10 Burst results for "Beirut Leyla"

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

08:12 min | Last month

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"A report there for my correspondent in Beirut Leyla Milana Allan thank you. Now normally in these sorts of situations, governments would step in and take control of the process but one of the things that's been troubling Beirut for many years as the question of who gets to decide what is best for city developments. Lack of oversight has also seen historic pieces of architecture lost to private development and citizens left well down the list of concerns. A Mirror L. sold is a cultural heritage, an urban planning consultant based in Beirut, and she joins me now a mirror. You've got plenty of experience with how public private partnerships can work for the common. Good. So, how big of a concern is that Beirutis after entrust so much of their recovery effort to private developers it's a huge concern. It's a huge concern I did work for city there for seventeen years and dealt with a lot of the criticism of having a private real estate company take on the role of public good and as an urban planner who headed the urban planning department. It was not a very easy position from which to really advocate for public spaces in public pedestrian areas, etcetera, and obviously the city over time while they're back in the day was incredibly controversial. It had restored one third of the buildings that were destroyed in the downtown whereas outside of the downtown out of the two thousand buildings that were deemed heritage buildings over the past thirty years of postwar reconstruction. Only one hundred, twenty buildings remain, and that's because of private developers. So in fact, one might say that most of the destruction to the city's architectural heritage has come at the hands of developers. And money. Our biggest problem is corruption and our biggest problem is money and may be in a moment where Lebanon has been suffering from financial crisis since October. Maybe that's a moment where you think that fast money isn't going to kick in as fast so than people can't really buy up the but already from the beginning almost three weeks into the aftermath of the bomb developers were snooping around trying to. See what they could get their hands on from the old sites because their prime real estate I mean Beirut is a city whose five thousand years of history has told us that everything rebuilds on itself. So even the developers the ready to just wipe out the rubble and builds on top of it and with lack of governance that means there is no master plan that means the municipality is absent that. Means there's zero protection for the owners of these buildings who now have lost the one asset that they probably had. They don't have much financial means to recover, and we're in a very precarious moment where not only do you have to deal with kind of the basics of shelter food and sustenance. But also, what is the long-term vision for the city and these neighborhoods? Will they ever be the same again? An interesting point rising I'd like your take on this. I guess for listeners who don't know the city these areas Jamais. Easy Mama Cho. They have automob- buildings. They have pieces of modernism and I of the buildings that was damaged was the Electricity Dula Bom building, which is a bit of an icon in the city. So we talked about all sorts of architecture being a threat and was threat anyway the buildings that hasn't been touched since of war but interwoven in between then his older communities, the people as you say, who lived there who worked. From printing presses and carriages and all sorts of things. As an urban est when you begin to think even where to start the process of putting back in a community and wall to protect what would be your advice to the people involved in where would you begin the process? Well, actually, I have to hear really give salute to the Beirut's heritage initiative, which has become a coalition of various professionals who I've worked with over the years and who have done amazing work. It also includes the Arab Center for architecture that we founded, which works really on preserving modernist heritage buildings such as that looks. Really bomb, which is a very important building trust as part of the modernist architecture story of Beirut's you know I think today many of the buildings Yes are from nineteen thirties to nine, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy s, and these are the heritage buildings that have been destroyed and there are proper restores and people who have owned these buildings and worked on them, and so there are old plans. There is no. How in Lebanon there's an amazing team of people that are really trying to. How to get UNESCO involved and really not have to deal with government authorities in saving some of these heritage buildings I think today it said necessity especially given that we've got winter coming and really with most of the red tiled roofs of the ultimate buildings having been destroyed you've got rain coming in and really just chipping away at the rest of what's left. So the task at hand is really enormous because there's also no fending people have been volunteering and there's no way of sustaining also getting all the suppliers in the material but the will is there. So the serving has already taken place there's an identification of almost six hundred heritage buildings destroyed. There's about Forty in sort of precarious position that are already having scaffolding and here I really salute the architects who've been doing restoration work for so many years in Beirut's at stepping in at really not waiting for any governance structures because we know we can't count on them, and so that's really been an inspiring moment i. think the question is, how do you keep this and sustainable way? So how are you able to restore preserve these buildings and protect the ownership of lands because people are going to need money and they're going to need a way to support their lives and today I'm not sure those people have the means to do that while also restoring their buildings. Also, joined today's episode by Mona for was a professor of urban studies and planning at the American. University of route. Mona. If baby is going to have any hope of retaining citizens and rebuilding yet again, it surely has to develop an optimism for its citizens future there. Now, you understand more the many the impediments that hamper hopes of retaining its residents. We so much displacement hitting route all at once we'll rebuild effort even be possible I think it's possible only if we can consolidate hands for these residents right now everyone is saying, yes, we need a people centered recovery the idea being that it's important that people come back. However when you look in practice, no one really knows what it means to me to understand what's a people centered recovery means you have to be on the ground talking to residents and understanding what is the impediment for you to return recognizing clearly that people is a diverse. Class gendered sectarian national divisions that exist between people and that they will have different needs depending on their location in these social hierarchies just quickly two examples because of the breakdown of the Lebanese current because, of course, the blast came after months of DEMOC. Basically, a lot of landlords were asking their talents to pay the rent and daughters and so shooter young woman or man or couple who had moved to modern Cayenne, which was the happening neighborhood. Last summer you were basically struggling for that. UH, last year to be able to rent and your landlord was. Asking you to pay more to pay in dollars.

Beirut Mona Leyla Milana Allan Electricity Dula Bom consultant UNESCO Lebanon Beirutis Cayenne DEMOC professor
"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:22 min | Last month

