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Fresh update on "beirut" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

01:02 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "beirut" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"To Fox News. As the nation looks at reopening schools, officials in Texas are collaborating on a plan to get kids back into class. President Trump has been adamant that even with the pandemic students should be back in classrooms this fall, he says, he'll turn up the pressure on governors who won't make that happen. Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick appeared on Fox's Caputo live Saturday, saying Sheer numbers make Texas unique. Just put this in perspective. We have more kids in school. K through 12 about 5.5 million in about half. The states have people we have 1200 school districts and over 9000 campuses. US. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is scheduled to appear on Fox News Sunday to talk about the challenges of resuming in person learning. Could all Scott Fox knew the University of North Carolina is looking to make some name changes at its campus. Four buildings at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill may be renamed in the very near future. A commission voted Friday in favor of the name changes. Schools chancellor now decides if it goes to the board of trustees, which is scheduled to meet Thursday. Commission cochair Seeing the four buildings are named after men who used their positions to impose and maintain violent systems of racial subject ation. Local news described Is the man as Josephus Daniels, a lifelong white supremacist Julian as Kara Ku Klux Klan supporter known for giving a racist speech. Former Governor Charles a cop who led a white supremacy campaign and suppressed black voters, and Thomas Roof and senior and junior, the elder estate Supreme Court justice who enslaved more than 100 people. His son attended the university and Kerik Fox News authorities say the search to find glee TV show starring Lya Rivera and a Southern California lake. Ended Saturday without any results of the search of Lake Beirut will resume Sunday.

Fox News Texas Scott Fox FOX University Of North Carolina United States President Trump Kara Ku Klux Klan Betsy Devos Josephus Daniels Lake Beirut Supreme Court Dan Patrick Kerik Thomas Roof Lya Rivera Southern California Lake Caputo Chancellor
Lebanon: Economic Meltdown Leaves Country on the Brink of Collapse

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:08 min | 1 d ago

Lebanon: Economic Meltdown Leaves Country on the Brink of Collapse

"Hello and welcome to the foreign desk I'm Andrew. Mullah guests today, Lena Katina and Layla. Milana Allen Lena Katina is the director of the Middle East and North Africa program at Chatham House and Layla Moulana. Allen is France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut. Welcome both to the program Leyla. I'll start with you in Lebanon if one was to take a stroll through by route right now today. What indications would you see of the problems? Lebanon is having. Closed shops and bars people inside shops, doing things like asking the cashier to stop touching items when they get to a certain price on the phone to their partners, trying to figure out how many items they can afford to buy their no prices now on items in most shots because they're changing every day, people still queuing outside banks trying to get them money. People going through bins of his point trying to find food, I don't want to state situation. You know we're not chaos yet. Some people have been saying, but it is very very clear that the situation is getting increasingly discover people. Very consent.

Milana Allen Lena Katina Lena Katina Lebanon Layla Moulana Beirut Chatham House Middle East France Director North Africa
Lebanon protesters call on government to resign amid crisis

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:28 sec | Last month

Lebanon protesters call on government to resign amid crisis

"Last night marked the second night of protests in Lebanon protesters clashed with security forces over the government's handling of the country's financial crisis protesters in Beirut to the northern city of Tripoli threw fireworks and stones police responded with tear gas and rubber bullets the address comes as the government holds talks with the International Monetary Fund in hopes of securing the financing to get the economy back on track to Lebanese palace lost about seventy percent of its value since

Beirut Tripoli International Monetary Fund Lebanon
Lebanese government meets after night of raging protests

Reveal

00:31 sec | Last month

Lebanese government meets after night of raging protests

"Last night marked a second night of protests in Lebanon protesters clashed with security forces over the government's handling of the country's financial crisis protesters in Beirut and the northern city of Tripoli threw fireworks and stones police responded with tear gas and rubber bullets the unrest comes as the government holds talks with the International Monetary Fund in hopes of securing the financing to get the economy back on track the Lebanese pound has lost about seventy percent of its value since

Beirut Tripoli International Monetary Fund Lebanon
Ex-Green Beret, Son Could Face Four Years in Japanese Jail Over Ghosn Escape

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:45 min | Last month

Ex-Green Beret, Son Could Face Four Years in Japanese Jail Over Ghosn Escape

"The escape of former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn from Japan apparently was orchestrated by a former green beret and his son and those two were arrested yesterday with me right now is A. B. C. news crime and terrorism analyst Brad Garrett good morning Brad good morning Greg what we know about this what was the motive of these two well Carlos Guzman was the was the former chairman of Nissan quite wealthy the lived in Tokyo was charged with some issues involving under reporting his salary and some other things the Japanese lock them up officially released him on house arrest it is home but did he hired this former green beret by the name of Michael Taylor and Michael Taylor son Peter who have a security business in Boston and they orchestrated this elaborate escape plan that involved multiple trips to Japan and other places but basically they placed goes in on a bullet train in Tokyo and took it to Osaka had a private plane already pre staged in also a case about the size of what you put a large speaker of like from a concert like a rock concert they secreted Goshen inside the case took off with the private jet flew to Istambul change private jets and include the case and goes in on to Beirut Lebanon where he is a citizen it's very elaborate I mean simplistic it it there's a lot of moving parts here but it's you know it's it's almost like one of those sort of spy thrillers that you might see in a movie well they got caught that's interesting to see what lengths they went to to get this thing

Peter Beirut Istambul Brad Garrett Analyst Carlos Ghosn Goshen Osaka Boston Chairman Michael Taylor Tokyo Nissan Carlos Guzman Greg Japan
Chickens, Fruit Trees, and Trellises

You Need a Budget

03:38 min | Last month

Chickens, Fruit Trees, and Trellises

"Where we teach you for rules to help you. Stop living paycheck to paycheck. Get Out of debt and save more money. Okay I'll be honest that I did kind of use. My paternity leave for just loads of projects. I think I added more to the list than I did. But of course journal out of that time. I was thinking about budgeting so while we may now own chickens and while we may have planted a massive asparagus patch. And while we may have a trellis that could hold pounds and pounds of cantaloupe. Yeah I still just thinking about budgeting and the idea was partially inspired by the podcast. I think was four. Twenty six talked about the value chain. Having a fruit tree seemed valuable versus having cash to buy fruit plus I mean homegrown fruit right. So there's a little bit of this preparedness kind of back to the land feel over here at the household but for the most part what. I was really landing on. Was this idea that you're doing something now. In order to have an outside benefit later on so these cute little chicks that frankly after two weeks they are not cute. They are ugly. We're feeding them. We're taking care of them. Make sure they have water. We built a little Box Forum. And eventually we'll get them into a coupe that we're GONNA have to put together and do all that and we're going to be making him really happy and they'll get to scratch around in the orchard and I'm no chicken expert by any means so I probably already said something wrong but the hope is eventually we'll get some eggs from these happy happy chickens but they those eggs won't happen for seven months the fruit trees. You don't get a harvest for definitely a couple years the ASPARAGUS. You don't even think about harvesting for at least two years so you're doing all this upfront. Work to hopefully have what I would call an outside benefit like walking out and snapping off a fresh asparagus. Spear you just haven't had asparagus like this right anyway. All that to say when you're thinking through your money a lot of the time you're battling with that voice that Santa want something now versus the voice that saying wouldn't it be nice to have something later the voice that said wouldn't it be nice to have this for later is often very quiet and frankly looks foolish a lot of the time. I mean you know you get some weird looks. When you're the person digging up a large portion of your trump's in order to drop in spiritus that look like little Martian plants if you buy in Beirut and you can feel a little foolish if you're the one just setting aside some money for the eventual car repair and you don't know when it'll happen or how much it'll cost so even as you're debating with yourself you might feel Kinda foolish but my hope is that if there are some lessons we've learned from the craziness of late. One of them can be that we should be looking ahead and preparing a little more to just be up. Maybe be able to have things be slightly less volatile for your household for your community for your city for your state for your country all of that but the ability to look ahead in perhaps differ a little bit of gratification. Now in order to get an outside benefit from that later on. I just think that's that's too good to pass up. You may be could

