17 Burst results for "Beethoven Brahms"

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It hazel bring to them first of all she brought a serious classical technique to the pieces as we heard she had studied at Juilliard she was one of the first artists really to make her mark in both classical music and jazz she sold with the New York Philharmonic and the Philadelphia Orchestra among others as a classical musician and then she often used boogie woogie when she jazz them up that's a specific kind of jazz especially piano jazz and to begin with that kinda made a statement because boogie woogie is based on something called the shuffle rhythm which kind of tents instant instant tents and it's the basic rhythm of the music called the blues which is ultimately and and originally an African American form so she was really saying this is our vernacular and we're bringing it to Chopin or box or list Lauren hazel really much more than a classical pianist in America at that time I was very much in the tradition of Bach Mozart Beethoven Brahms and the rest of who were wonderful improvisers and who were known for their improvisation and by the time she arrived in the mid of twentieth century you know improvisation had been bled out of what we call classical music but all those people improvised they also played with what Duke Ellington like to call the triple scoring an urge which you know has to do with making people want to shake their rear ends in other words dance what's your view on this current I wanted to sort of insert hazel's perspective about swinging the classics and how she felt about it and how it all began for her she was playing at a club on fifty second street on swing street a young girl she was a teenager so after high school she would run down the fifty second street and work through the night because she became a wage earner for her family she was the intermission pianist for the vocalist Frances Faye and she said she would start playing a song and then the waiter would come over tap on the shoulder and say oh you can't play that because the singer does that piece on her show so then she started another tune and he'd come back again and say oh no you can't play that one either because miss Faye does it in her show and she said she got so angry that she says I know what I'll do I'll play the Bach inventions and let's see if she plays that in her show and she starts swinging the Bach inventions in the middle of this jazz club and she fell in love with it and she got a kick out of it I think it's indicative of her personality too I mean there was a little bit of a a smart.

Juilliard New York Philharmonic Philadelphia Orchestra Chopin Lauren hazel America Beethoven Brahms Duke Ellington Frances Faye
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the pieces as we heard she had studied at Juilliard she was one of the first artists really to make her mark in both classical music and jazz she sold with the New York Philharmonic and the Philadelphia Orchestra among others as a classical musician and then she often used boogie woogie when she jazz them up that's a specific kind of jazz especially piano jazz and to begin with that kinda made a statement because boogie woogie is based on something called the shuffle rhythm which kind of tents instant instant tents and that's the basic rhythm of the music called the blues which is ultimately and and originally an African American form so she was really saying this is our vernacular and we're bringing it to Chopin or box or list Lauren is a really a much more than any classical pianist in America at that time I was very much in the tradition of Bach Mozart Beethoven Brahms and the rest who were wonderful improvisers and who were known for their improvisation and by the time she arrived in the mid the twentieth century you know improvisation had been bled out of what we call classical music but all those people improvise they also played with what Duke Ellington like to call the triple scoring an urge which you know has to do with making people want to shake their rear ends in other words dance what's your view on this current I wanted to sort of insert hazel's perspective about swinging the classics and how she felt about it and how it all began for her she was playing at a club on fifty second street on swing street a young girl she was a teenager so after high school she would run down the fifty second street and work through the night because she became a wage earner for her family she was the intermission pianist for the vocalist Frances Faye and she said she would start playing a song and then the waiter would come over tap on the shoulder and say oh you can't play that because the singer does that piece on her show so then she started another tune and he come back again and say oh no you can't play that one either because miss Faye does it on her show and she said she got so angry that she says I know what I'll do I'll play the Bach inventions and let's see if she plays that in her show and she starts swinging the Bach inventions in the middle of this jazz club and she fell in love with it and she got a kick out of it I think it's indicative of her personality too I mean there was a little bit of a a smart.

Juilliard New York Philharmonic Philadelphia Orchestra Chopin Lauren America Beethoven Brahms Duke Ellington hazel Frances Faye
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on KCRW

"To save small businesses I like that construction company that you just talked about and that's a fair point about the herculean nature of this and he has been talking to small business owners dozens of them have told us about particular problems applying for loans some of them say they're still waiting to hear back from their banks some of them have said the website crashes and several them miss several them has said the banks have played restrictions are placed restrictions that they just can't meet what's behind the problems it is it just the scale of the effort or is there something that can be done to fix this it's it's a little bit it's largely the scale of the effort and the unprecedented surge that came and immediately as the program open so you know I understand this is a small business in the first thing they do is they fill out an application they get their paperwork together they go to their bank their bank has to go through us to process that paperwork then that bank has to turn around and it has to submit a form that goes to the small business administration so the long can get assigned a number so we can get counted in this three hundred and fifty billion dollar fund and then all that has to go back to the bank and then the banking kind of originate the loan so we we tend to focus on the first step in the process there's a lot of stuff that goes on after that each step has to be completed but for that small business can get the money in their in their account is it is an optimistic take it is so interesting you know we hear three hundred and fifty billion dollars it's a lot of money but for a small business you need just a tiny percentage of that it can be life and death let me ask you out to that and you know at first there were three hundred and fifty billion dollars to support small businesses a few days after this lunch the president said he would like to add another two hundred and fifty billion to it what does that say to you about the depth of the trouble facing this country small businesses well it's it's tremendous so at the US chamber we just did a survey at the last few days of March with our partners at MetLife and what we learned was one in four businesses were already shuttered down another forty percent of those who weren't expected to be shut down within two weeks that's over half of Americans small businesses who had to shut their operations in addition they told us that one in four can only make it less than two months before they have to Herman at least close and so you know it is a day to day cash basis that's why the support is important we know that businesses are right on the brink in this money can't come fast enough and that's why we're doing everything we can to chamber to both help small businesses get their applications in order and we have guides that have been downloaded millions of times on our website to help them do that and then help the banks get the resources they need to process that everything's got to work seamlessly I don't know anyone that thinks it has worked perfectly but we have to keep redoubling our efforts you millions of people as you just said have a file for unemployment in the past few weeks how does the stimulus package help some of them get back to work also for those who are adults who work for small businesses those with generally fewer than five hundred employees this loan program that we're talking about directly encourages small businesses to keep their employees and bring back those who've they've laid off or furloughed that's how they qualify for the loan forgiveness small businesses can never loan forgiven to the extent that they're using the loan proceeds to keep paying their workers in addition we expect some programs to come online today or tomorrow from the treasury and the federal reserve to help larger businesses and so on the goal of helping the users to help U. S. chambers to help these folks leave it there thanks so much thank you there's been a lot of build up to a meeting today will of virtual meeting of OPEC and Russia as they face an oil glut and very low prices for their crew president trump is going to watch this closely he's trying to push them especially Saudi Arabia to cut production he says the low prices are threatening the US oil industry your interest check in with them when crude oil prices began spiraling downwards a month ago president trump was overjoyed low prices at the gas pump may drivers across the U. S. happy but that was before the corona virus forced virtually everything to shut down this is a ham comel with the racial group I think that initially lower oil prices were received to be good until it became clear to him that lower prices you mean a lot of job losses and in many states some of the states are critical in his reelection campaign specially Texas thousands of jobs in the US shale oil industry are at risk of rock bottom prices continue president trump has long made it clear he is no fan of OPEC something he repeated yesterday for many years I used to say go back was very unfair I hated all back you will know the truth I hated it because it was a fix now trump needs the cartel to come to an agreement to limit production which in turn will raise oil prices and that means trying to patch up the dispute between Saudi Arabia and non OPEC member Russia that led to the slide in prices Daniel your gun is an oil expert at IHS Markit the United States to step into the role and particularly president trump not it is so much as a deal maker but as a divorce mediator between Saudi Arabia and Russia you can says there's a lot of posturing and messaging going on from all sides ahead of today's meeting he says despite this he believes all countries are going to want to reach an agreement all the oil exporters are staring at the same harsh reality what's a bad situation we'll get really much worse as we go into the end of April beginning of may because the world will run out of storage for oil and the prices were really plummet so there is an incentive to make a deal the OPEC meeting will be followed Friday by a meeting of the G. twenty oil ministers which will bring Russia the Saudis in the US to the same table Jackie Northam NPR news Washington this is NPR news and this is Casey R. W. and from the KCRW newsroom initially the LA Philharmonic said it was cancelling concerts through early may now the orchestra says it's shutting down for the remainder of the twenty twenty season KCRW's not Gillam reports that while the LA Phil is bowing out the fate of another institution the Hollywood Bowl remains unknown the LA Phil will be playing the works of Beethoven Brahms or the other great composers of Walt Disney concert hall anytime soon along with canceling the season the symphony says it's laying people off and cutting some employees pay as it tries to navigate the hardships of the coronavirus Gustavo Dudamel the celebrated music and artistic director of LA Phil is going to forgo pay for the duration of the shutdown the LA times reports almost a hundred part time work stream please we'll see a pay cut of thirty five percent those on the leadership team will see even greater reductions the LA Phil's decision to cancel its season comes about two weeks after the New York Philharmonic decided to throw in the towel but what about picnics and concerts this summer at the Hollywood Bowl the LA Phil which manages the ball says it's not quite sure what the plan is yet they're hoping to have a full or at least partial season but organizer say they're being flooded with cancellations from artists for KCRW I met Gillam you probably have a lot of questions right now like what's the latest with the facts concerning covert nineteen for the buses and trains running as usual in LA what happens to homeless people how can I help small businesses succeed here take this week here in the case here to be a newsroom are farther apart but we are working as hard as ever if there's something we should know or something you want to know tell us on social media at Casey R. W. we are all in this together be well we're gonna get through this and stay tuned to KCRW and coming up later this hour that marketplace morning report we are likely in for yet another gut wrenching report on layoffs and joblessness this morning the labor department's numbers tracking first time claims for unemployment benefits have been soaring for weeks sitting Graham records today's report will likely show another astronomical figure but the actual number of Americans out of work is likely even higher more coming up fifty four degrees now in downtown LA we're expecting highs in the fifties again today with rain hours continuing tonight.

