17 Burst results for "Bela Fleck"

"bela fleck" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on KQED Radio

"If you're just joining us, Our guest is banjo player Bela Fleck. He has a new album. It's first in 20 years in a bluegrass context. It's called my Bluegrass Heart. So, as we said earlier, your father left your family before. You even really knew him And you had no contact with them. But you said you did beat him again and your forties. Was it easy to track him down? I was on a duo tour with my teacher, Tony Triska, Banjo teacher and we were passing through Syracuse, and he mentioned that he was, you know, he was kind of sad. His father had passed away that year in Syracuse, and he said, Hey, what's the deal with your father? And and you know, and I started explaining it to him and said, Well, where does he live? And I think I said he's somewhere in the D C area, and he said, Well, we're going to the sea and we were on our way to play there the next day, and he said, Would you like to go try and find him and Tony actually stimulated me to do it? You know, I don't know if I would have had the nerve without him. But I said Yeah, and we found an address and we went to his place. He wasn't there. We asked the neighbors, he said, Oh, yeah, teaches over at the University of Maryland. So, uh, we drove to the university. We asked where he taught found a class. I looked in the window of the class. He was teaching. He was a professor. And there he was. I never seen him before, And it was it was a crazy day. All the students lined up at the end of the class to hand in papers and I got on the end of the line and walked up to him and said, I am Baylor. Wow. What was his real? What was his reaction? Oh, well, this is a surprise. He was very formal, Um And he said, Well, in the case of an acrimonious split, I thought it was best to not be in touch. But you appear to be all grown up now. And he agreed that we would meet. You know we would meet. Next time I came to town. He wanted a heads up. And that's what happened. So I got to know him a bit and spend some time with him and he came to some shows was he controlled at all about leaving or there was one point where he said, You know, I don't think I'm that good. A person or something like that. And I said, Look, you don't I don't You don't have to feel that way, you know. It wasn't like I was forgiving him. I just I wasn't really there for that, Um Just wanted to know. And you know, it's kind of like you want to know who Darth Vader is that he had too much power in my life because I didn't know who he was. And that sort of feeling those feelings were complicated, and I wanted to Make him into a real person, and that's why I wanted to go meet him. We didn't have to suddenly become pals. And you know, we had a friendly enough formerly friendly type relationship from then on. But it wasn't like he suddenly turned into my father. You had a You have a close relationship with your stepfather? Yeah. My stepfather, Joe Paladino. He was my real father and every in every real way except by our accept biological, but at least the mystery was solved. I knew who he was. He knew who I was, and there was some contact and it just took a lot of this sort of Inflammation out of the situation for me. When you looked through the window of that classroom did that give you a shock? We like like that's me and in 20 years or like I remember looking at him and seeing his ear and going, that's my ear. You know, I see that ear And then when I walked up on the line to see him, I looked at his hand and it was like that's my thumb. I'm used to looking at my thumb because I played the banjo with my farm. And there it was on another person, and it was more like it looked more like my thumb than my older brothers. From, for instance, For some reason, the those were the things I felt right at the moment. It was very charged moment as you can imagine, But, uh, you know what happened. Covid really put the brakes on the life of a touring musician, But I was just wondering if Covid made you sort of reevaluate your life and that sort of family work balance and If you just reconsidered how you want to be a musician. I'm after Covid or Yeah. I mean, I guess what I discovered during the covid time is that if I don't work on my music, and I don't have some time to be involved with the music, I get a little bit crazy. And it, um You know, there's a temptation to think that you could just put it away and just, you know, take that time and enjoy just being with your family and That is not a primary driver of who you are. But, you know, I discovered it actually is, And that if I don't have a certain amount of time playing the banjo or working on the music, um I just I just am not Very happy. So I was able to do that. You know, I was able to go downstairs and downstairs in my studio where I am right now. I had you know the whole all the rough tracks from my bluegrass heart to work on so I could go downstairs and play with You know, hang out with Billy Strings and Chris the early and Sam Bush and Jerry Douglas and all of these cats on the speakers, or I could go work on..

Joe Paladino Sam Bush Jerry Douglas Tony Triska Bela Fleck Tony Chris Syracuse Billy Strings Darth Vader Covid University of Maryland first covid one point 20 years next day forties D C Banjo
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"House door. I got the keys to the kingdom. Now stu king do again. No no crime jesus To the phone the keys to the inga. The wild can. I got the keys to the kingdom again. Threw me the keys thing down. I got to the kingdom while an arm of the key in boozer gary everywhere. Go attic he okay. Together keys sued king. Wild can do jeeze down while can do he. Pain downed can do minh hammer time. Everything's got gatica clean down. Can he while you know thank you..

