17 Burst results for "Bela Fleck Abigail Washburne"

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"House door. I got the keys to the kingdom. Now stu king do again. No no crime jesus To the phone the keys to the inga. The wild can. I got the keys to the kingdom again. Threw me the keys thing down. I got to the kingdom while an arm of the key in boozer gary everywhere. Go attic he okay. Together keys sued king. Wild can do jeeze down while can do he. Pain downed can do minh hammer time. Everything's got gatica clean down. Can he while you know thank you..

stu king boozer gary jeeze
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So lame sweet. Okay your turn. i didn't bring any tissues. They left flick. What you've learned about what it means to be human that you couldn't possibly have guessed growing up in your favorite song. You like chocolate. All right come on. What was the question. What is the banjo. Teach you about life. Well you know i. I don't know where. I put my energy and i feel like everybody got a certain amount of energy in your life to devote to various things and i've been putting most of my energy into the banjo for most of my life. And actually what's interesting learning much about life right now from having a child. Abby and juno is a great teacher. And i'm what you call type a psychotic musician. I've lived that way up until now where i could. I could make music thing the most important thing in the world and and in a way that it's my job my job is to and i know it's not make believe that the banjo and what happens with the banjo is like the most important thing in the world. And that's why i'm that's what i do. That's my job. I the experience is like just like a great physicist has to believe that's the most important thing in the world to do the kind of work he wants to do but once you have a kid all of a sudden it's clearly not the most important thing in the world and so there's a lot of growing up comes with that because it's you know it's a different world so the challenge is now are how to keep the commitment that i made this guy while keeping the commitment that i made to this girl and the guy who is the little guy. Yeah so the holy. The holy badger emperor. Yeah so that's a challenge but you know we're figuring it out together and i'm finding that it's okay not to wake up and go know work on hard musical all day and to stop and spend all morning with the watching this little kid full of wonder at these things you know as best i can do well. It's great it's been a real joy and an honor to To dive into what you do and who you are. And i'm glad you're on the world and Thank you thank you for making yourself available for this and thank you all of you for coming. Now they're going to play some music for us again new. Hi guys. would you guys sing with us. Yeah all right. This is an old song that was recorded on a porch in merle's and let south carolina in the nineteen thirties. And i you know. Maybe we should try to learn it. I think you're gonna learn it really fast so just warm up your voices. Aw get the lipscomb. Come on life is so much more fun. When you do that i to the kingdom out can do the key. Can you do me. No the trump move on down down. You sound that trump to you hear from me. I got the key. Wild to the king down world can do me no harm john on. I'm a caddo gave from heaven. Oh i got the keys. Kingdom ki the king down can do you. Her yet spoke in they zimmerman. Jam came from an ellen down deputies in.

juno Abby merle south carolina john Kingdom zimmerman
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So i get to get to have it. I get to feel it. I get to be with her. But then it's okay to let go. Yeah we did it. And it's a container but also it. It touches other people also as the hope that actually was kind of an amazing demonstration of something that i was going to read to you. Bela this was somebody. This is from a blog called the rabbis pen. Have you ever heard this. My crack producer lily found this for me. Spiritual reflections on bailiff deflect tones by a rabbi. I didn't. I couldn't find the rabbis name. Music is a language away. All right we'll take it with a grain of salt. Music is a language a way of communicating vehicle for bringing greater peace tolerance and humor into our own hearts and into the world. Music is a spiritual discipline and a great teacher. Great musicians like bailiff lake and the flick tones are also great teachers. Think of yourself. Everything of yourself. As a teacher i dunno. I know there are people that have that. Learn from what i do. And it's exciting to see people that have taken What i what. I what i do and built on it just the way i built on earl scruggs and tony trish trashcans so many people that i learned from. But i don't formally teach very much and and in the past mostly. Because i was just so busy trying to do what i what i've been doing. You know and but i actually love teaching. I think actually that active teaching and that spiritual discipline was also send you know in that music you just you just shared. It's like it was an embodiment of this. This person also said At the rhyming auditorium. Bela fleck took a few moments to honor one of his teachers later. Scruggs there was a palpable sense of reverence and holiness throughout the auditorium. As many of us understood the great love that emerges when true teaching and learning have occurred. Well there's a lot you can do with instrumental music. And and sometimes we. We tend to sideline it and think of it as background music or support for vocals a lot of times. I can't tell you how many times i've been playing with somebody for an audience and the singer sings and then as soon as we go into the instrumental part people start talking and doesn't matter who it is going to be with some of the greatest musicians in the world. It's like a a go to. That's not the main thing but you know go to india. You might have a very different experience of spiritual experience listening to music. Doesn't have to india wherever you wherever you hear it or even people hearing the great german classical music or chopin can have a pretty ecstatic experience through the works of human beings. But i think the the great ones are trying to access this feeling when they play and and the pieces that i've come up with it. That have a strong mood or that kind of a component. I couldn't explain to you what i was going for. When i was trying to write them. I might have found a sound that that expressed a feeling or mood that I tried to write a piece around. And i couldn't explain what that mood is even but there but if someone who listened to it would know exactly what i was talking about we Joined to a close. And we're gonna hear a little more music from you. I advocate one of. I often will kind of circle around to this question of What you've learned through the life you've lived about what it means to human. And how how. Perhaps that has evolved since your your early days things that you know now are believe now that we're experience now. That would've surprised you. Then i felt i feel abigail at. You've been really are about your wisdom. In the commencement address you gave a colorado college and also this beautiful. Ted talk that gave and i love for you to reflect on that question. I would also love for you to tell that story that you told in the ted talk The little girl because it seemed to be kind of a moment that crystallized that for you how you how you think about this big question of why why you're here and why you live your life the way do. I was in china after the the big earthquake in two thousand eight. I hope i'm right about that. The years are fine by now. I have a baby and they will continue to and with a friend of mine. We were making. David liang the shanghai restoration project. We were making a a record with the kids And this actually happened before. We came back to make the record. I went there just to see what i could do. Because i had spent a lot of time in sichuan My great teacher who taught me my tremendous love for china old lady wong is from sichuan and so i felt like i really had to go back to citronen see what was going on with people there and how they were recovering. Eighty thousand people died are the estimates and it was a lot more than that and a lot of people affected so i went around and joined a for a couple of friends who are doing a quick relief project and they said why. Don't you just come a music for for the kids at these relocation schools. They had been taken away from their families at at home because many of their homes were destroyed and they had the parents had to stay there and rebuild them so the schools move to other places and the kids were struggling so much they were not only taken away from their homes but they had lost a lot of members and they were living in these Temporary trailers in place. They didn't know at all with just their teachers their their their fellow students come play for the kids. And maybe maybe it'll relieve their. You know their their minds for a moment and just thinks music. So i did and had so much fun with the kids and at the end of my performances. The kids would always come up to me and they'd they'd say you sang for us now. We want to sing for you. You know and so most of them. I would listen to like ninety pop songs. Chinese pops on bill would it and it was very cute and fun But this one girl came up to me and she said Long bad year which means big sister..