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Which were. Apparent have been celebrated that sorta come on the globalist life from London right here on monocle twenty four. I. Look at what else is happening in the news today the US president has publicly defended a teenager accused of killing two people during street clashes in Wisconsin several Saudi officials including two members of the Royal Family have been sacked by the king and in an echo of John F Kennedy's famous declaration of. Solidarity. With the people of Berlin, the head of the Czech Senate has announced himself Taiwanese in. A speech to the island's parliament stay tuned to monocle twenty four throughout the day for more on these stories. But first Lebanon's ambassador to Germany. Mustapha ADEA has been named as the country's next prime minister and has just been handed one of the toughest briefs in the political world. He must repair Beirut shattered by the explosion at the city's port. Last month, he must repair the country's economy already in the. And, he must also repair and rebuild his government's reputation with years and years of corruption bringing the country to its knees. So where does he start to tell us more? I'm joined by Layla Milan Allen. WHO's a journalist and monocle twenty, four contributor in Beirut Leyla. Good to have you back on the program just begin by telling us who is Mustafa Habib So. The is quite similar in many ways and the former prime minister, and this indeed was marked by many people. As soon as he was announced as the prime minister designate of course, even their last names anagrams reach the he's also an academic and he's been the Lebanese Ambassador to Germany for the. So he hasn't even been in the country wile everything that has. Transformed, Lebanon, in many ways in the last year has been going on, but he does have some political experience. He was previously an advisor to a full minister of public works was then Prime Minister Najib, Artie and so on. The one hand that gives them political experience because he was a director of his cabinet during a his time as prime minister on the. Other hand of course, that makes many people feel that he is part of the existing political establishment because he has those links now as as an academic and he does have experienced both working electoral nor form studying that which many people are calling for in the country complete change. The way people are elected and he's also worked on the imposition of social security of. Public Security and that liaison Republican Administration and the government. So theoretically, he has a strong understanding of how government institutions in Lebanon works. He should have quite a good grounding particularly with all the issues being raised around those things at the moment. But as I say many concerned that he's a bit of a damp squib and essentially has been chosen because he's quite inoffensive. So. This goes entirely against what so many of those protested who took to the streets of Beirut wanted insofar as it looks like the administration is just continuing with the same. It does and here's the problem. So most was chosen fall faster than Hasaan Andrea was chosen in the wake of Sag Hariri's resignation at the end of last year after a couple of weeks of protests in October, and then it took two months to select has undeb. There were a couple of failed attempts because, of course, the way the Lebanese system works is that the prime minister must be a Sunni Muslim and lost I'm finally when. They're able to agree on House I'm the was actually pushed through by the part of the parliament is controlled by this Powell block of Hezbollah. The Shiite lines is on the PM the party present. Michelle on this very strong power bloc alliance and he wasn't supported by the Sunni power blocks. So actually even from when he began, he had a very weak mandate and that's because they struggle to find somebody who they agreed on now. Devotes very different. It was extremely clear. The reason that he's been sent through. So thought he's been chosen say fast is because of this this pressure from international leaders, of course, in my call in particular to get moving quickly and there was a deal reached between. Hezbollah Amal, FPM alliance, and the eighty side the Sunni power bloc alliance that they would all support this character and are they say knowledge because he is known objectionable he's not going to get in the way of anybody's entrenched power and he doesn't really seem to have his own agenda. Everyone says, large is a very nice man. He's always been polite and mild mannered, but he's essentially had a career of not speaking out and not taking anything on too much. Now, of course as I said already. People saying that he's thought to associated with the old political power blocks, and that's the fundamental issue here when a government resigns in Lebanon that does not prompt the new election because the only time the Lebanese people vote is for their parliament. So the president is nominated by that parliament. The Prime Minister is nominated by that parliament through the system of all the different sectarian Powell blocks having negotiations and then voting to find somebody they can on three quarters of the parliamentary blocs did vote for Mister Adid. On this occasion. But as I say still selected by that parliament that firstly was voted for in the spring of two thousand and eighteen. Well before any of these changes this year, the economic crisis, the protest movement of the Code Nineteen lockdown, and now this horrific explosion that has transformed. Modern Lebanon as it is, and equally, they also come from this voting system and from this political clause which people believe these people on the street believe is completely legitimate and the numbers of those people have both grown and grown in the fury since explosion, which, of course, many victims and their families believe the government was responsible for because we know that both the president who is still in place and the foam premise the avenue at least a week before about this ammonium nitrate sitting at the court. So given all those circumstances, the Beirut's. Still having to deal with this devastating devastating explosion, we have tremendous economic problems and we also have this corruption where does Moustapha Begin. Where does he begin? He said it his speech yesterday he said now is not the time for promises and words. It's time for action moving forward and he actually asked the journalists assembled to pray for the success of this government, and that really is the case now but the problem is as I say I got form his cabinet but but where do they begin because there are so many entrenched issues and essentially it's impossible in many ways for them to try and move. Forward while stuck in this current political system. Of course, we saw these negotiations going on with the IMF for the last few months, which eventually stalled because the government in Lebanon wouldn't even signed a way to agree on the Psalm of the actual deficit of the national debt What they needed to move Louis kept doing was asking for more money but refusing to even engage in the initial steps of reform. The IMFN international leaders according for they want they want stereotype reforms. They want a huge cutback in public sector salaries because of course, the bloated public sector here is one of the ways in which the entrenchment clauses maintain the votes, the people who vote for them by handing out those jobs they won't change us to corruption because every single element of Lebanon that is public works with infrastructure and so on. Including the porch, which exploded is dominated by these different sectarian blocks nominate the people they want these roles and then take money for them just for. Example in the port, the way works is that each of the positions much like the parliament is reserved somebody from a different sectarian were different political sect, religious sects, and that of course there no nominated by those in power, and then they take kickbacks in order to allow goods to be sold in in order to not charge the correct import taxes that bleeds revenues. The state desperately needs to fund limited infrastructure their estimates that up to two billion dollars a year in lost just from. Beirut port that's just one example of the way that the endemic corruption is country is destroying the lives of people because then you see things like the roads falling apart as Roma's flooding every time it rains. So these a really deep entrenched issues quite aside through all the divisions that have come out and all reinforced by this Terry political system. Then you have the economic crisis in free fall and as I say that asking for international money but without pushing in these austerity reforms, there's going. To be no way to reform the economy but those will start forms are incredibly unpopular, and once again, the reason the government doesn't want to impose them is because the people who vote for them will be angry at a time when they're struggling much financially to have even more territory imposed on them. But unless they do that are less willing to accept that the Lira has lost so much value naturally floated publicly allow it to stabilize somewhere. There are currently five different exchange rates that also. Means that they were able to stabilize the economy, and of course, this bloated banking system which many people feel responsible economic crisis that's been in cahoots with the political political classes for years giving them high interest rates try and funneled dollars into the country that's now collapsed to that house of cards fell apart, which is another reason why the economy is falling apart many people.

prime minister Lebanon Beirut president Germany Prime Minister Najib Powell Beirut Leyla Czech Senate US Wisconsin London John F Kennedy Berlin Mustapha ADEA Layla Milan Allen Mustafa Habib Michelle Hezbollah Amal
"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:55 min | 2 months ago