stu king boozer gary jeeze
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So lame sweet. Okay your turn. i didn't bring any tissues. They left flick. What you've learned about what it means to be human that you couldn't possibly have guessed growing up in your favorite song. You like chocolate. All right come on. What was the question. What is the banjo. Teach you about life. Well you know i. I don't know where. I put my energy and i feel like everybody got a certain amount of energy in your life to devote to various things and i've been putting most of my energy into the banjo for most of my life. And actually what's interesting learning much about life right now from having a child. Abby and juno is a great teacher. And i'm what you call type a psychotic musician. I've lived that way up until now where i could. I could make music thing the most important thing in the world and and in a way that it's my job my job is to and i know it's not make believe that the banjo and what happens with the banjo is like the most important thing in the world. And that's why i'm that's what i do. That's my job. I the experience is like just like a great physicist has to believe that's the most important thing in the world to do the kind of work he wants to do but once you have a kid all of a sudden it's clearly not the most important thing in the world and so there's a lot of growing up comes with that because it's you know it's a different world so the challenge is now are how to keep the commitment that i made this guy while keeping the commitment that i made to this girl and the guy who is the little guy. Yeah so the holy. The holy badger emperor. Yeah so that's a challenge but you know we're figuring it out together and i'm finding that it's okay not to wake up and go know work on hard musical all day and to stop and spend all morning with the watching this little kid full of wonder at these things you know as best i can do well. It's great it's been a real joy and an honor to To dive into what you do and who you are. And i'm glad you're on the world and Thank you thank you for making yourself available for this and thank you all of you for coming. Now they're going to play some music for us again new. Hi guys. would you guys sing with us. Yeah all right. This is an old song that was recorded on a porch in merle's and let south carolina in the nineteen thirties. And i you know. Maybe we should try to learn it. I think you're gonna learn it really fast so just warm up your voices. Aw get the lipscomb. Come on life is so much more fun. When you do that i to the kingdom out can do the key. Can you do me. No the trump move on down down. You sound that trump to you hear from me. I got the key. Wild to the king down world can do me no harm john on. I'm a caddo gave from heaven. Oh i got the keys. Kingdom ki the king down can do you. Her yet spoke in they zimmerman. Jam came from an ellen down deputies in.

juno Abby merle south carolina john Kingdom zimmerman
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So i get to get to have it. I get to feel it. I get to be with her. But then it's okay to let go. Yeah we did it. And it's a container but also it. It touches other people also as the hope that actually was kind of an amazing demonstration of something that i was going to read to you. Bela this was somebody. This is from a blog called the rabbis pen. Have you ever heard this. My crack producer lily found this for me. Spiritual reflections on bailiff deflect tones by a rabbi. I didn't. I couldn't find the rabbis name. Music is a language away. All right we'll take it with a grain of salt. Music is a language a way of communicating vehicle for bringing greater peace tolerance and humor into our own hearts and into the world. Music is a spiritual discipline and a great teacher. Great musicians like bailiff lake and the flick tones are also great teachers. Think of yourself. Everything of yourself. As a teacher i dunno. I know there are people that have that. Learn from what i do. And it's exciting to see people that have taken What i what. I what i do and built on it just the way i built on earl scruggs and tony trish trashcans so many people that i learned from. But i don't formally teach very much and and in the past mostly. Because i was just so busy trying to do what i what i've been doing. You know and but i actually love teaching. I think actually that active teaching and that spiritual discipline was also send you know in that music you just you just shared. It's like it was an embodiment of this. This person also said At the rhyming auditorium. Bela fleck took a few moments to honor one of his teachers later. Scruggs there was a palpable sense of reverence and holiness throughout the auditorium. As many of us understood the great love that emerges when true teaching and learning have occurred. Well there's a lot you can do with instrumental music. And and sometimes we. We tend to sideline it and think of it as background music or support for vocals a lot of times. I can't tell you how many times i've been playing with somebody for an audience and the singer sings and then as soon as we go into the instrumental part people start talking and doesn't matter who it is going to be with some of the greatest musicians in the world. It's like a a go to. That's not the main thing but you know go to india. You might have a very different experience of spiritual experience listening to music. Doesn't have to india wherever you wherever you hear it or even people hearing the great german classical music or chopin can have a pretty ecstatic experience through the works of human beings. But i think the the great ones are trying to access this feeling when they play and and the pieces that i've come up with it. That have a strong mood or that kind of a component. I couldn't explain to you what i was going for. When i was trying to write them. I might have found a sound that that expressed a feeling or mood that I tried to write a piece around. And i couldn't explain what that mood is even but there but if someone who listened to it would know exactly what i was talking about we Joined to a close. And we're gonna hear a little more music from you. I advocate one of. I often will kind of circle around to this question of What you've learned through the life you've lived about what it means to human. And how how. Perhaps that has evolved since your your early days things that you know now are believe now that we're experience now. That would've surprised you. Then i felt i feel abigail at. You've been really are about your wisdom. In the commencement address you gave a colorado college and also this beautiful. Ted talk that gave and i love for you to reflect on that question. I would also love for you to tell that story that you told in the ted talk The little girl because it seemed to be kind of a moment that crystallized that for you how you how you think about this big question of why why you're here and why you live your life the way do. I was in china after the the big earthquake in two thousand eight. I hope i'm right about that. The years are fine by now. I have a baby and they will continue to and with a friend of mine. We were making. David liang the shanghai restoration project. We were making a a record with the kids And this actually happened before. We came back to make the record. I went there just to see what i could do. Because i had spent a lot of time in sichuan My great teacher who taught me my tremendous love for china old lady wong is from sichuan and so i felt like i really had to go back to citronen see what was going on with people there and how they were recovering. Eighty thousand people died are the estimates and it was a lot more than that and a lot of people affected so i went around and joined a for a couple of friends who are doing a quick relief project and they said why. Don't you just come a music for for the kids at these relocation schools. They had been taken away from their families at at home because many of their homes were destroyed and they had the parents had to stay there and rebuild them so the schools move to other places and the kids were struggling so much they were not only taken away from their homes but they had lost a lot of members and they were living in these Temporary trailers in place. They didn't know at all with just their teachers their their their fellow students come play for the kids. And maybe maybe it'll relieve their. You know their their minds for a moment and just thinks music. So i did and had so much fun with the kids and at the end of my performances. The kids would always come up to me and they'd they'd say you sang for us now. We want to sing for you. You know and so most of them. I would listen to like ninety pop songs. Chinese pops on bill would it and it was very cute and fun But this one girl came up to me and she said Long bad year which means big sister..