tony trish rhyming auditorium earl scruggs Bela Bela fleck Scruggs lily india David liang lady wong abigail china Ted ted colorado sichuan shanghai
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"The truth about your sexual orientation it really runs the gamut of does this is fun something. Also that intrigued me actually. Neither one of you has a really extensive professional training. I mean i mean this is you. You really came to this very late. Bela i mean you. Are the premier banjo player. Possibly in the world. And when you did this. I was reading when you did this when you did the the concerto you you had to. This is fascinating that you use the computer to help you translate between the difference between what you knew and how to do this kind of orchestral composition that you don't have real formal compositions on my head in high school there was there was nothing for the banja. They didn't have a place to put me and then when when after high school. I moved to boston. And i would've loved to gone to berkeley but they didn't have a place to put me there either so i just you know trying to figure out music that i loved you know one note at a time if i love charlie parker solo or culture solo. I just tried to figure out the first measure on the banjo. Describe build up my own understanding of the banjo so when trying to write a piece like that. It's not that i don't write music. I write banjo tablet. That's the way we communicate about how we play and the reason we used these this number system for for band communication because there's a lot of places to play the same note and those notes come fast so it's not enough to know that it's a d you need to know which it is and what not coming so it's better for me to see three and a seven and a five then then d. a. and c. and banjo players will know what position are totally day. Yeah so which means when it came time to. And then. When i play with people like the flat tones or my bluegrass fan sam bush jerry. Douglas and edgar meyer greek. Classical musician as well as everything else. I usually just bring a sketch. And i trust them to fill it all in great musicians. That are improvisers. We'll do that. You don't write out every note for them but when writing for an orchestra too. So how am i going to do that. Because i didn't have the skills to do that and so i did it with using that banjo. Help your computer program called sibelius where i could write the stuff in banja tablets and then copy and paste it onto a violence or french horn stave and it would turn into notation that they could read and then i hand that notation to copy of to clean it up and make it legible and that's sort of slowed me slow me down but i honestly i was going very fast and abigail. I have to say when i first experienced the two of you. I assume that you were somebody who'd grown up learning this and you are well. You're very much considered to be now. You're you're you're you play with bailiff luck and the two of you are in this this this this banjo playing duo and when you were pregnant you know some real some music reporters that now. They will give birth to the holy banjo emperor right. But but part of what you've been out there talking about and you delivered the commencement address or colorado college alma mater and you. You talked a lot about this this way. You were open to experience and you really discovered this thing that has become defining in fact you are defining. You know you're you're helping to define this kind of music now and culture but it was very unexpected. You didn't prepare for it all your life in a in a linear way. Well i a piece of my story that i don't really ever tell because it just adds another thirty seconds is the fact that When i left vermont on my road trip to go south before i was headed to china to become a lawyer i My first thought my very first stop was at the very center for buddhist studies and i spent five days meditating and it was the first time ever meditated my whole life and to this day. It's one of the hardest things i've ever done to sit. Still my body ached. I became afraid. I was hurting myself and then i felt the voices inside my head telling me about all the time i had hurt and i went into the darkest place and one day. I remember. I was sitting. There must have been three days in or something. And i went into this very deep place. Finally i wasn't really thinking a whole lot and i came out of it. Hours later and my entire shirt was covered with tears and burgers. I mean it was not pretty. And i i i. In that moment. I stood up an nobody was in the room. They had all left. And i know that. I had let go of something major I'm not even totally sure what it is to this day. But i know that. I didn't really feel like a victim anymore. When i left that place. I felt like i was clean and fresh and pure and i could make my decisions and that within days i was in louisville kentucky playing the phones on the banjo and was offered a record deal in nashville. Tennessee and i went to nashville. Instead of i came to nashville instead of going to china to go to law. School and i felt ready for that. I felt ready. Were you always a singer or did that come later too. I always loved. Singing inquire all through school. And i'd always try out for the solos. And i never got them so i really didn't fancy myself. Much of a singer. Didn't think i was going to be perceived as a cassisi. That's what i got out of getting ready to talk to you. Don't you don't really consider yourself to be a great musician no you don't you feel like this is something you came too late and this impostor language i mean. I don't think you do feel like an impostor because you you you throw yourself into it so joyfully but you don't think of yourself the way other people think of you as a musician right. No i don't and i but that is no harm or foul to how i feel about the muse. Yeah yeah and i feel like Just like most of my life. I hope that it's a service to people just goes back to my childhood. Yeah i do. Hope that i'm helping. I'm hoping that i'm continually through the music. Cultivating myself to have compassion and empathy into expressed that to people and talked to my mom today as we were walking around the lake trying to think of things from childhood and not. Forget too much. When i talk to you tonight and i was remembering. What a sensitive child i was. I was so Tuned in to everybody's feelings and it was a beautiful thing. Because i saw people's feelings before i saw them and now i consider it a great gift but at the time i didn't know how to manage it and so i felt darkness a lot because i immediately would recognize people feeling darkness and even in high school girl who had schizophrenia and talk to herself in the bathroom i would just be friendly with her because i could see. She was struggling and the counselor said that she said i heard the voices two. It was just really tuned into something there. And i saw that my mom comes to me honestly and my whole life. I've had to learn how to manage. That and a beautiful thing is that a song teaches me to manage that. Because i feel something so strong. Most songs i choose to sing unless there because his song becomes a container for the container for the empathy for the sensitivity. So i can feel something so strongly I been singing the song Come all you coal miners. That was written by an amazing woman named sarah ogan gunning and she was raised in a a coal camp and her child starved to death because they couldn't get milk for her baby and her husband died of black lung. And all of these things i i hear her story and i'm crying. I'm crying. i start to sing the song. Come all hugh hefner wherever you may be and listen to us to the next with the truth. I'll tell i am a coal miners. He i'm sure wish you will. Coal.