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Portal

The Portal

12:12 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Portal

"I think I started when I was eleven or twelve. Yeah I quit like around the time. I was seventeen because I went to college. And your musicianship Informed you in terms of what the structure of Music Zik really is at its deepest level of strong opinions about Music and culture. I was always terrible on guitar. I wanted to learn different fields of music and I thought to do that. You need to play something understand basics of music music theory cords. Whatever so? I did a bit like classical jazz blues every different and kind of guitar just a bit to have an entry point into the world of music it was never a player impress people right ever played for people and was never good but I could play okay the notes of a song to see how it fit together okay. There is a kind of relativism that has descended over musical taste. Where every time I say as something is better than something else I run into somebody instantaneously telling me I've committed like I? I get a traffic citation. That you can't say You know that that box is much more important or better than SCARLATTI. And I just don't understand this complete abdication of any role in which you know informed judgment Plays a role that we have to have issues of tastes that the say this is better than that. And then you're allowed to take a you're allowed to take a heterodox position on that Eh. But we should be passing along our tastes in our prejudice and exposing it to discussion with other people rather than just finding relativists. Mush Roy and I think the relativists often don't mean it what they're really saying is on objective grounds like challenge the status of the person making this proclamation and I will challenge the status by not accepting the judgment. But they're not actually claiming that all doors and they used to relativistic. I don't think of post modern relativism or these booking and the way Jordan Peterson says I've never bought that argument and Peterson's exchange with Zeke and their debate. I thought Peterson lost that part. The debate Most people are objective. ISTS whether they admit it or not. Let's just say what we think is correct and debate it and David Hume in the mid Eighteenth Century Torri wrote some wonderful essays on standards of taste in the test of time I think he was essentially correct. That matters of the aesthetics are not objective active in the same way that matters of fact are that you can measure and confirm them but nonetheless there is something about the judgments that informed people make that expresses an interest subjective validity and it can be debated and judged and it's one of the things we here on earth to do so tight wonderful music. What moves what moves your soul in music well start with classical music my completely orthodox so Bach Mozart? Beethoven Brahms I'm quite fond of contemporary classical music or mid twentieth century. Anybody who isn't in the acknowledged highest highest echelon. I don't think so. I think my tastes are so remarkably close to what you would call the cannon in these particular areas that they're boring Do Do you think I find a lot of music before Bach may be somewhat overrated. So Palestina is an important composer. When I listen to it I just don't enjoy it as much as I the post to defect Yom D'Amato it's fine? I don't know just Ken to pray I like it. I don't love it. Anything from that period period. Okay is fine in a slightly under impressed manner. Do you think I think with Monteverdi. And then Bach things explode and become marvelous and amazing. Even temperament is really the the central Is that Ground Zero for for the specific beauty of Western music. I think it saw development of instruments through capitalism and markets and growth of the middle class and having more people experiment playing and composing posing. Pianos become much. Better string instruments become much battery of the Modern Orchestra you have actual audiences and the interplay of those forces as supposed to music. Being more in the church may be closer to pure vocal music. I just think it's much better and almost everyone in their heart knows that. Yeah Uh yeah that tell me the no no no. I'm I'm actually. I'm processing in real time excites you and classical music. I think Haydn's under somewhat underrated closer to Mozart Mozart than people want to admit. Yeah durable Gosh I mean I guess. I- Mozart is amazing peaks but a significant portion of what Mozart road is boring. Younger works are mostly boring. I I often feel that I must have a hole in my soul because of the amount of Mozart. That doesn't is land that I hear all of these people describing Mozart is this you know exact- exactly perfect balance. And there's something about the language that I find Somewhat repellent so that. I'm less likely to get along with people who are bananas over over Mozart. If somebody's nobody's very clear about Bah like boxes like heroin. It's an addiction. You can't just can't get enough of the stuff. I relate to that much more often. Say that there are mathematicians nations who will claim that Bach isn't their favorite composer. And I never believe them. But you know take Mozart symphonies which are obviously chronological twenty-nine is quite good. And then not until you know maybe thirty six you could say thirty three thirty four but before twenty nine. They're just boring if they were somehow all gone. I don't think there'd be any great loss so most of Mozart that good. I don't think it detracts from him but even with boxers extreme selection in which Baku hear. You don't hear most of the todd is very much most of them are boring. Yeah that was the main thing he created. So there's some of that in johann-sebastian as well exonerate him mm-hmm from the board and charge altogether Christmas. Oratorio it's pretty good. It's not an incredible work so even Saint John's passion. It's quite good but not as good as B minor mass or Saint Matthews Passion Right. So there's extreme selection in the Bach. You're hearing and thinking about I you know the funny thing for me is is that I had to swim upstream from SEGOVIA 's translation of Spanish Piano Music Onto Guitar I didn't realize is that there was an entire world of Spanish Piano Music Where the guitar wasn't originally thought of necessarily as a as a concert door art music instrument it was more of a folk instrument and so that's been the huge well of Of interest for me like listening listening to Albany's on on Pianos Amazing Alicia dealer. Rocha right. She's a wonderful performer of that but the guitar music I find it very interesting to take some more modern like ambient music like Brian Eno or the whole movement from the nineteen seventies and. Listen in think through what was going on there right and then go back to earlier Guitar Music Baroque but also the Spaniards and listen to it through that Lens and it just comes alive in a completely new with Robert Frith. It was evacuated of clearly vic wayland music or something like that and I've never traced. Ny felt that Are you you. So I'm a big fan of what is misleadingly. Called World Music. Just listening to as many different musics as you can kind of figuring out there logics and then going back applying it to what you already knew from rock and roll or classical music or jazz and seeing it all you know quite a new are you. That's a very high productivity activity. Are you interested interested in in music. Sure of course. So when I found Muneer Bashir In Iraq I just my my jaw dropped. I thought this was such gorgeous stuff and then and I sort of made my way to Minerva. She furry trash who I think is unbelievable. And eventually I was listening in this Middle Eastern idiom and I hear him start to play with Blues and rock and roll on the mood and it was fascinating watching somebody from Iraq and who'd studied in Europe. Of course watching you there's a for example in at Stanford University there's this Garden which I think has Master carvings from Polynesia Indonesia and there's versions of Rodin Gates of hell in the thinker in this Polynesian or or or Indonesia idiom and it's just fascinating to see oneself regarded by the other. Sometimes I think the more interesting question is which music don't you like and to think through those so I'm going to ask you Eric. What music do you really not like Arcand to and you think just bad or wrong somehow I have trouble with music that doesn't allow us to impart more emotion because it's too highly produced. I am pretty sure that has to do with the emotion because I find Jimi Hendrix Very emotional I found that shares believe where she uses the auto tune function as an instrument rather than as a correcting of the human voice to be very emotional But when I hear very like computer oriented dirty and you name a name what are you reject point the finger not cheese. Do I have to you have to. It's your podcast cast and I hope the person isn't listening. Well I guess there was a time when I didn't like Amy Stewart's version in of knock on wood which was a great piano? R&B Song Because I found that it was so oh highly overproduced that I just couldn't cut into it That that had to do with the disco influence. I'm choosing things now that I really disliked like but I've sort of May become around because I find no look you find something in just about everything that you listen listen to. It's very hard to create music. That's completely devoid of interest. And so if I spend more time with something even if it's really really bad I'll be able to find something in that. Well that's why it became famous. And that's why that's why it's being listened to I. I've been down on. EDM TO BE. I don't think that I've some point. We had a car ride with a friend and I said let's put on songs. We can single with person puts on some idiom. There was nothing close close to a campfire song inside of it. I found that kind of sad you buy into electronic dance music heavy metal. I meant to say heavy metal. such as maybe. There's a lot of artistry so I asked Ted Joy this when I did my conversation with Tyler podcast with him. He's one of my favorite music. Critics are brilliant guy. You should should have him on but I asked him heavy metal I said underrated overrated and he said well it's underrated but I couldn't get him to admit that he actually listen to it. And you want to go there I think it's underrated from technical musicianship. And I think it's often overrated in terms of what it does to Heart Paul Gilbert. That's exactly what he said in other word. Okay so Paul. Gilbert has a beautiful riff on this. He's a you know obviously fantastic guitars. But he says you can take a great Blues Guitar Guitarist. Teach them A lot of scales and turn them into a shredder of devoid of interest but with fantastic technical chops..