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Is more than. Fifteen . years since Lebanon's Prime Minister Rafic, , Hariri was killed in a massive car bomb along with twenty one others. . Later today an international caught near The Hague will hand down verdicts in the trial of four people accused of planning and carrying out the attack the four accused of of the Iran backed militia and political party. . Hasballah. . Hezbollah itself is not formally accused. . Well, , let's hear from the journalist and multiple twenty four regular contributor in Beirut Leyla Milana Allen Lali you're standing outside the very hotel in front of which Rafic Hariri was killed. . What sense is in Beirut today that the justice will be done. . There is very little sense. . <hes> the families, , all of the twenty one people other than because eighty who were killed as well as the nearly three hundred injured have waited as you say, , over fifteen years justice taking a very long time <hes> this commission to come through with this, , and the problems are a few of course many people here feel that the responsibility lies with <hes> the Syrian regime and through has through then has one. . and. . The five men on trial here all labeled as Hezbollah supporters because they found it very difficult to actually find evidence to show that they his bumbling members because, , of course. . Is So secretive I'm one of the biggest problems is that must have budgeted dean who was the main sort of ringleader <hes> debt these indictments who was accused of having set. The . whole thing was known very well as the military imam to Hezbollah was killed in two thousand sixteen <hes> an attack on Damascus APP while his was helping Bashar Assad's regime with the wool there. . So he was the one person who is very easy to link to Hezbollah and the only evidence they have all circumstantial evidence from these mobile phone networks. . So as we expected, , the indictment will come through the verdict will. . Saying that before remaining men <hes> all guilty lane attempts about those who are accused of the murder of the prime minister. . said a five men who stand accused have all been labeled Hezbollah supporters and that's because it's incredibly difficult to prove that they were in fact, , Hezbollah members everyone in Lebanon believes that <hes> that. . The majority of people believe that Kennedy was assassinated at because he was starting to pull away from <hes> supporting the Syrian regime who'd had troops stationed in Lebanon nearly thirty years <hes> all the way through the civil war and afterwards, , and of course, , we now know that Hezbollah very heavily H. Two zero. . But this was all just sort of starting not link between Syria and Iran and Hezbollah but the main man was accused of being the ringleader. . Organized the whole nation is most of that that the WHO <hes> was very well known as the head of the military wing of Hezbollah but he was killed in two, , thousand sixteen and attacks Damascus Apple, , which means he's no longer in the indictments and he was the only person. . It was very easy to direct the link because there was evidence that he walls a top commander in. . Bola. . So I, , the that means that it's very unlikely has itself will be named in the verdict today it will simply be. . These men and then these men haven't been found <hes> the Lebanese government has been able to find. . Her Bella is a big portion Lebanese government and the chief of Hezbollah nationalize long maintained that he absolutely does not see any of independence in this inquiry he says that it's funded by Israel <hes> and he says that there is no way that they will ever hand over these suspects <hes> old they will ever be found and historic has very good at hiding <hes> its top guys who've been involved in operations in. . Lebanon in Syria and even Iran many think that these four worship over to Iran. . So even if that comes through in the verdict is guilty as we expect, , there's not really going to be any justice indeed has on Rolla said that Hezbollah isn't worried or isn't remotely concerned with today's verdicts but what will the repercussions be? ? The repercussions are unlikely to be much at this point, , and that's for a few reasons I, , Ne- as I said standing outside the. . Hotel, , which at the time in two, , thousand and five win this thousand kilograms of TNT when pages devastating crater in the middle of the road and destroying all the buildings around loons lodge in the public consciousness here <hes> you there had been assassinations in the years off the list of this by the largest active. . So many people because whoever was responsible really wasn't taking any chances and it was enormous copy. . And other than the two thousand, six , war with Israel, which , was very different because it's a war in terms of an explosion going off in a very recognizable. . Popular Ponte. . <hes> out of nowhere that was the one that was remembered. . Of course, , until two weeks ago, , two, , thousand, , seven, , hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. . In the port, , just a few hundred meters down the road from this hotel. . Injuring seven thousand people or more chilling up to two hundred, , and still don't have a full body copy. . What is still missing Susan now is far more would have. . Done that assassination the other thing is that at the time, , it was very shocking that people. . Had Eighty was really associated with post for Lebanon. . He was the symbol of course will Lebanon deeply loved by international leaders around the world as well as many Lebanese <hes> and so the idea that the Syrian regime would dad's kill him has would dare to kill him with. . So shocking even though of course, assassinations , were quite common <hes> but he was he was such. . An important figure now firstly, , since then of course, , we've seen brushing Alaska <hes> wage a almost decade long bloody war against his own citizens in Syria we've seen very clearly now those strong legs between Hezbollah Syria and Iran Hezbollah work soldiers <hes> full bachelor says regime in the civil war in Syria. . So nobody would be remote. . You surprised now that that they all responsible. . And the other issue of course is the fact that. . Sad had eighty <hes> I think Kennedy some kind of stepped in his stead very much because he was the son and that's why he was given so much faith especially young age and has become such an important figure in politics here. . But in the last year, , we've seen a rudy seismic shift in Lebanese. . Politics. . People say that happens every fifteen years the lost round with two, thousand, , , five, , thousand, , and six before the civil war ended in one, , thousand, , nine, , hundred before about. . It started in nineteen, , seventy five, , and now of two, , thousand, one, , , thousand, nine, , , hundred, , twenty weeks but newest protest movement Saudi the is very much seen as one of those political elites people out. . So the younger generation at least don't have that same attachment to the family and time to seeing them as such an important force a good and for future movements, , which is what that party is called Ford Movement in Lebanon <hes>. . So really this bird apartment, , of course for the families. . Of those killed and injured is not really going to have that much of an impact with so much else going on right now.

prime minister Kevin Rudd Belarus Julia Gillard finance minister London Putin Zurich Konami Justin Trudeau mark Galliotti UK Canada Brussels Paris London live knits institute for Resea Andrew Mueller
Lebanon tribunal names 4 suspects in Hariri killing

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:55 min | 2 months ago

Lebanon tribunal names 4 suspects in Hariri killing

"Is more than. Fifteen years since Lebanon's Prime Minister Rafic, Hariri was killed in a massive car bomb along with twenty one others. Later today an international caught near The Hague will hand down verdicts in the trial of four people accused of planning and carrying out the attack the four accused of of the Iran backed militia and political party. Hasballah. Hezbollah itself is not formally accused. Well, let's hear from the journalist and multiple twenty four regular contributor in Beirut Leyla Milana Allen Lali you're standing outside the very hotel in front of which Rafic Hariri was killed. What sense is in Beirut today that the justice will be done. There is very little sense. the families, all of the twenty one people other than because eighty who were killed as well as the nearly three hundred injured have waited as you say, over fifteen years justice taking a very long time this commission to come through with this, and the problems are a few of course many people here feel that the responsibility lies with the Syrian regime and through has through then has one. and. The five men on trial here all labeled as Hezbollah supporters because they found it very difficult to actually find evidence to show that they his bumbling members because, of course. Is So secretive I'm one of the biggest problems is that must have budgeted dean who was the main sort of ringleader debt these indictments who was accused of having set. The whole thing was known very well as the military imam to Hezbollah was killed in two thousand sixteen an attack on Damascus APP while his was helping Bashar Assad's regime with the wool there. So he was the one person who is very easy to link to Hezbollah and the only evidence they have all circumstantial evidence from these mobile phone networks. So as we expected, the indictment will come through the verdict will. Saying that before remaining men all guilty lane attempts about those who are accused of the murder of the prime minister. said a five men who stand accused have all been labeled Hezbollah supporters and that's because it's incredibly difficult to prove that they were in fact, Hezbollah members everyone in Lebanon believes that that. The majority of people believe that Kennedy was assassinated at because he was starting to pull away from supporting the Syrian regime who'd had troops stationed in Lebanon nearly thirty years all the way through the civil war and afterwards, and of course, we now know that Hezbollah very heavily H. Two zero. But this was all just sort of starting not link between Syria and Iran and Hezbollah but the main man was accused of being the ringleader. Organized the whole nation is most of that that the WHO was very well known as the head of the military wing of Hezbollah but he was killed in two, thousand sixteen and attacks Damascus Apple, which means he's no longer in the indictments and he was the only person. It was very easy to direct the link because there was evidence that he walls a top commander in. Bola. So I, the that means that it's very unlikely has itself will be named in the verdict today it will simply be. These men and then these men haven't been found the Lebanese government has been able to find. Her Bella is a big portion Lebanese government and the chief of Hezbollah nationalize long maintained that he absolutely does not see any of independence in this inquiry he says that it's funded by Israel and he says that there is no way that they will ever hand over these suspects old they will ever be found and historic has very good at hiding its top guys who've been involved in operations in. Lebanon in Syria and even Iran many think that these four worship over to Iran. So even if that comes through in the verdict is guilty as we expect, there's not really going to be any justice indeed has on Rolla said that Hezbollah isn't worried or isn't remotely concerned with today's verdicts but what will the repercussions be? The repercussions are unlikely to be much at this point, and that's for a few reasons I, Ne- as I said standing outside the. Hotel, which at the time in two, thousand and five win this thousand kilograms of TNT when pages devastating crater in the middle of the road and destroying all the buildings around loons lodge in the public consciousness here you there had been assassinations in the years off the list of this by the largest active. So many people because whoever was responsible really wasn't taking any chances and it was enormous copy. And other than the two thousand, six war with Israel, which was very different because it's a war in terms of an explosion going off in a very recognizable. Popular Ponte. out of nowhere that was the one that was remembered. Of course, until two weeks ago, two, thousand, seven, hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. In the port, just a few hundred meters down the road from this hotel. Injuring seven thousand people or more chilling up to two hundred, and still don't have a full body copy. What is still missing Susan now is far more would have. Done that assassination the other thing is that at the time, it was very shocking that people. Had Eighty was really associated with post for Lebanon. He was the symbol of course will Lebanon deeply loved by international leaders around the world as well as many Lebanese and so the idea that the Syrian regime would dad's kill him has would dare to kill him with. So shocking even though of course, assassinations were quite common but he was he was such. An important figure now firstly, since then of course, we've seen brushing Alaska wage a almost decade long bloody war against his own citizens in Syria we've seen very clearly now those strong legs between Hezbollah Syria and Iran Hezbollah work soldiers full bachelor says regime in the civil war in Syria. So nobody would be remote. You surprised now that that they all responsible. And the other issue of course is the fact that. Sad had eighty I think Kennedy some kind of stepped in his stead very much because he was the son and that's why he was given so much faith especially young age and has become such an important figure in politics here. But in the last year, we've seen a rudy seismic shift in Lebanese. Politics. People say that happens every fifteen years the lost round with two, thousand, five, thousand, and six before the civil war ended in one, thousand, nine, hundred before about. It started in nineteen, seventy five, and now of two, thousand, one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty weeks but newest protest movement Saudi the is very much seen as one of those political elites people out. So the younger generation at least don't have that same attachment to the family and time to seeing them as such an important force a good and for future movements, which is what that party is called Ford Movement in Lebanon So really this bird apartment, of course for the families. Of those killed and injured is not really going to have that much of an impact with so much else going on right now.

