16 Burst results for "Belcourt Theatre"

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:48 min | Last month

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Coming up. Well, it's very rainy and dreary today, but those are perfect movie days, so I'm all for it at this point. Tales from the belcourt theater straight ahead, but first, let's do the numbers. Now industrials off 305 points today, 9, 10%, 33,476. Things were up as I said until, I don't know an hour before the close, the NASDAQ down 77 points about 7 tenths percent, 11,004. The S&P 500 dropped 29 points, about three quarters percent, 39 and 34 there. For the week, the Dow fell two and 8 10% the NASDAQ dropped 4% the S&P 500 down 3.4%. Mitchell was telling us about the PPI, the producer price index, a .3% month on month partly due to the cost of food, so in wholesale food stocks dull down a tenth percent Coca-Cola flattened 1% Cisco corporation. Dropped 2%. Inflation has come for Christmas trees this year, the national Christmas tree association says the price of a tree is up about 10% on average timber company warehouser, where's the wire Hauser? I don't know. Sell seedlings anyway to Christmas tree farms, drooped 6 tenths percent, I think it's wire hazard. Competitor Boise cascade fell one and 7 tenths percent. The New York Times company after yesterday's walk out. Up one in 6 tenths percent today, bonds down yield on the ten year T note. Rose to 3.58%. You're

belcourt theater Cisco corporation national Christmas tree associ Mitchell Coca Cola Boise cascade The New York Times
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For like five songs in a two hour set. I was trying to get this song to time ratio up a little bit, but I didn't necessary. Okay, so there is the literal conversation. But there's also the kind of the dialogue between the banjo and the voice and also the dialogue between When you're both playing the banjo, different kinds of banjo and different styles and Right? At one stage as part of our performance. Yes, I think a real intention when we were Finally taking our thing together. Seriously, not just our Love for one another, but our ability to perform together which really hit When we realized we're gonna have a baby. So we decided that we needed to really make an effort to put out something in the world that was like a formal offering musically as a duo so that we could travel together and not be split up. Like so many couples that have Have babies and one of the one of the two of them travels, so we decided we'd throw our forces together and hit the take the baby with us. And so when we were planning our record, we we thought We know that two banjos and a vocal can be a really wonderful thing, but we have to Actually do have to prove it. So we decided to create soundscapes that differed from track to track and that differed from song to song, which meant including different types of banjos. There's um back in the late 18 hundreds, There were actual banjo orchestras all over America. They were really popular. There were big, uh, double banjo bases within pins that people stood and played, and they look like Taiko drums with strings on them. And, um piccolo banjos and banter, yuks and Banjul ins and It goes on cello. Why did that go away? Right? Exactly right? Yeah. I mean, why do we not even know this? Um uh, on your album, too, as well. This album you produced together. There's one Song called Banjo Banjo, one tune called Banjo, Banjo. That in the liner notes. Says that you sat down and made that music at when you first felt Juno kick they have to say, you know, it's enviable, you know, to think about this being part of your marriage, your your friendship and relationship in a way that you can celebrate. You know, you can literally make music together. It's great. I mean, we're constantly uh Amazed by our our situation. Yeah, it's a sweet, sweet situation. Probably the hardest thing to do is to find time to make new music. Because we wake up in the morning with Juno on the bus, and the first thing we want to do is just go play with him and be with him. And so we do that. We spend several hours together with do you know until he falsely for his nap and then were wiped out and then we're done. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on being today with musicians Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn in a public conversation at the Belcourt Theatre in Nashville, Tennessee. Oh, this is fun. Something also that intrigued me. Actually, neither one of you has a really extensive professional training, right? I mean, and I mean, this is you. You really came to this very late. But Baylor, I mean, you are the premier banjo player, possibly in the world. And you know, Abigail, I have to say when I first experienced the two of you, I also assume that you were somebody who had, you know, grown up learning this and You play with Bela Fleck. And you know the two of you Are this this banjo playing duo and when you were pregnant, you know, some music, reporters said, And now they will give birth to the Holy Banjo emperor, right? Um, but part of what you've been out there talking about and you delivered the commencement address her Colorado College for your alma mater. And you You talked a lot about this way. Um You were open to experience and you really discovered this thing that has become defining and in fact, you're helping to define this kind of music now and the culture, But it It was very unexpected and you didn't prepare for it all your life in a in a linear way. Well, a piece of my story that I don't really ever tell. Because it just adds Another 30 seconds is, um, the fact that when I left Vermont on my road trip to go south before I was headed to China to become a lawyer, my first stop. My very first stop was at the very center for Buddhist studies, and I spent five days Meditating and it was the first time I ever meditated my whole life and to the states one of the hardest things I've ever done. To sit still. My body act. I became afraid I was hurting myself. And I went into the darkest place. And One day I remember I was sitting there. It must have been three days in or something and I went into this very deep place. Finally, I wasn't really thinking a whole lot. And I came out of it hours later, and my entire shirt was covered with tears and Boogers. I mean, it was not pretty. And I I In that moment I stood up and if nobody was in the room they had all left. And I know that I had let go of something, Major, Um I'm not even totally sure what it is to this day, but I know that I didn't really feel like a victim anymore. When I left. That place I felt like I was clean and fresh and pure, and I could make my decisions. And that within days I was in Louisville, Kentucky, playing the four songs I knew on the banjo and was offered a record deal in Nashville, Tennessee. Came to Nashville instead of going to China to go to law school. And I felt ready for that. I felt ready. That's where you were You always a singer. Or did that come later to? Yeah, I always loved singing. I was in choir all through school, and, uh, I'd always try out for the solos and I never got them. So I really didn't fancy myself much of a singer. Uh, I didn't think I was going to be perceived as a good see, See, That's what I got out of getting ready to talk to you. You don't You don't really consider yourself to be a great musician. No, you don't You You feel like this is something you came too late. And this impostor language. I mean, you're I don't think you do feel like an imposter because you, you throw yourself into it so joyfully. Yeah, but you don't think of yourself the way other people think of you as a musician. Right? No, I I don't. But that is no Harm or foul to how I feel about the music and I feel like music Just like most of my life. I hope that it's a service to people. This goes back to my childhood. I'm hoping that I'm continually through the music cultivating myself. To have compassion and empathy and to express that to people. And I was talking to my mom today as we were walking around the lake, trying to just think of things from my childhood and not forget too much When I talk to you tonight, and and, um I was remembering what a sensitive child I was. I was so tuned into everybody's feelings, and it was a beautiful thing. Because I saw people's feelings before I saw them and, uh Now I consider it a great gift. But at the time I didn't know how to manage it. And so I felt darkness a lot because I immediately would recognize people feeling darkness and my whole life. I've had to learn how to manage that. And a beautiful thing is that a song teaches me to manage that. Because I feel something so strong. Most songs I choose to sing unless there because the song becomes a container for a container. For the empathy and for the sensitivity so I can feel something so strongly. I've been singing the song. Um come all you coal miners that was written by an amazing woman named Sarah Ogan gunning And she was raised in a coal camp and her child. Starve to death because they couldn't get milk for her baby and her husband died of black lung and all of these things I I hear her story and I'm crying and I'm crying and I start to sing the song. Come on, You call my owners wherever you may be, and listen to a story that I'll relate to.