tony trish rhyming auditorium earl scruggs Bela Bela fleck Scruggs lily india David liang lady wong abigail china Ted ted colorado sichuan shanghai
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"The truth about your sexual orientation it really runs the gamut of does this is fun something. Also that intrigued me actually. Neither one of you has a really extensive professional training. I mean i mean this is you. You really came to this very late. Bela i mean you. Are the premier banjo player. Possibly in the world. And when you did this. I was reading when you did this when you did the the concerto you you had to. This is fascinating that you use the computer to help you translate between the difference between what you knew and how to do this kind of orchestral composition that you don't have real formal compositions on my head in high school there was there was nothing for the banja. They didn't have a place to put me and then when when after high school. I moved to boston. And i would've loved to gone to berkeley but they didn't have a place to put me there either so i just you know trying to figure out music that i loved you know one note at a time if i love charlie parker solo or culture solo. I just tried to figure out the first measure on the banjo. Describe build up my own understanding of the banjo so when trying to write a piece like that. It's not that i don't write music. I write banjo tablet. That's the way we communicate about how we play and the reason we used these this number system for for band communication because there's a lot of places to play the same note and those notes come fast so it's not enough to know that it's a d you need to know which it is and what not coming so it's better for me to see three and a seven and a five then then d. a. and c. and banjo players will know what position are totally day. Yeah so which means when it came time to. And then. When i play with people like the flat tones or my bluegrass fan sam bush jerry. Douglas and edgar meyer greek. Classical musician as well as everything else. I usually just bring a sketch. And i trust them to fill it all in great musicians. That are improvisers. We'll do that. You don't write out every note for them but when writing for an orchestra too. So how am i going to do that. Because i didn't have the skills to do that and so i did it with using that banjo. Help your computer program called sibelius where i could write the stuff in banja tablets and then copy and paste it onto a violence or french horn stave and it would turn into notation that they could read and then i hand that notation to copy of to clean it up and make it legible and that's sort of slowed me slow me down but i honestly i was going very fast and abigail. I have to say when i first experienced the two of you. I assume that you were somebody who'd grown up learning this and you are well. You're very much considered to be now. You're you're you're you play with bailiff luck and the two of you are in this this this this banjo playing duo and when you were pregnant you know some real some music reporters that now. They will give birth to the holy banjo emperor right. But but part of what you've been out there talking about and you delivered the commencement address or colorado college alma mater and you. You talked a lot about this this way. You were open to experience and you really discovered this thing that has become defining in fact you are defining. You know you're you're helping to define this kind of music now and culture but it was very unexpected. You didn't prepare for it all your life in a in a linear way. Well i a piece of my story that i don't really ever tell because it just adds another thirty seconds is the fact that When i left vermont on my road trip to go south before i was headed to china to become a lawyer i My first thought my very first stop was at the very center for buddhist studies and i spent five days meditating and it was the first time ever meditated my whole life and to this day. It's one of the hardest things i've ever done to sit. Still my body ached. I became afraid. I was hurting myself and then i felt the voices inside my head telling me about all the time i had hurt and i went into the darkest place and one day. I remember. I was sitting. There must have been three days in or something. And i went into this very deep place. Finally i wasn't really thinking a whole lot and i came out of it. Hours later and my entire shirt was covered with tears and burgers. I mean it was not pretty. And i i i. In that moment. I stood up an nobody was in the room. They had all left. And i know that. I had let go of something major I'm not even totally sure what it is to this day. But i know that. I didn't really feel like a victim anymore. When i left that place. I felt like i was clean and fresh and pure and i could make my decisions and that within days i was in louisville kentucky playing the phones on the banjo and was offered a record deal in nashville. Tennessee and i went to nashville. Instead of i came to nashville instead of going to china to go to law. School and i felt ready for that. I felt ready. Were you always a singer or did that come later too. I always loved. Singing inquire all through school. And i'd always try out for the solos. And i never got them so i really didn't fancy myself. Much of a singer. Didn't think i was going to be perceived as a cassisi. That's what i got out of getting ready to talk to you. Don't you don't really consider yourself to be a great musician no you don't you feel like this is something you came too late and this impostor language i mean. I don't think you do feel like an impostor because you you you throw yourself into it so joyfully but you don't think of yourself the way other people think of you as a musician right. No i don't and i but that is no harm or foul to how i feel about the muse. Yeah yeah and i feel like Just like most of my life. I hope that it's a service to people just goes back to my childhood. Yeah i do. Hope that i'm helping. I'm hoping that i'm continually through the music. Cultivating myself to have compassion and empathy into expressed that to people and talked to my mom today as we were walking around the lake trying to think of things from childhood and not. Forget too much. When i talk to you tonight and i was remembering. What a sensitive child i was. I was so Tuned in to everybody's feelings and it was a beautiful thing. Because i saw people's feelings before i saw them and now i consider it a great gift but at the time i didn't know how to manage it and so i felt darkness a lot because i immediately would recognize people feeling darkness and even in high school girl who had schizophrenia and talk to herself in the bathroom i would just be friendly with her because i could see. She was struggling and the counselor said that she said i heard the voices two. It was just really tuned into something there. And i saw that my mom comes to me honestly and my whole life. I've had to learn how to manage. That and a beautiful thing is that a song teaches me to manage that. Because i feel something so strong. Most songs i choose to sing unless there because his song becomes a container for the container for the empathy for the sensitivity. So i can feel something so strongly I been singing the song Come all you coal miners. That was written by an amazing woman named sarah ogan gunning and she was raised in a a coal camp and her child starved to death because they couldn't get milk for her baby and her husband died of black lung. And all of these things i i hear her story and i'm crying. I'm crying. i start to sing the song. Come all hugh hefner wherever you may be and listen to us to the next with the truth. I'll tell i am a coal miners. He i'm sure wish you will. Coal.