Mozart Bach Jordan Peterson Paul Gilbert David Hume Baku Ny Yom D'Amato Brian Eno Beethoven Brahms Saint John SEGOVIA Jimi Hendrix Roy Iraq Palestina
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Podium Time

Podium Time

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Podium Time

"That's all that's all you know. Then you're just GONNA continue to go out there and you're going to be an amateur with regard to every composer that you've never studied before and you're just going to be learning on it. You know when you when you go to work with an orchestra on a composer you've never conducted before you're sort of learning on them you know. That's a responsibility to take it seriously. You know even marinated with just doing she did at Toronto Symphony with the Baltimore Symphony. Just this past spring was her first time to do it so she you know. I was watching her own struggle with on her level. That's such a very difficult piece With with a terrific orchestra but she was. She was learning on them. And and so so. The question is you know. Do you wanna be totally learning on every composer. That's not not a guy with a a B last name. No let it be in their last name. Is that how you WanNa do it or do you? WanNa have a little more at Brett's what you're doing. Yeah that's a difficult question. I certainly if I get a position this job that I have is. I haven't Liberal Arts University. So it's an undergraduate only institution so I won't have a graduate nothing. Ta or or somebody to to be teaching in that way. I'll be teaching the conducting class. But it'll be undergraduate conducting class So so at that level. Certainly looking at excerpts thinking about how what kind of equity I can provide even the repertoire level. There certainly will be something to be. It'll be looking at But when you get into the graduate level how are you going to make sure that you know you you do need to be have some core competencies to do with the Antidote Castle Repertoire that standard by the fact that that's the stuff that you're going to be asked to do on an audition stuff that you're going to be asked to do? Add I mean my Hannah was asked to do while. They were working on chester coach. Five so I was asked to go five and fortunately for me. I was very busy spring but I had studied Jessica which five in Grad School twice so I if made it possible for me to on short notice I mean I think I had maybe nine or ten days between the invite and the day of the audition that in that amount of time I come in and have a competent rehearsal not only works if there is some kind of consistency to of what kind of repertoire might be active. It's just the entire universe but I would at around Zabel inviting s where the price has the whole concept we need to be inviting works into the upper echelon of So called Canon thinking about what other great works by composers that are women and others coming from other underrepresented groups historically at we can hold up as excellent masterpieces in. That's that's where my focus on prices come because I I think about her but tobacco. I thought look I might pick up on on other little idea. You brought up a moment ago that you had a very long list at Was given to you and on that piece I might say. This is A trays to the heavens. For the work's being done by the composer diversity the two with Rob Damer and all those guys. Doing excellent work We're so lucky to. They're doing what they're doing. I think one of the next steps and I think I think they'll probably be engaged in this activity in the future because they've got lots of cool projects coming down the pipes but one of the things that I would love to see and doesn't even need to be them. I mean the whole thing is that they provided as data that others can use and so whether it be folks in house there at the composer diversity institute whether it be you and I or others that blog about it. We're talking about it on podcast or whatever to have more curated lists seven works seven concertos here. Seven Kano Concertos by proposes of color. Okay and so that also in one hit you you know you. You've narrow it down to one category in and it's a manageable bit and it's about the whole universe repertoire. So you haven't fixed all your problems but the next time you come around in time to piano concerto you Beethoven Brahms or Schumann. That you know. There's all the standard the usual suspects right while. Now you have seven new works that you sillier is just a little bit with and now that it's time to program concerto while now you're going to go do a deep dive on those seventy pieces and really really go into you. Know and the flip side. Is You know you could just be the other way round. You could be your. You already found out that you need to do at piano concerto you go be willing. And now they're the blonde plays out there that says here's seven piano concertos that you should know and you can go and explore them apple now but in either case you know having curated lists specific and narrow down to specific use cases. Because that's what we have to think about as as a conductor is the process by which we get our programs put together that involves what music were already familiar with and what resources we know to go to find other work that we aren't already for some curious which Florence price piece is in your Daniels Because I have in my volume five. The website has three pieces on. It is a guy that gets back in good graces on fourth rates. Just the Cambridge okay. So my fifth edition breaks and the Third Symphony. The website has those two plus the first infantry. So it's it's growing slow issue and then Jordan Billboard question if you could send a message out to everybody all musicians conductors wherever you like what would you would you put on that billboard billboard so? I have to be short the it it could be. It could be longer could be an image could be a hit on the billboard importing dragged by billboard. Then right sure if you if you want to put that if you WANNA play the game I can strike if it ends up being longer. That's fine the billboard has a Qr Code that you'd want to include other musicians like secret just for connectors sure -sition we can have. You can have keyboards okay. So I'm over thinking this point. That was my one my one billboard for conductors.