banja edgar meyer Bela sam bush charlie parker nashville berkeley colorado college abigail boston Douglas jerry china vermont louisville kentucky Tennessee schizophrenia sarah ogan hugh hefner
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"In the years ago and my grandma was a part of that and her ashes are spread her ashes. They're know really. It's a very important place for abbie's family. And i have to say you know. It's enviable out to think about this. Being part of your of your marriage your your friendship and relationship in a way that you can celebrate you know you can literally make music together. It's great i mean. We're constantly amazed by our our situation. Is we get to travel down the road with these very special people that that richard and and and bebop and My mom's mom and helen support team. That help us do these concerts and and make it all happen. You june goes to bed before the show usually and sleep in the bunk and it takes a lot of people to make all of that work. But it's really we'll get to go out and play music so sweet sweet situation. Probably the hardest thing to do is to find time to make new music because we wake up in the morning with juno on the bus and the first thing we wanna do is just go play with them and be with them and so we do that. We spend several hours together with do know until he falsely for his nap. Been we're wiped out and then we're tired. Yeah well. And i do have to say because i have been watching. The tv show nashville. Oh yeah i am mutare that this juggling music making music and and a relationship can be challenging. I don't know how does it factor and now juliette. Oh my yeah. I thought maybe i'd try to go visit deacon in the hospital..

abbie helen richard mutare nashville juliette deacon
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Like i like i very rarely play together and i. It's hard for us to think of any duos in historically that. Combine those two and the whole band. That's what they do. But we'd created tried to create a tapestry and we we we have two different techniques but we both ripple so when we get our rippling to line up together it just works and the registers is a great help to keep it from all sound the same but also having something that's not rippling on top of that is very completing. An abbey's voice sings out over the top of those sixteenth notes sixteenth notes. The way a banjo which doesn't have much to stain creates the impression of sustained by repeating notes hitting open strings keeping things ringing and you can really feel like there's a sustained in a soulful long note but there's nothing like having a long held note at the top of it and that's why fiddle and banjo works so great but vocals and banjo fantastic. But it's kind of unusual isn't it. It's not easy singing and banjo now. Because i think the way you guys do it now well. I think it's personal to us the way the way that we're doing it as a duo just a banjo duo with is unique. Okay but in old time music in particular. Which is the tradition. That i've been learning a lot from is actually in an all girl old time string band and there are so many women out there playing old-timey timey banjo. I mean you have to be in a certain strange limited colt people to actually enjoy. This trance-like repetitive music. However if you are in it you do know that there are a lot of women that sit and play. The banjo and seeing singleton's is starting to happen now and what i saw happening with. Abbey's music is you know when you think about a singer. Songwriter plays the piano. Billy plays the guitar james taylor. They write their songs built around the where the plane that instruments they open their mouth and utter sound right. But it's hard to think of people that write songs on the band playing the banjo weather composing their songs. And so i think that's when abby writes her own songs. I hear that contemporary that voice up today connected to the the tradition that she loves but in songs that are about her experience than that. Have a different tonality..