Beirut Santa
Back to the furore: protests set to reignite

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:51 min | 2 months ago

Back to the furore: protests set to reignite

"Switch on the news today. And chances are it'll be about one thing. Us Corona virus deaths. Almost these should but six or seven months ago something else was dominating global headlines and this show a wave of protests had erupted the cost the globe not least in the Middle East and Arab world. Not since I suppose the Arab spring of two thousand eleven half one seen so many apparently told NATO simultaneous protests in one place so once green now in Baghdad is carnival as the corona virus has spread many of these protests movements have necessarily and put on hold lately though in Lebanon. Not even a look down has been able to contain the public anger that has swelled. The country's economic crisis has gone from bad to worse. Those who took to the streets last October are protesting against their government once again for more than a month. The lockdown bought the Lebanese government clear. Streets there was a lot of concern here that the virus overwhelm the underfunded healthcare system in Lebanon and so people really did obey the government. Stay at home order for the latter part of March for much of April. Greg Carlstrom is our Middle East correspondent reporting from Beirut a gun to appoint over the past two weeks where the virus looks contains and where the economic situation has gotten so bad that people have begun to ignore the lockdown orders to go out and protest so particularly in Tripoli Northern Lebanon which is one of the poorest cities in the country. Thousands of people came out to protest some of these protests turned into riots people throwing firebombs into banks. Lebanese army using live ammunition to put down protests in Tripoli killed one protester a young twenty six year old man and wounded a number of others and the protests were seeing now are a continuation of the ones we saw last year they are the protests that started in October. Were really a rejection of the entire political class in Lebanon and the sectarian confessional system. It's been in place. Since the end of the civil war. In nineteen ninety but the trigger for the protests really was an economic crisis the banking sector looks illiquid if not entirely insolvent the currency is collapsing. People are seeing their life savings effectively. Cut In half over the past six months and all of this was happening even before the lockdown which is obviously dealt another severe blow to the economy so this situation now where food prices have gone up by an estimated forty percent since September. The government thinks inflation. This year will run about fifty percents. You hear reports from business federations that maybe a third of registered companies in Lebanon have gone under over the past six so the economic situation really has gotten very bleak and it's back into the streets and what is it that put Lebanon in this crisis in the first place. Lebanon has never had a very productive economy. It's been based on finance real estate tourism. Very large Service sector so. It's not a very wealthy country doesn't have very many well paying jobs but it's been able to keep the economy humming with this big influx of foreign capital much of which comes from the Lebanese diaspora. Which of course is larger than the Lebanese population inside of Lebanon? And what's happened over? The past few years is all of this. Stop working at once the real estate sector. There's a bubble that looks overbuilt and overpriced. The financial sector is slowing down deposits. After a year of steady growth deposits banks have begun to decline the central banks of resorted to running a pyramid scheme to defend the currency where it was borrowing dollars from commercial banks at very above market interest rates and no longer has enough dollars to do that and so all of a sudden everything has collapsed. Lebanese pound which has been pegged to the dollar at fifteen hundred since the nineteen nineties now trading at about four thousand on the dollar on the black market the government in March defaulted on its debts. Lebanese public debt is more than one hundred fifty percent of GDP and it's simply become unsustainable and the pandemic and the reaction to the pandemic has only exacerbated all of that it has and we don't know quite how bad the economic situation is yet because of course everything has been closed but a you hear sort of anecdotal stories of businesses. That are not going to reopen once. The lockdown lifted particularly things like restaurants bars cafes which are a big source of jobs in this country but between the lockdown off their business and the collapsing currency. They no longer have a sustainable business. There are stories of hardship that circulate on social media. Every day there was a video of a pregnant woman assume was her husband's Eating out of a dumpster the story of migrant workers who have really been hit hard by this crisis because they haven't been paid in months and some cases trying to cross the border into Israel. Which of course is closed and military is so it's become a very difficult situation. Lebanon has gone to the mouth to ask for a bailout. Of course it will be many other countries asking the IMF for help right now but securing one is going to require a very serious effort at which is something that successive Lebanese governments for decades have not want to do but late last year. We weren't just talking about protests in Lebanon there were demonstrations breaking out over the world particularly in the Middle East and the Arab world. Do you think it's the same story as in Lebanon? This kind of unrest will return to other countries in the region just as soon as the worst of the pandemic has passed. I think it is Lebanon is perhaps going I because the economic situation has gotten so bad here but you go back six months and Iraqis were in the streets protesting against the corrupt and ineffective government. Algerians were protesting all year in two thousand and nine thousand nine. I to overthrow their longtime dictator then to protest against the army-backed government. That succeeded him. All of that of course was suspended because of the lockdowns. Everyone has been at home but The grievances that drove them into the streets in the first place which again are largely economic. Those grievances remain there Iraq on Jerry or both should be quite wealthy countries. They have large oil and gas resources and yet that money has been squandered and stolen over the decades and that is what is driving people into the streets in protest and again in both of those countries situation looks to be getting worse because oil prices are as low as they. Are you look at Iraq? And there are estimates that the government will have a forty billion dollar shortfall this year from what it budgeted versus where oil prices are now. It's not at all clear who's going to step in to lend that kind of money to Iraq and so there to the economy is going to get worse and I think give it a few weeks or a couple of months and likely that people be back out on the streets there as well break. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you

Lebanon Middle East Lebanese Government Tripoli Northern Lebanon Lebanese Army Iraq Baghdad Tripoli Nato Beirut Greg Carlstrom Israel
Open Source Hardware: Makers Unite

Command Line Heroes

06:31 min | 3 months ago

Open Source Hardware: Makers Unite

"Back in the mid two thousands. The open source hardware community wasn't really much of a community. There were hacker spaces shore there. You could find people with a mind towards open source hardware. More and more of these spaces started to pop up all over the world and one was located at Mit. My name is dare. I am the founder of little bits. The group was really almost like a group of misfits from the media lab where it was like artists and designers and kind of like activists that came together to use technology to kind of make impact in the world. I was part of this next generation of multidisciplinary makers empowered by new hardware. I is an engineer. An interactive artist she graduated in Beirut with degrees in computer and Communications Engineering and sociology. In two thousand and four and then from the MIT media lab in two thousand six. I negotiated with my parents that if I had a degree in engineering I could then do design. Which is what I wanted to do. That was the deal. Engineering Tech was starting to make its way into non engineering fields. All over the world in two thousand eight I received a fellowship at IBM art and Technology Center. That's where she invented little bits. Little Bits are pre engineered magnetic electronic bricks similar to lego except they contain lights sound sensors motors solar panels. And so you snap a light. An led to battery light comes on you. Put a light center in between now. You've made a night light. You put motor in two wheels on it. Now you've made the light activated car you can you know put a the Bluetooth module on it. Now you can activate with your phone so you don't have to be an engineer. It takes you seconds to do it. They snapped with magnets so their magical and they Sound beautiful when they snapped. I had two goals to make little bits of company and to make it open source. She wanted the engineering concepts to be accessible to everyone. A lot of the work that existed random. It was around open source software. If there were a few people that were really interested. In how does open source apply to architecture? How it is open source apply to hardware. How does open source applied to electron ix? It made sense that the world is full of these incredible ideas and credible effort. If everybody's always closing off their Inventions and their and their IP You know the world suffers so for Muse. Interesting figuring out how to away where you can be Supporting yourself and sustainable and create strong businesses but also be sharing knowledge but little bits also had to function as business manufacturing distribution investment. Each area had cost associated with them. How could she combined business objectives while at the same time making her hardware? The crux of our operation open source to help figure this out. I did a fellowship with creative Commons and US. Little bits as a case study. That's when she decided to hold that workshop opening hardware back in early twenty ten. We did a workshop where we were like. You know one of the things that important. Should we have a definition? We have a place where we meet. We need a website What works what does work. And around the same time at least show had been doing a similar work as part of being a Bug. Labs another startup. That wanted to be open source. I'm a big proponent to like make sure that you're emotionally prepared to open your hardware before doing it because it kind of means that you're you're giving away your baby a leash. Gabe was working at an open hardware. Supplier called Bug labs as a researcher and prototype. She had started out as a librarian. And through getting my masters in Library Information Science I ended up tripping on this weird path that led me to electronics and I found that I really loved it and really enjoy that feeling of when you light a Benelli D. And you understand that your making electrons do stuff. It's a little bit like you. Control this tiny part of the universe and it feels really powerful and I just love that as different as library science and open hardware maybe for Lisa. They share the same. Ethos you are not a gatekeeper. As a librarian you're there to help people find the information they need. And so those roots really kind of pave the way for open source to be obvious to me really companies like leashes employer bug labs. Were starting to understand the business opportunities that open source hardware could offer. Smaller companies could tap into a broader group of makers Aka customers by going open source. Larger companies could open source designs to competitors and still profit by supplying them with related components. My boss ended up asking me. Look there's gotTa be more people trying to open source hardware than us. Do you think you can find those people and get everybody together. The seat for the future summit was planted with that conversation so as leashes started searching for other open source hardware makers I received the creative Commons Fellowship and hosted the workshop. So this was the first time that I would get to meet in person and I was pretty excited about because I read. Read her research and used it in my research. What I was doing my thesis on are we now and you know a lot of the people in the field. I kind of you either mad or an email lists or whatever. The people that I gathered around the table at her workshop have gone on to become leaders in the open source hardware movement members of the Duino team founders of spark fun and maker bought as well as one very interesting individual who named her hardware company after the world's first computer programmer.

Engineer Communications Engineering And Creative Commons Fellowship MIT Founder Bug Labs United States Technology Center Beirut Ibm Art Gabe Lisa Researcher
Coronavirus delivers tough blow to Lebanon’s dying economy

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus delivers tough blow to Lebanon’s dying economy

"Iraq's the the move virus military aimed pandemic says at keeping people has at least managed home two to do rockets well and this made have the was corona hit could inside virus not do Baghdad's outbreak close heavily boss comes a fortified day off restaurants to green Russian and zone president entertainment Vladimir the seat spots Iraq's Putin across government declared the next tiny and home week Mediterranean a holiday to the U. S. embassy country in which only an economic essential then you a gut attack businesses punch is the first would operate following a time a brief when Russian the button lull authorities is in violence also have mounting reported from early financial one this month of woes the eight hundred the but two also projectiles cases not all I the think struck new is virus very near the Baghdad since with one operations we've hundred never eighty gone command two through something new cases like which this registered before coordinates ever since Iraq's the he's day located before police a in minute Moscow Beirut's she foresees has normally also announced busy how the the Mara command holding center of street all international is now a few completely hundred flights yards deserted starting from the US from embassy earlier Friday this month which is although heeding a regular orders an exception target amid will of the rocket be spread made attacks for flights of the virus it's bringing not because Russians immediately he replaced home known from the if iconic there abroad were any chains casualties the to most brunches people it the virus was the leaving latest causes only mild rocket a attack delivery or moderate to service strike symptoms the operating greens and but for some since I'm three Charles it can rockets cause de hit severe Ledesma the area illness near and the embassy death last Charles Tuesday de Ledesma but the attack was the fourth to target US interests in Iraq in the span of a week I'm Charles de Ledesma

Iraq Baghdad Vladimir Mediterranean United States Charles Charles De Ledesma Zone President U. S. Moscow Charles Tuesday De Ledesma
Garden as refuge with Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:26 min | 4 months ago