Bela Fleck Abigail Washburn Krista Tippett Sarah Ogan Nashville China Abigail five days two hour Vermont Banjo Banjo Banjo five songs two banjos America tonight today two three days one Song
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"When Abigail Washburn graduated from college in 1999, she was poised to work for world peace after studying law in Beijing, but she was captured by the banjo instead. Bela Fleck became well known with his group Bela Fleck and the Flecktones. I spoke with the two of them in 2015 when Nashville Public Radio brought us together on stage at the Belcourt Theatre. In their hometown. So I advocate I know that you have a habit of bursting out into song spontaneously. And I want to encourage you to do that tonight. If you feel like it could you can dance anything that if you want to grab your banjo Okay. You know, uh, where? Where I always start my conversations. Whether I'm talking to it, physicist or banjo player is, um I'd like to hear a little bit about whether there was a religious or spiritual background to your childhood. And Abigail. I'd like to start with you. You grew up in a few places. Chicago Washington. Minnesota a little bit. I forgot that you were going to study that becoming. I'm Yes. I'm Oh, my, Um Yeah, well, my, uh, grandmother, who was in Evanston, Illinois, most of her life. Raised my mother there, Unitarian Universalist and I was raised from 3 to 11 years old in Montgomery Village, Maryland and the religious education in that U U Church. We actually went to everybody else's church. But we learned about, um what it was like to go to temple or synagogue or mosque. All kinds of different churches. And I was the kid in high school that instead in having my band posters on my wall I had Martin Luther King Jr Gandhi and the United Nations mural. And instead of going to my senior prom, I decided to go to the United Nations Youth Disarmament Conference and Canada and I ended up coming back in time for problem cause acute guy asked me, but, um, I actually did think that was more important. You know, the U. N Youth Disarmament Conference. Well, but so that's that was my my childhood as much as I should probably say, and by the time I was leaving high school and going off for all the different adventures, the next chapter I would say that I was I believe that my faith and my spiritual path was about cultivating. Myself for good action. Um Kayla, How do you Think about the How would you think about the religious or spiritual background of your childhood? However you think about that now you grew up in New York. Yeah. I was raised a harmless heathen..

Abigail Washburn New York 1999 Kayla 2015 Bela Fleck Abigail 3 Beijing Nashville Public Radio Chicago Washington Minnesota two 11 years tonight Evanston, Illinois Belcourt Theatre Martin Luther King Jr Gandhi Montgomery Village, Maryland United Nations
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:40 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Set. I was trying to get this song to time ratio up a little bit, but I didn't necessarily okay, so there is the literal conversation. But there's also the kind of the dialogue between the banjo and the voice and also the dialogue between When you're both playing the banjo, different kinds of banjo and different styles and Right? At one stage as part of our performance. Yes, I think a real intention when we were Finally taking our thing together. Seriously, not just our Love for one another, but our ability to perform together which really hit When we realized we're going to have a baby. So we decided that we needed to really make an effort to put out something in the world that was like a formal offering musically as a duo so that we could travel together and not be split up. Like so many couples that have Have babies and one of them. One of the two of them travels, so we decided we'd throw our forces together and hit the take the baby with us. And so when we were planning our record, we we thought We know that two banjos and a vocal can be a really wonderful thing, but we have to Actually, you have to prove it. So we decided to create soundscapes that differed from track to track and that differed from song to song, which meant including different types of banjos. There's um back in the late 18 hundreds, There were actual banjo orchestras all over America. They were really popular. There were big, uh, double banjo bases within pins that people stood and played, and they look like Taiko drums with strings on them. And, um piccolo banjos and banter, yuks and Banjul ins and It goes on, cellist. I did that. Go away, right? Exactly right? Yeah. I mean, why do we not even know this? Um On your album as well. This album you produced together, there's one Song called Banjo Banjo, one tune called Banjo, Banjo. That in the liner notes. Says that you sat down and made that music at when you first felt Juno kick they have to say, you know, it's enviable, you know, to think about this being part of your marriage, your your friendship and relationship in a way that you can celebrate. You know, you can literally make music together. It's great. I mean, yeah. Amazed by our our situation. Yeah, it's a sweet, sweet situation. Probably the hardest thing to do is to find time to make new music. Because we wake up in the morning with Juno on the bus, and the first thing we want to do is just go play with him and be with him. And so we do that. We spend several hours together with do you know until he falsely for his nap and then were wiped out and then we're done. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on being today with musicians Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn in a public conversation at the Belcourt Theatre in Nashville, Tennessee. Oh, this is fun. Something also that intrigued me. Actually, neither one of you has a really extensive professional training, right? I mean, and I mean, this is you. You really came to this very late. But Baylor, I mean, you are the premier banjo player, possibly in the world. And you know, Abigail, I have to say when I first experienced the two of you, I also assume that you were somebody who'd grown up learning this and You play with Bela Fleck. And you know the two of you Are this this banjo playing duo and when you were pregnant, you know, some music, reporters said, And now they will give birth to the Holy Banjo emperor, right? Um, but but part of what you've been out there talking about, and you delivered the commencement address or Colorado College for your alma mater. And you talked a lot about this way. Um You are open to experience and you really discovered this thing that has become defining and in fact, you're helping to define this kind of music now in the culture, but it It was very unexpected and you didn't prepare for it all your life in a in a linear way. Well, a piece of my story that I don't really ever tell. Because it just adds Another 30 seconds is, um, the fact that when I left Vermont on my road trip to go south before I was headed to China to become a lawyer, my first stop. My very first stop was at the very center for Buddhist studies, and I spent five days Meditating and it was the first time I ever meditated my whole life and to the states one of the hardest things I've ever done. To sit still. My body act. I became afraid I was hurting myself. And I went into the darkest place. And One day I remember I was sitting there. It must have been three days in or something and I went into this very deep place. Finally, I wasn't really thinking a whole lot. And I came out of it hours later, and my entire shirt was covered with tears and Boogers. I mean, it was not pretty. And I I In that moment I stood up and nobody was in the room that all left. And I know that I had let go of something, Major, Um I'm not even totally sure what it is to this day, but I know that I didn't really feel like a victim anymore. When I left. That place I felt like I was clean and fresh and pure, and I could make my decisions. And that within days I was in Louisville, Kentucky, playing the four songs I knew on the banjo and was offered a record deal in Nashville, Tennessee. Came to Nashville instead of going to China to go to law school. And I felt ready for that. I felt ready. That's where you were You always a singer. Or did that come later to? Yeah, I always loved singing. I was in choir all through school, and, uh, I'd always try out for the solos and I never got them. So I really didn't fancy myself much of a singer. Uh, I didn't think I was going to be perceived as a good see, See, That's what I got out of getting ready to talk to you. You don't You don't really consider yourself to be a great musician. No, you don't You You feel like this is something you came too late. And this impostor language. I mean, you're I don't think you do feel like an imposter because you, you throw yourself into it so joyfully. Yeah, but you don't think of yourself the way other people think of you as a musician. Right? No, I I don't. But that is no Harm or foul to how I feel about the music and I feel like music Just like most of my life. I hope that it's a service to people. This goes back to my childhood. I'm hoping that I'm continually through the music cultivating myself. To have compassion and empathy and to express that to people And I was talking to my mom today as we were walking around the lake, trying to just think of things from my childhood and not forget too much When I talk to you tonight and right, and, um I was remembering what a sensitive child I was. I was so tuned into everybody's feelings, and it was a beautiful thing. Because I saw people's feelings before I saw them and, uh Now I consider it a great gift. But at the time I didn't know how to manage it. And so I felt darkness a lot because I immediately would recognize people feeling darkness and my whole life. I've had to learn how to manage that. And a beautiful thing is that a song teaches me to manage that. Because I feel something so strong. Most songs I choose to sing unless there because the song becomes a container for it's a container. For the empathy and for the sensitivity so I can feel something so strongly. I've been singing the song Um Kamal, you coal miners that was written by an amazing woman named Sarah Ogan gunning And she was raised in a coal camp and her child. Starve to death because they couldn't get milk for her baby and her husband died of black lung and all of these things I I hear her story and I'm crying and I'm crying and I start to sing the song. Come on, You call my owners wherever you may be, and listen to a story that I'll relate.

