenon now that you're describing and also like a timeless feature of being human Totally. Yeah and I mean like. Being single in pandemic right now is not helping my long they've done. And obviously, this, this piece was produced before the pandemic and we released it in the pandemic and I was like is this going to work is going to feel weird but it ended up really resonating with people because if you are single right now or even if you have family and you're stuck with just one or two people, it is a very isolating time. Here in Vermont, like someone just posted on front porch forum with the subject alone and they were like I need to know like is anyone else alone right now it's hard to even remember. Than other people are alone. She's like like everywhere I go I see I see couples and so I. responded and I was like I'm also alone thank you for posting. You know because it's so there's such a stigma to loneliness and it's hard to even tell other people that you're lonely it's it's very awkward like even saying it out loud just to you I felt like Like it felt like transgression or something. That's really I. I. Liked that that conversation happened on a place called Front Porch Forum also there's something really sweet like about two shouting across each to each other from your front line you. Need to I need to do a piece about front porch. Forum. It is insane the post like this one person has been trying to give away a rooster for like six. and. Like no one wants it and they're like still have the rooster anyone anywhere. I also WanNa talk to you about your creative inspiration because all this week as part of our audio, we love festival. We're we're asking the creators of the shows that were featuring about the things that inspired them while they were making them So you already mentioned John Paul Sartre, who you talk about in the piece. Yeah. What's something else that you were sort of either going back to or thinking about as you're making this something that that provided you inspiration. Yes. So I mentioned performance art and one of the pieces that I almost mentioned in the story as well but ended up cutting last minute. Is a piece by the performance artists. Sophie. Calle. That she did in nineteen eighty I. Don't know how to pronounce even the title of this piece because it's in. French. It for us. How does it? S U I t e space the e with an accent over it and I t I, e n e hang on I'm putting it into a translator right now. French translate. Venetian. Sweet. That's that's how it it translated and Sophie Calle how does Sophie Calle Spell? What's CEO? C. A. L. L. E. Cow. anyway. So she met a stranger at a party in Paris I believe and she decided to follow that stranger all the way to. Venice. And and. He got on a plane. You know she followed him.

Sophie Calle Bianca Front Porch Forum producer WNYC WNYC studios spotify front porch Sophie Sofia Africa Believer magazine twitter Sophie John Paul Sartre Jim O'Grady CEO Venice Vermont Paris
"believer magazine" Discussed on Bitches on Comics

Bitches on Comics

04:54 min | 3 months ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on Bitches on Comics