Hezbollah Lebanon Iran Syria Rafic Hariri Damascus Israel Beirut Lebanese Government Kennedy Prime Minister Bashar Assad Leyla Milana Allen Lali Dean Commander Murder Alaska
"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:01 min | 2 months ago

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Live from London. This is the globalist I'm Emma Nelson and a very warm welcome to today's program coming up fifteen years after the assassination of Lebanon's Prime Minister Rafic Hariri accord in the, Hague will hand down verdicts on four men accused of his death. We'll ask why it took so long and what role politics played injustice also coming up the Democratic convention. Kicks off virtually, Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head will examine what the speeches from the lights of Michelle Obama and Bernie Sanders can set things in a winning direction plus we hear from Australia's former prime minister Kevin, Rudd. They might critics would never agree with us. I'm actually quite shy and that is I'm not much into. That's call it the Hagiography of politics Oh that plus the latest business headlines in the welcome return of the sleeper train. That's all ahead on the globalist live from London? I quick look at what else is happening in the news. The British government says it is still hopeful that a trade deal can be struck with the e U by next month Canada's finance ministers to step down following claims. He didn't repay travel expenses to a charity while on an overseas trip and while residents of Paris London New Yorker fleeing the city following the corona virus researchers suggested that Berliners are staying. Put Stay tuned to monocle twenty four throughout the day for more on these stories. But I it is more than. Fifteen years since Lebanon's Prime Minister Rafic, Hariri was killed in a massive car bomb along with twenty one others. Later today an international caught near The Hague will hand down verdicts in the trial of four people accused of planning and carrying out the attack the four accused of of the Iran backed militia and political party. Hasballah. Hezbollah itself is not formally accused. Well, let's hear from the journalist and multiple twenty four regular contributor in Beirut Leyla Milana Allen Lali you're standing outside the very hotel in front of which Rafic Hariri was killed. What sense is in Beirut today that the justice will be done. There is very little sense. the families, all of the twenty one people other than because eighty who were killed as well as the nearly three hundred injured have waited as you say, over fifteen years justice taking a very long time this commission to come through with this, and the problems are a few of course many people here feel that the responsibility lies with the Syrian regime and through has through then has one. and. The five men on trial here all labeled as Hezbollah supporters because they found it very difficult to actually find evidence to show that they his bumbling members because, of course. Is So secretive I'm one of the biggest problems is that must have budgeted dean who was the main sort of ringleader debt these indictments who was accused of having set. The whole thing was known very well as the military imam to Hezbollah was killed in two thousand sixteen an attack on Damascus APP while his was helping Bashar Assad's regime with the wool there. So he was the one person who is very easy to link to Hezbollah and the only evidence they have all circumstantial evidence from these mobile phone networks. So as we expected, the indictment will come through the verdict will. Saying that before remaining men all guilty lane attempts about those who are accused of the murder of the prime minister. said a five men who stand accused have all been labeled Hezbollah supporters and that's because it's incredibly difficult to prove that they were in fact, Hezbollah members everyone in Lebanon believes that that. The majority of people believe that Kennedy was assassinated at because he was starting to pull away from supporting the Syrian regime who'd had troops stationed in Lebanon nearly thirty years all the way through the civil war and afterwards, and of course, we now know that Hezbollah very heavily H. Two zero. But this was all just sort of starting not link between Syria and Iran and Hezbollah but the main man was accused of being the ringleader. Organized the whole nation is most of that that the WHO was very well known as the head of the military wing of Hezbollah but he was killed in two, thousand sixteen and attacks Damascus Apple, which means he's no longer in the indictments and he was the only person. It was very easy to direct the link because there was evidence that he walls a top commander in. Bola. So I, the that means that it's very unlikely has itself will be named in the verdict today it will simply be. These men and then these men haven't been found the Lebanese government has been able to find. Her Bella is a big portion Lebanese government and the chief of Hezbollah nationalize long maintained that he absolutely does not see any of independence in this inquiry he says that it's funded by Israel and he says that there is no way that they will ever hand over these suspects old they will ever be found and historic has very good at hiding its top guys who've been involved in operations in. Lebanon in Syria and even Iran many think that these four worship over to Iran. So even if that comes through in the verdict is guilty as we expect, there's not really going to be any justice indeed has on Rolla said that Hezbollah isn't worried or isn't remotely concerned with today's verdicts but what will the repercussions be? The repercussions are unlikely to be much at this point, and that's for a few reasons I, Ne- as I said standing outside the. Hotel, which at the time in two, thousand and five win this thousand kilograms of TNT when pages devastating crater in the middle of the road and destroying all the buildings around loons lodge in the public.