Garden as refuge with Ken Druse

"Kind of an eerie juxtaposition out the window and unfair days outside when we can go outside right now unfolding beauty and innocence. You know tiny bulbs plump Little Buds and the headlines. Hourly and daily so You know I wanted to backtrack about what gardening means tests and sort of what brought us to it. What brought you. How long have you been gardening since I was very young house was a teenager and I started with indoor plants and got really turned on and then when I went to college in Rhode Island I was kind of close to Danielson Connecticut which is where low Geez is and you know I was thinking about all this stuff and I think that shopping has a lot to do with my acquisitive NECE and interest in? You know seeing the new plant finding new plant thing will there? Also incredible and shopping online is something you can do now so really well. So you're GONNA be spending some money and when you you said you were a teenager and so forth. What did it besides these sort of amassing a collection? That sort of instinct. That you apparently had Was there some other escapism or something else that brought you to it or you know. I don't know I don't want to project too. I mean I can tell you mine but I just you know I don't know I I know I have a need to nurture and I just love. It's so exciting to see you know. It seems like slow-motion in most cases but to see a plant grow and thrive or something from seed that sometimes. That's pretty fast and from sea to in your case edibles. It's a miracle and to participate in that it it. I'm thinking how heartwarming it is. And that's it's you know it's a boost. Then it makes you. It makes you think about tomorrow. Yeah Yeah I mean for me. I was in my twenties and I mean you know the story most of my listeners. Know Story You know as my twenties. My father had died the next year. My mother was forty. Nine was diagnosed with early onset. Alzheimer's disease I don't even think they called it that at that time but that was the idea and so there. I was called home for my to cover my widowed mother and that unfolded this strange time in my young life and I was close to home to stay close to home during the day. I had a job at night. Someone else came and care for her at night. And what are you GONNA do? I mean as I say you can only watch so much daytime. Tv When you're twenty four twenty five years old and so I got a garden book. As someone gave me Crockett's victory garden and I would seem sad expression. Victory Gardens seems appropriate right now and I you know and I just started doing the stuff in it like I started going to the local garden center and whatever it said I just bought those seeds or that plant or just did these crazy experiments and obviously killed most of the things in the early going. You know I didn't know what I was doing. But that was my entree was during a very dark time and my my younger life So it's been a refuge for me You know number of times it seen me through. I have often said my gardens has saved me many times so I find I'm thinking of spending more time outside because I can't go at the moment And all of my vents. I'm sure like yours have been postponed at least through. May and I'm sure through June and whatever as well Are you thinking of doing more are you? I'm trying to assign myself some projects things I've put off because usually I have garden visitors and I can't make a mess and leave the mess there for weeks while I you know do a Jew Be Greenwich Ovation or something. I'm thinking well. This is the time Margaret. Nobody's coming right well. We we already talked about me shopping. I haven't really gotten that into that but I probably will usually I shop for something because I see something and then I track it down online and then that leads me. Oh they have a minimum order. Oh and then there's five plants and you only wanted one and then there's shipping savings if you buy forty nine dollars for the plant's not that. I've ever done that but I it's almost time for me to spruce up the house plans and that's something. I can do something I should do. You know do a house plant Rehab. I every day I run to light cart to see who's changed or what seed has sprouted. Miracle never tired of that miracle so there there's that Planted some perennials. Yesterday that came in the mail and they were dormant. How so that's happening already in? That's going to continue. I got a Beirut Cherry tree that I'm growing pot I don't know why right well but whatever gets you through. I mean I think right so you said I loved. You said WHO's changed. You went to the light cart To look at your all your little babysit who. You didn't say what she said. Who and I think of them. The same way to plants are not some inanimate objects some it right. You know I think of them as as as who not one but so you said House Plant Rehab. So this is a time for that and we have time. 'cause we're home and we have time to notice and we can. That's a good suggestion for me. Because a lot of years. I get so hectic. Try and get ready for the open gardens. I don't do my repotting of those house plants on their way out the door for the summer or do you know what I mean. I skip it. So that's a really good one when they're on their way out which is late usually mid. May and wouldn't it be great to for me to clean the leaves with a sponge and a little couple of drops dish soap in accord of warm water? And just clean off the dust but also some of them get a little city mole alden. There's all sorts of insects that can actually be removed with a sponge in a tiny bit of soap and water so The things that have ever removed most of the house plants and things that have firm leaves like citrus and Camelia. If you grow things like that and philodendron which you can go anywhere some philodendron. I put my hand under the leaf than just rub the top brush sponging were almost everything comes right off. The plants look so much better and then they say thank you. Yeah Yeah 'cause I mean. Spending a winter indoors is not really their thing. And all that unseen dust that moves around in the air with The heating system when heating systems on in any house right. And you find that fine dust like my clive is all have that by this time of year and they need a nice Tending you so you have you have a Camelia You Grow Hoyas don't you? I I do. There's one at the kitchen window and luckily that's very close the kitchen sink because the plant small enough. It'll go right in the kitchen sink and get washed off there or you have the climate as you. Probably take him to the shower. Yeah I do I do but Yeah but the hoyas. I've never grown them. I've grown them somehow as needed greenhouse. And well we can talk about what they are. They used to be part of the milkweed family but I think they've separated them now but they're semi succulent. They have thick leaves. They're pretty slow growing except in the spring when they kind of shoot. I have one wonderful one called Hoya Carey. I and I started with one leaf in a pot and it stayed that way for about five years. Want an apart- many years ago and then all of a sudden it just exploded a now. It's a very big viney plant. I have it on a a wreath circle. You know stuck in this well. It's a long story but I wound round and round and it has beautiful flowers when it blooms in the summer and it has heart shaped leaves. I have another one that has purple flowers. They don't flower very often. And it's important not to trim eight trim where the flowers come because it blooms on Spurs Kinda like an apple tree and it'll bloom over and over again on the same spurs so you have to not cut those dead head so to speak to the flowers and their fragrance almost all of them and if you do cut it or it will bleed white. Latex like a lot of succulents and milkweed male creates right. Right right

House Plant Rehab Camelia Victory Gardens Rhode Island Danielson Connecticut Spurs Alzheimer's Disease Hoya Carey Crockett Margaret Beirut
Beirut Bakery Bridging Divides

Monocle 24: The Menu

06:44 min | 4 months ago

Beirut Bakery Bridging Divides

"Bakery talks besides a row of small's cafes in central Beirutis north your typical location for community building checked but through producing high-quality Sour Dough. Bread and a roster of tempting bagels. Cookies and Mafias Ma. Baker is using business to bring together people who would likely never otherwise meet. Syrian and Lebanese who reached and poor old and young the bakery salsa focusing on using ancient varieties of local weeds as well as finding new uses for Levinstein. Kitchen cupboards staples like olive oil cumin seeds and great molasses. Monaco's Beta which correspond reports. Went along to meet the Bakers Kid kid scientists new to you as built up. Great confidence in myself. I used to be very introverted but now I talk before I never used to talk. People would come and I would never speak. I'll be ashamed but now I speak without a problem when a woman earns money she feels like she's done something in her life and has something now. My children are more aware about not just sitting at home between four walls. No I go out and work now policy. That's done your water for the past three years. She's been baking sour dough. Bread with us. Citizen Brent Stuart after a long period based in Tripoli in North Lebanon Brenton Dinya recently began baking but then new premises in Beirut Malia Bakery. It's named after a pre Islamic Arab Warrior Queen Reflecting the idea that work empowers women coming along to Mario Bakery in central Beirut's Bryant opened up a couple of weeks ago and let's go and have a look what they doing the bakery today. Smells just amazing and sledding bagels dipping them in great molasses and then covering them with sesame seeds and caraway seeds although their neighbors relations between Lebanon and Syrians haven't always been positive. Tensions have been exacerbated since the beginning of the war in Syria in two thousand and eleven Lebanese blame. The one million plus Syrians who sought refuge in their country for burdening and already creaking infrastructure and failing economy. Syrians blame Lebanese for discrimination and racism. So that's where the breadcrumbs and Brent had already started a small NGO in north Lebanon. He thought that by getting Syrians and Lebanese to bake together. Prejudice isn't fears might have less space to grow. My name is Brandt Stewart American from Las Vegas originally and I came to Lebanon about seven years ago. I started to realize in order to really support a community I needed to address the needs of everyone in the community equally. Not just one segment of it just to help foster these ties. I started to see that my role as a manager of this profit is to use various common goals in order to bring people under the same in the same space and so we don't come together and talk about. Let's say peace building or community building what we have in common and what we don't have in common. We actually just focus on the common goal and I've seen through that process whether that's baking bread or whether that's education in the classroom these barriers. They break away and they fall down and people. They focused on what they have in common instead of focusing on what they don't through baking bread with her. Dunya a mother of five from the great friendship with a Syrian woman. Oh bida she left law September because she married and moved to Turkey but didn't use realization that they shed more similarities than differences has remained bus another synthetic Halloween again. Two years we spent working together really wonderful. She was like my sister and more. We used to visit each other. Go to sitting cafe together and had a good time. Mom about Malia bakery staple product is a high quality sour bread baked in woodfired oven with Brunton Dina's meticulous work. One loaf takes three days to produce from start to finish if we go to the oven Ashley now and so. This is the oven where things baked. So there's a huge gold oven and would fights. It's what fired. Yeah so this door is made of steel. It's very well fitted just to keep steam. We have to steam the breath to keep the steam contained in. Wow Wow goodness me as you can see here still quite hot. We fired this about three days ago. Mase yeah you can feel the heat coming out still quite hot Brunton Dunya. Sour dough is different from Standard White Lopes produced in Lebanon and Syria Venezuela hovers hide. The hovers the Brady's really good it's healthy with natural wheat and fermentation honestly. When I got my mom to taste it. It reminded her of the bridge. He used to have in the old days when they would make the starter and use it to bake bread. My Mom really likes it always tells me to bring some for her to perform MOEE. Bakery is also promoting Lebanon's feed producers by using local varieties of wheat. That's an idea that attracted chef. Yes Meena Hayek who knows twenty loaves a week for restaurant. La Career in Beirut's to Maisy district so most of the flowers on Lebanon refined flowers and it's rare to find stone mill flowers like brands and brand stone. Mrs Practice Flower instantly before baking so which Which which gives his bread this awesome flavors because if power is very fresh. I think that's using these varieties of wheat. That are going to eventually disappear as a way to save. Our food heritage. Brent soon hopes to expand Maui a bakery into a cafe as well wet buyers can come to enjoy the products on site the seven spice cookies and smokey sour dough crust particularly Morrish. Junior may well soon have other bakers joining her to cope with increased demand