singleton james taylor Abbey Billy abby
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"A two hour with the song ratio. Okay so there is the literal conversation but there's also the kind of the dialogue between the banjo in the voice and also the dialogue between year. Two quite when you're playing the banjo different kinds of banjo and different styles and right on stage performance yet. I think a a real intention when we were finally taking our thing together seriously. Not just our love for one another but our ability to perform together which really hit when we realized Bergen have baby so we decided that we needed to really make an effort to put out something in the world that was like a formal offering musically As a duo so that we could travel together and not be split up like so many couples that have have babies and one of the one of the two of them travels. So we decided we'd throw a forces together and hit the road baby with us and that's what we've been doing for the last couple of years and so when we were planning our our record we we thought we know that to banjos vocal can be a really wonderful thing but we have to actually do have to prove it. So we decided to create soundscape. S- that differed from track to track and the different from santa song which meant including different types of banjos. There's Back in the late. Eighteen hundreds there were actual banjo. Orchestras all over america. They were really popular. There were big Double banjo basis. within pins. People stood and played and they look like taiko drums with strings on them and Piccolo benches and bencher ucs and benjamin's and It goes on cello. That go away right. Exactly yeah.

Bergen santa america Piccolo benjamin
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Really hit the peak with ufo tova talent drums And we We did a show. We did an event in in new york city in the fall about box. It was during the bach month with a computer scientist anna boch lover and we actually put. This recording is amazing recording of you playing box party two for violin number three on the banjo on our website. So gorgeous have incredible taste. But i was in also really amazed. Learned that you've written a concerto for banjo with the with the national orchestra with the eighty and eighty piece symphony orchestra. Very intrigued by The tidal the impostor you to that would you talk about sure and really the impostor abby and i've talked about feeling like you're the outsider other. Yeah it kind of comes back to this idea that the banjo is not a real instrument. Yeah and especially. And i realized at some point that I'm always putting myself in positions playing the banjo where it hasn't really been played not always but often put myself in positions where the banjo hasn't been played before so i have to figure out a role for the banjo in with indian musicians or with chinese musicians or with classical musicians or jazz musicians and The only place. I really know exactly what the banjo supposed to do is bluegrass. That's the place where i know exactly. What almost every banjo player of notice. Played since earl scruggs from till now i know how they would do things and i can make my choices based on an understanding but everywhere else. I'm kind of waiting for somebody to say. Hey you're not supposed to be in here get outta here. So that's a feeling that. I sometimes get when i'm feeling insecure like somebody's gonna catch me and kicked me out. And so with the impostor playing in front of a symphony orchestra and writing the peace. And everything too. I was had my ears peeled for somebody to eject me. Yeah and then. There's this place at the very end where the banjo breaks free from the rest of the orchestra and how what what would what that symbolize writing in writing the piece being a serious attempt not to do a Appalachian concerto the most expected thing to do with a banjo is to put it in a show as often it's traditional glory within an orchestra and i really wanted this to be peace where the banjo was not that. And that's often. That's what i'm doing is trying to prove that the they can be viable not just as a traditional instrument but for the sound and the abilities that it has the no other instrument has and but it but by the end of the piece i was really trying hard to complete this piece and i wasn't coming up with a beginning right. That's one desperately. I reached furrow scruggs. And he was there for me and not only that. I dedicated the piece to earl scruggs and got to play it for him before the premier came to the premier and it was the last concert that became to and he passed away. Maybe five or six months later so it was some some closure. There he was. He was very sweet. I it felt to me like you know. You really have come full circle. I mean i. I read that you when you first started getting in banjo bluegrass. You're trying to cover up your your accent and then here you are really bringing all these things together and even you've also. Is there a song in your in your album. You've done together from bela bartok. Oh yeah yeah so. You've actually come back to your name thick really when i started writing that piece. That was when i finally said. Look i gotta get into this bartok stuff. It's people keep asking me. Oh you must really be a bartok fan because he was always exploring folk music and classical music. And i'm like i really haven't heard very much of it and i think because of the complexity of my relationship with the person gave me that name. I wasn't eager to embrace it. But at the point when when i was writing this piece it was like okay. Let's just deal with all of this stuff. And at that point yeah at some kind of a lot of the sort of darth vader. Ism had sort of subsided when my making him into a real person and then i was ready to go face bartok which turned out to be some of the greatest music i ever really. Oh my god. It's so it's so different at so Free from convention and imaginative. I love it. I really do so. Yeah so i. I found a couple of deanna. Pieces arranged them for abby and ida play on on the new album. That was the first bartok that. But i'd like to actually like try to learn violin concerto on the banjo and things like that. A lot of fun. the two of you do something which which you did here just before we started which is kind of unusual saint singing and the banjo and song together. And i've i've seen you you both talk about this. The music you do together in terms of like dialogue and conversation. Let's abby like i am not a talker. This is a lot for.