banja edgar meyer Bela sam bush charlie parker nashville berkeley colorado college abigail boston Douglas jerry china vermont louisville kentucky Tennessee schizophrenia sarah ogan hugh hefner
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"In the years ago and my grandma was a part of that and her ashes are spread her ashes. They're know really. It's a very important place for abbie's family. And i have to say you know. It's enviable out to think about this. Being part of your of your marriage your your friendship and relationship in a way that you can celebrate you know you can literally make music together. It's great i mean. We're constantly amazed by our our situation. Is we get to travel down the road with these very special people that that richard and and and bebop and My mom's mom and helen support team. That help us do these concerts and and make it all happen. You june goes to bed before the show usually and sleep in the bunk and it takes a lot of people to make all of that work. But it's really we'll get to go out and play music so sweet sweet situation. Probably the hardest thing to do is to find time to make new music because we wake up in the morning with juno on the bus and the first thing we wanna do is just go play with them and be with them and so we do that. We spend several hours together with do know until he falsely for his nap. Been we're wiped out and then we're tired. Yeah well. And i do have to say because i have been watching. The tv show nashville. Oh yeah i am mutare that this juggling music making music and and a relationship can be challenging. I don't know how does it factor and now juliette. Oh my yeah. I thought maybe i'd try to go visit deacon in the hospital..

abbie helen richard mutare nashville juliette deacon
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Like i like i very rarely play together and i. It's hard for us to think of any duos in historically that. Combine those two and the whole band. That's what they do. But we'd created tried to create a tapestry and we we we have two different techniques but we both ripple so when we get our rippling to line up together it just works and the registers is a great help to keep it from all sound the same but also having something that's not rippling on top of that is very completing. An abbey's voice sings out over the top of those sixteenth notes sixteenth notes. The way a banjo which doesn't have much to stain creates the impression of sustained by repeating notes hitting open strings keeping things ringing and you can really feel like there's a sustained in a soulful long note but there's nothing like having a long held note at the top of it and that's why fiddle and banjo works so great but vocals and banjo fantastic. But it's kind of unusual isn't it. It's not easy singing and banjo now. Because i think the way you guys do it now well. I think it's personal to us the way the way that we're doing it as a duo just a banjo duo with is unique. Okay but in old time music in particular. Which is the tradition. That i've been learning a lot from is actually in an all girl old time string band and there are so many women out there playing old-timey timey banjo. I mean you have to be in a certain strange limited colt people to actually enjoy. This trance-like repetitive music. However if you are in it you do know that there are a lot of women that sit and play. The banjo and seeing singleton's is starting to happen now and what i saw happening with. Abbey's music is you know when you think about a singer. Songwriter plays the piano. Billy plays the guitar james taylor. They write their songs built around the where the plane that instruments they open their mouth and utter sound right. But it's hard to think of people that write songs on the band playing the banjo weather composing their songs. And so i think that's when abby writes her own songs. I hear that contemporary that voice up today connected to the the tradition that she loves but in songs that are about her experience than that. Have a different tonality..