Lebanon Brent Stuart Beirut Beirut Malia Bakery Syria Mario Bakery North Lebanon Brenton Dinya Brunton Dunya Mafias Ma Beirutis Levinstein Monaco Baker Brunton Dina Meena Hayek Islamic Arab Mrs Practice Flower Turkey Brandt Stewart
Amaio: High End Beyond Swimwear

American Fashion Podcast

09:18 min | 5 months ago

Amaio: High End Beyond Swimwear

"Hi Samantha. Hi Charles how are you? I'm pretty good. So you're You're swimwear line line a Myo. It's Kinda pitched as Appraise swim which the French for after swim. So you're covering swimwear you're making giving suits and then you're making things to wear after he got out of the pool or around the pool kind of stuff exactly okay But you're also very sustainability focused in your maiden Los Angeles so let's talk Tell me a little bit about the brandon where it came from. Yeah so We are very much pointing the swim category. All of our pieces are made and designed to be worn. Not only as swim but as ready to wear solve our one pieces you can easily whereas bodysuits and our tops as crop tops or are swim card against tops with high waisted pants. In addition to all of our resort where pieces transitioning straight back to the swim and you can have a full couture outfit all in a Myo tour We it is not. It's high end luxury and we tried to be as As possible obviously not being in Paris and coming from that heritage but Very much in our technique in the construction of our pieces. We take a lot of inspiration from couture and do the best that we can. You actually have a background where you're very Cosmopolitan you've been around. Can you talk to me a little bit about How you came to do fashion a new. You also have a fine arts and literature background as well. Yes that's correct so I got my degree in Studio Fine Arts And French Comparative Literature I made the transition into fashion design right after university and kind of fell in love with the swim category because it felt like the perfect combination of these two sides of myself One that's been in the water as much as possible since I was a child And then the other the the more cosmopolitan side of of growing up Between Boston in Paris and And Beirut so Having something that was more fashion forward and elegant within the swim category really resonated with me and then creating a multi functioning Multipurpose product for the cosmopolitan. Modern woman was very exciting for us. Would you say from Your Fine Arts background? How much does that inform what you do as a designer do? Do you feel like you pull more from your fashion school skills or you're fine. Art Skills the things that you learn specifically in those different schools when you're designing. I would say from my fine arts just because in particular. We spend a lot of time studying the female body and the female form does yes and so dealing with a stretch. Fabric fit is obviously the most critical and important aspect of the product. So and then and then the inspiration from more of the old couture houses of Paris. Kind of the fun. Cherry on top So we I take a lot of inspiration from ready to wear and couture elements and then apply them onto onto swim so most people think of Los Angeles as producing t shirts and jeans. Not the the find sewing. So how do you build an apparatus? Did you find a factory in La? That was already able to do this or did you start your operation. Now it's been very difficult We are development as start up from scratch So I found all of our development team Which is a huge component of being able to replicate the more fine finer sewing And then we work with several contractors but we are very hands on with the contractors to ensure they execute Kind of at the level and standard that were striving for so. How were you selling? This we are selling to wholesalers or we have wholesale partners as well as directly off of our website. What's kind of stores are you in so far? I mean you started this in two thousand sixteen right We officially launched in May twenty seventeen. I did a very soft launch and may twenty sixteen okay And then we started mainly just with wholesale accounts and then we launched our ECOMMERCE platform in January twenty eighteen and we're currently with Neiman. Marcus Bergdorf Goodman. We've been with anthropology and And then several you know hotel luxury luxury hotels around the world like the four seasons and chevelle blown Saint Bart's and Were with Michelle farmer and Several other small stood greats. Luxury store is around the world. I don't think of all those kind of high end stores. As being very tech savvy. Do you get good information about your sales from and what's selling and what's not working and we do we do. I mean we. Our retail partners are important to us as much as our direct to consumer as as important to us And really building. That relationship with our buyers is important So we tried to make an effort to do that As well as you know making an effort to have that relationship with our directly with our consumers and how you approach ecommerce what what do you say to people online about the brand what? How'd you encapsulated into the little bits that get shared on social media? Yeah so our messaging to our customers very two folds one is explaining that we are making that bridge between a place ski which most people are more familiar with Saying you know you you have a place. Ski In the Outerwear Category. Why don't we have a play? Swim come to a mile and this is who we are and we style All of our pieces very much during her shoots as ready to wear to showcase to the consumer how you can wear our our product outside of the beach and ocean and pool And then the second fold is is looping background to your first question about the sustainability and philanthropic component of our brand which is very important for us In today's market. I think you have to have a really strong vision. And stance of where you want to be in the global climate today And for us it's really important to be a part of that sustainability conversation especially since unfortunately lycra is a synthetic fabric So we WANNA be really on the forefront of the new technology that's coming out around textiles. That are better for the environment Better for the world as well as promoting the more artisanal craftsmanship Better working conditions word. You see the most promise in terms of material science meeting these sustainability challenges for stretch fabric. Yeah I think definitely. Just in the efforts around creating recyclable LYCRA fabrics We still have not been able to find a fabric. That's one hundred percent recyclable. And still very luxurious so we put a lot of emphasis on our base. Swim Fabric In this sustainability component of it so the the meal that we work with fully powered and their technology for how they recycle and reuse. The water waste is extremely efficient and innovative And so that's all really important. So if we can't use a fully recyclable fabric. We try to make sure that every other component of how that fabric is made is very sustainable and very efficient and provide an you know creates as little carbon waste as possible are like Rizzo Extra Life Lycra certified so it will last you a lifetime. Oh what is that? Extra life. Lakers certified is pretty much is what it almost. Sounds like It? It's a tight. It's a technique that diminishes the erosion and kind of the wear and tear. That GRA can go through when it's exposed to the elements and so it's in the it's in the finishing in its in actually how they create the fabric in ensuring it will last you fifty plus sixty years. So is this a new product that you're able to access that that wasn't there a couple of years ago now extra life. Laker has been technology. That's been around for a couple years And so we just make sure that we are a part of that. But there's a lot of really interesting new technology around Recycled Nanno fibers which I find highly fascinating. Japan is actually a great They're really on the forefront of the these new types of fabrics and so. I'm hoping to incorporate more of

Paris Studio Fine Arts And French Co Los Angeles Charles Samantha Marcus Bergdorf Goodman Development Team Japan Lakers Laker SKI Michelle Farmer Boston Rizzo
"beirut" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:58 min | 5 months ago

"beirut" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Outside the US embassy in Beirut they're angry over the White House plan for Middle East peace which heavily favors Israel police outside the embassy spraying pepper spray the long arm of the law catching up with a criminal in Canada who escaped American justice sixteen years ago police crediting digital footprints of the capture of a don per as where to in Toronto authorities say a detective from the Chandler police department Arizona started searching for where to buy checking social media post of his family and friends a thirty year old pleaded guilty to negligent homicide stemming from a two thousand two death of a nineteen year old woman who was a passenger in a vehicle driven by where to fox's CJ Papa at the time of the crash authorities say where his blood alcohol level was twice the legal limit the arrest warrant form was issued in two thousand three Miami beach is bustling as football fans there and across the country prepare for the Superbowl as the Kansas City Chiefs get set to take on the San Francisco forty Niners this is arguably one of the most balanced Superbowl matchups one can recall Tyron Matthew there's a Richard Sherman Fred deport a Frank Clark for a Travis Kelsey at George kill retiree killing me call Hartman Emmanuel Sanders in depot Samuel the chiefs won a half point favorites for pretty much all of the lead up to the big game tonight Kansas city in search of their first Super Bowl victory in five decades the forty Niners won their first in twenty five years in Miami ad of Super Bowl fifty four Paul Dano fox news at the Australian Open Novak Djokovic age didn't just win the men's final he refused to lose looking weary and worn down Djokovic battled back to beat Dominik team the victory his eighth at the Australian Open it was his seventeenth grand slam trophy overall I'm camp who sell this is fox news this news was brought to you by A. M. M. collision now for your kale BJ radar weather watch quite a warm day ahead for today will see.