"Us but also like being anti rich, I don't know but complicated relationship but it's just kind of like well, I mean if some of us are redistributing their wealth, I guess that's one thing but I'm not doing to become rich and famous. I did acting when I was younger I wanted to be an actor was in the Second City Conservatory program and did all that and realize they hated it and realized that I didn't care for those things at all. I actually just wanted to tell stories like my whole life. I just wanted to tell stories that's my favorite thing to do Captivate an audience and share something with us and us to have this moment together. I feel like even if the internet were to die and all we had was telling stories to each other over a fire. That's that's what I want. That's the ideal Society for me. Honestly would say I will join you we will both. Yeah, I mean this is weird but like I think about the village that M Night Shyamalan movie and I'm just like, you know honestly wage Yeah, there are some weird stuff going on there. But I mean all my friends moved to the woods and just turned the internet off. Let's do it. Let's just do it. Yeah, yep Village what a note to go out. Well, I do before we do go out. I want to ask are there any projects you can tell us about that you are working now and or in the field, yeah. I mean, I'm working on a a little short story that's going to be and believer magazine. I love those guys over there, but I'm doing I did a workshop with them over the summer Comics as a form of resistance, which you can go to their website and participate in if you're curious and taking a free Workshop. I'm also going to be doing the workshop with them. I think on September 25th, but I have a comic that I'm dealing with them is going to be in their magazine and it's going to be a little different. I'm trying a different style. It's still my art style. But I'm trying a different way of laying it out. So it's really dead. Getting to be able to have this again just have the space to play. I think that's the most wonderful thing you can tell to an artist is to tell them to just play cuz I feel like we lose that especially as artists professional we kind of get into this grind that we forget the joy of making art and I definitely want to continue to create those experience for myself. And so I'm working on a comic it's going to be a music, Cake and it's going to be a story talking about my relationship with music and my relationship with love and things like that and talking about some there's some abandonment things in there too. So it's really sad, but it's like a very sort of sweet sadness like all good goth music is and we love to yeah, it's it's a good it's a cozy said I like a good Cody said that's a good description. I love that Sarah lives for cozy sad also like devastating sad. Yeah, literally just my job. Being as varying degrees of sadness in a nice way though. It's very cozy. We were talking about astrology and I'm a cancer rising and cancer more than therefore. I was wrong with this. I was born to be this person. Yes. I'm so excited. I also I'm just going to recommend that everybody goes and checks out the Gum Road. That's the form that you have it on, right? Yeah. It's it's gumroad.com for its last bianchinis. That's my comic shop. I made it easy for folks where you can download them. Yes. I just ordered two while we were talking so I can protest to the fact it's yeah, you can tell them for the sake of you know, printing costs and covid-19 and those problems and you could just read them right at your desk. I have a wrestling Xena I'm going to do with a bunch of other people in comics that's going to be great that that's going to be printed. So that'll be really cool. And you know, just keep your eyes peeled. I'm also taking a little bit of a step back outside of my six chicks. Those are weekend. Every Tuesday, I'm taking a step back to work on a longer-form graphic novel. So that's really exciting to be able to tell a long story but it's still going to be like very Punk Fair wage, like imagine the pink hair story but two hundred pages long. So oh my God, I'm going to be great. Yeah. Yeh. Well, thank you for you know being brilliant and being the college just come on to your show and amazing things. That's exactly what we hope for this has been absolutely delightful. We will be catching you on patreon and Gum Road and obviously we'll see you in the twitterverse always there. Thank you so much. Genuinely. And again, if you want to follow Bianca and social media, it's at Bianca you nice. We will also have it in our show notes. So if you want to check out there, we will have Bianca's info..

Bianca Gum Road Second City Conservatory believer magazine M Night Shyamalan Society Cody Sarah
"believer magazine" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