Hezbollah Rafic Hariri Lebanon prime minister Iran London Damascus Donald Trump Beirut Lebanese government Emma Nelson Leyla Milana Allen Lali Paris Bashar Assad president Michelle Obama British government Syria Canada Australia
"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:43 min | 2 months ago

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Some exercises in perspective the IRA bomb which severely damaged Canary Wharf in London in Nineteen ninety-six was estimated at just over one ton of ammonium nitrate Timothy McVeigh's bomb which demolished a federal government building in Oklahoma City in nineteen ninety-five was just over two tons of the same material. . The boss which erupted in Beirut's port on Tuesday was estimated at two. . Thousand seven hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. . One of the biggest peacetime non nuclear explosions in history as Bhai. . Route begins the barely imaginable task of cleaning up and is understandably enough growing tear gas was fired yesterday at protesters near the parliament building I'm joined. . Now by Lila Milana, , Allen France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut Leyla. . First of all, , you have been visiting the port which was the epicenter of the explosion. . I can't begin to imagine where you would even describe such scene but I'm going to ask you to have a crack at doing that the scene is as you say, , almost indescribable does smoke still rising from the charred MBA's off. . Destroyed packing crates destroyed shelving and it says every kind of. . Utility <hes> things you'd expect to see in shops. . Twisted. . Washing machines on the floor items from pharmacies because this of course port, , this is the one thirty functional in Lebanon imposed everything and everything was stored than in the center. . You have the remains of these enormous grain silos that carried the grain for the majority of the country <hes> completely destroyed and parts of them. . Still collapsing there you have a aid workers desperately trying to dig people of rubble that's thirty meters deep, , and the conditions are horrific temperatures of thirty degrees baking hot sun. . The air is thick and brown the smell acrid burning metal and plastic. . It really is post-apocalyptic and this goes on for over a mile. . Entire poor is just smoking twisted metal and daybreak. . Nash. . have. . You got a clear sense of how widespread the damage across Beirutis. . How far can you go from the blast without seeing broken windows? ? So it. . was about nine kilometers where we're still doing things like breaking windows <hes> the impact of it and having people. That's . it really has <hes> spread incredibly far, , and it's an uneven spread as well <hes> because. . What's happened is that the grain ciders positioned in a certain way which meant that it protected half of the city of West Beirut, , which historically has in many disasters. . Conflicts actually born the brunt of of problems in Beirut and actually deflected the majority of the blast towards the East and the south, , which is why a famous areas like Gymnasium Ohio Asha fear completely <hes>. . The buildings there obliterated and one of the concerns now is a lot of. . Buildings the older buildings in Beirut the few buildings left in the east of in pre-civil war, , which were much loved already, , quite delicate on the point of collapse yesterday as people were trying to clear the streets <hes> constantly civil defense volunteers trying to pull people back away from these buildings with balconies hanging down stone starting to crumble because of course, , that's a huge dangerous. . People are still sifting through rubble trying to find loved ones that buildings could. . New Buildings that had not yet collapsed could collapse on top of the other issue is that the new builds a lot of them are concrete and speaking to an engineer what can happen with concrete is that with a shockwave blast like this concrete cracks easily under pressure and so that can be in tunnel cracks there that you don't know about in can't be seen from the outside, , but the make the building unstable and because there's really been. . Very, , little help from the government with people trying to go back into their homes, , clear up and see what they can retrieve and whether their homes are still livable. . Many people going back into very unstable buildings and some living there because they have no other former shelter. . So a real risk of further injury <hes> as buildings might potentially collapse over the next few days very similar to the aftermath of an earthquake, which , is what this is compared to. . A among the people who was serving the damage in Beirut yesterday was of course, , President Emmanuel Macron of France undertaking a extraordinary spontaneous visit. . How is that being received? ? I mean, , it's it's understandable enough that Lebanese politicians don't want to interact at a personal level with the public at the not only for their own safety but is it being regarded as strange that the first high profile politician to to take a walkabout should be the president of an entirely different country? ? Well, , it is strange, , but it's not being regarded as strange. . I was down on the street yesterday when McCone was was walking through glad-handing the crowd I mean, , he really was <hes> you know playing up to it and was supposed to be going <hes> to Baabda Palace, , the Presidential Palace to meet with politicians and delayed that for an extra hour on the schedule to stay with Lebanese people in the streets of course, , <hes> playing up very much. . The fact that he was there to see them he'd said before the visit my main priorities to go and be with the people of Lebanon. . And extend, , solidarity's to them, and , then after that I will be dealing with the political varieties speaking to them. . So in the streets, , he was absolutely mobbed by people he's hugging people shaking hands with them people coming up tim saying, , please don't give those politicians any money that corrupt criminals we don't trust them and he responded to one woman I know you don't trust them graffiti everywhere saying don't give one. . Euro. . To those Michael help us. . So he really did make himself as I say a man of the people yesterday I spoke to a couple of young women afterwards. . WHO said to me? ? That man was more of a leader to us in fifteen minutes than any of our politicians have been where all day no one has come to see us where are they wears the help and later in the day after a lot of commentary that. . The. . Obviously. . Lebanese politicians feeding quite shamefaced one. . The justice minister did come down to the streets to try and speak to people clearing up and she had water thrown in her face and chanting protest. . Immediately, , <hes> they're not welcome and that people absolutely fading that the government has no interest in safety in their health in their wellbeing and their ability to rebuild hiding away from them as everybody marshals together to try and get things. . Back to nothing like normal but something livable at least just to follow that up finally, , regular listeners may recall that you and I were speaking on Monday talking about the resignation of Lebanon's foreign minister and that seemed like a pretty big story at the time <hes>. . He's probably ruin his timing at this point but have you seen or heard anything in terms of actual messaging attempts to help or anything from the alleged government of Lebanon or d you kind of assume that they've all got to the point where they just realized the games up nobody really wants to hear from them anymore. . It's quite extraordinary. . There is honesty nothing happening in terms of that what the government is doing <hes> <hes> a lot of finger pointing at each other and previous administrations about who's to blame for this they've put everybody associated with the report under house arrest and saying that they're going to find the perpetrators. . But of course, , everybody's saying somebody else's the perpetrator on what we know so far <hes> it seems that for six years has been ongoing negligence at the highest. . Level where a several reports were were built up by the head of the port and have customs sent to the government center the Prime Minister's Office the judiciary about the fact that this was a ticking time bomb and something has to be done completely ignored. . So the government is going on about this investigation saying they'll find responsible meanwhile three hundred, , thousand people in Beirut homeless, , five, , thousand injured hundreds still missing, , and honestly all you can see on the streets is volunteers. . The. . Lebanese. . <hes> breath volunteers, , obviously with their ambulances civil defence wanting tears, , young people armed with spades and rooms marching down the street just going into people's homes into buildings and sweeping up what they can and moving onto the next one cleaning up themselves. . They all said to me of course not here we wouldn't expect anything else from them with the only people who can help ourselves and today international aid. . Groups coming in different countries, , sending their own firefighters medical support in, , and still a complete absence of the Lebanese government anywhere except the poor area learn Milana Allen in Beirut thank you very much for joining us.