White House A. M. M. Dominik Novak Djokovic Miami Kansas Richard Sherman Fred football fox Chandler Toronto Israel Middle East Beirut US fox news Niners Hartman Emmanuel Sanders
Introducing WeCrashed the story of the rise and fall of We Work

Business Wars Daily

05:49 min | 5 months ago

Introducing WeCrashed the story of the rise and fall of We Work

"Daily. Hey their business wars listeners. I'm David Brown every week on the show. We talk about the greatest rivalries in history manipulation and backstabbing or common as companies. Try to take each other down but what happens when a major company company collapses from the inside out the tech. Darling we work was the poster child for a new economy. We works founders wanted to revolutionize the way people work how they live how they sleep even how they raise their kids. It's charismatic founder. Adam Newman had an intoxicating vision for the company but it never we're matched up with reality from wondering the makers of business wars and dirty John Comes. We crashed a six part series about the rise and fall of we work work. It's a story of hope and Hubris. We crashed peels back. The layers on how Newman's culture personality shaped every square foot of we. You Work and how that same powerful personality destroyed it. You're about to hear a preview of the first episode of we crashed as you're listening. Be Sure to subscribe to. We crashed and other. Great wondering shows on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you're listening right now it was June twenty seventeen and the Barclay Center in Brooklyn was packed nearly every seat of the arena that was filled with thousands of group college graduates and their families. I'm looking at all the parents. I'm looking at balloons. I'm seeing horns people smiling. I think I had a smile on my face. Probably the whole time. While I'm at Francis was graduating second in his class which meant he had one of the best seats in the House that was on stage and it was just like wow. I'll be seated the next to you. Know some distinguished people the year before Senator Chuck Schumer had been the commencement speaker this year though was different because this year the the person giving the speech was also graduated. Just like Quan. Well Cumberland College. Class of twenty seventy soon as he walks onstage tall guy. Long hair slicked back. Look he's pulled out the roll out of his trunk and it's like all right. I gotTa dawn this little thing for this ceremony. But I think it'd be headed his way he'd be a t shirt written some fans. Adam Newman all six feet. Five inches of him had taken fifteen years from his first class to finally get his college degree here he was. We looked at it to see a black mortar boards and clasped his hands together in what looked like a gesture of prayer. It's my honor and privilege to graduate with all of you today with his billowing robe flowing black hair and arms outstretched Adam look more like a preacher than what he actually was the. CEO of a multi cheap billion dollars startup called we were an atom was here to spread the spirit of we who is definitely not a traditional commencement speech. The next revolution is going to be the we river loose and the we revolution it's going to be led by generation and the we generation does not discriminate between age race gender or religion Derek. Throwing their hands up their fist pump in people are standing up and train them on. You could think of somebody being the life of the party. You could think of him so as Kwame and the other students listened. Adam told them his story how he had. I moved to New York from Israel to get a degree college. I spent my first two years in Baru studying a little bit and partying locked but then a close friend. His came from Israel to visit. It looked at me and said is this while you left Israel. Is this why you left your family and your loved ones everyone who care about to go party in New York City. I was inspired by his words and his harsh criticism. I woke up the next morning and said it's time to start my first business adventure. Eventually Adam left Beirut behind his business career took off but he was here today he said because even after he'd become a billionaire all his grandma ever ever wanted was for him to finish college South Dynasty who paid for my full tuition. She really did want to graduate. She really did and she kept asking me every year. When you graduating when are you graduating and I said this you know we've done? I have a family we built us. We're doing well no. When are you graduating? I need to Oh hanging above my bed. It was a good story and Adam was a great storyteller. He commanded a presence on like any other. He definitely took everybody's attention so it was just very different a different kind of message. We are weak and if we worked together we cannot not be stopped we work the business Adam found it was more than just a company to him. Yes he wanted to become the world's first trillionaire there but he also truly believe that his company would fundamentally change not just how people work how they live how they raise children how they communicate with one. Another Adam believed he was on the brink of making history in a way you know he was because Adam Newman was about to preside over the largest largest fastest wipe out of shareholder value by a single company since Enron looking back. Maybe the most telling moment of the Ho- commencement speech was when when he shared a story about his first date with his wife. Rebecca went on the first date with me and within five minutes. Now I say five minutes to be nice but it surely it

Adam Newman Senator Chuck Schumer Israel Darling David Brown Cumberland College Founder Kwame Barclay Center New York City Brooklyn Enron Apple HO Francis Rebecca CEO Baru John New York
The Roman Catholic Priest Held Hostage in Lebanon

Hostage

07:37 min | 5 months ago

The Roman Catholic Priest Held Hostage in Lebanon

"This is our final episode on Father Lawrence. Martin Janko a Catholic priest taken hostage by a Lebanese terrorist organization. Last week we examined the curious. Mix Up that led to Father Chen Coz capture sure we also followed the trajectory of the Lebanese terrorist organization Hezbollah and they're extremist co founder. Imad Mugniyah this week. We'll delve into the wretched. Living conditions and abuse Father Janko experienced in captivity will also follow his family's campaign for his release and the multiple to free Father Janko and other US hostages in Lebanon late January nineteen eighty five. Fifty year-old Father Janko was chained to a radiator in the dirty kitchen of an apartment overlooking overlooking Lebanon's because valley on his lap lay an abridged version of David Copperfield. That one of his guards had given him. He must have read it ten times. Already with the glasses he'd had in his pocket when he was captured reaching beneath his sweater he pulled out a raw potato and nibbled nibbled off a piece he placed it near the small hole where his friends family of ants. Were busy foraging. Father Janko envied their freedom freedom. He had been in this filthy kitchen for nearly a month and he still didn't know why nevertheless he had adapted to a little routine meals. Sales were three times a day. Lebanese bread rice fava beans and the occasional vegetable. He was also given one daily trip to the toilet for a while. This visit to the bathroom included a hot shower. Then the boiler in the basement exploded. It had been weeks since he had felt. It's even remotely clean or warm the radiator. He was chained to didn't work and at night. His guards had pile blankets on top of him to keep him from freezing being the end. He was still experiencing occasional tightness around his heart the day before his capture Father Janko had visited a doctor for tests he tried not to dwell. On what the results might have been especially since his father had died at age fifty three from heart attack his two guards. Guards provided occasional distractions during the long days. They were gentle towards father. Janko calling him a Buna the Arabic word for our father father if he was lucky they would strike up a small conversation in broken English. One Guard told a story of his sister visiting a restaurant in Switzerland island not knowing a common word for chicken she had to act it out. The guard burst into laughter and Father Janko couldn't help but chuckle. To one of the men occasionally brought Father Janko a small bag of cookies from his wife. The other gave him Muslim prayer beads to add to the Catholic Rosary. He'd made out of potato sack strings. These small relationships brought a mild sense of comfort to Father Janko during his seemingly endless days but he was otherwise alone. Most of the long quiet hours were passed by praying with his rosary although he had other more devious ways of passing the time every every so often soldiers would bring fresh food like mutton potatoes and tomatoes to the apartment. Father Janko found chances to sneak pieces of food food off the kitchen counter. He would hide them in his close to snack on between meals or to share with the family of ants. Uh One afternoon. In February Father Janko spied a jeep coming over the hill. He grabbed the sweater. He used as a blindfold. A car meant visitors and he was expected to wear a blindfold anytime someone new entered the apartment a few minutes later a strange man strode into the kitchen. Hitchin through the loose. We've his blindfold father. Janko could detect has dark eyebrows a bushy beard and a strong frame. UNBEKNOWNST to him him this was very man who had ordered his kidnapping. The Stranger crouched in front Father Janko and began to speak an interpreter behind him. Said my name is had Rodwin. Conversation was brief had Radwan did not explain y Father Janko had been kidnapped. He simply told him that he would be going home soon. Father Djenka would hear that word. Many times is over. The next eighteen months he would eventually come to mistrust it but for now he clung to this scrap of hope it would be many a years before he or anyone outside of Hezbollah would realize that had Radwan was a pseudonym the man standing before Father Janko was Imad odd move Nia the founder of Hezbollah Hezbollah was Lebanese. Shia extremist group funded by Shia revolutionaries and Iran and the group took root in the months following. Israel's nineteen eighty-two invasion of Lebanon their main goal was to drive Israel and its western Western allies out of Lebanon and to establish a pro Islamic government in the capital city of Beirut at the time of Father Jean Coz kidnapping Hezbollah was still an underground militia who outwardly call themselves Islamic Jihad which means holy war in in December of Nineteen eighty-three. Imad Mughniyah had helped orchestrate the Hezbollah bombing six locations and Kuwait City including the US embassy in the aftermath. Seventeen Shia radicals were captured by the Kuwaiti government. One of them was a mods best friend and brother-in-law Mustafa Body in retaliation for Mustafa's capture Imad had ordered the kidnapping of several. US citizens in Beirut route. He hoped that President Ronald Reagan would pressure the Kuwaiti government to release their seventeen prisoners. But the Reagan administration at least at that point had a staunch policy against negotiating with terrorists to do so would only incite more acts of terrorism in the midst of this impasse. Father Other Janko had been abducted. His was the fifth of eight American kidnappings connected to Hezbollah although one prisoner Jerry. Levin would escape on Valentine's Day February fourteenth nineteen eighty five that morning father Jenkins Guards burst into his his room panicked. They ordered him to put on his blindfold as they unfathomable chains in his haste. Father Janko didn't think to grab his glasses or his rosary. They let him down the hall and into another room of the apartment through his blindfold. He could see a rope. made a bed sheets dangling from a small window high up on the wall. Jerry Levin's exit route. Then to strange men marched into the room and brought Father Janko outside ride an escaped captive could compromise their location. So they would have to move Father Janko quickly. They shoved him into a car trunk and sped off

Martin Janko Father Lawrence Father Chen Hezbollah Father Djenka Imad Mugniyah Lebanon Kidnapping United States Jerry Levin Radwan Beirut Catholic Rosary Co Founder David Copperfield President Ronald Reagan Kuwaiti Government Switzerland Island Iran
"For Your Reconsideration" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:40 min | 5 months ago