Jordan Billboard Toronto Symphony Baltimore Symphony Third Symphony chester Liberal Arts University Rob Damer Zabel Hannah Jessica Brett Beethoven Brahms Grad School Wan Canon apple Florence Cambridge Daniels Schumann
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tripadvisor. But after decades of scoring film and television Danny wanted to step away briefly from sculpting other people's worlds and create one of his own his new album is it's the pricing. It's called eleven eleven. It's Danny Alvin this famous film composers first violin concerto and listen. This is never happened to me before. But speaking of surprises. So we were just about to start our conversation and his his phone went off like his phone rang, and I couldn't help but notice he had an interesting ring tone. So I had to ask him about it. Anyway, that's that's where things start off with Danny often. Phone off there. It is. That's the violent, by the way, I'm dying to know. Now that it happened. What your ringtone is day the earth stood still Bernard Hermann? Wow. It's the first piece of music that ever got me into film music. That's that's something beautiful about that. Like whenever it rings. It would it would trigger something in you. Yeah. I was around twelve when I saw the movie, and it's the first time I ever became aware of a score. And it started my long interest in film music. It was Bernard Hermann because at that young age a lot of my favorite movies in that period of time were really Harry housing. Adventures like, Dave, you're I mean other than the day there is that still it would have been like Jason and Argonauts. The seventh voyage of Sinbad mysterious island. These were the really fun fantasy films of my youth. And if I saw Herman and Harry housing on the Bill, meaning the animator, the claymation animator Ray, stop motion animator Ray, Harry housing and the composer Bernard Hermann, I knew it would be my favorite movie or I loved that combination. So I always have a special place in my heart for the day the earth stood still because like. I suppose everybody you see movies. And you think the music is just there for the first time. I said I remember thinking somebody wrote this. This wasn't just there. The music stood out for me. And I paid attention to who I actually saw. There was a name. There's a person who did this. And so it was a turning point for me. But anyhow, I digress. I I was reading some of your notes on the violin concerto. One thing. Stuck out to me? Can you wrote the violin is to me a very intimidating solo instrument violent concertos were not really a part of my repertoire, classical music listening and skip ahead. And you said one thing became abundantly clear. Writing a violin concerto would require far more disciplined than anything. I had done previously and would be even more difficult to execute than I'd imagined. I I love difficult. Well, it's funny because I had made a mental decision around that time that would have been two three years ago that I am going to sacrifice some film work and do concert work every year. I need to do that. And I've done a couple pieces over the previous decade. But I just never found the way to make it a regular thing. Because you know, film work is just always there, and it's hard to say, no. And the thing is I imagined my I work because in a way, I see this as my first attempt at this new career if that's what it is. Because even though I've done three non film works before this. They weren't designed to become part of an orchestra in orchestra's repertory. I'd never imagined a violin concerto. I was imagining something for percussion or piano because those were the things I felt closer to and we were playing Burton concert three years ago. I guess in Prague and in the bar afterwards. I was approached by my agent for non film. Music, right. And he said, I had an interesting conversation with the orchestra director after the show, and he'd like to know if you'd be interested in writing a violin concerto for sandy. This is sandy Cameron Cameron. How would you like to write her a violin concerto and always with just about anything in my life my mouth works faster than my brain? So I said, yeah. Sure. And then I start thinking that mean, I'll figure that outlet. Yeah. And then it was it wasn't for a couple of months later when I started to really delve into violin concertos that I thought oh my God. Maybe this was a huge mistake. So I really spent a couple of months sandy kind of got me started on about twenty five different the violin concertos and these were like post twentieth century, romantic concertos. This wasn't like Mendelssohn or Mozart or anything like that. No, I already I knew that even though I love Beethoven Brahms and Mozart. It's not where my heart is my orchestral music heart got connected in the early twentieth. And that probably really I should call it the late nineteenth century because it starts with a lineage of Russians really probably beginning with.

Bernard Hermann Danny Alvin Harry housing Cameron Cameron Tripadvisor. Ray Mozart Prague Beethoven Brahms Dave director Mendelssohn Jason Burton Herman two three years three years
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On fresh air. How extremist you social media to amplify their message, recruit, new, followers and incite violence. Terry gross talks, jam burger who has studied and written about ISIS and white nationalist movements in the US and abroad. Tune in today at two on ninety three point nine FM. Welcome back to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. It's Monday and on Mondays and the show we listened to classical music with the crave director at our sister station W cue that is news clemency Burton hill every week. She stops by the places plaza music and share some of the stories from her book year of wonder classical music to enjoy day by day clemmie. Hi, nice to see you. Nice to see you. You were going to kick us off. With Bela Bartok. Yes. On this day, the twenty fifth of March he was born in eighteen eighty one. So thinking about Bela Bartok and the incredible. I guess contribution that he made to musical history. He was very much steeped in music from the past. So the big giants whether it's Barco Beethoven Brahms, Strauss and ABC, but he was also really interested by what was happening in that moment in his own history. Which was the kind of breakdown of western tonality, so pay like you have with Cuba with people like. The Casio or modernism in literature people like James Joyce, not as Elliot you have these renegade Mavericks, come along and music, like Arnold shun bug, for example, and shake the tree really hard on what? Harmony even is. And why all we all like playing around in the same structures that people have been doing so forever. Why don't we just hit the whole thing on its head? So he has this interesting musical perspective of being able to see and incorporate the pause being very receptive to what's happening at that moment in the present. But then he also brings this. I would say very special source to proceedings, and he was obsessed with the folk music of his own native, Hungary, but also beyond so he collected and curated and arranged and analyzed by music from places like Turkey and Algieria the Carpathian basin. He was I think it was be described as an early pioneer in comparative Musicology. So the idea of thinking about the human beings who actually make this in the context in which they make it rather than just sort of coldly academically. Analyzing the music itself. So he's very interested in the people's and the culture and technology apology, essentially, I mean now he would call it ethnomusicology. But exactly that so real people really making the stuff in real time. And he was a great synthesizer vote of that. And I find that for his music has just kind of endlessly interesting. It's not all or it's not necessarily the easiest or most familiar musicals on well to get into. But then some of it feels like amazingly kind of. Yeah, I get this. This feels rooted in a sort of folk idiom is very much a familiar to people in wherever you come from. And the funny kind of way. So I love this piece particularly the backstory behind it. Because in the summer of nineteen o four it was a completely chance and serendipitous thing that happened to him which was he was on holiday, and he had a nanny singing some traditional Transylvanian songs to the children that she was looking off. And he was kind of so captivated by this. Melody, apparently, followed it and again made a sing. Again, tracked down and incorporate this, and I just love that this idea that this very elevated classical music comes from these real moments in life, and he himself said that peasant music, and the idiom of peasant music is elevated to the point where it's become his musical mother tongue. Great advocate for the idea that these musics that we might think of is somehow less important in the classical music or she often at all. So he was a great musical. Hey, rose. I felt we should place him botox on the twenty fifth of March. And this is from his Romanian folk dances. And it's such don's. It's based on a dance in which the don's is traditionally wet, very distinctive, colorful, sash or waistband. So while you're listening to this. You can picture some dancers. Learn is beautiful sashes. So happy birthday develop. Thank you. For.

Bela Bartok Arnold Alison Stewart Terry gross US don Burton hill Barco Beethoven Brahms director ABC James Joyce Strauss Cuba Carpathian basin Hungary Turkey Melody Elliot
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. It's Monday and on Mondays on the show. We listened to classical music with the creative director at our sister station, q. That is news clemency Burton hill every week. She stops by to places of music and share some of the stories from her book year of wonder classical music to enjoy day by day, high clemmie. Hi, nice to see you. Nice to see you. You were going to kick us off. With Bela Bartok. Yes. On this day, the twenty fifth of March he was born in eighteen eighty one. So thinking about Bela Bartok and the incredible. I guess contribution that he made to musical history. He was very much steeped in music from the past. So the big giants whether it's Barco Beethoven Brahms Strauss Debussy, but he was also really interested by what was happening in that moment in his own history. Which was the kind of breakdown of western tonality like you have with cubism with people like the Casio or modernism in literature people like James Joyce OT? As Elliot you have these renegade Mavericks, come along and music, like Arnold Schoenberg, for example, and shake the tree really hard on what? Harmony even is. And y all. Oh, like playing around in the same structures that people have been doing so forever. Why don't we just hit the whole thing on its head? So he has this interesting musical perspective of being able to see and incorporate the pause being very receptive to what's happening at that moment in the present. But then he also brings this. I would say very special source to proceedings, and he was obsessed with the folk music of his own native, Hungary, but also beyond so he collected and curated arranged and analyzed by music from places like Turkey and geria- the call pathogen basin. He was I think it was be described as an early pioneer in comparative Musicology. So the idea of thinking about the human beings who actually make this in the context in which they make it rather than just sort of coldly academically analyzing the music itself. So he's very interested in the people's, and the culture and politics politics, essentially, I mean now he would call it ethnomusicology. But exactly that so real people really making the stuff in real time. And he was a great. Synthesizer vote of that. And I find that for his music has just kind of endlessly interesting. It's not all or it's not necessarily the easiest or most familiar musicals on well to get into. But then some of it feels like amazingly kind of. Yeah, I get this. This feels rooted in a sort of folk idiom is very much a familiarity people in wherever you come from in the funny kind of way. So I love this piece particularly the backstory behind it. Because in some of nineteen o four it was a completely chance and serendipitous thing that happened to him which was he was on holiday, and he had a nanny singing some traditional Transylvanian songs to the children that she was looking after. And he was kind of so captivated by this. Melody, apparently, the followed it and had to sing it again tracked down incorporated this. And I just love that the idea that this very elevated classical music comes from these real moments in life, and he himself said. That peasant music and the idiom of peasant music is elevated to the point where it's become his musical mother-tongue advocate for the idea that these musics that we might think of is somehow less important in the classical music or she often at the root to all. So he was a great musical heroes. I felt we should place him Bostock on the twenty fifth of March. And this is from his Romanian photons. Isn't it su- such don's it's based on a dance in which the don's is traditionally wet, very distinctive, colorful, sash or waistband? So while you're listening to this. You can picture some dancers learning this beautiful sashes. So happy birthday develop. Thank you..