Bela Fleck Abigail Washburn Krista Tippett Sarah Ogan five days Nashville Abigail China Vermont Banjo Banjo three days America two Colorado College One one tonight one Song two banjos four songs
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In 1999. She was poised to work for world peace after studying law in Beijing, but she was captured by the banjo. Instead, Bela Fleck became well known with his group Bela Fleck and the Flecktones. Spoke with the two of them in 2015 when Nashville Public Radio brought us together on stage at the Belcourt Theatre in their hometown. So I advocate I know that you have a habit of bursting out into song spontaneously. And I want to encourage you to do that tonight. If you feel like a you can dance anything that if you want to grab your banjo Okay. You know, uh, where? Where I always start my conversations. Whether I'm talking to it, physicist or banjo player is, um I'd like to hear a little bit about whether there was a religious or spiritual background to your childhood and Abaco. I'd like to start with you. You grew up in a few places. Chicago Washington. Minnesota a little bit. I forgot that you were going to study that becoming. I'm Yes. I'm Oh, my, Um Yeah, well, my, uh, grandmother, who was in Evanston, Illinois, most of her life. Raised my mother there, Unitarian Universalist and I was raised from 3 to 11 years old in Montgomery Village, Maryland and the religious education in that U U Church. We actually went to everybody else's church We learned about, um what it was like to to go to temple or synagogue or, um, mask. All kinds of different churches. And I was the kid in high school that instead in having my band posters on my wall I had Martin Luther King Jr Gandhi and the United Nations mural. And instead of going to my senior prom, I decided to go to the United Nations Youth Disarmament Conference and Canada and I ended up coming back in time for problem cause acute guy asked me, but, um, I actually did think that was more important. You know, the U. N Youth Disarmament Conference. Well, but so that's that was my in my childhood as much as I should probably say, and by the time I was leaving high school and going off for all the different adventures, the next chapter I would say that I was, uh, I believe that my faith and my spiritual path was about cultivating. Myself for good action. Um Kayla, How do you Think about the How would you think about the religious or spiritual background of your childhood? However you think about that now you grew up in New York. Yeah. I was raised a harmless heathen. Uh And.

New York 2015 Kayla 1999 Bela Fleck Beijing 3 Nashville Public Radio Minnesota Chicago Washington two tonight Evanston, Illinois Belcourt Theatre Canada Unitarian Universalist United Nations Montgomery Village, Maryland Martin Luther King Jr Gandhi Abaco
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Bela Fleck is one of the greatest living banjo players. Abigail Washburn is a celebrated banjo player and singer both in English and Chinese, and they are partners in music and in life together, they recover something ancient and deeply American at once. They impart beauty to what they play and how they live. We're giving a summer re listen to this refreshing on being experienced a few years ago at the Belcourt Theatre in their hometown of Nashville, where things are forgotten. I'm Krista Tippett and this is on being stay with us. Live from NPR news. I'm trial. Snyder. The airports in Kabul has reopened for some domestic flights. Planes began taking off and landing this weekend. The development could pave the way for charter flights to help Americans and at risk Afghans. The State Department has set up to 200 U. S. Citizens are still trying to get out of the country. The country's top military officer. Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman General Mark Milley is praising military soldiers of the 10th Mountain division for their efforts during the evacuation from Afghanistan. You guys did an incredible job, all of you and everybody. Yeah. Army. Navy Marines Air force finding out 124,000 people. That's what you say. That's what came out of their family, speaking in Germany to a group of soldiers who were there when the Islamic state affiliate in Afghanistan bombed a gate near the airport, 13 U. S service members were among scores who died. Billy also said Saturday that civil war is likely if the Taliban cannot consolidate power and established governance, he told Fox News that could lead to the the resurgence of terror groups such as Isis White House searching companies to be on the alert for cyber attacks over this Labor Day weekend. Here's NPR's Franco or Dona. And Neuberger, the deputy national security advisor for Cyber told reporters that the FBI as well as the cybersecurity and Infrastructure security Agency, we're on the lookout for any signs of potential cyberattacks and ready to respond if necessary. We have new specific threat information. Information regarding attacks this weekend, but we do have is history. Neuberger says in the path that Attackers have taken advantage of holiday weekends when security operation centers maybe understaffed. Biden officials note that the cyber attack on the colonial pipeline as well as the attack on one of the world's largest meat processors were both conducted on long weekends. Franco or DONA as NPR news, the White House to Michigan now where abortion providers in the state are gearing up for a fight from member station W. CMU. For a Dahlberg reports. Estate has a 90 year old abortion bans still on the books and Neuberger, the deputy The ban hasn't been enforced since the 19 seventies after the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade ruling now, with the high court, refusing to hear a challenge to a virtual abortion ban in Texas abortion providers in Michigan say that precedent is in jeopardy. Dr Sarah Wallet, is the chief medical officer for Planned Parenthood of Michigan. If there is a time for alarm, it is now This is really real, and it is very Possible that What we take for granted in Michigan. Could go away. The state's attorney general has said she won't enforce the abortion ban if Roe v. Wade is overturned. Michigan Republicans say the attorney general shouldn't get to pick which laws get enforced. This is NPR news. President Biden is scheduled to travel to New York and New Jersey this week. The White House says he will visit those two states on Tuesday as people clean up from the deadly flooding brought on by the remnants of Hurricane Ida. Meanwhile, divers off the coast of Louisiana will try to locate the source of a reported oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Today..