"For Your Reconsideration" Week

"This week's theme is for your reconsideration. The curator is Donde from luminary. Here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Yolanda. Monday's episode comes from metaphysical milkshake and is called. Can you honor indigenous faiths without being a jerk. It's thirty four minutes long in this episode. rainn Wilson Resin Ostlund have one question. How do we honor and embrace embrace indigenous faiths without becoming like Kevin Costner? How can we become more than dilettantes? With dream catchers Kevin Locke is an artist Hoop dancer musician musician. Educator and cultural ambassador for his Lakota an Amish on Beirut's he joined the pod to share what we can do to better understand our indigenous faith traditions and how out to see our spiritual heritage in all the land around us. Join the conversation using Hashtag. Metaphysical an email your thoughts to metaphysical milkshake at soul pancake. GEICO DOT COM. Tuesday's episode comes from on second thought with Trevor Noah and is called prison break. It's forty four minutes long in this episode. Trevor and David David discussed their ideas for improving. Prison then talk about alternatives to incarceration Danielle Sarid founder of common justice. Wednesday's episode comes from from under the skin with Russell brand and his called science capitalism. And God with Neil degrasse Tyson. It's one hundred twenty one minutes long. Here's the description. This week's guest on under the skin is the infamous astrophysicist Neil degrasse Tyson. He's pretty amazing. He was promoting his book letters from an astrophysicist but he was much more than and being a focused and dedicated educator I enjoyed talking to him. Thursday's episode comes from here to slay with Roxane gay and Tracy McMillan Cottam him and his called all. Your faves are problematic. It's fifty three minutes long this week on the show Tracy and Roxanne take on the Popeye's chicken sandwich and all of its glory as well as the problematic takes that have come along with it. Friday's episode comes from the seaward with Lena Dunham and Alison Bennett and is called Lady Rosemary. Aber door it's fifty three minutes long in this episode Rosemary. Obrador seemed to most like a shy awkward wallflower but underneath drab exterior lurked an appetite for Jules parties parties and larceny born into an unassuming middle-class English home rosemary secretly stole thousands of pounds to fund her glamorous identity as titled Aristocracy. That's Lady Lady Aberdeen to you. Lena analyst Cover Rosemary's wild parties outrageous schemes her ultimate downfall and discuss what it's like to feel unseen and unappreciated those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Yolanda for this week's theme for your reconsideration

Neil Degrasse Tyson Lady Rosemary Trevor Noah Yolanda Lady Lady Aberdeen Kevin Costner Cover Rosemary Lena Dunham Rainn Wilson Resin Kevin Locke Geico Beirut Tracy Mcmillan Danielle Sarid Obrador Russell Analyst Jules Roxane Gay David David
Lebanon Names New Cabinet Amid Political and Economic Crisis

Morning Edition

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Lebanon Names New Cabinet Amid Political and Economic Crisis

"Anti government protests are continuing in Lebanon where a new cabinet is in place nearly four months after the country's prime minister resigned NPR's Deborah Amos in Beirut says Lebanon is experiencing its worst economic crisis in decades the new prime minister sixty year old house and DO is a university professor his cabinet is made up of specialist technocrats do you have said the new cabinet filled the demands of the protesters but that seems unlikely these cabinet ministers are backed by traditional political parties the deal finalized when Hezbollah agreed on the names with our

Lebanon Prime Minister NPR Deborah Amos Beirut Professor Hezbollah
Lebanon protests: New government ends months of deadlock

All Things Considered

00:58 sec | 6 months ago

Lebanon protests: New government ends months of deadlock

"There's a new government in Lebanon this after protesters forced the resignation of the prime minister almost four months ago from Beirut and peers Deborah Amos reports the new cabinet lineup will have to tackle the country's worst economic crisis in decades the new prime minister sixty year old house on DHEA is a university professor his cabinet is made up of specialist technocrats the OB said none of them would stand for elections to focus on the economic crisis for the first time a woman was named as his deputy do you have said the new cabinet for filled the demands of the protesters but that seems unlikely protesters have called for sweeping reforms these cabinet ministers are backed by traditional political parties the deal finalized when Hezbollah a powerful political and militant organization agreed on the names with our allies political parties aligned with the west in Saudi Arabia are now outside the government in opposition Deborah Amos NPR news

Lebanon Prime Minister Beirut Deborah Amos Professor Saudi Arabia Hezbollah
Lebanese protesters back in streets following brief lull

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Lebanese protesters back in streets following brief lull

"Hundreds of protesters marched in the streets of Beirut to was the residence of the designated prime minister Hasan di OB I am in Syria Sheckley pulling a brief flawless Lebanese protesters that return to the streets looking several rows around the capital Beirut and other areas of the country in renewed rallies against a ruling elites they say has failed to address the economy's downward spiral protesters burned tires and blocked three main highways leading to the capital from the south east and north bringing traffic to a standstill school and university students took part in some of the protests and hundreds March down main highways raising Lebanese flags and blasting writing songs through laws because Lebanon is facing its worst economic crisis in decades

Japan failed to arrange fair trial for Ghosn: French lawyer

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

Japan failed to arrange fair trial for Ghosn: French lawyer

"A French lawyer representing former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn says he agrees with this client that go and could not get a fair trial in Japan Cohn says that's largely why he fled to Lebanon while out on bail in Tokyo on charges of financial misconduct NPR's Eleanor Beardsley has more from Paris lawyer falls was in Norway said it had been for Japan's prosecutors to prove Goans guilt not for going to have to prove his innocence in a two hour plus press conference this week in Beirut going said he feared for his life in the Japanese justice system this is a system that is indifferent to the truth indifferent to fairness I'm process indifferent to fundamental CVV birdies and I accepted norms of justice Japan's justice minister called cones allegations untrue and said he was looking to justify his unlawful exit from

Chairman Carlos Ghosn Japan Cohn Lebanon Tokyo Eleanor Beardsley Norway Japan Beirut Justice Minister Nissan Paris Goans
"beirut" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:45 min | 9 months ago

"beirut" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Welcome to the Lebanon ready for combat in the midst of an escalating sectarian crisis in the country in his new book published by the Brookings Institution press titled Beirut Nineteen fifty-eight See Makers in this conversation today with Bill Finance Director of the Brookings Press all the Molly Reynolds explains what's happening in Congress. You can follow the Brookings Podcast podcast if you want more podcast content from brookings experts on tough global challenges learn how to manage North Korea and Danny Bahar on how to repair Venezuela shattered economy foreign policy dot com slash podcasts war on your podcast APP and now.

"beirut" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"beirut" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Important myself out of Beirut. Once I think I can get out of New Jersey. We'll be so sue others have tried and failed. The atop population is back. Facing New Jersey and that south sent an accidental sell Paul. I should know from jersey. I'm going back to jersey starting up a business, again, don't even tell me down the shore and was planning to class field trip to a French wig factory. Trump said resists the bunny at the memo park mall is marking Vincent. Hello to taste in jersey jersey filled out what that's a lovely accent. You have New Jersey live from New Jersey. It's Dement ski Doyle. Good afternoon. It is to ten. Yes. It's a Friday. And we are DNB. I'm jeff. Radio. Big Bill Doyle. Bill. Yes. I know how excited you must be with the release of western stars. I know you're a huge Bruce Springsteen fan. Oh as wonder what the hell you talking about western star, the movie or something all your favorite artists Bruce Springsteen. I don't.

New Jersey Bruce Springsteen Bill Doyle Beirut Trump Vincent
"beirut" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"beirut" Discussed on PRI's The World

"After holiday in the told me of love is lane, which is kind of Parkway which runs possum Roman ruins. And as we sat down on the bench. There was this couple and Ronnie kind of jerk with them every week. He interrupts this and they evening. Bye. Bye. Footsie tourists to sit down on the bench next. Couples moments embarrassing. I apologize and on the way 'cause it pasta, and that kind of blasting music and rone's joking with people calling out the windows to us, and you can just tell the being on the streets and explaining Beirut's of people like this is is kind of when rone's in is elements. Around. Drew? Roney was telling stories of Beirut's best days and days. And he says he always try to remain objective in version of events. He told but in two thousand thirteen his family was sucked into the story of Pless clan. Rest that he'd recounted hundreds of times. A massive car bombing echo throughout the city and most assassinations you can hear them when you're in Beirut. I heard the explosion and for few minutes. I thought this. There was a construction site next to where I was living. I thought something may have fallen. But by maybe fifteen twenty minutes after it happened. My INTERPOL was buzzing my friend who helps on the tour. She had heard on the news. Choose in Texas on the radio. She had heard that it was my father. Rone's dad who was eleven politician was assassinated in downtown Beirut. I found out by basically pushing her away from me because she did not want to see my phone. I went outside the apartment, I left her inside. I went to my phone within a maybe a few seconds after that. I realized what happened. Two days lights are Rony buried his dad right next to mall to square he still doing the toll. And he says he didn't want to be in Lebanon anymore. My father was killed. There's no trial criminals that did this got away. Why am I still here? So in September two thousand fourteen he moved to Scotland never imagined that end up in skull them never thought. I'd visits colon or there my girlfriend now my fiancee, she was accepted to a university of the university of Edinburgh. And we agreed that we would leave this country together of the next four years. He studied for his most in literature and at the start of this year at the two thousand eighteen he came to Lebanon, just for a visit I had to test myself for longtime. I had not been back for years. So I decided to see everyone that I missed dearly and sort of just come to terms of it program had been started in his dad's name, and and he wanted to raise extra funds to cover the costs of it. So he did the toll one will time. So I thought I'd do one tour by just literally thought, you know, what I'll do it one more time. But when he thought publicizing it Nettie fi. Eight.