anna boch national orchestra earl scruggs abby furrow scruggs new york city bela bartok bartok deanna ida
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"That's kind of a century them where my mind went. Yeah let's let's and we got to do these state department tours. Us is usa which basically they call them propaganda tours but we got to go to india and bangladesh. We got to go to a lot of amazing places and at a certain point. I realized that we had like an ambassador status so I started cabling ahead and saying find me musicians. I want to get there. I wanna jam with somebody and and started They people would show up. We get to a country and get to play with these these people and we'd start out like what is what is this like abbie. What is why. Why am i here. Why do i have to do this when we start to play and the whole room would change. it was like almost the color changed from this dark to technicolor. You know like the wizard of oz you know when you landed is and so it was such an exciting thing that was part of what made me feel competent. That going to africa could be that way because it had that experience over over and over again and when the flood tones got the opportunity to do a trip like that to the pacific rim. We made it a point that every country went to somebody from the local culture would come on stage and perform with us and it broke the ice like like nothing. It felt so great to do but that was favorite part of the show obviously for the locals because we were celebrating their culture and we taken the time to learn something their music which was really Great thing we both came to the separately and it's one of the and then we found each other that That aspiration that very kind of american ambition you had to go to law school and make policy change the world. This is a whole other way in to the same thing at a different at a human level they let you have said and i do again believe you really said this that the first time you heard abigail music. You're listening in the car and you've got stopped for speeding. it was out out franklin. There was just so caught up and she gave me in fact i. It's not really the first time. It's been slightly sanitized story. But what the first time i heard her. It was at a party and she was playing these very very sad slow songs with a bunch of girls gathered around her and i was going. This is just not for me. You know it was really. It was really slow and it was beautiful. But i was like okay. She's good you know. But but then she gave me this. This cd at this party. And i started listening to it. And i had a completely different experience because the banjo is upfront. There was this group to it and she was singing like you just heard her with this. Ancient sound very connected to traditional music. And i just started driving faster and faster. Wow i really like this. I was even talking to myself. And then i got pulled over and had to walk the line. Well i'm going to do my radio thing now. I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with musicians. Bela fleck abigail washburne in a public conversation at belcourt theatre in nashville tennessee him. It seems to me. Bela that your story is also about kind of not as much as it's about traveling through places it's about traveling through genres kind of i dunno as old star trek lever. Taking the banjo or no banjo has gone before.

abbie bangladesh usa pacific rim india africa abigail franklin krista tippett Bela fleck abigail washburne belcourt theatre Bela nashville tennessee
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"We cut that out this one. Maybe i'll decide later. And he showed up and he saw me in this wonderful band of musicians from america and He just didn't look happy at all. he he looked at me said john. Goran her warren boone. Et t. hoods will americans and chinese cannot simply cannot play music together. Two different and i looked at him. And i was like. Oh okay Would you just play for us then. funding gay woman teeny sherry. Go an eat me. She wandered drago gershon and he pulled out his our who started playing this breathtakingly gorgeous melody from tibet. Actually and And the band as we were listening we just started to tune up our instruments to match his tuning in. We started playing along with him. And you can see this. It was barely there but you could see just corner of his mouth kinda turn up ever so slightly and that night. We performed that song that we created in that moment for fourteen hundred people in a theater in that town and at the end of the show he came up to me and and he so was Didn't want sean. We'll fauchet ally tonight. Discovered something butcher magwar aunt who doran boyhood so. It's not that americans in chinese can't play music together. Seen hushing hoods. It's just that music is actually the communication of hearts and that to me became whole. But that's not you get it. Ironically distant best interest and i have had parallel experiences back when i was in new grass revival in the eighties nine hundred eighty s. And.

warren boone drago gershon Goran tibet butcher magwar america doran boyhood john sean
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Weight. It's not haven't you. Have you also been over there kind of not just taking this music. But also collecting their music and doing senator silk road trip. Yeah i've done a number of on almost every trip i've done. I've tried to collaborate with somebody locally. No matter where i end up and and just ask somebody sound guy or whatever or you know really if you're doing a proper tour you're being handled by the cultural bureau the central Ministry of culture. And so i would call call ahead or ask someone in our party to call ahead and see if we could collaborate somebody really great in each town and plays some kind of folk music at that led to that has led to meeting the most incredible wonderful local musicians all over china. So i feel like. I have gotten to jam and play with wieger tibetans. Mongolians i people hun wonderful hon Folk music players from all over china and one really memorable experience that was of Being in a in a city and calling ahead and asking for someone to common this old man showed up backstage and he had an are who case in our who is a little too to stringed-instrument actually but the ball goes in between both of the strength. And it sounds. Snakeskin covered snakeskin cut joe really violent tiny tiny head and sits on your knee and you play it sounds like human voice almost sounds like a human voice to dying cat to others. It really depends i have. Can.

central Ministry of culture wieger china joe
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"There any less your. What did you learn in that in that journey that you took it. Was there anything. He learned really kind of opened up the instrument for you and in new ways i think for me it was more like i was This is after about fifteen years straight of of the. Tom bailiff like in the flat tones and and that was an area where we had a lot of control as a group like Except live we we improvise a lot but in the studio or in the composing there was a lot of control and yeah. I found that whenever we wouldn't invite someone to guest with us and get up on stage with us and we had no. We'd nobody knew what was going to happen. All awesome. things would happen that we never could planned. So when i went to africa part of it was there was no way i could be prepared for what was going to happen in. Africa played music with four people right. Because i was there for six weeks almost every day i was playing and recording with people. I'd never met before playing music than in most cases. I couldn't learn ahead of time so i had to sort of just let go and let things happen a lot of time and sort of allow. It's sort of like a fighter flight response. You could look at that way or you could say it's a spiritual thing that's something comes in to help you when you need it the most but it seems as i got to go back and study what happened on that trip. Those are the moments that are the most magical is when when nobody had time to plan and we just started playing. And i was because i edited the movie. I had some control on the back end. And i and i could make sure that. That's what you guys heard when you saw it. But i think it was. It was a lot about that that that odd combination of being prepared and practicing and working and caring and everything. You can be ready but when it comes down to the moment you have to let go and throw all that away and and hope that the gods are with you if there are gods daily called me while he was over there and you were almost having a nervous breakdown you were like. They're playing and i don't know where the one is. I can't find the one the one but just think beat that. Yeah here's the downbeat is so layered and so rhythmically complex that If you ask somebody over there they don't really know what you're talking about. Everybody knows they're part. They've been playing. It's been they learned. A lot of it was passed down from centuries and villages that all play this family. This part of the beat. That part of family plays that part of the you know when they all get together and play music they go into their thing and then all just as this incredible gel and to try and figure out how to play in that music was overwhelming. And what abby says. Well i don't think you actually have to know to play good music. I think this is where you let go when you play. What comes to you. And and it'll be okay. And i was like i said anything that deep i think i said you just play something. That sounds good. It's pretty much the same thing..