Iran United States UN Security Council UN Elliot Abrams Beirut Brian Hook Donald Trump Prime Minister's Office Russia China Lebanese government five Security Council United States Administration Joe Biden Tehran Atlantic Milana Allen Mike Pompeo deb
beirut explosion latest news

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:43 min | 2 months ago

beirut explosion latest news

"Some exercises in perspective the IRA bomb which severely damaged Canary Wharf in London in Nineteen ninety-six was estimated at just over one ton of ammonium nitrate Timothy McVeigh's bomb which demolished a federal government building in Oklahoma City in nineteen ninety-five was just over two tons of the same material. The boss which erupted in Beirut's port on Tuesday was estimated at two. Thousand seven hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. One of the biggest peacetime non nuclear explosions in history as Bhai. Route begins the barely imaginable task of cleaning up and is understandably enough growing tear gas was fired yesterday at protesters near the parliament building I'm joined. Now by Lila Milana, Allen France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut Leyla. First of all, you have been visiting the port which was the epicenter of the explosion. I can't begin to imagine where you would even describe such scene but I'm going to ask you to have a crack at doing that the scene is as you say, almost indescribable does smoke still rising from the charred MBA's off. Destroyed packing crates destroyed shelving and it says every kind of. Utility things you'd expect to see in shops. Twisted. Washing machines on the floor items from pharmacies because this of course port, this is the one thirty functional in Lebanon imposed everything and everything was stored than in the center. You have the remains of these enormous grain silos that carried the grain for the majority of the country completely destroyed and parts of them. Still collapsing there you have a aid workers desperately trying to dig people of rubble that's thirty meters deep, and the conditions are horrific temperatures of thirty degrees baking hot sun. The air is thick and brown the smell acrid burning metal and plastic. It really is post-apocalyptic and this goes on for over a mile. Entire poor is just smoking twisted metal and daybreak. Nash. have. You got a clear sense of how widespread the damage across Beirutis. How far can you go from the blast without seeing broken windows? So it. was about nine kilometers where we're still doing things like breaking windows the impact of it and having people. That's it really has spread incredibly far, and it's an uneven spread as well because. What's happened is that the grain ciders positioned in a certain way which meant that it protected half of the city of West Beirut, which historically has in many disasters. Conflicts actually born the brunt of of problems in Beirut and actually deflected the majority of the blast towards the East and the south, which is why a famous areas like Gymnasium Ohio Asha fear completely The buildings there obliterated and one of the concerns now is a lot of. Buildings the older buildings in Beirut the few buildings left in the east of in pre-civil war, which were much loved already, quite delicate on the point of collapse yesterday as people were trying to clear the streets constantly civil defense volunteers trying to pull people back away from these buildings with balconies hanging down stone starting to crumble because of course, that's a huge dangerous. People are still sifting through rubble trying to find loved ones that buildings could. New Buildings that had not yet collapsed could collapse on top of the other issue is that the new builds a lot of them are concrete and speaking to an engineer what can happen with concrete is that with a shockwave blast like this concrete cracks easily under pressure and so that can be in tunnel cracks there that you don't know about in can't be seen from the outside, but the make the building unstable and because there's really been. Very, little help from the government with people trying to go back into their homes, clear up and see what they can retrieve and whether their homes are still livable. Many people going back into very unstable buildings and some living there because they have no other former shelter. So a real risk of further injury as buildings might potentially collapse over the next few days very similar to the aftermath of an earthquake, which is what this is compared to. A among the people who was serving the damage in Beirut yesterday was of course, President Emmanuel Macron of France undertaking a extraordinary spontaneous visit. How is that being received? I mean, it's it's understandable enough that Lebanese politicians don't want to interact at a personal level with the public at the not only for their own safety but is it being regarded as strange that the first high profile politician to to take a walkabout should be the president of an entirely different country? Well, it is strange, but it's not being regarded as strange. I was down on the street yesterday when McCone was was walking through glad-handing the crowd I mean, he really was you know playing up to it and was supposed to be going to Baabda Palace, the Presidential Palace to meet with politicians and delayed that for an extra hour on the schedule to stay with Lebanese people in the streets of course, playing up very much. The fact that he was there to see them he'd said before the visit my main priorities to go and be with the people of Lebanon. And extend, solidarity's to them, and then after that I will be dealing with the political varieties speaking to them. So in the streets, he was absolutely mobbed by people he's hugging people shaking hands with them people coming up tim saying, please don't give those politicians any money that corrupt criminals we don't trust them and he responded to one woman I know you don't trust them graffiti everywhere saying don't give one. Euro. To those Michael help us. So he really did make himself as I say a man of the people yesterday I spoke to a couple of young women afterwards. WHO said to me? That man was more of a leader to us in fifteen minutes than any of our politicians have been where all day no one has come to see us where are they wears the help and later in the day after a lot of commentary that. The. Obviously. Lebanese politicians feeding quite shamefaced one. The justice minister did come down to the streets to try and speak to people clearing up and she had water thrown in her face and chanting protest. Immediately, they're not welcome and that people absolutely fading that the government has no interest in safety in their health in their wellbeing and their ability to rebuild hiding away from them as everybody marshals together to try and get things. Back to nothing like normal but something livable at least just to follow that up finally, regular listeners may recall that you and I were speaking on Monday talking about the resignation of Lebanon's foreign minister and that seemed like a pretty big story at the time He's probably ruin his timing at this point but have you seen or heard anything in terms of actual messaging attempts to help or anything from the alleged government of Lebanon or d you kind of assume that they've all got to the point where they just realized the games up nobody really wants to hear from them anymore. It's quite extraordinary. There is honesty nothing happening in terms of that what the government is doing a lot of finger pointing at each other and previous administrations about who's to blame for this they've put everybody associated with the report under house arrest and saying that they're going to find the perpetrators. But of course, everybody's saying somebody else's the perpetrator on what we know so far it seems that for six years has been ongoing negligence at the highest. Level where a several reports were were built up by the head of the port and have customs sent to the government center the Prime Minister's Office the judiciary about the fact that this was a ticking time bomb and something has to be done completely ignored. So the government is going on about this investigation saying they'll find responsible meanwhile three hundred, thousand people in Beirut homeless, five, thousand injured hundreds still missing, and honestly all you can see on the streets is volunteers. The. Lebanese. breath volunteers, obviously with their ambulances civil defence wanting tears, young people armed with spades and rooms marching down the street just going into people's homes into buildings and sweeping up what they can and moving onto the next one cleaning up themselves. They all said to me of course not here we wouldn't expect anything else from them with the only people who can help ourselves and today international aid. Groups coming in different countries, sending their own firefighters medical support in, and still a complete absence of the Lebanese government anywhere except the poor area learn Milana Allen in Beirut thank you very much for joining us.