Beirut rone Roney Ronnie kind Lebanon INTERPOL Pless Rony Texas university of Edinburgh Scotland fifteen twenty minutes four years Two days
"beirut" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"beirut" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman. And this is the world where a co production of the BBC World Service PRI and WG here in Boston. When I go jogging usually run across the MIT campus, and I often come across a tour guide showing off the main dome building on massive smart, local showing off a little piece of their world for the next fifteen minutes, you're going to take this kind of tour. It is set in a place Beirut a city that has seen a lot of upheaval and conflict, but our tour is focused on the life of the tour guide himself. Reporter Alex Aytac has his story. So we stunning holiday in downtown Beirut, which is basically seen as one of the city's most obvious reminders, if the civil will it stunts shelled out Dulcie with bullet holes is this kind of gray hunk of tala. One year. It's a monster right in the heart of the city. That's Ronnie Irani shut up. I guess the best title from us storyteller. Or narrator of the city's past the Holiday Inn was famous for three things size that rotating balcony the restaurant at the top. And lesser known fact, which the luxury cinema boutique cinema below it called the Saint Charles. We're talking I mean leather chairs and velvet curtains all that. So you know, if you wanted to impress your date, it would take them to that cinema or maybe taking to the rest of stairs. He kind of half jokingly told us that he was a product at the hotel right before the war started his parents had one of states that one of their first romantic dates, so it's also a way to look back, even if it's falling apart and strip bear and war torn. The hotels which made Beirut the tourist center the Middle East on to teach forts one in street by street flow by full battle one of the most iconic images to merge from the war is a Bill of black smoke rising from a fire inside the hotel. The hotel was only open for one year when the Lebanese civil Wilbur out. And when it did rone's parents left Lebanon for the US bay fled in nineteen seventy six one year into the civil war. His that go visas moved to Texas to study at the university of Texas. That's where I was born. So runny wasn't born in Lebanon, but his early relationship to Lebanon, his early his early exposure to Lebanon, when he was young was through these like storybooks, these kind of nostalgia books as he called them are home was full of these nostalgia books. You have these sort of old pictures of the country before the war broke out. These are nineteen sixties photos early nineteen seventies. And it's funny to see how. Different. This country is today that it's so built up. Now, it's hard to hard to really experience the glory days of Beirut and Lebanon. I think that's that's permanently gone. But these photos are nice to kind of almost like an exercise in imagination. See what the country used to quit, and these kinds of photos that he's talking about you. You see them every Torah shop in Beirut that these kind of high saturation vers tinted tributes to Beirut's glory days, they show Beirut locked in the state of prosperity that it never returned to off to the wall. My memories earliest memories of Beirut are war torn downtown from the early nineties. You could still see a lot of the mess that was left from the civil war. He had trees everywhere stray dogs. There were still land mines you couldn't go anywhere. It was risky so running out with under reconstruction. And those say neighborhoods that he'd always known to be unsafe by the time..

Beirut rone Lebanon Marco werman BBC Ronnie Irani MIT Holiday Inn Boston Alex Aytac Reporter Middle East Texas Saint Charles university of Texas US nineteen seventy six one year fifteen minutes
"beirut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Challenge ram coolers because we thought we are architects urban planners, and we read his theory and we'd see is works and what he says that's not apply to where he designed. And we're happy that we got an answer from, at least he is aware that people are not happy with this project. We are fighting for the whole coast of Beirut, but Dalli is right next to Rochat rose de landmark of Beirut, it's on our national money. It's, you know, shit. It's like if there's one mugging Beirut, Rosie, so you want to build right next to it. So if somebody comes to take photograph Knicks throughout, she has now to do and not to get the results sign with it. It's not possible. I mean, the integrity of the landscape, it's one not to landscape. So if this cannot be defended, well, how can I defend small beach and unfair small beach in the south. This has a memory has the prestige of the landmark. It is an open geological museum. We have geologist who came in because you can see the strata by threat. So they said that anybody who knows a bit of geology can act. Trace the layers of Bela just by looking at it, and then it is also Narcology side and it was the first bellio Listrik Flint factory. So half of the Flint of the Mediterranean was mind was tooled in Delhi. So imagine all of this and they want to dig it buy compressors, and we have ninety pieces in them. You did in that are called the stylus of minted daily. So you know, they took them to Leo and now we're gonna if we dig, we would find more. They're not allowing them even start, so I'll kill geologic endemic plants. It has endemic flora and it has marine fauna that is coral, reefs and stuff. So what else do you want to defend a place in the city? You tell me what else do I need as Mona will explain the difficulty in turning public opinion in Beirut isn't out of blind APPA and so in your work as a Preservationists or circumstances like this, trying to save space from development, how easier. Heart is it? Or in what ways do you try to engage residents and get them to understand what's at stake? It's really difficult because people have given up the will itself has taken a lot of the energy of the people. And when the war ended, they were cruel. You know, devastated homes are destroyed and then came solitaire with the promise of redevelopment. But the downtown was redeveloped not for the people. So today the people do not go to their downtown. So people lost hope in everything and they lost been fighting in the first place because if you're downtown has been taken over by real estate development company, your whole downtown, what are you fighting for your little street or little alleyway? If nobody listened to you about your downtown,.

Beirut Rosie geological museum Listrik Flint Dalli geologist Delhi APPA Leo Mona
"beirut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"And since we've ERI short on space, we can't ask somebody to give us a part of his lot to make a garden. We said, why don't you park your cars under your garden? So she actually created a raised garden, and this guy didn't has medicinal plants, develop plans and decorative plants. So you have Rosemary, thyme basil, and you have dania jesmyn and you have an orange tree tomatoes, and that as are very into the to water it and pick it up. So we said, it's just like this ten by five space becomes a place where the community takes over is not only hard. The president is in urban hive. This is module. Can potentially be different ones together to create a larger garden. The idea is to intervene in parking's because parking spaces are quite correct Aristo of urbanization that has developed this way before Beirut was full of gardens in front of houses, and then they gradually got destroyed when gardens destroyed. The new developers have no right to build before two years. So for two years, the land remains either a waste them or a parking. I mean with barking you can actually earn a bit of money. So that idea was to bring back gardens into the parking spots. And this is a very simple scheme. Basically, it's the raise a structure of a car and then create on top of it garden, which is offer in the mental and half edible to basically provides the community with kind of an ultimate and garden in green spaces where they can come respite play and cultivate their plans. And of course also provide. Those who own parking lots kind of selling feature as shaded. Parking's. Well, of course this is for you know, the perking owner, but also because we're looking at ways of funding it, it could also be, you know, because sometimes in parking's, you pay a monthly fee so that would encourage people to pay maybe a little bit more, but then have their own space, have their cars in the state, but also have their food and also have green space within their community. And it could also create a community kind of work. No. If you take care of a garden together, then that creates kind of community life. What seems the great optimism is not too convinced developers to create open spaces for public use as becoming the standard with larger developments in London, for example, but to add a layer of elements to Beirut that can bring communities together or create them. Some projects, John dark are fixed, others are temporary and others still such as a truck converted into a botanical garden or mobile. What was your name? Masha Anura about nest about nest and ecologist and I'm head of by diversity commission and in hand organization, we are starting with the mobile, but you can garden and hopefully we will reach the potential garden. But I think this will will keep on going because the the importance of it is the mobility because we go to the school. So I was standing someone, for example, instead of the school taking the class to the botany garden, they will lose the whole day. But when we go to the school, they will only lose one. Concession and their program, and this is something that's very important for the school not to lose the whole day to do one or one hour, you know, and the bus, the green hand organization is an NGO founded in two thousand and one that operates throughout the country, and their mobile garden is primarily used for education running programs for students to help them understand the natural world. But there's another critical element of their work that everyone and especially every developer here should be listening to aspect is to encourage people to use the native plants of the country..

ERI Beirut dania jesmyn Masha Anura Rosemary president developer John London diversity commission two years one hour
"beirut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"It is important for our lives making an object is important, but these line is not only about that. So basically I wanted to just expand this notion of design not only being about product furniture and mainly I wanted the students graduating from universities when they call themselves designers not to have one goal in their minds which is ending up in gallery because this is not where it is I should be represented. That's one to another thing that also I found problematic. I always found problematic in Beirut. Which is the lack of collaborations. And this is also I believe, is a part of the problem of being in a this contemporary art era that we're living in contemporary design here. This idea about collectors and selling art buying art internationally, Zayn fairs that became a little bit like a standardized ways of selling design as it's the only way where designers could be represented, created ideas of superstar designer, superstar collectors, superstars curator's and I wanted to challenge this notion as well, because I believe that this is not what designers as well. The third ingredient was me one thing to make defense or change. That's always been something that I thought that I am going to do through my work or through my personal, which is make the friends make a change as silly as idealised as seems like changing the world. But that's something that always wanted to do like a lot of the creatives living here. A lot of people, my age, this age range. In Lebanon during this election always seems to be when frustration grows is to travel and move in the broad. And for me, it was either I have to do that or I have to change the place where I live. And so the idea was to get the designers to engage with the other experts with other people living in the city dwellers the citizens residents and try to come up with solutions to make the cities better little places. Do you feel like Lebanon Beirut has a particular point of view? I mean, they're kind of Lebanese or Beirut mindset in terms of purchase to or been solutions defect that there was really no clear master planning for the city for talking about instructor or urbanism doesn't really make our life easier because you cannot really identify one problem. The fact that the issue is so big. So it's always hard for us to decide where to start with always arriving a little bit at the end when things get super obvious. And then we start identifying the problem and then we go and start interfering. And this happens a lot with activism work that's happening here. So we get messages at some point that, okay, there's a building and Hamadeh that's heritage buildings being destroyed. Let's go over like, let's go Monday morning demonstrate protests. So we're always arriving little bit late when things are really happening because there are so many things that are going wrong in different directions that we're not really aware really organized. So I think the role of design here is to maybe design strategy design systems that can actually predict these types of issues that are happening to organize the way we work at in relation of making an impact in the city. And another thing that I want to bring into the conversation as well when we talk about the different problems that are happening here and everyone, I think he would tell you that nothing's working and frustration, electricity transportation pollution, like we have issues on so many different levels. It is very clear that the cause of this is. Because there's lack of engagement from the public sector his, it's basically not existence. It's not even active, not doing its job. It's just a spectator and it's run by politicians who own private companies that are benefiting from this corruption or the status quo. So the idea is that what can we do? Can we just wait, sit and complain and say that it's never gonna change because they to powerful, they have mafias, whatever that we cannot make any difference. Because obviously, if we ask them and we tried this to complain as go on TV and campaign and has them do their job and they're not willing to do it..

