17 Burst results for "Beethoven Brahms"

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

06:18 min | 10 months ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"The nineteen fifties. Rebel without a cause or something like that. So DC's a piece called SUPERNOVA. Describing a Supernova and yes, you are very right that what happened is that in the twentieth century, the music also had great new repertoire sex to the movies and what the movie do is try to describe and help the mood yet was fair the different scenarios and characters and therefore ads the same kind of value used as the French creek that describing when I spoke about the south one of their use. It was in a way psychedelic movie before movie was invented, it was Hollywood before here what he and so you're very right that a lot of moving music could be qualified as impressionistic or slightly Frenchtown times and this. Job. has this this kind of visual quality and he wrote many many great pc's I've recorded already for CD of is really can vary if I miss that myself I'm so enthusiastic and passionate about this week I please encourage people to go listen to all the music of game console Theo An. What? This up on on the websites here he the future of French physique it's alive and it will be there for very long time as I hope fringe Kook as well all over the world. Thanks to our wine and cuisine. Has Been Incredible I'm like. I've learned so much today and it Kinda seems like what's remarkable to me about French music after having gotten this kind of intense. consolidated overview of it is that it sort of been weirdly the same since the beginning it's got this very consistent characteristic to it where it's it's emotive. It's describing the world around. It's sort of very engaged with the world of outside of the self. It's very when you listen to it. You're experiencing the feeling of something. As opposed to sort of thinking deeply about not that it's like superficial or anything like that. But but like it's it really works on an emotional level more than some other music you know. I couldn't be happier with what you just say because indeed I think sometimes, I have myself suffered from the idea that basically. Beethoven Brahms Bruckner Vagner would be. Deep Music because they speak about man speak about metaphysics the speak about. Humanistic. Values and that French music would be actually somehow you superficial and on the third faith and can decorative and actually I really believe that it is not the case in the sense that it depends how you see what is your attitude with the world and as we have always wore environmental concerns with the world, we understand that it is very That we are connected to the world, we are in and. Despite being often descriptive or visual, the French music I think it's it's a structure behind that that is in sync with the depth of the world and that what is searching it and that's what makes it really also, very, very deep. It's mindful. It's like it's like it's paying attention to what's going on around instead of being like sort of you know solid cystic and just sort of pulled into the the self it's it's like like I said, it serve engaged in observing what's happening. In this absolutely I mean sometimes. Short Haiku from Japan poetry little poem from. Fringe Kook. I believe could fay in a very concise way as much about men as much about metaphysics as you know some very heavy. Literature from from thumb German of I. Think it's both of them are important interesting but we should not indeed just put one above the other. I think. Both. Valid to try to make us understand the world better and be happier agree to fund enough. This has been amazing I feel like like I have been on. An journey of sound today I really really appreciate it. This has been a great listen I and thanks for taking the time to do it. It's my pleasure. Thank you for your patience and well I. Hope you would come visit us in. Saint Louis to hear a lot of. Music of. Every composer, but also some French. Music. Ones. By the Super. I Adore I'm so proud I love them. Well, it's a fun. Thanks again. Appreciate it. Thank. Thank you. Over. All right everyone that does it for this epic episode of classical classroom for more classroom head over to classical classroom show dot com, where you can find all of our episodes forever ways to connect with us ways to support the show financially and. Where to buy classical classroom merch don't forget to subscribe to rate and review the show wherever you listen. It helps a lot and we live hearing your comments hearing your comments and we love reading your comments. Thanks to the birthplace of classroom Houston public media. Thanks to the official virtual meeting background provider of classical classrooms. Streaker streaker provides a naked person to streak across your screen during important meetings at random intervals. Thanks to find enough for being on the show it was great to meet both you and your amazing hairless cats to fund. Thanks to me for saying words but most of all, thanks to you for listening. Of Why? Or why? Simone?.