Arnold Schoenberg Bela Bartok Alison Stewart Barco Beethoven Brahms Strauss Burton hill director James Joyce don Elliot Hungary Turkey Bostock Melody twenty fifth
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

09:55 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Thanks for staying on board. John mcginnis with your NewsRadio KFC K talk. How the have all things the Oscars the Academy Awards. Did you watch are you inclined to watch you? Enjoy movies is a fair question to what movies are good. What are the movies that you like oftentimes critically acclaimed or did you find the contrary? I I did get a note from goaty who says the reason why people watch was because Queen and at Queen. That's that's a group and Adam Lambert sang also, Bradley Cooper and lady Gaga sang together. Both of those were excellent. Okay. Well. I'm in the dark on that too. But I want to get your thoughts. I'm getting a thumbs up from somebody who is there the teddy Cataldo kitty on you'll just walked in. And she was there and and enjoyed it. I trust. Yeah. Well, most of it, you know, I don't I don't buy into the whole thing. But there's parts of it that I like the musical performances. The opening I thought was refreshing. And I loved lady Gaga, Bradley Cooper, do really. That was the highlight of the show for me is beautiful. So do you think that might be enough to increase the viewership was up by three million people, maybe possibly for the music? Yeah. I can see it. I mean, I'd rewatch that. That's how much I liked it. Right. Yeah. Well, there you have it right there. Well, I, and of course, I remain vulnerable people. I get the impression that they feel is I'm critical of people who like it. I'm not at all if you enjoy it. That's wonderful. There are things I like that other people don't and I get this t- to each their own. Let's get your calls nine one six nine to one fifteen thirty eight hundred eight three four fifteen thirty also wanna get at some point. I wanna talk kinda on a completely different matter of how chaos can come out of matters of law in particular where there's court decisions that seem to put things in conflict. We'll talk about that as it relates to to property taxes and other local taxes that's coming up. So, but in the meantime, we've got people that have been holding. Let's let's give them the respect of getting on the air. Let's check in with Frank in Orangeville Frank good afternoon. Welcome to the conversation. Thank you for holding on. Thank you. Don, Shirley, was an innovator and the point is. Provide came out of what we would call modern jazz Dixieland, jazz blues and modern jazz came out after that. And. My mom was a piano player, and she could do the same thing. You gotta excuse me. But I I don't know who Don Shirley is. What does that is that one of these movies featured on Shirley? Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. And he was like I said he was an innovator and jazz is not constricted to specific notes. You know, like Beethoven Brahms, that's all cut and dried you played the same way every time you play it modern jazz. And then it became what we would call gas today is that it it's playing differently. Every time the songs were played is. Okay. So so there's a component to the movie separate and apart from the race relations message that with you found interesting as well is that accurate? That's true. He was he was really liked in Europe. He was more popular in Europe than he was in America. I think in America in the sixties. There was still just white black thing. Yeah. And unfortunately, but he was tremendous player, and I got an album of his and finally my dad said would you take that thing out into the patio room to play because I played it so many times and drove my dad crazy. Well, there's a good perspective on it as I was unaware of the story. But I gotta say as I read a little bit about it today. It's it does sound like a very good stories. And I understand why it may get being client to be recognized as it was last night. So again, I guess there's a question Mark with regard to the behavior of Spike Lee. And I know nothing about his movie, and I know nothing about him. I don't know these people, so, but, but I do know sportsmanship, and I do know dignified behaviour versus rude behavior. And so the whether the whether he felt this movie was was worthy of his recognition or not. I think you should have behaved differently. Good call though, Frank. Appreciate it very much. Let's check in with Louis in east Sacramento Lewis. Good afternoon. Welcome to the conversation. Thank you for holding on. Hello, Louis, Louis. We're looks like we're connected. How about Cheryl and Auburn Cheryl good afternoon? Welcome to the conversation. Hi, how are you Riddick? Thanks. How're you doing? Good. So I'm a local actress, and you would think that I would be really really super excited to watch the Academy Awards. But I am not I wasn't. I didn't I launch have you ever? Oh, yeah. I used to all the time. I loved it and being an acting. I mean, it it just it interesting to watch the films that get the awards the actors that can actresses stick at the awards, but over the years because I also which these two things don't really actually next, but I am conservative even though I am an actor. And it's just gotten way too political. It's just taking the enjoyment out of it. They've used it as a platform to say their personal whatever's going on in their personal beliefs for in the world of politics has just turned me off. I don't even watch it in and I can see if you have. A story that's been told. And and there's a a sensitive critical component to that story, and perhaps the actor or the director, whomever has has a lot of life experience at it. How it may may cause them to take it beyond the the limits of their ad the bounds of their acting. But you made the observation that it's that it's that you're you're out of the norm because you're an actor that that is conservative. I it seems to me if a person performs a task whether it's acting or or putting a baseball out of the park or moving a football down the field or putting a basketball hoop. Whatever the case may be or building a better widget, your political ideology shouldn't come into play. And I think you have absolutely no then don't use that as an excuse to. I don't care what your political beliefs. Are I've watched you because you were in this movie that I like. Yeah. Yeah. Like a getting up. Yeah. Doctor of the year award while he's up there. He decides he's going to let everybody know his political beliefs. I don't share your you weren't award because you're a good doctor. And you think about some of these actors who have taken a hard position on things about which they know nothing in the might even if there may be cases where I be inclined to agree with him on something nonetheless, they don't have the expertise when you're talking about climate science, for example, if you're a really good actor, and you make people laugh or cry or put them in fear by virtue of your talent, your art on the stage or on the screen good for you. But that does not do anything to enhance your knowledge about climate change or or the economy or any number of things have become critical in terms of public policy, and politics and just one more thing, and this is political. But I'm I'm just going to say it, anyway, these actors that are very well known that are, you know, they they're. Against having a while. But yet they live behind the four, of course, this and I'm like, oh my gosh. How hypocritical are you? That's a classic example. And and by the way, the same thing is true about people who are in a position I understand what their with their fame and notoriety they do need to have security, but they have an abundance of armed security, and they're opposed to the idea of ordinary citizens exercising their second amendment rights. They don't think people should have that opportunity. And that that's that has been a I think there are a number of examples where that dust has taken place and the the lack of sincerity. That that's displayed by those kinds of behaviors when yes, I've got big walls and alarm systems around my home, and I'm I have armed guards to take me from one place to another and but the rest of the world is not entitled to that. That's absolutely as flawed logic. And I think it goes back to a feeling of entitlement and a feeling of of really truly applying greater import to your trade than is deserved. If you're if you're an actor. We'll tell you what you do is nice. It'd probably bring satisfaction to you. And people who watch you do what you do. Good for you. That's wonderful. But but that that trade that art that that ability is not going to make a major change in the world is not going to cure diseases. It's not going to bring a problem to bring an end rather to to a problem that has been existing for years. So don't overinflate you're I'm not bike sharing. You obviously, I I sense. You have a clear understanding of that. But I think so many of them believed that. Because they're who they are. They should be the subject of greater belief and greater impact when they share their message. So appreciate appreciate the call Cheryl very much, and it's good to get the perspective of somebody who's who's at least tangentially in the business, and and not inclined to watch the the Oscars for some very good reasons. We'll be back with more conversation after this gonna talk a little bit about what happens when the court send a conflicting message to the public, especially when it has to do with the topic like taxation, what are the local officials to do. That's coming up. Right after this information.