singleton james taylor Abbey Billy abby
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Of who was kind of an amazing demonstration of something that i was going to read to you. Bela this was somebody. This is from a blog called the rabbis pen. Have you ever heard this. My crack producer lily found this for me spiritual reflections on bela fleck and the flesh tones by a rabbi. I didn't i couldn't find the rabbis name Music is a language. All right. we'll take it with a grain of salt. Music is a language a way of communicating vehicle for bringing greater peace tolerance and humor into our own hearts and into the world. Music is a spiritual discipline and a great teacher. Great musicians like bela fleck and the flick. Tones are also great teachers. Think of yourself of yourself as a teacher. i don't know. I mean. I know there are people that have learned from what i do. And it's exciting to see people that have taken What i what. I what i do and built on it just the way i built on earl scruggs and tony trish ken so many great people that i learned from this person also said At the reimann auditorium. Bela fleck took a few moments to honor one of his teachers. The late earl scruggs there was a palpable sense of reverence and holiness throughout the auditorium. As many of us understood the great love that emerges when tru teaching and learning have occurred. Well there's a lot you can do with instrumental music and and Sometimes we t- we tend to sideline it and think of it as background music or support for vocals. Like a lotta times. I can't tell you how many times i've been playing with somebody For an audience and the singer sings and then as soon as we go into the instrumental part. People start talking and doesn't matter who it is could be with some of the greatest musicians in the world. It's like a a go to. That's not the main thing but you know go to india. You might have a very different experience of a spiritual experience. Listening to music. Doesn't have to be india wherever you wherever you hear it. Or even people hearing The great german classical music or chopin can have a pretty ecstatic experience through the works of of human beings and the pieces. That i've come up with it. That have strong mood or that. Kind of a component. I couldn't explain to you what i was going for when i was trying to ride them or i might have found a sound that that has expressed a feeling or mood that i tried to write a piece around and I couldn't explain what that mood is even but there but if but someone who listened to it would know exactly what i was talking about. We are joined to close. And we're going to hear a little more music from you i I often will kind of circle around to this question of What you've learned to the life you've lived about what it means to be human. And and how how perhaps that has evolved. Since you know your early days things that you know now are believe now that experience now that would have surprise you then. I was in china after the the big earthquake in two thousand eight. I hope i'm right about that. The years are fine by another. I have a baby and they will continue to and with a friend of mine. We were making delaying the shanghai restoration project. We were making a record with the kids And this actually happened before. We came back to make a record. I went there just to see what i could do. Because i had spent a lotta time in sichuan My great teacher who taught me my tremendous love for china old lady wong is from sichuan and said you know. Why don't you just come place. A music for for the kids at these relocation schools and the kids were struggling so much. I mean they were not only taken away from their homes but they had lost a lot of family members and they were living in these Temporary trailers in a place. They didn't know at all with just their teachers their their fellow students and at the end of the my performances the kids would always come up to me and they'd they'd say you sang for us. Now we want to sing for you. you know. And so most of them. I would listen to like ninety pop songs chinese pops up. You alien debut would it. And it was very cute and fun but this one girl came up to me and she said one bad year which means big sister. Wong washburn is long. Geelong dodgier was young. Gainey chung iguchi. Should mama gerald good. Big sister wong. I wanna sing you a song that my mother taught me and my mother died in the earthquake and so she sat down on my lap and she started singing to me and tears started coming down my face and she started to cry too. I had this moment. Where i just saw this light shining from her and from me i felt so very connected to her and to everyone and i just knew that i wanted to live and i do want to live in that light as much as possible with her and with you and with everyone and that's how i try to live. My life.

Bela fleck earl scruggs tony trish ken reimann auditorium Bela lily india lady wong china sichuan shanghai Wong washburn Geelong dodgier Gainey chung iguchi gerald good wong earthquake
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"That's kind of a century them where my mind went. Yeah let's let's and we got to do these state department tours. Us is usa which basically they call them propaganda tours but we got to go to india and bangladesh. We got to go to a lot of amazing places and at a certain point. I realized that we had like an ambassador status so I started cabling ahead and saying find me musicians. I want to get there. I wanna jam with somebody and and started They people would show up. We get to a country and get to play with these these people and we'd start out like what is what is this like abbie. What is why. Why am i here. Why do i have to do this when we start to play and the whole room would change. it was like almost the color changed from this dark to technicolor. You know like the wizard of oz you know when you landed is and so it was such an exciting thing that was part of what made me feel competent. That going to africa could be that way because it had that experience over over and over again and when the flood tones got the opportunity to do a trip like that to the pacific rim. We made it a point that every country went to somebody from the local culture would come on stage and perform with us and it broke the ice like like nothing. It felt so great to do but that was favorite part of the show obviously for the locals because we were celebrating their culture and we taken the time to learn something their music which was really Great thing we both came to the separately and it's one of the and then we found each other that That aspiration that very kind of american ambition you had to go to law school and make policy change the world. This is a whole other way in to the same thing at a different at a human level they let you have said and i do again believe you really said this that the first time you heard abigail music. You're listening in the car and you've got stopped for speeding. it was out out franklin. There was just so caught up and she gave me in fact i. It's not really the first time. It's been slightly sanitized story. But what the first time i heard her. It was at a party and she was playing these very very sad slow songs with a bunch of girls gathered around her and i was going. This is just not for me. You know it was really. It was really slow and it was beautiful. But i was like okay. She's good you know. But but then she gave me this. This cd at this party. And i started listening to it. And i had a completely different experience because the banjo is upfront. There was this group to it and she was singing like you just heard her with this. Ancient sound very connected to traditional music. And i just started driving faster and faster. Wow i really like this. I was even talking to myself. And then i got pulled over and had to walk the line. Well i'm going to do my radio thing now. I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with musicians. Bela fleck abigail washburne in a public conversation at belcourt theatre in nashville tennessee him. It seems to me. Bela that your story is also about kind of not as much as it's about traveling through places it's about traveling through genres kind of i dunno as old star trek lever. Taking the banjo or no banjo has gone before.