Theo An Hollywood French creek Beethoven Brahms Bruckner Vagn DC Japan Simone official fay Houston Saint Louis
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It hazel bring to them first of all she brought a serious classical technique to the pieces as we heard she had studied at Juilliard she was one of the first artists really to make her mark in both classical music and jazz she sold with the New York Philharmonic and the Philadelphia Orchestra among others as a classical musician and then she often used boogie woogie when she jazz them up that's a specific kind of jazz especially piano jazz and to begin with that kinda made a statement because boogie woogie is based on something called the shuffle rhythm which kind of tents instant instant tents and it's the basic rhythm of the music called the blues which is ultimately and and originally an African American form so she was really saying this is our vernacular and we're bringing it to Chopin or box or list Lauren hazel really much more than a classical pianist in America at that time I was very much in the tradition of Bach Mozart Beethoven Brahms and the rest of who were wonderful improvisers and who were known for their improvisation and by the time she arrived in the mid of twentieth century you know improvisation had been bled out of what we call classical music but all those people improvised they also played with what Duke Ellington like to call the triple scoring an urge which you know has to do with making people want to shake their rear ends in other words dance what's your view on this current I wanted to sort of insert hazel's perspective about swinging the classics and how she felt about it and how it all began for her she was playing at a club on fifty second street on swing street a young girl she was a teenager so after high school she would run down the fifty second street and work through the night because she became a wage earner for her family she was the intermission pianist for the vocalist Frances Faye and she said she would start playing a song and then the waiter would come over tap on the shoulder and say oh you can't play that because the singer does that piece on her show so then she started another tune and he'd come back again and say oh no you can't play that one either because miss Faye does it in her show and she said she got so angry that she says I know what I'll do I'll play the Bach inventions and let's see if she plays that in her show and she starts swinging the Bach inventions in the middle of this jazz club and she fell in love with it and she got a kick out of it I think it's indicative of her personality too I mean there was a little bit of a a smart.

Juilliard New York Philharmonic Philadelphia Orchestra Chopin Lauren hazel America Beethoven Brahms Duke Ellington Frances Faye
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the pieces as we heard she had studied at Juilliard she was one of the first artists really to make her mark in both classical music and jazz she sold with the New York Philharmonic and the Philadelphia Orchestra among others as a classical musician and then she often used boogie woogie when she jazz them up that's a specific kind of jazz especially piano jazz and to begin with that kinda made a statement because boogie woogie is based on something called the shuffle rhythm which kind of tents instant instant tents and that's the basic rhythm of the music called the blues which is ultimately and and originally an African American form so she was really saying this is our vernacular and we're bringing it to Chopin or box or list Lauren is a really a much more than any classical pianist in America at that time I was very much in the tradition of Bach Mozart Beethoven Brahms and the rest who were wonderful improvisers and who were known for their improvisation and by the time she arrived in the mid the twentieth century you know improvisation had been bled out of what we call classical music but all those people improvise they also played with what Duke Ellington like to call the triple scoring an urge which you know has to do with making people want to shake their rear ends in other words dance what's your view on this current I wanted to sort of insert hazel's perspective about swinging the classics and how she felt about it and how it all began for her she was playing at a club on fifty second street on swing street a young girl she was a teenager so after high school she would run down the fifty second street and work through the night because she became a wage earner for her family she was the intermission pianist for the vocalist Frances Faye and she said she would start playing a song and then the waiter would come over tap on the shoulder and say oh you can't play that because the singer does that piece on her show so then she started another tune and he come back again and say oh no you can't play that one either because miss Faye does it on her show and she said she got so angry that she says I know what I'll do I'll play the Bach inventions and let's see if she plays that in her show and she starts swinging the Bach inventions in the middle of this jazz club and she fell in love with it and she got a kick out of it I think it's indicative of her personality too I mean there was a little bit of a a smart.