08:23 min | 9 months ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Are gentle of the week is one of the great gentile authors working in the English language. It's Nick Hornby. He is the British author of about a boy high fidelity Juliet naked and one of my favorite bits of occasional rating. Which is the stuff. I've been reading column in the Believer Magazine. We're so excited to have nick. Hornby here as gentle of the week. Welcome Sir thank you so much for letting me be a drug trial if we have you ever been a gentile of the week before never in my life or a little less. I am every every time you leave the room the Jews who have been in there. He's kind of gentle this week. What a week for Nick. Hornby so we WANNA move in deep into your new but let's start with the task at hand. Which is we all. Were were watching the old John cusack movie. And then we watched the Zoe Kravitz reboot on Hulu of high fidelity. Why did this book have such legs like? Why do you think it's become something that speaks to people in twenty twenty as it did in nineteen ninety six or so? It's been interesting watching the skip generations when it came out. I was thirty six or something when it was published. It was pretty much by people of my age and they kept coming to signing says. I write more books and got on night but then I started tonight's They were searching Twenty-five coming to the readings twenty years after the book was written which was kind of cool and then this whole vinyl thing happened find less a contrast. I guess to spotify kids who were really really super music still wanted to a stamp on the world in some rice. I spending money on records. And whoever's idea it was to rebates it so that you could still say things about the mobile world free the prism of the book. I liked the book and the movie both tremendous amount but I remember that when I read the book. I did think that the story was different British than American early. Because you guys have a more calcified class structure right that in America certainly in the ninety s a hipster who owns a vinyl record shop even back before was hip when it was just a medium for music but that could be like a cool person who went to a university and then did that whereas rob the book. He's not someone who could have aspired to Oxford. Was interesting seeing it. Move to a country like America without that. Same kind of class Kassim. Yes it was something I thought about too much A. We had a sorts of mediator in Stephen Phrase direct to his English and I think undisturbed the English Moraga Snicks was Was there to make sure that they didn't get to American happy making it defined job but yeah I think the people that writes it who I became very close to what they wanted to see it. They thought it was about them. In a very good reifer another Taishin by thought it was about then drying up and of course. I didn't save that cross thing so it wasn't in the movie and the things that make no sense to people when they're adapting. Its like you mentioned earlier that the vital renaissance sparked some interest in the story. Yeah we having re washed the movie series and reread. The book had a little conversation earlier in which we basically said look. There's something that strikes certainly in me less. Oh Stephanie as a little bit off about that because we don't think that kids interact with music now even if they listen to it on vinyl we just don't think kids interact with music the same way like when we were young and part of the reason why the book spoke so well to us right as music. Find everything about you and now it just seems to me like disposable background music. Do you buy that or am I just being ridiculous old? Well a huge change. Is the kids walk around with something in their pocket but gives them access to every piece of recorded music clever Mike and the fundamental shift to musical psyche? That makes About you about I know when I was a kid and Was Fourteen I had one record and then three weeks later. I had to records in a year later. I had twenty records and that's how I built my collection. I knew the crackles in between tracks because I've listened to them so often. I'm not necessarily sure that was a good thing in because he can remember that terrible feeling of having to commit to. What you just even if you like you made yourself like look Billy Joel is. The bridge was a very important album for the month that it was my only acquisition from Leach Mirrors Springfield Massachusetts. It was a classic me up. Yeah and you had to make yourself like that record. I remember buying as a result of a review in an English magazine and it was way too out. Ask Me an English progressive. Bad could van de graff. Generates the Hora when I got home and put it on a sit spikes the journalists. Write that revere. My money back in kids school were asking to borrow it and I was like now. I can't spare it because I didn't want them to hear what I'd spent money on and my kids right. Just go off over the place. It's like that of the Rolling Stones Daddy of a remains unequal. Listen they come back. They say I like that was great. Then they move on to something else and I guess. The connection is deep because of a lot more and they've listened a lot more but the thing about the remake. The latest remake the show that works so well is that it's set now right and obviously you know the idea of making a playlist for Zoe. Kravitz is something very different than making a playlist for John cusack the technicality of what that meant but I argued. With my gentlemen co-hosts earlier that for young people music is almost everything their entire lives are scored and it's because they don't have to walk around with a blue box. They have one they have their little. Their lives are just one long soundtrack and so I think that the reason this still works today is because actually music does play that same important role in people's lives it just looks a little different listenable. Music is it because I didn't have that much time or access or music so as far as I could tell my kids. Listen three four hours a day and they can listen while. They're on their bikes. They can listen when they're walking down the street and a lot listened to. I just couldn't do any of that so I do. Think the connections very deep but I do think it's different and I suspect as Superior Leon are GonNa have to rethink everything. Nick Hornby told us that we were wrong because he agrees with me. This is medicine now. We have to re re watch the book the movie and we my seventeen year old just heard stuff that I would never have anywhere near you know because I had to take all the time on am I gonNa like this is GonNa be worth my money. They're a great records. I didn't Odin Tillerson by full cheese because my friends hunted so I didn't need to buy And they don't have any of You wrote a piece for rolling stone. Speaking back to critics. I guess who were very protective of the original high fidelity movie with John Cusak in which you basically said look. It's not for you. It's for everyone who loves the Book and ROB can be a black female. American Rob Justice Rob was British Rob and then White American rob. And did you get some hostility? I mean I. I'm not that insane. I love the original movie but I was excited to love the TV show as well but are there some people who are like you know? Have that sort of rush fan level intensity about the band they love with regards to the original rob. The movie moved to America. People saying how could you let that happen? That was before they even seen the movie. They Cross about SEC. But Zoe is a black woman. So what's he supposed to do if the book speaks to her at her version of and it really pissed me off the idea that they seem to be thinking that someone in Hollywood said. Oh now we go to the other way round. Because that's what the Martin will amounts and I need that. The spirits of it was not like that Zoe had never thoughts about way. So you've written six novels now seven or something like that but you've also written screenplays have another novel coming out next year. How do you decide when the next project going to be a novel when it's going to be a screen play.