abbie bangladesh usa pacific rim india africa abigail franklin krista tippett Bela fleck abigail washburne belcourt theatre Bela nashville tennessee
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"We cut that out this one. Maybe i'll decide later. And he showed up and he saw me in this wonderful band of musicians from america and He just didn't look happy at all. he he looked at me said john. Goran her warren boone. Et t. hoods will americans and chinese cannot simply cannot play music together. Two different and i looked at him. And i was like. Oh okay Would you just play for us then. funding gay woman teeny sherry. Go an eat me. She wandered drago gershon and he pulled out his our who started playing this breathtakingly gorgeous melody from tibet. Actually and And the band as we were listening we just started to tune up our instruments to match his tuning in. We started playing along with him. And you can see this. It was barely there but you could see just corner of his mouth kinda turn up ever so slightly and that night. We performed that song that we created in that moment for fourteen hundred people in a theater in that town and at the end of the show he came up to me and and he so was Didn't want sean. We'll fauchet ally tonight. Discovered something butcher magwar aunt who doran boyhood so. It's not that americans in chinese can't play music together. Seen hushing hoods. It's just that music is actually the communication of hearts and that to me became whole. But that's not you get it. Ironically distant best interest and i have had parallel experiences back when i was in new grass revival in the eighties nine hundred eighty s. And.

warren boone drago gershon Goran tibet butcher magwar america doran boyhood john sean
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Weight. It's not haven't you. Have you also been over there kind of not just taking this music. But also collecting their music and doing senator silk road trip. Yeah i've done a number of on almost every trip i've done. I've tried to collaborate with somebody locally. No matter where i end up and and just ask somebody sound guy or whatever or you know really if you're doing a proper tour you're being handled by the cultural bureau the central Ministry of culture. And so i would call call ahead or ask someone in our party to call ahead and see if we could collaborate somebody really great in each town and plays some kind of folk music at that led to that has led to meeting the most incredible wonderful local musicians all over china. So i feel like. I have gotten to jam and play with wieger tibetans. Mongolians i people hun wonderful hon Folk music players from all over china and one really memorable experience that was of Being in a in a city and calling ahead and asking for someone to common this old man showed up backstage and he had an are who case in our who is a little too to stringed-instrument actually but the ball goes in between both of the strength. And it sounds. Snakeskin covered snakeskin cut joe really violent tiny tiny head and sits on your knee and you play it sounds like human voice almost sounds like a human voice to dying cat to others. It really depends i have. Can.

central Ministry of culture wieger china joe
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And she won. She wants but she was the only contestant in her age group but she finished she had a wonderful sense of humor as she was getting very old and and not remembering things and she'd get in the grandma loop where they say the same thing again and again you know did i order the omelette. I want the omelette. Grandma you've ordered four times You know she would laugh at herself. She laughed at herself until the moment she died. And we We love her so much. And so when. Juno was born which was just about a year and a half or two after she died. It was actually bela's mother who thought of the idea of great. If you're gonna write name yeah well and so think to this idea of reality and the truth in this music There's a story you told the first track on your new album. Which is your first or your first album together Is i've been working on the railroad. Would you sing in a minor key. But i love this. This story that you've told about how maybe this isn't true either. Correct me if i heard this on the internet or publicists rights alone so so that so you maybe you were traveling. Abigail your home. It's you know. And do know his banging on the table. Yeah and you got really about that which you know. This is a life lesson for other parents. Were not musicians because you thought. He's learning rhythm soon and banging in time. It was consistent time. Are you sure it's a fair question. But i mean what. I remember to somebody when i was learning to cross country. Ski in minnesota. Somebody taught me how to keep my pace by singing. I've been working on the railroad and the thing. I think a lot of people might think. Oh bluegrass music or folk. Music is not my music is not my taste and yet some of this music is like woven into our lives in ways that we don't ever don't even reflect on. Yeah i i. I don't think we'll let me put it this way. Some bluegrass music might not be your taste but some other bluegrass music might be. And if you just let the name bluegrass repel you because you just heard some bluegrass. You didn't like you'll miss out on a bunch of great music. And i think whenever we decide we don't like kinda music We're the one that loses because there's always something in every field. That's beautiful that that you would like. Yeah yeah and i it was just. It was kind of revelatory. Firming it to think about this when i was getting ready to talk to the two of you. This is not folk music. But the first thing i thought it was when we were learning baby. Cpr they taught us to sing staying alive. Actually stanley standard really does.