Juilliard New York Philharmonic Philadelphia Orchestra Chopin Lauren America Beethoven Brahms Duke Ellington hazel Frances Faye
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on KCRW

"To save small businesses I like that construction company that you just talked about and that's a fair point about the herculean nature of this and he has been talking to small business owners dozens of them have told us about particular problems applying for loans some of them say they're still waiting to hear back from their banks some of them have said the website crashes and several them miss several them has said the banks have played restrictions are placed restrictions that they just can't meet what's behind the problems it is it just the scale of the effort or is there something that can be done to fix this it's it's a little bit it's largely the scale of the effort and the unprecedented surge that came and immediately as the program open so you know I understand this is a small business in the first thing they do is they fill out an application they get their paperwork together they go to their bank their bank has to go through us to process that paperwork then that bank has to turn around and it has to submit a form that goes to the small business administration so the long can get assigned a number so we can get counted in this three hundred and fifty billion dollar fund and then all that has to go back to the bank and then the banking kind of originate the loan so we we tend to focus on the first step in the process there's a lot of stuff that goes on after that each step has to be completed but for that small business can get the money in their in their account is it is an optimistic take it is so interesting you know we hear three hundred and fifty billion dollars it's a lot of money but for a small business you need just a tiny percentage of that it can be life and death let me ask you out to that and you know at first there were three hundred and fifty billion dollars to support small businesses a few days after this lunch the president said he would like to add another two hundred and fifty billion to it what does that say to you about the depth of the trouble facing this country small businesses well it's it's tremendous so at the US chamber we just did a survey at the last few days of March with our partners at MetLife and what we learned was one in four businesses were already shuttered down another forty percent of those who weren't expected to be shut down within two weeks that's over half of Americans small businesses who had to shut their operations in addition they told us that one in four can only make it less than two months before they have to Herman at least close and so you know it is a day to day cash basis that's why the support is important we know that businesses are right on the brink in this money can't come fast enough and that's why we're doing everything we can to chamber to both help small businesses get their applications in order and we have guides that have been downloaded millions of times on our website to help them do that and then help the banks get the resources they need to process that everything's got to work seamlessly I don't know anyone that thinks it has worked perfectly but we have to keep redoubling our efforts you millions of people as you just said have a file for unemployment in the past few weeks how does the stimulus package help some of them get back to work also for those who are adults who work for small businesses those with generally fewer than five hundred employees this loan program that we're talking about directly encourages small businesses to keep their employees and bring back those who've they've laid off or furloughed that's how they qualify for the loan forgiveness small businesses can never loan forgiven to the extent that they're using the loan proceeds to keep paying their workers in addition we expect some programs to come online today or tomorrow from the treasury and the federal reserve to help larger businesses and so on the goal of helping the users to help U. S. chambers to help these folks leave it there thanks so much thank you there's been a lot of build up to a meeting today will of virtual meeting of OPEC and Russia as they face an oil glut and very low prices for their crew president trump is going to watch this closely he's trying to push them especially Saudi Arabia to cut production he says the low prices are threatening the US oil industry your interest check in with them when crude oil prices began spiraling downwards a month ago president trump was overjoyed low prices at the gas pump may drivers across the U. S. happy but that was before the corona virus forced virtually everything to shut down this is a ham comel with the racial group I think that initially lower oil prices were received to be good until it became clear to him that lower prices you mean a lot of job losses and in many states some of the states are critical in his reelection campaign specially Texas thousands of jobs in the US shale oil industry are at risk of rock bottom prices continue president trump has long made it clear he is no fan of OPEC something he repeated yesterday for many years I used to say go back was very unfair I hated all back you will know the truth I hated it because it was a fix now trump needs the cartel to come to an agreement to limit production which in turn will raise oil prices and that means trying to patch up the dispute between Saudi Arabia and non OPEC member Russia that led to the slide in prices Daniel your gun is an oil expert at IHS Markit the United States to step into the role and particularly president trump not it is so much as a deal maker but as a divorce mediator between Saudi Arabia and Russia you can says there's a lot of posturing and messaging going on from all sides ahead of today's meeting he says despite this he believes all countries are going to want to reach an agreement all the oil exporters are staring at the same harsh reality what's a bad situation we'll get really much worse as we go into the end of April beginning of may because the world will run out of storage for oil and the prices were really plummet so there is an incentive to make a deal the OPEC meeting will be followed Friday by a meeting of the G. twenty oil ministers which will bring Russia the Saudis in the US to the same table Jackie Northam NPR news Washington this is NPR news and this is Casey R. W. and from the KCRW newsroom initially the LA Philharmonic said it was cancelling concerts through early may now the orchestra says it's shutting down for the remainder of the twenty twenty season KCRW's not Gillam reports that while the LA Phil is bowing out the fate of another institution the Hollywood Bowl remains unknown the LA Phil will be playing the works of Beethoven Brahms or the other great composers of Walt Disney concert hall anytime soon along with canceling the season the symphony says it's laying people off and cutting some employees pay as it tries to navigate the hardships of the coronavirus Gustavo Dudamel the celebrated music and artistic director of LA Phil is going to forgo pay for the duration of the shutdown the LA times reports almost a hundred part time work stream please we'll see a pay cut of thirty five percent those on the leadership team will see even greater reductions the LA Phil's decision to cancel its season comes about two weeks after the New York Philharmonic decided to throw in the towel but what about picnics and concerts this summer at the Hollywood Bowl the LA Phil which manages the ball says it's not quite sure what the plan is yet they're hoping to have a full or at least partial season but organizer say they're being flooded with cancellations from artists for KCRW I met Gillam you probably have a lot of questions right now like what's the latest with the facts concerning covert nineteen for the buses and trains running as usual in LA what happens to homeless people how can I help small businesses succeed here take this week here in the case here to be a newsroom are farther apart but we are working as hard as ever if there's something we should know or something you want to know tell us on social media at Casey R. W. we are all in this together be well we're gonna get through this and stay tuned to KCRW and coming up later this hour that marketplace morning report we are likely in for yet another gut wrenching report on layoffs and joblessness this morning the labor department's numbers tracking first time claims for unemployment benefits have been soaring for weeks sitting Graham records today's report will likely show another astronomical figure but the actual number of Americans out of work is likely even higher more coming up fifty four degrees now in downtown LA we're expecting highs in the fifties again today with rain hours continuing tonight.