Krista Tippett Abigail Washburn New York FBI Kabul Billy Franco Tuesday Texas Saturday Bela Fleck New Jersey Dona Taliban Louisiana 124,000 people Gulf of Mexico Nashville Afghanistan Fox News
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Washburne. <Speech_Female> Newest album <Speech_Female> is woo. <Speech_Female> Fey and abigail <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> washburne. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> It's a collaboration <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with her longtime <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> friend. The renowned <Speech_Female> guchang player <Speech_Female> wu fei <Speech_Female> her <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> other albums include <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> song of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> traveling daughter <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and city <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of refuge. <Speech_Female> Bela <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> fleck has record <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of over forty <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> albums. Most <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> famously with the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> flick. Tom's and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> new grass revival <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in two thousand twenty. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> He released throwdown <Speech_Female> your heart. <Speech_Female> The complete <Speech_Female> africa sessions. <Speech_Female> His <Speech_Female> latest album is <Speech_Female> my bluegrass <Speech_Female> heart <Speech_Female> and together. <Speech_Female> They have to full <Speech_Female> album. Collaborations <Speech_Female> bailiff <Speech_Female> fleck and abigail <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> washburne and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> echo in the valley <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> two thousand eighteen. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Be produced another <Speech_Female> collaboration <Speech_Female> there. Second son <Speech_Music_Female> and in twenty <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> twenty <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> they live streamed <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> banjo house <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> locked down concerts <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> from their <Speech_Female> nashville home <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> with their children <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on friday nights. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Those <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> are well worth <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> watching on <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> youtube on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> any friday night. <Speech_Music_Female> In any <SpeakerChange> year <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> a <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> king down <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> can <Speech_Female> do no <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> harm. I'm gonna say <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> finally special. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks again to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> our friends at wpn <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> national <Speech_Female> public radio <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and the <Speech_Female> belcourt theatre <Speech_Music_Female> for <SpeakerChange> making <Speech_Music_Female> this show possible <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> from heaven <Speech_Music_Female> down <Speech_Music_Female> that <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> would involve. I got <Speech_Music_Female> the keys <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> while <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> i'm <Speech_Music_Female> ki. <Music> <Music> The king kingdom <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> can do <Speech_Music_Female> know her. <SpeakerChange> Yeah <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> the <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> on. <Speech_Female> Being project <Speech_Female> is kristi. <Speech_Female> Laurent drummer <Speech_Male> hausen. <SpeakerChange> Aaron <Speech_Male> call asako. <Speech_Male> Eddie gonzalez <Speech_Male> million bill <Speech_Music_Female> lucas johnson. <Speech_Female> Suzanne <Speech_Male> burly zack. <Speech_Music_Female> rose <SpeakerChange> calling <Speech_Music_Female> check. Julie <Speech_Music_Female> cycle gretchen. <Speech_Female> Handled <SpeakerChange> jolly <Speech_Male> akhavan <Speech_Music_Male> poetry. Gautama <Speech_Music_Male> ben <SpeakerChange> caught <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> in benowitz <Speech_Female> april. <Speech_Female> Adamson actually <Speech_Female> her <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> met martinez <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> beyond <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> being project is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> located on dakota <Speech_Music_Female> land <Speech_Female> are lovely theme. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Music is provided <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and composed by <Speech_Female> zoe keating <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and the last <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> voice that you hear <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> singing at the end of our <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> show is <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> cameron. 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washburne Eddie gonzalez lucas johnson Tom africa youtube kristi gretchen Suzanne Julie dakota cameron
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"That's kind of a century them where my mind went. Yeah let's let's and we got to do these state department tours. Us is usa which basically they call them propaganda tours but we got to go to india and bangladesh. We got to go to a lot of amazing places and at a certain point. I realized that we had like an ambassador status so I started cabling ahead and saying find me musicians. I want to get there. I wanna jam with somebody and and started They people would show up. We get to a country and get to play with these these people and we'd start out like what is what is this like abbie. What is why. Why am i here. Why do i have to do this when we start to play and the whole room would change. it was like almost the color changed from this dark to technicolor. You know like the wizard of oz you know when you landed is and so it was such an exciting thing that was part of what made me feel competent. That going to africa could be that way because it had that experience over over and over again and when the flood tones got the opportunity to do a trip like that to the pacific rim. We made it a point that every country went to somebody from the local culture would come on stage and perform with us and it broke the ice like like nothing. It felt so great to do but that was favorite part of the show obviously for the locals because we were celebrating their culture and we taken the time to learn something their music which was really Great thing we both came to the separately and it's one of the and then we found each other that That aspiration that very kind of american ambition you had to go to law school and make policy change the world. This is a whole other way in to the same thing at a different at a human level they let you have said and i do again believe you really said this that the first time you heard abigail music. You're listening in the car and you've got stopped for speeding. it was out out franklin. There was just so caught up and she gave me in fact i. It's not really the first time. It's been slightly sanitized story. But what the first time i heard her. It was at a party and she was playing these very very sad slow songs with a bunch of girls gathered around her and i was going. This is just not for me. You know it was really. It was really slow and it was beautiful. But i was like okay. She's good you know. But but then she gave me this. This cd at this party. And i started listening to it. And i had a completely different experience because the banjo is upfront. There was this group to it and she was singing like you just heard her with this. Ancient sound very connected to traditional music. And i just started driving faster and faster. Wow i really like this. I was even talking to myself. And then i got pulled over and had to walk the line. Well i'm going to do my radio thing now. I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with musicians. Bela fleck abigail washburne in a public conversation at belcourt theatre in nashville tennessee him. It seems to me. Bela that your story is also about kind of not as much as it's about traveling through places it's about traveling through genres kind of i dunno as old star trek lever. Taking the banjo or no banjo has gone before.

abbie bangladesh usa pacific rim india africa abigail franklin krista tippett Bela fleck abigail washburne belcourt theatre Bela nashville tennessee
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So there is the literal conversation but there's also the kind of the dialogue between the banjo and the voice and also the dialogue between when you're playing the banjo different kinds of banjo in different styles. And right oh on stage like performance yet. I think a real intention when we were finally taking our thing together seriously not just our love for one another but our ability to perform together which really hit when we realized. We're going to have a baby so we decided that we needed to really make an effort to put out something in the world. That was like a formal offering musically As a duo so that we could travel together and not be split up like so many couples that have had babies and one of the one of the two of travels. We decided we'd throw a forces together and hit the road and so when we were planning our our record we we thought. We know that to banjos vocal can be a really wonderful thing but we have to. We actually do have to prove it. So we decided to create soundscape. That differed from track to track and the differed from santa song which meant including different types of banjos. There's Back in the late. Eighteen hundreds there were actual banjo. Orchestras all over america. They were really popular. There were big Double banjo basis with pins that people stood and played and they look like taiko drums with strings on them and Piccolo benches and banjo ucs and banjo. Lynn's and It it goes on cello. I did that go away. Why exactly right. Yeah i mean. Why do we even know this on your album to as well this album you produced together. There's one song called banjo banjo when tune called banjo banjo that in the liner notes. It says that you sat down and made that music at when you first felt juno kick that i have to say you know. It's enviable think about this. Being part of your marriage your friendship and relationship in a way that you can celebrate you know you can literally make music together. This great Amazed by our our situation. Sweet sweet situation. Probably the hardest thing to do is to find time to make new music because wake up in the morning with juno on the bus and the first thing we want to do is just go. Play with them and be with him and so we do that. We spend several hours together with do know until he falsely for his nap. We're wiped out. And i'm krista tippett and this is on being today with musicians. Bela flack and abigail washburne. In a public conversation at the belcourt theatre in nashville tennessee. This is fun. Something that intrigued me. Actually neither one of you has a really extensive professional training right. I mean and i mean this is. You really came to this very late. But bela i mean you. Are the premier banjo player. Possibly in the world and abigail. I have to say when i first experienced the two of you. I also that you were somebody who had grown up learning us and you play with bailiff luck and the two of you. Are this banjo playing duo and when you were pregnant you know some music reporters that and now they will give birth to the holy banjo emperor right. But part of what you've been out there talking about and you delivered the commencement address or colorado college for mater. You talked a lot about this way. you were open to experience and you really discovered this thing that has become defining. And in fact you're helping define this kind of music now in the culture but it. It was very unexpected. You didn't prepare for it all your life in an in a linear way Piece of my story. That i don't really ever tell because it just adds another thirty seconds is the fact that When i left vermont on my road trip to go south before. I was headed to china to become a lawyer. My i thought my very first stop was at the very center for buddhist studies and i spent five days meditating and it was the first time i ever meditated my whole life and to this day. It's one of the hardest things i've ever done to sit. Still my body ached. I became afraid. I was hurting myself. And i went into the darkest place and one day. I remember i was sitting. There must have been three days in or something. And i went into this very deep place. Finally i wasn't really thinking a whole lot. And i came out of it hours later and my entire shirt was covered with tears and boogers. I mean it was not pretty. And i i. In that moment. I stood up and nobody was in the room. They had all left. And i know that. I had let go of something major I'm not even totally sure what it is to this day. But i know that. I didn't really feel like a victim anymore. When i left that place. I felt like i was clean and fresh and pure and i could make my decisions and that within days i was in louisville kentucky playing the four sons i knew on the banjo and was offered a record deal in nashville tennessee. I came to nashville. Instead of going to china to go to law school and i felt ready for that. I felt ready. You were you always a singer or did that come later to. I always loved singing. I was in choir all through school. And i'd always try out for the solos and i never got them so. I really didn't fancy myself much of a singer. I i didn't think i was going to be perceived as cassisi. That's what i got out of getting ready to talk to you. You don't you don't really consider yourself to be a great musician no you. Don't you feel like there's something you came too late and this impostor language i mean. I don't think you do feel like an impostor because you you throw yourself into it so joyfully but you don't think of yourself the way other people think of you as a musician right. No i don't but that is no harm or foul. To how i feel about the music and i feel like music just like most of my life. I hope that it's a service to people. This goes back to my childhood. Yeah i'm hoping that. I'm continuing through the music. Cultivating myself to have compassion and empathy and to express that people and i was talking to my mom today as we were walking around the lake. Trying to just think of things for my childhood and not. Forget too much when i talk to you tonight and i was remembering. What a sensitive child. I was so tuned in to everybody's feelings and it was a beautiful thing because i saw people's feelings before i saw them and Now i consider it a great gift but at the time i didn't know how to manage it and so i felt darkness a lot because i immediately would recognize people feeling darkness my whole life. I've had to learn how to manage that. In a beautiful thing is that a song teaches me to manage that. Because i feel something so strong. Most songs i i choose to sing unless because this song becomes the container for a container for the empathy and for the sensitivity. So i can feel something so strongly. I been singing the song Come all you coal miners. That was written by an amazing woman named sarah ogan gunning and she was raised in a coal camp and her child starved to death because they couldn't get milk for her baby and her husband died of black lung and all of these things i i hear her story and i'm crying and i'm crying. Start to sing the song. Come all hueco. He knows wherever you may be and listen to to the..