bela Juno Abigail minnesota
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I can stop buying a hereafter of your banjo with you. I i sense that. Your mother must've Musically if not spiritually with music also is so fascinating. She named after not one but three central european complete. Actually that was my father. Who i didn't know and he named leave me. I got the better names than my older brother. I won't go. What are your three. Name's bela bela anton. Leo's flick. i mean if it was a boy he would name them. If it was a girl she would name. The girl i ended up being two boys bartlett after bartok janacek list janacek and anton burn so some some pretty out there stuff. Yeah but not banjo. Music differ out there in different. What could be could be what you've done. Yeah you've done that. And but i mean the banjo also wasn't your first instrument. You played french horn man. Not yeah what happened. Was everything read on the internet. I i was I took a test for this. The school uptown called. I guess it's the fame school this is in new york city called music and art. There's actually several schools that fame the fame television show and movie based on a music and art art and design and i think there was a third one but anyway i tried out for it and which i took a musical aptitude test and i played guitar at that. Time played some folk songs. I had a killing version of. Here comes the sun which place on occasion on guitar and i got into the school playing that and and i think i was rated number. I guess number two number three possible to with four being the most talented because we found all this stuff out you know we found out what your rating and that is pretty weird. I think they should've told anybody that. But anyway. When i got in the school there was no guitar teaching anything like that. And so they said we'll put you on a real instrument and we need a french horn really badly so they put me in a room and i tried to play french horn for a season and never got the i. I could never even get the f. Which is the. I know you play on a on a french word. I can never even make the first node until finally they said you know. We don't have very many boys in the chorus. And i was moved into the chorus where i just screamed all the way through high school. Meanwhile i was learning to play the banjo. The and you discovered evancho your captivated by early. Yeah earl scruggs the beverly hillbillies theme which actually people talk about. Come to god moment and for most banjo players of note in the bluegrass world. Hero scruggs is that moment and it. There's before and after so talk. Tell us about that. What is that. What is it that happens in that moment though awesome it was i remember. It was like lightbulb lights. Going off in my every note was like a light going off in my brain and was this was way before i got my span. This is before. I played guitar. I never had the ego. At that time to believe that that i could actually play the banjo when i finally found out what it was but it was just an amazing sound and i now i try to explain it as being a high tech yet primitive sound because it's not just like a computer can play fast but you don't get excited but there's something so earthy deep especially the about the way. Earl scruggs played Which which turned people into believers. What did you say a minute ago. He said something about real said this before that people talk about the banjo is though it's not a real instrument which then i guess gets at the question of how we define real right and i think both i think you're both really eloquent or i think it's fascinating that Neither one of your both actually came from the north. Neither one of you grew up surrounded by banjo. Bluegrass yeah you became believers as you said so. Talk about talk about that a bit. The reality like what what is real. What is bad music captured. You that just takes you away. Well my come to god. Moment in the folk music world was hearing an lp of doc watson singing and playing shady grove. Yeah this is where you want me to bust into the i do. I was hoping you shady grow ma shady grow. I don't love. I'm going back to when i heard that sound.

bela bela anton bartok janacek janacek anton burn Earl scruggs bartlett Hero scruggs Leo new york city doc watson
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And a lot of the things in religion. You know you can find in music to some hoping that that's going to work out for me done fine if there's a hereafter your banjo with you i I sense that. Your mother must've communed musically. If not spiritually with music also she is so fascinating. She named after not one but three central european composer. Actually that was my father who i didn't know and he named and and leave me. I got the better names than my older brother. I won't go. What are your three. Name's bela bela anti leo's flick. Really after bartok. Janacek and anton burn so some some pretty out there stuff but not banjo music. I mean differ out there and could be. What could be could be what you've done. Yeah you've done that and you discovered the banjo. Your captivated by earl earl scruggs the beverly hillbillies theme which actually people talk about. Come to god moment and for most banjo players of note in the bluegrass world. Here narrow scruggs is that moment and it. There's before and after so talk. Tell us about that. What is that. What is it that happens. In that moment i remember. It was like lightbulb lights. Going off in my every note was like a light going off in my brain and it was just an amazing sound. And now i try to explain it as being a high tech yet. Primitive sound like a computer can play fast. But you don't get excited you know but there's something so earthy and deep especially the earl scruggs played which which turned people into believers says about real. I mean you've said this before that people talk about the banjo as though it's not a real instrument which then i guess gets at the question of how we define real right. Also i think it's fascinating that Neither one of you. You're both actually came from the north. Neither one of you like grew up surrounded by banjo and bluegrass. So talk about that a bit. The reality like what what is real What is bad music captured you. That just takes you away. Well my come to god moment in the the folk music world was hearing an l. p. of doc watson singing and playing shady grove. Where you want me to bust into sidhu shady grow ma Shady grove grow the love. Own back to harlan. When i heard that sound.