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Myths as you know the the the kangaroos raised up and torn down. And but I think in the art forms I think in architecture you know people have been talking about the end of the stark attacked the the star celebrity genius architect and in in in music and new music. People are looking past this sensibility. Where are you know? There's only a few people really Matter whether in composition or performance and and I think that's that's healthy but there's also something this. This is Ella Mental. Need you know with the people people go to concerts. They go look at buildings they they they go to great restaurants They go to museums in order to be overpowered. You know they're they want something exceptional. They want something awesome And and the the whole culture that is built up you know around trading and providing and said of also marketing that kind of experience that brings up all these pitfalls automatically. But we still we still want to. You know we still need it. So y'all can we have a future where where we have quote unquote genius. Who who are providing these kinds of experiences and yet they're all kind of really nice people and treating people it's tricky So it's but it is kind of working through of of that couldn't go genius. Model that Eh. that it seems like every art form actually dealing with this right now Absolutely in the food world to one hundred percent As a question not to be so reductive to food critic but I'm always asking myself just to better understand my industry again because because I've restaurants they get reviewed by critics. I WANNA know how a food critic thinks when read their work and all of these things to get a better understanding what they might think of our food. What does it take to be a good music critic then because it seems to me this is the one kind of criticism where if you're not constantly reading listening getting in better It's not gonNa look so good like you must be just consuming information all the time. Yeah I am. Yeah I mean it's you do need to keep up There are some basic qualities that I think you need to have to to do it. I mean there's no there's no exact training you know and you don't need to. Have you know a certain certain kind of degree you know to do it. As sort of level of of professional perfect pitch now definitely not I don't have perfect pitch and now you don't need to be a you can be a great musician without having perfect pitch at says it's it's it's not a necessity at all But you need some level of musical training like every critic I know has played an instrument played. I played the piano and oboe. It quite poorly but But my main thing actually was I wanted to be a composer So up until age eighteen hours reading these pieces that what made you stop. It was just a kind of dawning awareness that I wasn't even going to be Sally Airy. That'd be lucky if I if if I got to be very Just didn't have the actually. I didn't have the drive to do it. I would have ideas outright. Like a little kind of melody down or sketch out a texture sure and then it just wouldn't go anywhere you know and I wouldn't be able to think of what what comes next and I didn't have this this drive to to just kind of really dig into it and like Mike just obsess over it And kind of figure out where it was going and the odd thing is. That's exactly the quality that I have for writing and I don't know why my brain is like just kind of vague in this one area like sort of much different than in the neighboring area but was writing I I completely love. Oh love love is the right word I I I just kind of end up. You know getting swept up in this process of of you. Know if they're putting the initial sketch on on the page and then just just hour after hour day after day. kind of moving things around and reworking it until it's near the way I want and and and so that I didn't have that kind of Obsessive nece when it came to music. And you know I just love to listen and read about it more than than I wanted to Create it and I just loved the history and the biography in the background. You're listening to everything to it seems. Well I can't handlers genres. You're not just listening to classical music. And Yeah it's as I've gotten older sort of moving into my fifties now now I find it really hard to keep up with what's going on a couple generations. Vied is sort of keep up with my old favorites but it's the sort of overwhelming. So I think twenty years ago I was just a lot more plugged into what was going on and pop music and now it's but there's also just so much going on in terms of this so much feels like this mortal into its better known as Sallie but there's just more in classical music there's dislike now there's streaming. There's like a live concert happening in Australia which I can listen to on the Internet. You know Radio Stations You know orchestras filming their own concerts and putting them on the Internet and and so I just. I'm just getting a fraction of it. You know I just try all day long and there's always music playing always you know here's a name I don't know. Let me go explore. You know this person's work and and so you know there's that kind of basic nick kind of training or