banjo banjo krista tippett Bela flack abigail washburne belcourt theatre colorado college for mater nashville tennessee bela Lynn abigail santa china america vermont louisville kentucky sarah ogan
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Major league baseball said that more than thirty legendary baseball and softball players are scheduled to appear over the course of all five days of the event. And if you're so inclined you'll be able to grab a bat and play baseball and softball play ball and batting cages. Pitching tunnels and on three. Indoor diamonds for all ages can also participate in demos drills and play with rising stars. Former all stars coaches and olympians. There also be exhibits curated by the national baseball hall of fame and museum exhibit directly from cooperstown and the negro leagues baseball museum. The world series trophy and other. Mlb trophies will be on hand for photos. Now this will be the first time the first round of the mlb draft will be held at mlb all star week and in denver. but let's go to the all star five k. We'll come back to the mlb draft family friendly five k walk and run. We'll take place saturday. That'd be tomorrow through the streets of downtown denver opened all ages. The all star five ks course begins and ends at denver's civic center park Taking participants or roots featuring capitol kill speer boulevard and the golden triangle mascots from round. Major league baseball will be waiting for the participants at the finish line to help recognize their accomplishment. Major league baseball went on to say that all five k. participants so then invited to a post to five k. all star celebration featuring music and complimentary refreshments participants are encouraged to needless to say arrive early and warm up prior to the events a start time all right so back to the m. l. draft. Yeah that begins. Sunday july eleventh at five pm at the belcourt theater at the colorado convention center now as of the reporting courtesy of a channel. Nine this was yesterday There were apparently still tickets available for that draft. Don't know if they still are. But if you're so inclined.

baseball softball denver national baseball hall of fame cooperstown Major league civic center park belcourt theater colorado convention center
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"All right. So you're you're throwing these downs in an insurance building. It's going well. People are showing up. Mayors are dropping like flies trying to fight this thing to be big city new york city in tennessee and so they said we gotta move so they said all right. First thing we'll do is we'll move into an actual auditorium space here in the same building that worked for a little while. Then in thirty four they moved to the hillsboro theatre community playhouse now called the belcourt theatre Started telling some ads making a little dough. We think two years later. they outgrew. That moved to the dixie tabernacle which was religious hall Sort of an old timey sort of revival house and they were there for a few years before they said you know what. I don't like this wild audience coming in here on the drink. And acting all crazy dancing in the aisle so get out of the dixie tabernacle and they moved to the war memorial art auditorium which is when they started selling tickets for a quarter apiece. In one thousand nine thirty nine and started i think they even got A spot on nbc. There in a movie thing started happening in a big way. Yeah it was a big deal in thirty nine when nbc started broadcasting them on the radio to a national audience. I mean first of all. It's it's now it's national and certainly legitimizes it but the fact that one of the big broadcasters at the time thought it was important enough show to to pick it up and you know send it out to everybody else. That's a that's a huge and this is you know less than twenty years after it's about fifteen years after the grand ole opry. I went on the air. Yeah that's pretty impressive stuff And then they moved on. I think nineteen forty three to the reimann theater which is one of the places that the grand ole opry is synonymous with right. Yeah and that's i'm dying to go to a show there i'll make it there at some point. Hopefully get that backstage tour from joseph but It was a legendary theater. It was there for thirty years. Twenty three hundred seats. It's the mother church of country music and Think they raise the price to eighty cents there We'll talk a little bit more. About how the reimann still figures in today. but it was That's when things really. I mean if you're an in a twenty three hundred seat you filling it up a few times a week. That's your your big time. At that point. I think they The regular cast would played carnegie hall in the forties went onto tour in europe. And they were starting to birth. Some real sort of superstars like roy aikoff yen minnie. Pearl came along in nineteen forty two. She's just as closely linked to that period of the The grand ole opry is. Roy is for sure I was reading about her. Did you know that whole thing was just a total put on as she was like a college educated woman from well to do family. Yeah it was. It was a character hook line and sinker. She was larry the cable guy. Yes exactly she was. She was larry the cable guy prior to larry the cable guy but i was like i know she was in a commercial that i loved when i was a kid as i think it was speaking span now looked it up and sure enough was it thank you internet. There's one thousand nine hundred eighty two speaking spanish show where she shows up and shows this this lady that she can get her linoleum floors back to looking. New with speaking span was great. Let's funny what hangs in the memory right. It really does that. And then my other association with minnie pearl is That developments on punk rock girl. They'll name their their daughter many pearl. Oh right that's the other the other minnie pearl thing so there's a couple of ways you can get on stage and play the grand ole opry. Most people are invited to play as a guest just on a random individual show and that's a great great honor. Then they have their. I mentioned the cast earlier. They have what's called members there of the cast their these regular Performers who are invited to become a member I think publicly. Once you're invited an existing member will ask you to join them. Live on the air during broadcast. Canada's the the big coming out party i guess And being a member is It's a really big deal like They take a lot of time to add members. They only add maybe a couple of year. There's there's i think sixty five current active members. I'm sorry sixty five total nine of which no longer perform or of officially retired okay. But they're still. They're still considered members of the consider. I think you kind of have to pass away to officially be taken off unless you run a foul which we'll talk about that as well i gotcha So yeah there's the there's the basically i mean to become a member of the grand. Ole opry is an enormous honour. Like it's a really big deal. There are people who Are just huge country superstars that are not members of the grand ole opry. They might be invited to come play a show or something like that. But they're not members of the grand ole opry if you're a member of the grand ole opry. Basically the impression i have is are considered the the The guard of country music is is one way to put it in a really confusing way. Yeah i mean there are a lot of things that go into it and they. I mean it sounds like it's you know they talk about you being successful and you being connected and you being committed. That's a big part of it and we'll get into that in a second but it sounds like there's not just sort of one set of criteria where like hey if you have so many number one hits or so much music sales it's like a bunch of stuff decided by people like subjectively and objectively right. I think also in some cases it's a it's a judgment that's passed on your style of country music like they might not like it at a time. Maybe think too poppy. Back in the day they might have thou- thought it sounded to rock and roll Like there's a there's a definite like like you said subjectivity to it as well as objectivity But if you if you do get that that That invitation You're expected to come play. Twelve shows a year Twelve saturday nights. I should say a year To maintain your Your membership And i think also you have to sell cookies in the in february to help raise funds as a true. I wouldn't surprise me man. it's the girl scouts. No it would not surprise me because they they do expect a lot of participation and not just on show nights. They expect you to go to a lot of shows. Yeah they expect you just kind of be there. a lot. I think in the fifties and sixties They were at. I mean from its inception up into the fifties and sixties. They required twenty six shows a year which is hot man. There's like half your weekend shows. Basic right yeah tour. Yeah if you want to go to. Or that's that's a significant amount of time that you have to dedicate and they've they finally knocked down to twelve which is still pretty significant. Especially if you don't live in nashville but It's much much more manageable than twenty six. You know yeah. They knocked it down to twenty in nineteen sixty four after they balked at twenty six and then nineteen sixty four. It took i think in two thousand they finally knocked it down to twelve. Oh really it took that long Yeah it took a while. Wow so over the years. The the the membership of the grand ole opry has been. You know there's a lot of people that that you would expect Who were members like everybody. From roy cuff as we said earlier and bill monroe the father of bluegrass Pet decline hank williams was for a while johnny cash Barbara mandrell reba. Ribas actually playing. What's the date today. you now. Is it the twenty second. Yes ribas slaying..