Nick Hornby Zoe Kravitz Rob Justice Rob America John cusack Believer Magazine Juliet spotify van de graff Billy Joel English Moraga Snicks Stephen revere John Cusak SEC Leach Mirrors Springfield Mass Kassim Taishin Oxford Odin Tillerson
"believer magazine" Discussed on Feminist Frequency Radio

Feminist Frequency Radio

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on Feminist Frequency Radio

"Com slash free. That's right. That's what I meant to say. So the first episode of the new twilight zone was called the comedian and on last week's bonus. Zara, and I had what I thought was a really great conversation about that episode. She she like offered so much insight into that episode for me, I've since watched two more episodes of the twilight of the new twilight zone one is called a traveler and it star. It features Stephen young in a major role Stephen Janas enact or who I've gotten really excited about recently, particularly after seeing him in in burning which was a film. I freaked out about on an earlier episode and the other one that I watch is called the the one. Underpinned and it stars John show. And like a traveller as an episode. I didn't alternately find it started off so great. And then I ultimately didn't find a satisfying as I had hoped to. But I still think it was absolutely worth watching just because Stephen Yan is so kind of charismatic and enigmatic in the absurd. He's very good at playing enigmatic characters, and he does that spectacularly here. So I recommend watching it just for the pleasure of seeing Stevens performance. The other episode. The wonder can so stars John show as a campaign manager political campaign manager who undertakes the task basically runs the campaign for this kid. I forget it. He's he's eight or eleven he's a young kid who's like running for president and John show. Like a takes takes him under his wing and tries to like make him president. And this episode I found like really effective and devastating. I don't wanna go into too much detail because it it'll spoil things, but it definitely has very very clear parallels to living under under Trump, and to the very notion of the of the the the point in time when the very notion of what's true, or what's real starts to bend or break. Because. Ause someone in power says it's one thing when everyone knows it's actually something else and John show. As an actor just in everything I see a man he just brings a such a sincerety like to his roles and this episode in this performance definitely really benefits from that. So Stephen Yan John show to actors I really love in two separate episodes of the new twilight zone, check it out. Sweet. My freak out is I spent the weekend at a car at a festival in Las Vegas called the believer fast run by believer magazine, which is a literary magazine. And the reason I want to mention it is I think that Vegas is such an interesting place because we immediately think of it as like a place where you go party. Right. You debauchery and parties and the whole slogan of what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. It's it's glitzy and glamorous and gritty and. Everyone has a conception of igus which I did too until I started going there. A lot more regularly for a variety of reasons. And one thing that I think the believer fest does is really help us. See how vibrant there is a vibrant the arts community is in Vegas outside of the strip and outside of our conceptions of what that city is. And I think there's a lot of value to being able to find the communities that live in these spaces that are we have these concepts of what all these cities are. But that it's not always accurate, and the people that live in them, build these communities in these arts communities in these various different spaces and restaurants in all of these sorts of pieces of culture that often get a raced or written out of the narrative. And so I guess like next time you go to Vegas encourage you to see more of the city than just what I mean, unless you're just. Going to this hardy. Yeah. But but that there's anything that happens with L A, right?.