background that you have to get interested in it first and then there's this constant just keeping up you know you're an advocate the kit for modern classical music With my again limited understanding. It always sounds something that I don't know if I could just sit down and listen to and the way I feel people that are aficionados and fans of classical music genres. They tend to talk about in a way that I can talk about food. That can be ostracizing right right just bewildering. Yeah why why. Why is it so important to you? And when you try to explain the virtues and the brilliance of modern music I tend to feel the same way about modern. Strana me. Well it's not for everyone right but you have to appreciate the brilliance. Like you have to see what they're trying to do. The best way that I I can understand what you're trying to say it's like it's not supposed to be delicious. Might be if you understand sixteen different reasons why this dish was created for you. We need to have some knowledge beforehand but there are so many dishes right now in this twenty nineteen or just coming out of this modern movement mint right that were in place now. I don't know if anyone knows what kind of food were making anymore. It's just this ray. Complete Limbo is that sorta where music is classically. Yeah Yeah and of course like you know as someone goes to restaurants. I'm on the other side of like I'm of Philistine. Not kind of well-versed you know in in all the latest trends so you know. I may have a dish or like Nad. Like you know what that was about and And I'm aware that that that it's you you know it might be you know very sophisticated and and Worthy of attention. So it's funny. How you know you're going to stand up on different sides of that divide between the you know the connoisseur her just like the regular person You know for me. I know it's a tough sell you know and it's a tough sell within classical music. Never mind kind of all the other people out there. A lot of people who grew up with you know Bach Mozart. Beethoven Brahms Maybe Mahler at the tail and Who Love that music and have a huge problem with everything that came after that my parents were like that I mean they? They grew up taking me to Jimmy Music concerts around DC He and this was the music they really loved. And you know to this day they kind of scratch their heads over this stuff that I write about. What do you think causes that moment? Moment where you're just like. I'm not gonNA appreciate anything after this appointment I did. You see that in food exports and basically everything. Yeah people do get locked down. I mean I mean it happens in pop music where people kind of stopped taking new music after you know their their use you know and so kind of everything that happens after that is you know doesn't make much sense to them Of course in this case people are you know all this happened long before they were born. So it's not like you know Brahms was the music they grew up with you know and so it's a deeper problem which.

Beethoven Brahms Jimmy Music Ella Mental Sally Airy Australia Mike Bach Mozart Sallie Mahler
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"What this looks like. He just goes right for it. It feels it off the wall and hung a calls it hungry artist. It took some work for this guy to find. The banana was removed from public display after our basil concluded earlier this week and relocated to a gallery. The tuna was also given incredible leeway for the sunny actually conversed with several patrons who are treating his efforts with utter seriousness. Because this was in fact a work of art. Catalan worked on his art for a year. According to the press release from the gallery. ALARY catalans banana was being exhibited for sale. The Gallery Clinton has sentimental value to the artist. Apparently the good news is that it's easy to replace the banana shocking. You can get headed for under a dollar anywhere in the United States so it don't worry it's hard though it's definitely definitely art. It's not the decline of art is not that incline of Western civilization. It's not the fact that we have too much much money. Apparently being held by like you WanNa turn turn me into a Bernie Sanders Socialist. Someone one hundred twenty thousand dollars for banana tape to duct tape the wall that that'd be the answer. Radars radars solid stuff there. Yeah the death of art definitely has taken place in real time. Which is why you go to modern art museum? You're like Oh my kid could paint that right you're could paint at. This is correct because art has been completely separated from skulls. The message of the art that matters the message in once the art becomes about the message not about the actual art. The art is supposed to be universal. Sense that it's supposed to have meaning for everyone who takes a look at us. You know what this means this duct tape banana to a wall. It means that everyone is a moron. So I guess the chiefs that affect achieve that purpose the art critic by the way over at the New York Times defended this thing and said no no no. It is indeed art a grudging defense of the one hundred and twenty thousand dollar Banana Jason. Farrell says art may be long in life short but the existence of a