hillsboro theatre community pl belcourt theatre war memorial art auditorium reimann theater minnie pearl reimann nbc larry roy aikoff Ole opry tennessee carnegie hall new york city minnie joseph Roy europe Canada nashville
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Did. But we are. It turns out smack dab in the middle of cinema Week 2021 movie theaters and industry groups getting together to promote the culture of movie going. Now that we can. Stephanie Silverman is the executive director of the Belcourt Theatre in Nashville. Also, she is one of the 10 people we have been following in our series, the United States of work. Well, well, well. Stephanie Silverman as I live and breathe Well, hello, Kyra. Stall. Nice to hear your voice again. Good to talk to you, too. How are you? Have you been? You know, pretty good. All in all, um, you know, still still on the covid roller coaster. But, um, it's a good new phase. I think starting to work our way back to some sense of normalcy. You are open in person. Yes, I can go see a movie. Next time I come to Nashville. You can every single day of the week. Uh, it's been good. We reopened officially on April 23rd. So it's been a few weeks now. So what's it like on a Friday night? I mean, are there crowds and lines of their people eating Bob corn and all that good stuff? There are definitely people eating popcorn. Um, crowds. It's very inconsistent. I would just say right now. It's been interesting to us as we watch sort of what people are coming to. You know, we have a sold out screening of the film Children of Men tonight, Right in the middle of the week. A movie that is has been out in the world for a long time. But we have a speaker and a bunch of other stuff around it, and that's sold out for us is at 50% capacity, of course, right now, But you know some of the other stuff some of the new release stuff that also might have a life on another streaming platforms say. It's lower so time for some heavy curation to to really find the right mix. This is a little touchy failure than I usually get. But people missed you clearly. Yeah, they did, and we missed them. It's been pretty great to be back, and especially for our regular, you know, to see our regulars to see people's just standing in the lobby, talking about movies after a movie. It's powerful. It's it's and it's really rewarding honestly. Yeah, and and validating right in terms of what you do, right? We talked about this before you're you're a mission driven person in the mission driven organization. But even a mission driven organization needs money. Last time we had John We talked about the shuttered venue operators grant and how you were kind of hanging fire on that and trying to get some money. And where does that stand? Well, our application did move from submitted to under review yesterday, which is good. Of course, the applications have been in for over nine weeks now, so we're still waiting, and this money was legislatively authorized in December, so The gift of the support. It was really like a light at the end of the tunnel, but the process has been, um I will just say maddening is the kindest word I can use to describe it right now. Um, do you think you're out of the woods? You know, I do think we are. I think the sort of the rough sea things ahead of us are just getting people used to being in a space like a theater again. And part of it, I think is just like the rapid nous of change. So I just I think we're just in the re learning process and theaters are kind of at that at that. The end of the tail sort of, um Yeah, And then you know, we're we are still working through what was, um, a pandemic release model for new movies Right, which was screaming and maybe in the four theaters that were open in the country. Um, so that's the That's the structural changes question right? Because there are clearly structural changes coming to your industry and how you can deal with that. Well, we've always been pretty good at navigating these things, uh, through the way we program frankly, just by directly marketing movies to audiences in a way that's different from the larger national model. But I also know that there, you know, I think maybe even our distributor friends are going to learn some lessons about just going straight to streaming and how many people actually see that wonderful filmmakers movie if they don't give it the kind of exhibition first release whether those windows stay open as long as they used to, I don't know, but there's I still really feel that what we do In movie world is something different for that piece of work. Then what happens when it's on in TV world in your house? Yeah. Stephanie Silverman. She's the executive director of the Belcourt Theatre there in Nashville, Tennessee. Trying to get by trying to get back is what they're doing, Stephanie. Thanks a lot. It's really good to talk to you again. Thanks, Kai. It's really good to talk to you to do. Okay back to real estate here for just a second because it matters, right? We have told you I can't count. How many times including.