West Beirut Lebanon Government Beirut Leyla Lebanese Government New Buildings Canary Wharf Lila Milana Timothy Mcveigh Oklahoma City London Prime Minister's Office Baabda Palace Beirutis Allen France Milana Allen Nash. Gymnasium Ohio Asha
"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:27 min | 2 months ago

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"In London I'm Andrew Miller coming up are contributed in Beirut Layla. Milana Allen will have the latest from the site of Tuesday's colossal explosion in the Lebanese capital also ahead, of course, the conflict in Yemen his rage in large part because Islam Republic of Iran's illegal arms transfers to the WHO th-this. And so next week, the United States will put forward a resolution in the Security Council, to extend the arms embargo on Iran. Secretary of State Mike pompeo is talking tough on Iran and a bit later on Hello Finland was to buy share today will be joined by senior Elliott and who be talking about the latest in Latin America including the strong connections between Lebanon and Brazil, plus we'll have our weekly recap of what we have learned since about this time last Friday, all that coming up right here on the briefing on Monaco, two, thousand four. Welcome to today's edition of the briefing with me, Andrew. Miller some exercises in perspective the IRA bomb which severely damaged Canary Wharf in London in Nineteen ninety-six was estimated at just over one ton of ammonium nitrate Timothy McVeigh's bomb which demolished a federal government building in Oklahoma City in nineteen ninety-five was just over two tons of the same material. The boss which erupted in Beirut's port on Tuesday was estimated at two. Thousand seven hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. One of the biggest peacetime non nuclear explosions in history as Bhai. Route begins the barely imaginable task of cleaning up and is understandably enough growing tear gas was fired yesterday at protesters near the parliament building I'm joined. Now by Lila Milana, Allen France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut Leyla. First of all, you have been visiting the port which was the epicenter of the explosion. I can't begin to imagine where you would even describe such scene but I'm going to ask you to have a crack at doing that the scene is as you say, almost indescribable does smoke still rising from the charred MBA's off. Destroyed packing crates destroyed shelving and it says every kind of. Utility things you'd expect to see in shops. Twisted. Washing machines on the floor items from pharmacies because this of course port, this is the one thirty functional in Lebanon imposed everything and everything was stored than in the center. You have the remains of these enormous grain silos that carried the grain for the majority of the country completely destroyed and parts of them. Still collapsing there you have a aid workers desperately trying to dig people of rubble that's thirty meters deep, and the conditions are horrific temperatures of thirty degrees baking hot sun. The air is thick and brown the smell acrid burning metal and plastic. It really is post-apocalyptic and this goes on for over a mile. Entire poor is just smoking twisted metal and daybreak. Nash. have. You got a clear sense of how widespread the damage across Beirutis. How far can you go from the blast without seeing broken windows? So it. was about nine kilometers where we're still doing things like breaking windows the impact of it and having people. That's it really has spread incredibly far, and it's an uneven spread as well because. What's happened is that the grain ciders positioned in a certain way which meant that it protected half of the city of West Beirut, which historically has in many disasters. Conflicts actually born the brunt of of problems in Beirut and actually deflected the majority of the blast towards the East and the south, which is why a famous areas like Gymnasium Ohio Asha fear completely The buildings there obliterated and one of the concerns now is a lot of. Buildings the older buildings in Beirut the few buildings left in the east of in pre-civil war, which were much loved already, quite delicate on the point of collapse yesterday as people were trying to clear the streets constantly civil defense volunteers trying to pull people back away from these buildings with balconies hanging down stone starting to crumble because of course, that's a huge dangerous. People are still sifting through rubble trying to find loved ones that buildings could. New Buildings that had not yet collapsed could collapse on top of the other issue is that the new builds a lot of them are concrete and speaking to an engineer what can happen with concrete is that with a shockwave blast like this concrete cracks easily under pressure and so that can be in tunnel cracks there that you don't know about in can't be seen from the outside, but the make the building unstable and because there's really been. Very, little help from the government with people trying to go back into their homes, clear up and see what they can retrieve and whether their homes are still livable. Many people going back into very unstable buildings and some living there because they have no other former shelter. So a real risk of further injury as buildings might potentially collapse over the next few days very similar to the aftermath of an earthquake, which is what this is compared to. A among the people who was serving the damage in Beirut yesterday was of course, President Emmanuel Macron of France undertaking a extraordinary spontaneous visit. How is that being received? I mean, it's it's understandable enough that Lebanese politicians don't want to interact at a personal level with the public at the not only for their own safety but is it being regarded as strange that the first high profile politician to to take a walkabout should be the president of an entirely different country? Well, it is strange, but it's not being regarded as strange. I was down on the street yesterday when McCone was was walking through glad-handing the crowd I mean, he really was you know playing up to it and was supposed to be going to Baabda Palace, the Presidential Palace to meet with politicians and delayed that for an extra hour on the schedule to stay with Lebanese people in the streets of course, playing up very much. The fact that he was there to see them he'd said before the visit my main priorities to go and be with the people of Lebanon. And extend, solidarity's to them, and then after that I will be dealing with the political varieties speaking to them. So in the streets, he was absolutely mobbed by people he's hugging people shaking hands with them people coming up tim saying, please don't give those politicians any money that corrupt criminals we don't trust them and he responded to one woman I know you don't trust them graffiti everywhere saying don't give one. Euro. To those Michael help us. So he really did make himself as I say a man of the people yesterday I spoke to a couple of young women afterwards. WHO said to me? That man was more of a leader to us in fifteen minutes than any of our politicians have been where all day no one has come to see us where are they wears the help and later in the day after a lot of commentary that. The. Obviously. Lebanese politicians feeding quite shamefaced one. The justice minister did come down to the streets to try and speak to people clearing up and she had water thrown in her face and chanting protest. Immediately, they're not welcome and that people absolutely fading that the government has no interest in safety in their health in their wellbeing and their ability to rebuild hiding away from them as everybody marshals together to try and get things. Back to nothing like normal but something livable at least just to follow that up finally, regular listeners may recall that you and I were speaking on Monday talking about the resignation of Lebanon's foreign minister and that seemed like a pretty big story at the time He's probably ruin his timing at this point but have you seen or heard anything in terms of actual messaging attempts to help or anything from the alleged government of Lebanon or d you kind of assume that they've all got to the point where they just realized the games up nobody really wants to hear from them anymore. It's quite extraordinary. There is honesty nothing happening in terms of that what the government is doing a lot of finger pointing at each other and previous administrations about who's to blame for this they've put everybody associated with the report under house arrest and saying that they're going to find the perpetrators..

West Beirut Lebanon Andrew Miller government London Iran Beirut Leyla Milana Allen WHO New Buildings United States Mike pompeo Timothy McVeigh Canary Wharf Yemen Finland Oklahoma City
"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:51 min | 2 months ago

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"You're listening to the briefing I broadcast the sixth of August. Two Thousand Twenty on Monocle Twenty, four debriefing is brought to you in association with Lance. As part of the programs partnership, with `alliance, we bring you stories that demonstrate his commitment to securing people's lives. After all for a hundred and thirty years all around the globe Alleanza has been working hard to do just that to give courage to its customers for what's ahead. Because allience knows how important it is to have a fair partner, your side who provides solid and sustainable solutions. Leon strives to do it right we've passion every day. Stay tuned to the briefing. Dear, exactly. How allience does it? An allowance for life? Hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you live for articles newsroom here in Zurich, todd, birthday coming up on today's program. This is something on a different scale even during the civil war people tell us that there was never a single event. This big the level to which this explosion has just devastated the entire city. That's our women in. Beirut. Leyla Moulana Allen will have the latest from the Lebanese capital and ask what the future holds for the country. Also had will explore why the world's richest nations are nailing colors to the mast when it comes to backing covert nineteen vaccine plus will take a deep delve into some of the design and architecture stories making waves here in Mitteleuropa and then it's time for the clash of our musical titans..