Tom bailiff africa Africa abby
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"The tempo. That's yeah that you're supposed to. They're in trouble right now. Fiji's can help parents. I like to circle back to china because this is an amazing part of your story. But it's a little cleaned up in the way it gets told so i was really happy. I mean it is an amazing story you you you become fluent. You're going to go to law school in china in beijing. And then you hear doc watson. Pick up the banjo and But i also found Something you wrote about how it wasn't an immediate love. A love affair with china right and when the story gets condensed. It's just that love of that passion that surf you now you wrote about you know you're at colorado college and You saw this sign. Tacked to a bulletin board in a dank and narrow path leading to the university cafeteria. Study chinese in china so dramatic and and you talked about that first time you went there for the summer and air sweating profusely on july day. And you know you said. My interaction with the chinese people could be broken into two categories one. They aggressively tried to sell me stuff to practice their english on me. I hated the way. China made me feel unwanted like a resource for exploitation. But so you so you had this experience of being there and feeling outside but then you went back and and you were you were drawn in. So let's talk a little bit about. I'm just interested in that kind of trajectory about what it is and so again you know then you decided to key. We're going to be there for world peace and you were going to go study. You're going to study law. And you learn china but what was. What was the revelation. When you heard doc watson singing shady grove that was connected to that and yet took a completely different direction with it at the point. I heard doc watson. I had already fallen in love with china right and at that point rather than feeling like an outsider. That was frustrated. That i couldn't get in. I was starting to feel like someone who's finding a place there. And i would hear people you know once i could speak a little bit. I could start to hear what people were saying about. Americans and i traveled other places in the world and seeing things people are saying about americans to this was the early nineties and Kinda thought of us as big bullies and homogenize and people that wanted the world to be like them and A lot of people thought. Hollywood right away real dangerous movies. People would be like janci nagar law. Shanti i don't want to go to los angeles because i'll get shot. Everybody gets shot in los angeles in the movies. You know. so. I wasn't thinking about it consciously but when i heard doc watson i realized that i really needed to find what it was about america that i could believe in so strongly and stand in front of my chinese friends and be like look. This is real. This is beautiful. And this is something. I i wanna share with. You and i'm proud of this is part of who i am as much about self discovery as it was about sharing something beautiful from my culture and then there was that he said this a minute ago out you'd really become so I think you use the word of with. China's ain't deep ancient culture that that that realization that this music actually carried that that depth and and that age and those layers of history time. That's exactly right. I mean people talk about america being a new new country and indeed we are a nation in comparison to most around the world and especially in comparison to china but the music just like learned in bela's film. That banjo comes from africa. Comes from these. Ancient civilizations that have been making gored gored banjos with hide heads in gut strings for for centuries and it comes from ireland and scotland and where these melodies has been to medieval times before and that came to american. It became this beautiful new form of of this beautiful new sound of suffering. And hope it's ancient. By by the way i was i was trying desperately to get pete seeger to do an interview for my film and and i would call them up and he'd say oh i'm far too busy and then he would talk to me for three hours about mr evanger drive again in a few months so i tried to in a few months. The same exact thing happened and what he said in both conversations pretty much. The same thing was oh. The band doesn't actually come from africa. It comes from it. Came down the tigris-euphrates river down through the trade routes into africa. It actually comes. So i was like wait. Are you saying that. America's instrument is actually from iraq during the iraq war. Yeah wow this is great. But unfortunately i never got to do that interview with them. Yeah do you think that's right do you have you trace. That history. seem to think so yes. He believe pete seeger. Was.