Stephanie Silverman Stephanie December Kai John April 23rd Kyra 50% Nashville Friday night United States yesterday Children of Men Nashville, Tennessee four theaters 10 people Stall over nine weeks one Week 2021
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Maybe you miss this full disclosure. I did but we are. It turns out smack dab in the middle of cinema week twenty twenty one movie theaters and industry groups getting together to promote the culture of movie going. Now that we can stephanie. Silverman is the executive director of the belcore theater in nashville also. She is one of the ten people. We've been following in our series. The united states of work. Well well well stephanie. Silverman as i live and breathe. Well hello hi rez. Dom hear your voice again. Good to talk to you too. How are you you've been you know. Pretty good all in all you know. Still still on the co-pay rollercoaster. But it's a good new as i think. Starting to work our way back to some sense of normalcy. You are open in person. Yes i can go see moving accent. Come to nashville. You can. Every single day of the week it's been good. We opened officially on april twenty third. So it's been a few weeks now. So what's it like. Running out. I mean are there crowds lines of there people eating popcorn and all that good stuff. There are definitely people eating popcorn crowds. It's very inconsistent. I would just say right now. It's been interesting to us as we watch. Sort of what people are coming to. You know we have a sold out screening of the film children of men tonight right in the middle of the week. A movie that is has been out in the world for a long time but we have a speaker and a bunch of other stuff around it and that's sold out for us is at fifty percent capacity of course right now but you know some of the other stuff some of the new release stuff that also might have a life on another streaming platform. Say it's slower so time for some heavy curation to find the right mix. This is a little touchy feely. Usually get but people missed you clearly. Yeah they did and we missed them. It's been pretty great to be back and especially for our regular to see our regulars to see people just standing in the lobby talking about movies after a movie it's powerful. It's it's an. It's really rewarding. Honestly and validating right in terms of what you do. We talked about this before. You're you're a mission driven person in a mission driven organization but even a mission driven organization needs money. Last time we had john We about the shuttered. Venue operators grant. And how you were kind of hanging fire on that and trying to get money and where does that stand well. Our application did move from submitted to under review yesterday but of course the applications have been in for over nine weeks. Now so we're still waiting and this money was legislatively rised in december so the gift of the support It was really like a light at the end of the tunnel but the process has been i will just say maddening is the kindest word i can use to describe it right now. Do you think you're out of the woods. I do think we are. I think the sort of the rough see things ahead of us are just getting people used to being in a space like a theater again and a part of it i think is just like the rapidness of change. So i think we're just in the relearning process and theaters are kind of at that at the end of the tail. Sort of and then you know we are still working through. What was a pandemic released model for new movies right which was coming and maybe in the four theaters that were open in the country right. So that's the that's the structural changes question right because there are clearly structural changes coming to your industry and and how you can deal with it. Well we've always been pretty good at navigating these things through the way we program mike just by directly marketing movies to audiences in a way. That's different from the larger national model. But i also know that the you know i think maybe even our distributor friends are going to learn some lessons about just going straight to streaming. And how many people actually see that film makers movie if they don't give it the kind of exhibition first. Release whether those windows stay open as long as they used to. I don't know. But i still really feel that what we do in movie world is something different for that piece of work. Then what happens when it's on. Mtv world in your house stephanie. Silverman she's executive director of the belcourt theatre there in nashville tennessee. Trying to.

fifty percent nashville april twenty third december Silverman stephanie yesterday ten people one tonight nashville tennessee over nine weeks belcourt theatre four theaters john belcore single day week united states week twenty twenty one
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Following in our series about the American Labor Force. It's called the United States of work. Hey, Stephanie. It's kind. How are you? Jake. I'm good. How are you? I'm good. I'm good. You rolling on your end. I am rolling. All right. Good. We're gonna keep it here. We're gonna use this is the helos, Um, standard first question with with a caveat here. How's business given that you've been closed since January, 1st? Ah well, the movie ticket business is fairly slow, I will say, although, you know we got some great virtual film streaming and people are watching them. And then this weekend, we're rebooting our drive in because the Bill Court is a satellite site for the Sundance Film Festival this year, so people would be outside in January in Nashville, which is not really that warm but It'll be fun to see. Audiences again is being a Sunday and satellite thing does that come with some cachet for you with Belle corn? Um, you know, they gave us some support to help, you know, hire people for panels and some other stuff. The ticket sales that we are part of our film offerings. We do get to keep the revenue from those. So that's super helpful for us for sure. Um to the brass tacks, then. I mean, you're trying to get by. You can't really do what you do for a business. What are you going to do? Well, we are super excited about this. Um, you know about the last federal funding bill, which had what was once known as the Save our Stages program in it. It's now called the shuttered venue operators grant Theatric ation hasn't opened yet. It's been about a month, but if that happens, I think it really will allow us to get through the next several months to the point where we are seeing much more widespread vaccination. It's pretty clear. But that is the piece that people are waiting on to feel comfortable about coming back into public spaces. Yeah, for sure it was. It was pretty clear cut to you that that after being open for a minute, as we talked about last time you run around Thanksgiving, you kind of had to close it down. I mean, there's no keeping an open, right? Yeah. I mean, the numbers got so severe It feels a little bit like we're back into the unknown days of of last year as we approach the year mark of being closed, just kind of unbelievable. We talked a lot in our first couple of conversations during the pandemic about your staff and the care you were trying to take with them. Acknowledging that Lot of merlot wage workers to begin with, And this is a gig economy for a lot of them. Have you been able to keep paying them? Yeah, well, we We had a minute where we had to furlough. Some. We were able to bring a ton of them back on when we reopened, and right now they're still on the payroll. We're keeping them paid, and we all feel really committed to doing that for his long as physically possible. I mean, I guess If we don't pay them. They do not get enough money through other federal programs to be able to pay their rent, pay their utility bills and buy food. Just the really bottom line basics. Right, So let's let this kind of an awkward turn. But let's let's do it anyway. Let's assume in a number of months that is somewhere in the single digits. Fingers crossed. The vaccine is out, you are able to open up again. The movie industry has changed. It just has right and this whole streaming thing is not going away Releases to online at the same time they're in theaters is not going away. You worried about the Belcourt and it's you know, short to medium term future. Um, you know, I hope this isn't Polyana ish, but I'm not. I really think that once people feel like they could be out in the world again, they will want to be out in the world again. And well streaming as a reality. It's not communal and communal still matters whether it is dining in a restaurant or whether gathering in the park with a ton of people around going to festivals or watching a movie in a theater. I really think that that's gonna matter. In the long term. I I hope you're right. I hope you're right. Stephanie Silverman is the executive director of the Belcourt Theater there in Nashville. Tennessee. Talk to you soon, huh? Big sky Take care. You two.