Stephen Yan John Las Vegas Stephen Yan Zara Stephen young Stephen Janas believer magazine president Trump Stevens literary magazine
"believer magazine" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"And so that's actually that was his theory was him or someone else's theory about why listen condo. Never ended up is part of the criterion collection because his career was something some were jobs for higher like in other were were screenplays that he wrote, but he didn't necessarily have a clear about tour vision that went throughout his career. So yeah, you you tired it's hard to kind of categorize him or or put him in. You know in a kind of helpful box to say this was who he was are, typically speaking. So how do you go from watching the movie in two thousand twelve to rating and nearly five hundred page book about this tire family? It happened gradually in a didn't realize what was happening as it happened because. Over a number of years. So I is soon as I saw the film. I think the next day I spent the whole day googling researching in maybe even that same day. I sent a pitch to the believer magazine which ensures you're familiar with it, but really great arts culture, literature magazine in pretty much. I knew the only place that I would have a chance of them. You know, American publication writing leading me right about an obscure fans Spanish cult documentary in. That's what's so great about him. Is they completely went for it. So I wrote a six thousand word piece about this, which you know, that's pretty long. I don't know. How many maybe that's fifteen double spaced pages emission, but along along piece in for that I interviewed the director I'm interviewed one of the one of the biogra- or the biographer of one of the sons in a couple of people in that was just interested in the family in a non professional way in just. I got obsessed with them because I thought they were such interesting characters. So over the next couple of years, I read their memoirs read a lot of their poetry in my wife and actually moving to LA the economic crisis was so bad in Spain the time having option to move to since I'm American her Rian car came through, you know, it just it was the right choice for us. I just still stayed interested in the family in. Then I started doing were doing ghost writing nonfiction books with scientists kind of Ted talk type guys. So I learned a lot about how the nonfiction market works for books. So then I realize I'm gonna write a book proposal seventy or so pages of what the book would be see if I could interest publisher in that in. So when I decided I did that we went it was going to do that. We went and spent six weeks in Spain. And I found a lot of archives with documents letters. I started interviewing a lot more people. In started building this base. Weekly this huge pile of raw material related to the family documents and testimonies their poetry memoirs. And then there was a whole sub-genre memoirs about by people who knew the the financial family. And so I started looking all that and figuring out how it shaped that into a book. And luckily, I found a publisher echo, which is a an imprint of heck of HarperCollins. And they were they were amazing enough to say, all right? We we want this book about this family that a Spanish literary family that no one in the US knows anything about in. So then I spent a about three and a half years writing in researching in it came out in March of this year two thousand eighteen so that's the journey in lots of strange strange experiences along the way to get there people that I know that and in stories in in rumors and in facts and fictions that I had to weed through. It must have been so difficult for. People even in Spain to be like, what does this American wanna know about? It was actually I think that was that opened so many doors for me, they were just like this is so weird that you're so into this in the people in the US like publisher would be interested in this that people were really so open to me..

Spain publisher the criterion collection US believer magazine LA Ted literature magazine director six weeks
"believer magazine" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

The Flop House Podcast

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

"Allowed this charles burns who did it took a break from doing cover for believer magazine i guess to do this barnum story so the the rowdies who hate all the non you know sis bodied people i guess they're all body because the bodies they were born in what would you call like what's a what's respectfully to describe someone who at the time would have been called like an oddity you know that's why i've been struggling with throughout the podcast is that why you said so little yeah i mean i keep spacing out because i keep getting concerned with this technical with skype but it's fine oh i thought it was in your head you're just going through all your favorite songs yeah to who's that i think that's we are great or write all the songs have have source of course in this like hoop hoop more like oh that deducted dutta time oh for the greatest showman soundtracks all billy joel do we not mentioned that man i would have anything you want at our greatest shows arcus circus tent tent that restaurant saw yeah and i don't know so which song do you guys if it was put out thank you that would be like the big hit no how like one night bangkok from jesse is is such a huge switch on an earlier episode i incorrectly said was andrew lloyd webber show right i don't i can't keep track of all your incorrect statements i think i think what was said it was.