bela bela Janacek anton burn earl earl scruggs bartok scruggs leo earl scruggs banjo doc watson harlan
"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Abigail i know. You have a habit of bursting out into song spontaneous. Encourage you to do that tonight. Did you can dance anything that if you want to grab your banjo okay you know. We're we're i always start my conversation whether i'm talking to a physicist or banjo players they'd like a little bit about whether there is a religious or spiritual background your childhood and advocate. I'd like to start with you. You grow up in a few places chicago washington minnesota a little bit. I forgot that you were going to study than i. Oh my yeah. Well my grandmother who was in evanston illinois. Most of her life raised my mother. There unitarian universalist and i was raised from three to eleven years old in montgomery village maryland and the religious education. In that you you church. We actually went to everybody else's church. We learned about what it was like to go to temple or synagogue or mosque all kinds of different churches. And i was the kid in high school at instead of having band posters on my wall i had martin luther king jr. gandhi the united nations mural and instead of going to my senior prom. I decided to go to the united nations youth disarmament conference in canada. And i ended up coming back in time for prompt. Because a cute guy asked me but I actually did think that was more important. You know go to the un youth disarmament conference but So that's that was my my childhood as much as i should probably say and by the time i was leaving high school and going off for all the different adventures next chapter i i would say that i was I believe that my faith and my spiritual path was about cultivating myself for good action bela how do you think about the well. Would you think about the religious or spiritual background of your child. How do you think about that. Now you grew up in new york. I was raised a harmless heathen.

Abigail montgomery village evanston united nations minnesota martin luther king jr chicago illinois washington maryland gandhi un canada bela new york
"bela fleck" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Bela Fleck among many others for NPR news I'm Stina Sieg in Grand Junction Colorado severe storms blew through parts of the south and Midwest on Thursday homes and businesses were damaged in Arkansas and in Indiana where one woman was slightly injured the National Weather Service warns there is a continuing threat of severe weather today the bad weather will stretch into the mid Atlantic region where wind gusts could reach up to fifty miles an hour I'm korva Coleman NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include whole foods market who is committed to helping make meal planning easier by offering meal guidelines and recipes on its website learn more at whole foods dot com and Americans for the arts good morning you're waking up to Friday April tenth it looks like the weather's going to change we can have a gradual warming trend it'll begin today through the weekend as high pressure slowly builds over the region and the upper low continues to push farther inland more seasonable temperatures and drier conditions will persist into at least early next week what does that mean well today will start off mostly cloudy then becoming mostly sunny highs near sixty then tonight partly cloudy with overnight lows dropping in the lower fifties and then for Saturday and Sunday we'll have some sunshine by afternoon with highs getting into the mid sixties for the Sacramento area sunny and warmer with highs in the mid seventies currently around the bay area open checks in with fifty six Santa Rosa fifty one Palo alto has fifteen fifty five in Fremont it's fifties for San Jose it's fifty six Nevada checks in with fifty Livermore fifty one redwood city fifty two and here in San Francisco it's fifty one degrees at KQED public radio good morning I'm Lori Sanders thank you for joining us and now morning edition from KQED public radio it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Noel king and David Greene when patients with the corona virus disease die they often die alone there's no one there to hold their hand or to tell them in person how much they'll be missed the trees many hospitals have restricted family visits the risk of infection is just too high and so for many families the only connection they have to a loved one in their final moments is to a hospital chaplain as New York City experiences a staggering loss of life this week will be the voice of one of those chaplains his name is rocky Walker right now I am at the nurses station here at Mount Sinai hospital this is a I see you and I from where I'm sitting I can see about eight rooms the doors are shut of course on each of the rooms the doors have windows so you can look into the windows this windows of patient rooms are where Walker does his work these days he'll stand there on the phone or video chat with a family member describing what he's seeing in the room sometimes he'll show with the family by taking video he says by this stage.

Bela Fleck Stina Sieg Grand Junction Colorado NPR
"bela fleck" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"bela fleck" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Know you know what now the dental yeah yeah it'll actually found out that James Gordon isn't driving his car during car karaoke yeah they'll find out that he doesn't actually needed told to take him to work every day right right so it's on a like a flatbed truck and they're just riding around with a camera like a fix to the dealer that's what they do with I know it funny because people on the internet where you stock really realistic yeah we're like do you know how Hollywood works for them or not driving cars now ours fans take those movies TV shows they never drive you're either a set that's in a chair holding history with Dave Matthews announcing the band is going to have a tour this summer begins on June sixteenth a couple of nights in Mohegan sun in Connecticut and then goes all the way through the end of September ending up down in south haven Mississippi Mavis staples Bela Fleck the Flecktones Allen stone Robert Randolph and the family band and jumps to find this is a really weird for Dave yeah Dave Matthews is a very young following which is kind of odd because like even when I was in college I liked him so everyone is in college goes to see Dave Matthews and then to have all these like really older artists opening I'm not sure it's going to work so who is testifying dumpster funk I've been on the front of the Neville brothers that's his banner realities yeah right well not a fan of the laptop to rich McFadden he's a big and who they really yeah they played jazz fest New Orleans every Dave Matthews Band committing to help plant one million trees as an effort to go along with all the things they're doing this summer so that's the update twenty eight after the hour here in the Dave Matthews Band hi I'm Warren Eckstein with the pet show to put the day exercise for senior dogs and your dog hated to senior years he may not be able to run as fast jump as high I have the stamina.

James Gordon Hollywood Dave Matthews Connecticut Bela Fleck Robert Randolph McFadden New Orleans Warren Eckstein Mississippi Neville