Stephanie Silverman Nashville Bill Court Belcourt Theater United States American Labor Force Jake Tennessee executive director
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Julie de Fish will be back after marketplace with a look at Bay Area traffic and then at 4 30 on all things considered one of the many problems with the covert 19 vaccine rollout is that dose. Is there going to waste a look at the issue and what could be done to address it is coming up on all things considered at 4 30 here on KQED Public radio. This is marketplace. I'm kind ridsdel as I was saying earlier. One of the companies caught up in the volatility of the past week or so is AMC Entertainment, the beleaguered movie theater chain that Until recently wasn't sure it was going to make it out The other end of this pandemic out in the real economy. Meantime, there are still Real challenges from movie theaters, including the nonprofit Belcourt Theater in Nashville, Tennessee, which closed in the spring open back up in November and then closed back down again at New Year's The Ball Courts executive director Stephanie Silverman is one of the 10 people we have been following. In our series about the American Labor force. It's called the United States of work. Hey, Stephanie's kind. How are you? Cake. I'm good. How are you? I'm good. I'm good. You rolling on your end. I am rolling. All right. Good. We're gonna keep it here. We're gonna use this is the helos, Um, standard first question with with a caveat here. How's business given that you've been closed since January, 1st? Ah well, the movie ticket business is fairly slow, I will say, although, you know we got some great virtual film streaming and people are watching them. And then this weekend, we're rebooting our drive in because the Bill Court is a satellite site for the Sundance Film Festival this year, So people be outside in January in Nashville, which is not really that warm but It'll be fun to see. Audiences again is being a Sunday and satellite thing does that come with some cachet for you with Belle corn? Um, you know, they gave us some support to help, you know, hire people for panels and some other stuff. The ticket sales that we are part of our film offerings. We do get to keep the revenue from those. So that's super helpful for us for sure. Um to the brass tacks, then. I mean, you're trying to get by. You can't really do what you do for a business. What are you going to do? Well, we are super excited about this. Um, you know about the last federal funding bill, which had what was once known as the Save our Stages program in it. It's now called the shuttered venue operators grant Theatric ation hasn't opened yet, and it's been about a month. But if that happens it think it really will allow us to get through the next several months to the point where we are seeing much more widespread vaccination. It's pretty clear. But that is the piece that people are waiting on to feel comfortable about coming back into public spaces. Yeah, for sure it was. It was pretty clear cut to you that that after being open for a minute, as we talked about last time you run around Thanksgiving, you kind of had to close it down. I mean, there's no keeping an open, right? Yeah. I mean, the numbers got so severe It feels a little bit like we're back into the unknown days of last year as we approach the year mark of being closed, just kind of unbelievable. We talked a lot in our first couple of conversations during the pandemic about your staff and the care you were trying to take with them. Acknowledging that Lot of merlot wage workers to begin with, And this is a gig economy for a lot of them. Have you been able to keep paying them? Yeah, well, we way had a minute where we had to furlough. Some. We were able to bring a ton of them back on when we re opened, and right now they're still on the payroll. We're keeping them paid, and we all feel really committed to doing that for his long as physically possible. I mean, I guess If we don't pay them. They do not get enough money through other federal programs to be able to pay their rent, pay their utility bills and buy food. Just the really bottom line basics. Right, So let's let this kind of an awkward turn. But let's let's do it anyway. Let's assume in a number of months that is somewhere in the single digits. Fingers crossed. The vaccine is out, you are able to open up again. The movie industry has changed. It just has right and this whole streaming thing is not going away Releases to online at the same time they're in theaters is not going away. You worried about the Belcourt and it's you know, short to medium term future. Um, you know, I hope this isn't Polyana ish, but I'm not. I really think that once people feel like they could be out in the world again, they will want to be out in the world again. Well streaming as a reality. It's not communal and communal still matters whether it is dining in a restaurant or whether gathering in the parks with a ton of people around going to festivals or watching a movie in a theater. I really think that that's gonna matter in the long term. I hope you're right. I hope you're right. Stephanie Silverman is the executive director of the Belcourt Theater there in Nashville. Tennessee. Talk to you soon, huh? Thanks, guy. Take care. You two. You.

Stephanie Silverman Belcourt Theater Nashville Tennessee executive director AMC Entertainment United States Julie de Fish KQED American Labor force Bay Area Bill Court The Ball Courts
"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"belcourt theatre" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm kind ridsdel as I was saying earlier, one of the companies caught up in the volatilities of the past week or so is AMC Entertainment, the beleaguered movie theater chain that Until recently wasn't sure it was going to make it out the other end of this pandemic out in the real economy. Meantime, there are still real challenges from movie theaters, including the nonprofit Belcourt Theater in Nashville, Tennessee, which closed in the spring. Open back up in November and then closed back down again at New Year's The ball Courts executive director Stephanie Silverman is one of the 10 people We have been following in our series about the American Labor Force. It's called the United States of work. Hey, Stephanie. It's kinda how are you? Jake. I'm good. How are you? I'm good. I'm good. You rolling on your end. I am rolling. All right. Good. We're gonna keep it here. We're gonna use this is the helos, Um, standard first question with with a caveat here. How's business given that you've been closed since January, 1st. Uh, well, the movie ticket business is fairly slow. I will say, um, although, you know, we got some great virtual film streaming and people are watching them. And then this weekend, we're rebooting our drive in because the Bill Court is a satellite site for the Sundance Film Festival this year, so people will be outside in January in Nashville, which is not really that warm but It'll be fun to see. Audiences again is being a Sunday and satellite thing does that come with some cachet for you with Belle corn? Um, you know, they gave us some support to help, you know, hire people for panels and some other stuff. The ticket sales that we are part of our film offerings. We do get to keep the revenue from those. So that's super helpful for us for sure. Um to the brass tacks, then. I mean, you're trying to get by. You can't really do what you do for a business. What are you going to do? Well, we are super excited about this. Um, you know about the last federal funding bill, which had what was once known as the Save Our stages programming it. It's now called the shuttered venue operators grant Theatric ation hasn't opened yet, and it's been about a month. But if that happens, I think it really will allow us to get through the next several months to the point where we are seeing much more widespread vaccination. It's pretty clear. But that is the piece that people are waiting on to feel comfortable about coming back into public spaces. Yeah, for sure it was. It was pretty clear cut to you that that after being open for a minute, as we talked about last time you run around Thanksgiving, you kind of had to close it down. I mean, there's no keeping an open, right? Yeah. I mean, the numbers got so severe It feels a little bit like we're back into the unknown days of of last year. As we approach the year mark of being closed, just kind of unbelievable. We talked a lot in our first couple of conversations during the pandemic about your staff and the care you were trying to take with them. Acknowledging that Lot of merlot age workers to begin with, And this is a gig economy for a lot of them. Have you been able to keep paying them? Yeah, well, we We had a minute where we had to furlough. Some. We were able to bring a ton of them back on when we reopened, and right now they're still on the payroll. We're keeping them paid, and we all feel really committed to doing that for his long as physically possible. I mean, I guess If we don't pay them. They do not get enough money through other federal programs to be able to pay their rent, pay their utility bills and buy food. Just the really bottom line basics. Right, So let's let this kind of an awkward turn. But let's let's do it anyway. Let's assume in a number of months that is somewhere in the single digits. Fingers crossed. The vaccine is out, you are able to open up again. The movie industry has changed. It just has right and this whole streaming thing is not going away Releases to online at the same time they're in theaters is not going away. You worried about the Belcourt and it's you know, short to medium term future. Um, you know, I hope this isn't Polyana ish, but I'm not. I really think that once people feel like they could be out in the world again, they will want to be out in the world again. Well streaming as a reality. It's not communal and communal still matters whether it is dining in a restaurant or whether gathering in the park with a ton of people around going to festivals or watching a movie in a theater. I really think that that's gonna matter in the long term. Well, I hope you're right. I hope you're right. Stephanie Silverman is the executive director of the Belcourt Theater there in Nashville. Tennessee. Talk to you soon, huh? Thanks, guy. Take care. You two You spend more time at home as a whole lot of people have been doing for going on a year. Now you notice things, things that need to be fixed her Changed or improved. What nagged at you before screams at you. Now the joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard figures We collectively spent $340 billion on home improvement and repair last year about 3.5% more than we did in 2019. Sadly, we have no statistics on how many of us actually know what we're doing. But for the latest installment of our series adventures in the housing market places, Amy Scott does take a look at remodelers remorse..

Nashville Belcourt Theater Stephanie Silverman Tennessee executive director AMC Entertainment United States Jake Bill Court American Labor Force Amy Scott joint Center for Housing Studi The ball Courts Harvard