Beirut Lebanon Zayn instructor
"beirut" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"At our guest coming out shortly will know that information off the top of his head diehard saint louis blues fan diehard saint louis cardinals fan jon hamm the we hit a nerve on i don't believe we've heard a nerve but john's coming out lots talk about with him he's always into having a sports conversation his new movie beirut is terrific he's great in it written by tony gilroy who wrote michael clayton also i do believe he wrote rogue one like this guy he wrote and directed michael clayton and this movie beirut was written by tony gilroy we're told on the set of a famed ice skating movie that's not so famed and not many people remember but we're gonna go down ice skating movie memory lane with jon hamm words and ever thought i would ever say into a microphone let alone on this show but that's what we're here for that's what we're here for i think he also wrote the born movies yeah he did he did and again jon hamm's character in this in this film is a lot of michael clayton in him and michael clayton when i'm asked about an underrated movie that's remote trough sent that is that's a movie that doesn't get enough of a rating i'll i'll tell you that any rate beirut in theaters near you it's been it's been up and running for a couple of weeks john is now out here in los angeles so he's coming in d norris's in the movie is well d norse you're not gonna recognize does he has a full head of hair he looks nothing like hang from from breaking bad.

john beirut tony gilroy michael clayton norris jon hamm los angeles
"beirut" Discussed on KWAM 990 Talk Radio

KWAM 990 Talk Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on KWAM 990 Talk Radio

"Americans in beirut i know the trailer got some criticism because it it does sort of minimize in marginalize the history of beirut now i'm not an expert on middle eastern politics i'm not even close and i do not know much about the history of beirut and i remember during the lebanon civil war when beirut was in the news a lot but i was watching like the dukes of hazzard and being annoyed when they were cutting into it with news breaks i come from the generation that remembers anwar sadat the leader of egypt was assassinated and i remember that because the news story preempted double dukes tonight on tv that that week which was a huge thing to the kids in third grade but to the you know regular adults it was a big story so to me beirut has always been something that was in the news and lebanon was in the news but i don't know a whole lot about it and it's a very complex history and they do try and pay service to that a little bit but ultimately it's not about the people from beirut it's about the americans in beirut and the spies in beirut and then it makes sense because it's written by tony gilroy who did like the borne trilogy so he's playing around in a very similar sandbox but i do think that there is a certain argument to be made that it does minimize and marginalized the people who are actually there who actually live there so don't go to this movie if you're expecting some intense dissection of lebanese politics because the lebanese civil war was very complex at the time but overall i mean the acting is good i mean jon hamm does a good job he really should have a bigger career right now he's known for madman and he's done some great stuff i mean he was like baby driver last year and he was in bridesmaids i mean he's done big movies but he's never clicked as the leading man and he might be suffering from the fact that he's not a movie star he's more of a tv star but i i really like john him i'd like to see him do bigger and.

beirut hazzard egypt tony gilroy jon hamm john lebanon anwar sadat
"beirut" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on About to Review

"Hello everybody and welcome back to speak edition of the about to review podcast i were host as always that guy named john make sure to follow rate subscribe and review the podcast on your podcast platform of choice it is about to review listed on blueberry stitcher podcasts apple podcast everywhere we can find it you can also stream the episodes directly from the website about review dot com make sure to follow the podcast on social media at about review facebook twitter and instagram as well as you can sport the show but clicking the amazon link in these subscription in the subscription below in the description below yeah on today's episode i'm joined via the phone because we just got out of a screening and we both wanted to head home by tim hall the people's critic yes definitely had to go home and process this contender so on this week's episode we're actually going to be talking about four different movies that are all in theaters right now they're going to be a quiet place beirut ready player one and the f forementioned episode or aforementioned movie that we just saw which is rampage yes so before we get to all of the reviews and the geek news on this episode we'll get into the original theme song credit by damian randall of illmannered media song goto the fbi let's all go to those let's all go to those the changed.

john tim hall damian randall facebook instagram beirut fbi
"beirut" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Liam neeson mm the earlier beirut mm mm owned uh bill.

Liam neeson beirut
"beirut" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Liam neeson mm the earlier beirut mm mm owned uh bill.

Liam neeson beirut
"beirut" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Like a stage so much mean you know win was planted how was it planted what did you feeder with what type of soil type of soil that it it's kind of a tough thing to say you know is is an unusual thing or not now i will say though that if you plant a bear beirut fruit chery in general and you planted usually some time in the month of january february that that's probably your most successful time to plant any of those things just because they are dorm it it is cooler weather there's a lot more leeway when it comes to planting at that point in time so if you were to planted though in june or july i'd say it's very common for them to die people can't always you know you're taking a a tree leads yang new growing and if you don't water correctly during some of the hottest months of the year then you're going to have problems in it's tough sometimes stove will also lenore lives in canyon country which gets pretty hot during the summer time so that first year is really important to get a a establish any bear route establishing even on roses uh even though roses are smaller and have a small routes system still important to get them over there through the first summer with the extra once once the roses establish their own drought tolerant correct and they're not gonna look racing water by in the trees and is don't fruits also you know once they're establish there they're really tolerate to a lot of environments who's well i've noticed with our deciduous plants in general they are if you go into and a lot of this will happen in palm palm springs you know if you think about the hot weather over there that what happens to them as they just go dormant some even though they might not dropped their leaves but to them it'll be just like winner they just stopped growing and the middle struck growing right in the know come back as soon as the weather conditions are favorable and a question underneath factor i believe tiger yeah and then a baram from betty she says unusual weather.

beirut
"beirut" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"The dry areas in beirut this is a center that has replaced the one in the city of aleppo in syria tell us a little bit about that center in syria yes that rebuilding a recreating the collections the really important collections and the great work they were doing there and the the really important thing about lee centers is that they they conserve and they use such important genetic diversity within these species the centre within beirut in lebanon an actually has been able to already recreate some of the collections that while lost from aleppo and some really important species for dry areas and through extracting some of that collections the the syrian carter had actually submit into the foul bout seat bank in norway so they've they made the first extraction from the norwegian seed bank and the rebuilding the collections in qatar in lebanon in order to then put them back into this alba's bank said this isn't this is a project that isn't just about conserving uh current diversity but it's also about breeding new crops that can withstand the the vagaries of of climate change and drought and so on yet that's exactly right is one of the the biggest kind of global projects that have ever taken place and the the real kind of importance of ice that we're doing it for the future and but also a thinking about now so we were already seeing threats to the domesticated coops that we rely on whether this comes in the form of landuse change or pests and diseases or really facing at the moment is such from climate change so these wild relatives they have hot too.

beirut aleppo syria lee centers lebanon carter norway norwegian seed bank qatar alba climate change
"beirut" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Have you joined us yeah all right i was parading my round work my learning of these last days that the land bridge is now intact running from tehran two bosra to baghdad to ramadi kind on to damascus on the beirut andy addition now of the crossing the border crossing in asia oh time that you mentioned rebel kamau which now completes and enables the transfer by iran gene ally of fighters and weapons in both directions but from tehran to the mediterranean and of course bringing them within two kilometers uh of this crossing as you mentioned between iraq and iran um but we'll be a threat to israel and us forces are about twenty five kilometers north of the town uh but this is a major uh development and that means in any future confrontation in lebanon was his belie the israel would see that the enemy forces were reinforced both with power and with supplies coming from iran and its clients so i just want to establish the because one other element the iranians will decamp with their hezbollah allies in syria leave and they're backed up by russian intelligence russian air and the power the diplomatic power of moscow correct absolutely correct and now we have a very significant development which amazingly has gotten no coverage in the united states but this foreign ministers of turkey iran and russia have been meeting and they announced that they have reached complete understanding on the outstanding issues in syria this is part of the us donna process stein of being the capital of uh of conflicts done and they were uh working on this uh uh arrangement they've had i think eight or nine sessions but this is the this meeting today is a prelude to a meeting on wednesday with.

moscow donna hezbollah beirut damascus ramadi baghdad syria russia tehran iran israel lebanon us iraq kamau asia twenty five kilometers two kilometers
"beirut" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"beirut" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Story all the uncertainty facing emigrants when they lose their temporary protected status over at pri dot org carla thanks so much for your time now thank you so much uber schmidhuber beirut's traditional taxes are still going strong as up next here on the world support for the world comes from legalzoomcom time is money when you run a business so don't waste valuable time on issues legalzoom can help with legalzoom's network of independent attorneys was built to provide business owners with the advice they need for the daytoday grind of running a business and you'll never get hit with billable hours since legalzoom's not a law firm spend your time growing your business and use legalzoom for the legal stuff for special savings be sure to enter promo code world in the referral box at checkout that's promo code world at legalzoomcom i'm mark a woman with the world i'm sure i don't have to tell you that rideshare app like over our crowding out traditional taxis all over the globe but in beirut lebanon they're up against and especially stubborn competitor the girl shared taxi is still the number one way to get around there the royals richard hall road along for a day to find out why is the sound that so prevalent on the streets of beirut the locals hud leave in here anymore rigby bike that god because passengers sometimes they walk they don't thought of that the texture of the service are behind him so remains the hard to get his attention this constant beeping is the sound of taxi drivers looking for business unlike in new york or london my people may have to crane the neck looking for a taxi beirut he's a fighting them off with a stick you hear that sound all over beirut's sure sure is essential beep is it like just one too he he like that that's it that's it i'm writing along today with gabrielle saad he drives a beautiful 1918 mercedesbenz with racing greenfront seats and royal blue leather in the back and on dash it's the quintessential beirut taxi on the way taxis work it takes a little explaining the vast majority of caps a shared rights essentially impromptu polls quote a service they costa dolar trip they would like this darpa out drives around looking for passengers when he spots one he pulls up alongside.

beirut legalzoom law firm lebanon royals new york gabrielle saad rigby london