doc watson china colorado college Fiji beijing los angeles Shanti America Hollywood bela mr evanger africa pete seeger scotland ireland euphrates river iraq
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And she won. She wants but she was the only contestant in her age group but she finished she had a wonderful sense of humor as she was getting very old and and not remembering things and she'd get in the grandma loop where they say the same thing again and again you know did i order the omelette. I want the omelette. Grandma you've ordered four times You know she would laugh at herself. She laughed at herself until the moment she died. And we We love her so much. And so when. Juno was born which was just about a year and a half or two after she died. It was actually bela's mother who thought of the idea of great. If you're gonna write name yeah well and so think to this idea of reality and the truth in this music There's a story you told the first track on your new album. Which is your first or your first album together Is i've been working on the railroad. Would you sing in a minor key. But i love this. This story that you've told about how maybe this isn't true either. Correct me if i heard this on the internet or publicists rights alone so so that so you maybe you were traveling. Abigail your home. It's you know. And do know his banging on the table. Yeah and you got really about that which you know. This is a life lesson for other parents. Were not musicians because you thought. He's learning rhythm soon and banging in time. It was consistent time. Are you sure it's a fair question. But i mean what. I remember to somebody when i was learning to cross country. Ski in minnesota. Somebody taught me how to keep my pace by singing. I've been working on the railroad and the thing. I think a lot of people might think. Oh bluegrass music or folk. Music is not my music is not my taste and yet some of this music is like woven into our lives in ways that we don't ever don't even reflect on. Yeah i i. I don't think we'll let me put it this way. Some bluegrass music might not be your taste but some other bluegrass music might be. And if you just let the name bluegrass repel you because you just heard some bluegrass. You didn't like you'll miss out on a bunch of great music. And i think whenever we decide we don't like kinda music We're the one that loses because there's always something in every field. That's beautiful that that you would like. Yeah yeah and i it was just. It was kind of revelatory. Firming it to think about this when i was getting ready to talk to the two of you. This is not folk music. But the first thing i thought it was when we were learning baby. Cpr they taught us to sing staying alive. Actually stanley standard really does.

bela Juno Abigail minnesota
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Shady grow. I don't love. I'm going back to when i heard that sound dock singing it for me. There was this moment where i knew i was hearing and i should preface this that i was really immersed in china at this point. Yeah loving chinese culture and and studying the language really intensely and bid their number of times. And when i heard doc watson i felt like a heard the beauty of authentic american culture and i wanted it so bad i i've been looking for it so badly and i finally heard it when i heard doctors. High lonesome searching struggling suffering hopeful voice. Singing this ancient ancient melody and these old old words and it didn't matter who owned it or where it came from but this man was sharing it with me. And i knew that i had to add to go get a banjo and i had to learn shady grove and instead of doing karaoke in china with my clients when i would become a lawyer someday i would play ballots from appalachia of course was like for me. What i think the word. I thought of when you when you were talking about what you actually heard was the truth. Something that was the truth. And i think that the greatest musicians that when i think about like bb king. We just lost. But earl scruggs and miles davis some of these people that played something that somehow seem so profound and these are just instrumentalists. Abbey's talking about doc. Watson could use words but it just sounds so true. Even though it's it's just notes you know this is something more about it and and this notion of routes like roots music which again. It's kind of a it's language we throw around but but when you start talking about what the music conveys and where it comes from deep that is and what it touches in us something that i learned from Movie bela made. And this isn't a plug. This is just the truth. i. I watched bela's documentary. Throw down your heart. You called me on your big global phone from over in africa number of times and I think it was when you were in tanzania. He was learning the story of how on that side the band. This this the journey of the to america tracing their original roots of the banjo in africa. Yeah yeah And what he had learned in part of the reason the documentaries called throwdown your heart is because as people were being boarded onto the slave ships. They said through your heart down here. You're not going to want to carry it to where you're going and a lot of the slave masters figured out that if they had a banjo player online on board playing the music of home. More of the cargo would live to the other side so the origins of the banjo in america are the bitterest of roots makes me wanna cry just thinking about it in this moment and it. It formed an amazing origin to what became a blend of traditions from from africa. Ireland scotland when those fiddlers and that those banjo players those banjo players from africa and those fiddlers from scotland and ireland started. Playing plantation dances together. That's what really started what we know of as that early appalachian that early american sound at least for that part of america and That sound is based in the city route. But with this actual hope. This hope that. I can live that. I can live. I can survive. It's an amazing tradition. Yeah and i think that that hope is something that you feel the music along with. There's all just the song you just saying there. What's the name of that the song you sing. Starting o end am my born to die now. That's a little light duty but that's the thing but that's the thing this kind of music takes us to the hard bidder sorrowful places of life and also insists on hope and humanity. That it is. They're not in spite of it but woven into it. Yeah that's where i hear the truth. Yeah yeah There's this actually. There's a story you've told about your son do know by the way where it is. His name come from. I don't know any central european composers named the first name juno. My grandmother's name was june. Carl okay and dune was fabulous woman. She got us to player for show. Together as duo. She loved bela's so much and she insisted that we play show at her unitarian-universalist church. Okay so that was our first show together and she ran a roller skating rink and downtown chicago for a long time along with her husband. Alan and she's fermentable woman she Inline skated and inline skating. Marathon at the age of eighty four.