Academy Awards Don Shirley lady Gaga Frank Cheryl Louis Bradley Cooper John mcginnis Europe teddy Cataldo Adam Lambert Queen America Beethoven Brahms Spike Lee Sacramento Auburn baseball
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Stand Partners for Life

Stand Partners for Life

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Stand Partners for Life

"Yeah. That sounds familiar, but most of the time you can count on playing one of your concertos to start. Meaning that both of them have to be comfortable the openings have to be comfortable for you. Because that's your first impression. And that's just that's by far the most important minute chill play. Yeah. Not to make it something. I mean, you know, we've talked about the fact that you can you should never feel like, you know, it's over just because he had a bad opening or something. But no, certainly not. But since I mean, this is one of the few things you have control over in the addition because the orchestra will have picked the whole list that you're playing from except for your concerto. So at least you can sort of put your stamp on right on that. Right. And that's I think that's one of the hardest things about taking it on Titian as just feeling like, you know, you're a number here. Not on the name your at a face, even because there's a screen, you know, you just end it goes by so fast. It's easy to serve just it's just flies by some like, I've played auditions or you come out and you're like. What just happened? Well, so for that reason you've heard of people you've talked to people, right? Who they want to select something out of the way to stand out. Yes. Yes. That does happen. And I think that's a mistake. Yeah. I do too. If that's your if that's your biggest reason for picking a certain piece is because other people aren't playing it then. Yeah. I also think that's a mistake on this. If you're using it because you feel like you're playing it really well people sometimes a lot of the time say this, you know, to easy and committee is going to knock going to respect me as a player if I choose the species on the list of accepted pieces. Yeah. There's some feeling like, oh, the other gonna think I can't play something harder. Right. And if you start thinking that way than you're you're dead. You're trying to appeal to the committee. But you also can't. Yeah. You can try to read their minds because that's just not going to work Royd. So I think in the end you have to it sounds trite, but you have to be yourself. And I think like you were saying if there is a piece that maybe a piece really speaks to you because it's not played all the time, and therefore you really identify with it and you play it. Well, and without a lot of self conscious feeling the night can be great. That's a win win. You know, then you're you are standing out for good reasons. I think it's weird one Prokofiev one is on lasts seen that. And it just seems strange while I was going to say, I think it's weird when they put two and not one, but. Well, we'll get we'll get to the specifics just wanted to sort of set some set some expectations for what we're talking about here with what what a concerto should be for you in the first place and stop wandering off. Okay. Heard me back in it. Shape here. Okay, then. Yeah. And in my article about violent concerto openings I wanted to run through all the major violin concerto openings figuring out where they would rank on the scale from cruise control to may you don't the lesson is in your audition. You don't want any anything that feels like mayday to to start. You're not setting yourself up for no one would do that. I mean, I think. Days until like, they gather people do they think I'm going to play Mendelssohn because nobody else's playing it. But it does seem like, okay, it's going to be so bad. You know? And then you get there, and you feel naked and that is true. So yeah, I mean, that's the importance of playing for people like knowing how you're gonna react. And and visualization. I think you're you know, you you you've got a whole article on visualizing. And I I I was like what are you talking about? But you know, the more I think about it's true. It's like even when I'm just playing some like a shift just like an ordinary one one to another note. I can tell feel like you know, you right before I play it like this feels weird. You know, I I'm going to do something strange like you've never done it before. Yeah. And even though in the moment you end up playing to you know, sometimes you'll get it. But there is something a little odd. And I think Mendelssohn falls into that category of things like probably superficially seemed like it was going to be. Okay. But like if you really sat down thought about yourself getting ice nervous as you possibly can. Yeah. You're something. Strange might happen. Yeah. You wanna? Yeah. Ferret those moments out, and we'll talk about Mendelssohn more later too. But yeah. Oh, because it's one that people learn when they're young also. You tend to learn that piece at an age when you're really fearless. And then having to play at an age where your fear fearful can be very strange. And so yeah, that piece needs a lot of seasoning. And a lot of performing if you're really going to go for it. Well, we do have a sample list to to work from an our discussion today because when I took a group of great players through preparation for Detroit symphony audition in the beginning of two thousand eighteen and that list was pretty Representative. And it was a list says these pieces are allowed and anything else is not allowed. So I figured it would be a good actually that was your idea to go from an actual audition list. So thank you for that. So here are the concertos Detroit allowed for their audition. And they wanted the first movement with credential of one of the following, and that was Beethoven Brahms divorce Jacques Mendelssohn. For coffee of to Sibelius and Tchaikovsky. And then they also wanted the first movement without Kadena, interestingly of one of the following Mozart's, and it's three four or five least three so. Yes. Yeah. Right now, it'd be salivating over like, ooh, Detroit here. I come. What may maybe let's talk about the Mozart's first because that'll be a bit of a shorter discussion. I mean, the content of those three Mozart concertos is not drastically different one to the next three has the stigma of being the student concerto. Although what I think we we've always both agreed that anything. Well play. Anybody listening right now? Just play Mozart three. You're taking Detroit. Forget about it. Stop stop foreign five right now. I mean, the I think the thought is as with the romantic insured, a you play. What you play the best right with no thought whatsoever to what someone else I e the committee is going to think about it. And. Yeah. Just you play what's comfortable, and what you play the best. I mean any peace. That's on this list is going to be great. If it's played. Well, yeah. Let's art was no dummy. Need already written two concertos? But by the time he'd written the third. It's a great piece. But yeah, the opening is not nearly as difficult as either four or five, which is a great thing. And got a lot with it. It's not like, you know, you can show your we've got a great sound. You can go to your laxed. You know, your Bronco can concern really really beautiful, and you can just produce a great sound that opening and just immediately win some people over in the first one of my favorite times hearing Pearlman live was Mozart three that was a long time ago. Probably twenty years almost and ask yourself like if you if you heard ten different recordings of Mozart three would you have a favorite like sure? So same thing. That's a it's a great piece. So that's we're putting too to bed forever. The idea that it's not made my point Mozart three. That's the way to go. Well, and you won the LA Philadelphian originally Mozart three so. Yeah. And I think also Chicago I think they also allowed. I think the I think they now maybe they only say for five my very first audition. I remember Philly. Said you could play three four or five. But when I asked my coach and mentor, William defense quality. Said that really means four or five do not show up playing three. Explains why didn't advance in the. Well, well, mystery solved all these years later. Well, I had you know, inside info, and I still well advanced. Okay. But I didn't get to the finals. Okay. The kind of like that turns my whole theory on its head. Then that was you know orchestra. You don't get inside information to advance burn. Two thousand era. Philly orchestra nine hundred ninety nine. A boston. I think was the first audition. I took where they just said four four or five. But here we are in Detroit three four or five quickly. I guess between four or five is they're they're both tough openings big differences that Mozart five is slow. It's an adagio opening and opening his is harder than it was to me Senate pretty simple the opening of five. Yeah. And then he start playing it. And you're like even now I sit down planets hard to get everything as smooth as you want. And I think it depends on what your natural strengths are. I guess playing smoothies. Maybe not my strength. Well, it's interesting. I just heard a quote, it's actually from an old colleague of ours. Eugene is a former principal oboe of Chicago. I'm still thinking about it. Actually, it was that your whatever your strengths are those are still going to be with you in an audition or under pressure, the other things may or may not be. But you're you're very strong. Your superpowers. So to speak are gonna stay with you. If one of those is just like, a nice, smooth singing sound, then no matter how nervous you're going to be Mozart five would be a great opening for you know, for me smooth. And singing can sometimes be the first thing that goes out the window one. I'm nervous. But but he's doing that's your Mozart concerto though for for auditions. So it served you served you quite well that is another episode to all right mine's always been four that a force of habit. And something about that key of d major most popular key for violin concertos. So. Yeah. And you know, you you play great Mozart for mister I have played it in a lot of audience for been every audition then. Well every audition I've taken. Yeah. I mean, it's not like well is there ever not rather just say five I feel like there has been. I thought maybe a Boston. Maybe boston. Yeah. Okay. Just five. But in fact, if if and when I've gotten the choice of which solo to start with which concerto, I would always pick Mozart I would pick them outside for between, just comfort wise. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So we should get to why why we gravitate to problems like what do you want to take this Detroit list and order? Sure, then we okay just two quick recap Beethoven Brahms Mendelssohn Prokofiev to Sibelius Tchaikovsky. So you're thinking immediately. How weird it is that they don't they won't allow Prokofiev one. Oh, that's something. I I know I had my first thought on reading out that list out loud is the I mean, the only concertos we ever hear and auditions really are Brahms Sibelius and Tchaikovsky. I mean that would cover ninety five out of one hundred auditions. Yeah. How would you feel about starting with divorce tougher it with the double stops? Oh, yeah. Do you? Do you want to do this in order? Because. Yeah, I would not feel good about starting with the. Yeah. Beethoven?