skype billy joel jesse charles burns andrew lloyd webber
"believer magazine" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on Think Again

"Studio we talk a bit about their work and then we encountered these surprise videos and the conversation goes where it goes so that was very scary i mean i'd never done anything like this before really in two thousand fifteen when we started this but i wanted it to be scary i wanted i wanted to put myself and to put guests who maybe are used to saying the same thing over and over and a lot of different ways to a lot of different people in the position of discovering something and the show at its best is able to do that i'm really really happy today to be speaking with kristen radke she's a graphic novelist incredibly talented graphic novelist and the author and illustrator of imagine wanting only this and she's also art director for the believer magazine and the new york editor for believer magazine imagine wanting only this to me is about the ways that we look into the world for patterns and for meaning and for things that we can consider as ours to understand ourselves and to have a sense of belonging and the ways that the world allows that and the ways that the world resists that but kristen can correct me if it's about more than that or something else entirely welcome to think again thank you i just said what i think it's about why don't why don't you talk a little bit about what you think it's about.

kristen radke director believer magazine new york editor
"believer magazine" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on Think Again

"Then ultimately get interpreted in the brain but it's such a broad and distributed system as should we not think of the brain and the body so separately as we as we do oh i it's a complex interacting system i'll the until about the first people to really bring this into modern era science i think he's absolutely right and that that's we're finding out more and more finding out how the gut it relates to neural activity and all the rest of it so yes it's obviously there's queuing systems and signaling systems of all kinds that are very important part of the whole story i only question about okay i think we have had a a rich and productive conversation on on all of this stuff and i think it's true that beyond this point people do need to read the book and i wanna thank you you so much for your time today mike khazanah that's great and thank you for taking the time wraps up this week's episode of think again and rounds out our to episode mini mini series about neuroscience brain consciousness over the last two weeks will have interesting things coming your way in the next couple of weeks going in different directions from a live show that i did in green bay wisconsin with graphic novelist and believer magazine art director kristen radke to a conversation with investigative journalist ronin pharaoh about the decline of american diplomacy and influence abroad in the meantime if you wanna come talk to us hang out with us on social media please join friends of think again a big thing podcast on facebook it's about four hundred strong and growing and we are constantly having interesting conversations on there so i'd love to.

facebook mike khazanah green bay wisconsin believer magazine director kristen radke two weeks
"believer magazine" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"believer magazine" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"There's no false modesty there but jimbo mathis who played with sedale davis made his former bandits ingenuity even clearer in an interview with kuna our radio in little rock arkansas he said quote if you look at his technique the slide is facing an entirely different way deters upside down and strong upside down and backwards the slide the only way he was able to hold the butter knife is facing up at an angle toward the top of the front board up and towards the heads talk it's like a reinvention of the guitar unquote said el davis played duke joints throughout the american selves for decades before the new york times music critic robert palmer hurt a couple of his songs mr plumber was so astonished and impressed that he produced mr davis's first fulllength album feel like doing something wrong was released in 1994 nearly sixty years after sadelli davis had grabbed at butter knife and restrung and reinvented the guitar said l davis at a bunch of concerts coming up this year couldn't play guitar anymore he had had a stroke in two thousand five but he kept singing and he kept performing and as he told the believer magazine this past february quote i've had polio i've had stroke i've had high blood everything in the book almost everything in the book but i'm still around here you've been listening to the as it happens podcast our show can be heard monday the friday on cbc radio one and siriusxm you can also listen to the whole show on the web this go to cbc dot c a slash a each and follow the links to our online archive thanks for listening i'm carol us and i'm geoff douglass.

robert palmer sadelli davis believer magazine polio geoff douglass jimbo mathis new york times cbc carol sixty years