Movie bela doc watson africa china earl scruggs appalachia miles davis bela america Abbey Watson scotland tanzania Ireland ireland Carl okay universalist church chicago Alan
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I can stop buying a hereafter of your banjo with you. I i sense that. Your mother must've Musically if not spiritually with music also is so fascinating. She named after not one but three central european complete. Actually that was my father. Who i didn't know and he named leave me. I got the better names than my older brother. I won't go. What are your three. Name's bela bela anton. Leo's flick. i mean if it was a boy he would name them. If it was a girl she would name. The girl i ended up being two boys bartlett after bartok janacek list janacek and anton burn so some some pretty out there stuff. Yeah but not banjo. Music differ out there in different. What could be could be what you've done. Yeah you've done that. And but i mean the banjo also wasn't your first instrument. You played french horn man. Not yeah what happened. Was everything read on the internet. I i was I took a test for this. The school uptown called. I guess it's the fame school this is in new york city called music and art. There's actually several schools that fame the fame television show and movie based on a music and art art and design and i think there was a third one but anyway i tried out for it and which i took a musical aptitude test and i played guitar at that. Time played some folk songs. I had a killing version of. Here comes the sun which place on occasion on guitar and i got into the school playing that and and i think i was rated number. I guess number two number three possible to with four being the most talented because we found all this stuff out you know we found out what your rating and that is pretty weird. I think they should've told anybody that. But anyway. When i got in the school there was no guitar teaching anything like that. And so they said we'll put you on a real instrument and we need a french horn really badly so they put me in a room and i tried to play french horn for a season and never got the i. I could never even get the f. Which is the. I know you play on a on a french word. I can never even make the first node until finally they said you know. We don't have very many boys in the chorus. And i was moved into the chorus where i just screamed all the way through high school. Meanwhile i was learning to play the banjo. The and you discovered evancho your captivated by early. Yeah earl scruggs the beverly hillbillies theme which actually people talk about. Come to god moment and for most banjo players of note in the bluegrass world. Hero scruggs is that moment and it. There's before and after so talk. Tell us about that. What is that. What is it that happens in that moment though awesome it was i remember. It was like lightbulb lights. Going off in my every note was like a light going off in my brain and was this was way before i got my span. This is before. I played guitar. I never had the ego. At that time to believe that that i could actually play the banjo when i finally found out what it was but it was just an amazing sound and i now i try to explain it as being a high tech yet primitive sound because it's not just like a computer can play fast but you don't get excited but there's something so earthy deep especially the about the way. Earl scruggs played Which which turned people into believers. What did you say a minute ago. He said something about real said this before that people talk about the banjo is though it's not a real instrument which then i guess gets at the question of how we define real right and i think both i think you're both really eloquent or i think it's fascinating that Neither one of your both actually came from the north. Neither one of you grew up surrounded by banjo. Bluegrass yeah you became believers as you said so. Talk about talk about that a bit. The reality like what what is real. What is bad music captured. You that just takes you away. Well my come to god. Moment in the folk music world was hearing an lp of doc watson singing and playing shady grove. Yeah this is where you want me to bust into the i do. I was hoping you shady grow ma shady grow. I don't love. I'm going back to when i heard that sound.

bela bela anton bartok janacek janacek anton burn Earl scruggs bartlett Hero scruggs Leo new york city doc watson
"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck abigail washburn" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"In nashville. So aright right. So you know. We're we're i always start my conversations whether i'm talking to a physicist or banjo players like tear a little bit about whether there was a religious or spiritual background your childhood and avid. I'd like to start with you. You grow up in a few places chicago washington minnesota a little bit. I forgot that you were going to study becoming. Yeah well my grandmother who was in evanston illinois. Most of her life raised my mother. There unitarian universalist and then i was also raised by my mother and my brother Unitarian universalist and if people don't know what that is just in case unitarian I i think you know. In the in the faith learned to never think we know everything so but it means the unity or the trinity is the unity All gods are one. God and the universalism means universal salvation. All people are and be saved And everybody takes their own walk their own path in that and to that salvation And it's something for us to learn from our own faith and i was raised from three to eleven years old in montgomery village maryland and the religious education. That you you church. We actually went to everybody else's church learned about What it was like to go to temple or synagogue or mosque all kinds of different churches and we were learning about that to inform our own faith and intentionally. That's a plan. Yeah that was the religious education curriculum. Yeah and I was also living in a place. Montgomery village maryland which is just outside washington. Dc which is incredibly diverse. So i grew up going to dinner at my friend. Liza's house and they called god out an eye and we went to my friend young's house and they said buddha and i went to shari ours house and they said allah and my friend lauren and their parents printed jesus before dinner. And all these people to me to me were god. and then i moved to My parents who are here in the audience oregon. They're so wonderful and sweet and they're here I hope i can't see them though. Because that would really freak me out i love you. We moved to minnesota. We moved to minnesota and my my dad at that point was making really good money and we we move to a wealthy suburb of minneapolis. And my mom recalls the story. That when i came home from school the first day i said mom. We're all the people. I was gonna say minnesota's not what you just described and what i meant was why is everybody white and for the first time in my life for the first time in my life i felt what it was like to be to feel like an other to feel different and To fill in the margins even though for the first time in my life i actually looked like everyone and it was a it was a very strange feeling and the religious education at that church Minneapolis was all about social action and community service informing our faith and so i ended up working in a domestic violence shelter helping to take a young people that were coming in with their parents. Their mothers and i ended up working at an aids hospice and stayed there for about three or four years. Volunteering and I was the kid in high school at instead of having banned posters on my wall. I had martin luther king jr. gandhi the united nations mural and instead of going to my senior prom i decided to go to the united nations youth disarmament conference in canada and i ended up coming back in time for because a cute guy asked me but i actually did think that was more important. You know to the un us disarmament conference but So that's that was my my childhood as much as i should probably say and by the time i was leaving high school and going off for all the different adventures next chapter i would say that i was I believe that my faith and my spiritual path was about cultivating myself for good action. Okay well we'll come back to that Bela how do you think about the. Would you think about the religious spiritual background of your child headed. However you think about that. You grew up in new york. Yeah i was raised a harmless heathen.

minnesota maryland montgomery village washington evanston Montgomery village nashville illinois Liza chicago lauren minneapolis oregon united nations young Minneapolis martin luther king jr gandhi aids un