Mozart Detroit Jacques Mendelssohn Beethoven Brahms Mendelssohn P boston Sibelius Tchaikovsky Titian Philly Chicago Royd Beethoven Brahms Beethoven Kadena Senate William Representative Pearlman Eugene
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"So it's very important that we do look back, and that we sort of incorporate, and I it's this very slow. It's like a. A glacier. That's what I feel like music is is this huge glacier. That's moving. We can't see it moving as imperceptible, but it's moving over hundreds and hundreds of years so for everyone who's kind of going off the beaten path, and experimenting and doing all sorts of different things than there are people who are more traditionalist, and there are people doing both. And it's kind of it's inching forward, and it might go back a little bit and then inches forward some more, but always maintaining this kind of I of the hurricane like. Center about it that has both worlds. And I think that that is really important, and it's it's important in education, especially people studying to to be in music that we do have that tradition, which I had the, you know, the only thing I wished as a student was that I did more of the other which more maybe improvisation more jazz more experimenting and kind of it took me until you know, later after school joining bang on a can where I began to embrace those ugly sounds that I was talking about or embrace mistakes. There can be a lot of anxiety and pressure on like how something should sound. I'm based on what came before. And I think new music is beautiful. And it's it's new and it hasn't been recorded. Knows how it should sound. There's this freedom. And that's how I now approach older music. Whenever I go back and play Bach or Beethoven Brahms or any of those composers. I look at it. Like, a new piece of this new way that you've learned how to be with music has shut a new new light on this very old vast off. And I think I just wish that those two things could merge sooner in life for people. I think they are. I think that colleges and universities, and even hopefully, you know elementary on up are becoming more aware of that and incorporating those things contemporary music is playing a bigger role in education, and I just want. I wanna see that happen more. And when I do visit schools or when I do or coming demonstrate or lecture. I I like to talk about that, you know, just encourage people to to get off the page, you know, and don't spend all your time in a practice room, go out and play with other. People out and talk to other people collaborate like that's what you know. You have so much time, you know, and everybody says oh enjoy it while it lasts. And you're like Heidel always be there. And then you realize you get into real life and professional life, and you don't have you have very little time. Yeah. So that's what I wish I could see more of is not only that we're doing classical music and tradition, but we're also bringing as much of the new and the experimental into that kind of really platform of in that those stages of development because that's kind of where it counts, you know, it's much harder later in life too. Teaching dog matrix. And we're back to Dr. This man, this has been so much fun. Actually. Thank you so much for taking the time to come into the same me have so much fun on your tour. I hope you enjoy the drive on the west coast. Right. What is it US one one one? Oh one. Okay. Yeah. I've never done that you'll have too much. All right, everyone.

US Heidel Beethoven Brahms Bach
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"Hey, guys, it's your host station. So if you're listening to the classical classroom podcast, it's legacy that you're aware that there is a world of classical music out there in that. It's got something to do with these guys Bach Beethoven Brahms. Most of it was written a really long time ago. All that good stuff. And you may have wondered how on earth that music is related to this more avant-garde experimental world of music out there that also calls itself classical like Philip glass in John cage. Well in this episode cellist, Ashley Bathgate explains that link and she kind of gives a primer on what's going on in the new classical music world, and what is kind of lending to the world of classical music as a whole. I learned a ton by talking to Ashley it was really fun. And I hope you learn a lot too. I think you will when you do when you're like, oh my God. It's like I've gotten a free education because. You have make sure you go on over to I tunes or wherever you listen. And you subscribe to rate and review the show makes a whole lot of difference for us, and it takes like, two seconds. I mean, come on. Okay. And now a word from our sponsor. This episode of classical classroom is sponsored by maestro classics visit muster classics dot com today to take advantage of their cyber Monday sale all CDs with twenty four page activity books. Regularly price at sixteen ninety eight are on sale for only nine ninety eight and include free shipping. You can also get the maestro classics twelve CD box set an excellent gift for the holidays for only eighty nine ninety five visit Maestra classics dot com today and give the gift of classical music this holiday season, not a bad idea. All right now on with the show..

Ashley Bathgate Bach Beethoven Brahms Philip glass John cage two seconds
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"Order with code classroom. There's a rumor going around that classical music can be Whitey toy d. But here in the classroom, we beg to differ. Beethoven faa. Aw. Prospal music is where we have to feel restricted or we have to act a certain way, you know. That's not going to be helpful going forward shaking with excitement. I mean, there's just so many parts of the opera PS me to play his favorite spot in the first one. Browns by started using those lex mega tires. How be classical music Rockstars because there's not enough of that in this business choosing really blogging demanding to my head. I don't change my voice talking to class. I'm playing classical music now. I mean, yes, same twelve notes. That's what's so cool about it. I'm Dacia Klay a classical music newbie. And I'm trying to learn all I can about the music. Come learn with me and the classical music experts I invite in to the classical classroom. Hello everyone. Welcome to the classical classroom. I'm dish Klay. And here with me today is violinist Joshua bell. He doesn't really need an introduction. But for the sake of formality among go ahead, and do it Joshua is the music director of the British ensemble academy of Saint Martin in the fields. He's a Grammy and Avery Fisher prize winner among many many other things he's put out an album of max Brooks work called Scottish fantasy. And that's what he's going to be teaching me about today. Joshua, welcome to the classical classroom. Thanks for having me. Okay. So this is gonna sound like kind of Aleem question to ask you to begin with. But I have always wondered about the name academy of St. Martin in the fields, which is the on samba that you play with them reporting. What is up with that name mouthful? And I remember growing up listening to classical radio is a kid. My parents always headed on. And it seemed like every other recording was the kademi of. Saint Martin in the fields with sir Neville Marriner. He turn I learned later. He founded the orchestra they came up with the name. It's I don't know exactly how it came about. He he put together an orchestra when he was very young. And they started playing concerts in. I don't know how they came up with the name. It's too late to change it now because everybody knows that you get but it is about full. May not be the best aspect of the orchestra is their actual name. But I think it's one of the great orchestras around. They could they can always certain it to like an acronym. What would that be as well? SM f-. Yeah. Academy sounds a little bit. You know academic. I guess you might say which is not what comes through when you hear them play. They're really great artists. And and I'm I'm so lucky to get to be their music director. That's there year only their second music director ever. We're just kinda crazy. Well, sir, Neville Marriner. Started them as a youngster young man leading them not as a conductor with a baton, but from the violin, and he stayed with him as music for fifty some years. So I'm not going to be able to. I don't think Bill to match as his longevity in that way. So that records going to stay in the in the books for a while. I think and then and then when he finally retired at the age of ninety almost ninety I they asked me to be the music director, so great privilege. Wow ninety. That's amazing. Yeah. Well, that's conductors live along. That's why I'm starting to lean in that direction. I'm it's of. Transitioning into being a conductor or semiconductor, you might save. You know, they they do have a tendency to live very long time. Yeah. This sounds like a wise decision. So. Tell me about max Bruch. So we can kind of put this piece in context when did he live was he all that? Good stuff. Max, bro. You might not. If you're if you're new Dacosta music, you probably know Beethoven Brahms and Mozart, and maybe Bach and some few others. Brooke may not be one. You know, though, some of his pieces are as popular as anything else in classical music. One of them is the violent concerto the g minor concertos played by every violence..