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:59 min | 4 months ago

"beirut leyla" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"In Lebanon as the country's economic crisis continues to deeper. There had been hopes that the International Monetary Fund would bail out the economy, but Lebanon's politician, unable or unwilling to make changes that would guarantee a rescue package. Let's get more on this now. With Layla Milona Allen who's Franzen cats correspondent in Lebanon's capital Beirut Leyla good afternoon tea. Thanks for being with us. Just bring us up to speed it. It does look like A. Starkly a bad situation is only gonNA get worse. It does Tom so as you may have seen. The situation in Lebanon financially has been really plummeting off the cliff edge over the last few months. Since the end of summer last year back then Lebanese liberal. It was pegged at fifteen hundred lyrics the dollar. It's now sunk to about five thousand around that number. The majority of that crashes happened just over the last few months, so there was already a huge economic crisis habit of course, covid nineteen has massively exacerbated that and what we're seeing now is that the Lebanese government has reached out. I'm MEF formally asked for the IMF to consider a bailout deal about a month ago, but the problem is that historically Lebanon has not been a very good candidate for these kinds of deals, because there is lots of money that they've been given the then. Don't turn around and implement the. The reforms that do actually ready eleven billion dollars just hanging in limbo that they're waiting for from the said conference collection of European investors from a couple of years ago, but because they have the reforms. They were all stupid. They still access that money they've lost the IMF for around twenty billion dollars, which we made money from the IMF Auburn donor countries, and as I said Nope the best candidate for loan, because historically they haven't really fulfilled what they need to do. Even worse right now, because so many countries around the world, all skin guy with the money now there have been talks going on over the last few weeks and initially an appraisal of the finance of the country. said that they were in about sixty two billion dollar hole. That was those are the figures that were give the IMF said they kind of agreed with that that seemed about right about honest and then suddenly. MP's timed around. and Re reevaluated those numbers and said Oh no, actually we've reduced the numbers. It's only about eighteen billion dollars that seventy percent car. Essentially, they're not being honest about how up in in many people look at that. As a result, the IMF is very likely unlikely to agree to deal with them, because they simply don't trust those numbers and don't trust that engage in honest dialogue about the problems here. Well let me ask you more about that. Let it because it is interesting that the Central Bank of Lebanon has defended its ongoing practices as I think they call them financial engineering, which is euphemistic, but there are those from without who say look. This is a best this is. Some financial trickery at worse I've I've heard it described as a Ponzi scheme by some Where does the truth lie as UCF in terms of the difficulty just getting to the bottom of these numbers almost. Indeed in financial engineering is a kind way of pushing it I mean we're we're now in a situation in Lebanon whether all five parallel exchange rates and one of the problems is the Riyadh solemn Central Bank? Governor for the last twenty three years has been able to maintain this peg mostly safely, essentially artificial by pumping lots of dollars inter the Lebanese banks by giving high interest rates, the people willing to keep the doors in the country, and so it seemed as though the Lebanese providing, but it wasn't. Wasn't really at was. As we say, south up a bit like upon Z., scheming as things have started to crash, he's tried to maintain that right. He said No. It's fine survive, and then what's happened is the people who have that donors in banks and savings tradition people. Can that money in banks in the doors because the Lebanese lira on the dollar used concurrently bubba knees. Lyric is enclosed currency. It means that it can only be used inside Lebanon. You can't trade outside of Lebanon's kept them money. And suddenly the realistic exchange rates on the street of what I mean by realistic is the not the people can actually get for that dollars has totally changed and within the banks they are still only worth fifteen hundred lira so i. people have been massively losing money, and if you look like they've lost about sixty five percent of their savings where we are now with a black market exchange rate, and they also have even been able. Able to get them money out of the banks months because all the banks have put arbitrary capital controls meaning stopping people from taking money out, because they don't want to run on the banks that is enough cash to keep the banks liquid. If everyone takes out the money, and then on the streets, we've got up to five different current exchange rates warming at the same time as rate. If you go to the currency, exchange the legal. Legal ones rate if you go to the black market cars, the exchange rate if you go to Western Union, you try and send yourself money and each bank also has its own rate of rate. You can take those dollars out so every single day. People panicking over what their money really means, and at the same time because Lebanon imports, so many of its goods radius country that's based on imports. The prices of things have gone up. Up Exponentially because of course, they have to pay for those imports indoors dollars now so expensive. WHOA, Whoa, that's resulting in is chaos in terms of people's financial viability, the viability of that basic daily lives paying their rent, paying for food, and instead of reacting to business insane going to do something about it. They feel that the central government in collaboration with the government is simply pretending that this situation isn't as bad as it truly as. Well let's take a step back. Maybe just finally We've always seen a lot of protests on the streets. principally directed at the government around this steepening economic crisis. Just gives you a sense about. Any potential pathways through the the next few weeks and We talked to Lamar Twenty four before about political inertia in Lebanon how difficult it is to get things down into make structural change without even being the embassies. Is there a a pathway you can see? That navigates the country through this particularly turbulent moment. So of course, these protests when they started in October of last year were hopeful protests, they were aimed at trying to get a government that the people felt they deserved and changing the political system. Since Code. Nineteen back has really changed these on now. Bread protests these are hunger protests, and of course that has a very different mood to it as I said you, if things will bad before covid nineteen and a three month lockdown, which did work in terms of the rates here goes. Nineteen have been catch pretty low was important because the hospitals are so would be so overwhelmed. Weather health crisis hit I really wouldn't be able to function, but that meant of course is so many businesses closed will never reopen Sony. People have lost their livelihoods. Though is an estimate recently that thirty five percent of restaurants and hotels across the country have to close, and another third of people that have their salaries completely slashed in half, so Sony people not earning anywhere near what they were or nothing at all, and so people rooting out all on the breadline was suddenly seeing huge poverty rates here there have been estimates that by the end of the is seventy five percent of people in Lebanon. We'll be living in poverty. That's a huge jump so in Thomson. Actually because what we've been seeing for the last few weeks is every week or so we'll be. Be a couple of protests. The anger boiled over something will happen with financial situation all the political situation, and it will trigger a big protest, and these have been violent protest. Now there's been allotted violence between security forces and people on the streets who had just so furious and desperate, and they feel nothing's being done for them, so it looks like that's likely to keep playing out over the next few weeks. The question is whether the government will be able to spy whether Hasan used. Government will be able to live whether they will actually be able to lock in this lion FDR, not which? Would give some positivity some sense that things are going to change, but at the moment everyone on the streets to say they feel completely hopeless, and they don't think that government cares about them, and so it is, we will see a lot more of those protests start reality indeed. Leyla, thank you very much for the update. That was Layla Milana Allen in Beirut. Listening to the briefing here..

Lebanon International Monetary Fund Layla Milona Allen Beirut Lebanese government Tom Ponzi scheme Sony Riyadh Hasan Franzen Western Union UCF Lamar Thomson