sir Neville Marriner Saint Martin Joshua bell director Dacia Klay max Bruch Whitey max Brooks Max St. Martin Grammy Avery Fisher Beethoven Brahms Bill Brooke Bach Mozart
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"Something in the fifteen to twenty five dollar range, which is within shouting distance of a movie. I think that a lot of presentations are within shouting distance of the theater Broadway as much more. Than a lot of opera productions and you don't hear the same scream about Broadway because it's an iconic thing to do. That's very true and certainly pop concerts or even going to hear some singer-songwriter that you like if you spend an evening at a club and get entry tickets, and then a couple of drinks you're going to end up spending, maybe one hundred dollars. So in that sense, it's not priced, so completely out of reach. Yeah. I mean, I've yet to be able to afford to see Justin Timberlake. I feel like this is where you go in for me. So so I think classical music isn't the only entertainment that's expensive, but it's become so much seen that way. And also the people are thrilled to give the money to hear Justin. Timberlake people aren't sure they want to give that money to the orchestra. They're not sure they're going to have an experienced, they like, and so it seems more expensive. You know to buy something you don't know you're going to like, of course, there's more of a barrier to giving out that money, but it is interesting. You know the the people have that perception because you're right, like if you look, if you look hard enough, you know you poke through the ticket prices on your at your local symphonies website. It can usually find something that you can you can afford. But yeah, yeah, some is often discussed. I think part of the problem too is that the experience that is being marketed is not inherently appealing to people because the experience is you were going to go and sit in silence for two hours on velvet seats. You're not exactly comfortable. You're not sure what to wear. You're not. Sure. When the clap, you don't know what you're supposed to be getting out of it. Why on earth would you want to pay for that experience? And it's, it's too bad. I think that orchestras have become. So we're talking about orchestras in particular because of course, chamber music is much more flexible. I mean, classical music can be as solo piano doing something, you know, but an orchestra isn't ticket or an opera is a particular size and orchestras are trying to break down that perception. But I think it's a shame they don't do it more. It's possible to perform different kinds of venues. Now when you speaking of classical music offering something on a large scale, I'm wondering if you could recommend a couple of pieces of music that people could get started on to listen to it home, maybe find on Spotify or whatever to to listen to, with regards to orchestra, music. Well, I assume that anybody who's heard of an orchestras heard of Beethoven Brahms. And of course, listening to a Beethoven symphony is never a waste of time. I love Beethoven's third, but I wonder if people know how much more recently has been done. I heard Philip glasses, fifth symphony recently, and I just loved Philip classes, fifth symphony..

Justin Timberlake Beethoven Brahms Beethoven Philip glasses Spotify one hundred dollars twenty five dollar two hours
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"It's not like I was some kind of trailblazer, but because that was at the time. So it was sort of seen as a marker. Well, you know, and I, I love finding out people's origin stories like how they wound up in the careers that their end because inevitably, I think I think people who are getting started and things have these this misconception that you know, there's this clear path that you take to doing whatever it is that you're doing, especially in the classical music world. Yes, there so not. And you know, not I, yeah. And I think that. You know, you're an unusual path. You're, you're winding paths to getting to where you are now and where you're firmly established and a voice that so many people listen to maybe what gives your writing such a fresh taken. Like I love this article, the beginner's guide to enjoy classical music because it's it's so fresh, like most of the articles that I've read about how to get started in classical music. It's like, okay, well, you wanna start with buck and periods, you know, and like all that kind of stuff like, all right. All right. Yeah, I kind of know all that, but, but your article takes us really different approach. I'm just gonna read the first couple of sentences because I feel like I really sets the tone for the rest of the article. So well, when it starts out, classical music aficionados go away. This article is not for you instead. It is for everyone who sees classical music as a private club and who feels they're standing outside the clubhouse girl. You are preaching. To me. Now I said immediately say that there is predictably commenter on the website on the article who is completely offended that I am discriminating against him with this opening because he is an admission auto. It doesn't wish to be shut out of this article. So there's really no policing everybody. No, no, never. But I do. I think it's it's such a shame that classical music and I don't think I realized quite how true this was until I wrote this article. We see it as the sort of set of predetermined hurdles that you have to leap over before. You're allowed to listen to any of the advanced stuff. Like if you don't know your basic Bach, Beethoven Brahms, and Mozart, you can't. You don't get to listen to the advanced stuff and I literally saw somebody post on a classical music website. Well, I appreciate DARA. I can't pronounce her last name the. There's a female composer from nine hundred eighteen from Croatia whose music I love whom I included in this. And this writer said, I appreciate her Buzek, but this isn't something to give to beginners. Why not? Music is truly for everybody. We don't have sort of entry level versus advanced level things in pop music, but you can't listen to Bjork because you haven't digested the Beatles yet..

Croatia Bjork Beatles writer Beethoven Brahms Bach Mozart
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Out of musical biographies lately i've finished the the bronze biography that i've been reading and it's just antastic john elliott gardner has a very good book about box of buff music in the castle of heaven and he talks about about life in i in his music bought his one of the rare composers who actually had a relatively happy life you look at beethoven brahms is it guys who are single until they died never had any children by had a bunch of kids including some kids who are more famous than he was in their time fill a carlphilip emmanuel cp bar was more famous composer than johan sebastian actually own sebastian was famous for being a great organised but his music itself wasn't really amply discovered until a little bit later he became the basis for everything is famous story that mozart the mozart was in the middle of of writing and he actually discovered box music box music was rediscovered after one hundred seventy years and what it was rediscovered but then mohtar actually took a break from composing for months to study the counter in bah if you if you look at box music it's very often sounds when it when for example when you when you listen to box inventions his twopart inventions than what you see i in in his panda music is the use of counterpoint counterpoint is basically two themes that are playing simultaneously and it sounds like two different instruments are playing simultaneously it's just brilliantly britain he's also written some most beautiful music that's ever been written i so we'll we'll we'll you will have to play some botha's week i'll take some favorite pieces of mind that are that are about um because there really are spectacular okay other things that i like so the one thing at the emmys at the grammys rather that were pretty great uh that was pretty great joy villa who has been a guest i believe on michael mols a show i.

john elliott gardner beethoven brahms mohtar botha michael mols johan sebastian one hundred seventy years
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

03:23 min | 6 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

"Bach. Beethoven brahms bay. the beatles. future generations will have to judge whether the musical cortez. The beatles ranks musically with artists such as handel and chopin but no one can deny their historical significance. Look for photos of john lennon. Paul mccartney george harrison and ringo starr before and after their fame the rock band burst onto the scene. In the early nineteen sixties unheard of popularity with long hair and loud music they brought counterculture and revolutionary ideas to the middle class affecting the values of an entire generation during the globe. They served as a link between young people everywhere. Among the displays. You'll find the manuscripts of song lyrics written by lennon and mccartney the to guiding lights of the group. I wanna hold. Your hand was the song that launched them into stardom a hard day's night and help we're titled songs of two films capturing the excitement and chaos of their hectic touring schedule. Some call a ticket to ride the first heavy metal song. Yesterday by paul was recorded with guitar and voice backed by a string quartet. A touch of sophistication from producer. George martin also read the handwritten poem by young john lennon labeled untitled verse. Rambling depressed cynical but humorous. Is that a self portrait down at the bottom. The beatles memorabilia hangs alongside manuscripts by mozart. Beethoven schubert and others kind of an anti-climax after the fab four i know off and on display a work by german-born composer who found a home right here in london. Find george frederic handel's famous or a you the messiah. It was written in a flash of inspiration three.

George martin john lennon london Beethoven lennon Bach handel chopin paul mccartney Yesterday early nineteen sixties george frederic handel Beethoven schubert two films Paul mccartney george harrison german three first heavy metal song four