hand. Fruit is most ephemeral ephemeral of all this week at Art Basel Miami Beach The Art World Premiere Champagne steeped swap meet no works for more grins guffaws in southeast than a new sculpture. Call it a sculpture. By the semi retired tired Italian. trickster Maurizio Catalina Banana duct taped to a wall. It's peel already speckled with Brown spots. It's titled Comedian by Wednesday. It hardy one art art world. Notoriety righty on Saturday. The chief the public visibility that any artist would envy after self promoting wag toward the banana off the wall and levels it up. Suffice it to say that works of contemporary we are rarely make the cover of the New York Post but this is Mr Catalans second recent appearance on the tabloids front page when it comes to the bananas ons logical status art or produce. I thought we get settled this already. If you buy a light work by Dan Flavin and the fluorescent bulbs starts flickering. You can play with anyone if you buy assault Walls wrong and move house. You can race the old one and draw new one a banana. Manna even more than a light. Fixture was always going to require replacement. Catalan had already drawn up instructions from lucky collectors to replace the fruit every day to ten days as to why Catalans bananas gripped the public imagination has something to do with the price something to do also with the comic potential of bananas is it art. Did you have to be there. Let me reassure you are not a hopeless Philippines. You find this all a bit foolish foolishness. And deflating sense that a culture that once encouraged the blonde beauty now only permits. DOPEY JOKES IS MR CADILLAC. The stock in trade. But perhaps we'll find more to appreciate catalans work if you take notes of two point. One former one social says the New York Times art critic. I I've been dismayed to discover eh for work that has been endlessly photograph. Imperative over the course of its one week life. Almost no one has discussed that. It is not just a banana it is and a piece of duct tape and this is a a significant difference. Comedian is not a one note. Datta estim- posture in which commodities proclaimed a work of art which would be an entire century out of date now as David is a film director mimicking. Making W Griffith comedian is a sculpture when the continues Mr Catalans. decades-long reliance on suspension. Make the obvious seem ridiculous and to deflate and defeat the pretensions engines early. Okay fire this guy. Fire this guy seriously. Fire the critic fire the artist fire everyone the culture that produced the Sistine Chapel has now produced a man duct taping of Banana Nanto Wall the culture that produced Bach. Beethoven Brahms has now produced a piece of fruit that is rotting on a wall tape there with duct tape and we are supposed to believe the Z.. They deep deep and profound commentary on American culture. The only commentary on American cultures that anybody took this thing seriously in the first place. It's ridiculous on. Its face and the fact that nobody aspires anymore. Instead we just find joy in mockery. The nobody aspires anymore. Maybe that's the only thing it has to say about our culture. Maybe those catalans point. It Ain't worth one hundred twenty grand. I just gave it to you for free so enjoy I already. We'll be back in two hours of content. We have a lot to get to a little bit later days. Definitely tune in or show up tomorrow. I'm Ben Shapiro. This is the Ben Shapiro. Show If you enjoyed this episode don't forget to subscribe and if you want to help spread the word. Please give us a five.

modern art museum Art Basel Miami Beach New York Times chiefs Ben Shapiro Bernie Sanders New York Post Dan Flavin United States Sistine Chapel MR CADILLAC Maurizio Catalina ALARY Clinton assault Farrell Beethoven Brahms Datta estim
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

09:20 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"I'm Alec Baldwin and you're listening to here's the thing long long had barely hit puberty when he and his father landed in Philadelphia from Shenyang the Curtis Institute of Music awarded long full scholarship but teenagers still need a high school education. I still remember my first day. If it had alpha in high school and I went into the class and they say so you introduce yourself and I said yeah I'm I'm playing piano. I come here to to study daddy classical music and everybody look. I'm east either seeing alien. You who what as I most hard are heard about that guy guy he. He's dead for many years while this is something you've been in a bubble. Oh we also record chapstick. I don't know that China did not know chopstick. I know topsy but so so so so the by me that my career would be over yeah so so one day you made them backstage often officer. There's a piano they were the rehearsal for two minutes and they can't stand anymore though they owe came out because they just couldn't listen to symphony and they say this is a piano there. Can you play h have steak and I was so I don't really know and then they showed me and I started but from that moment aren't we became really good friends. There's also a culture clash. Is Kind of you know we've been through that point out and then. I realized you know one day. I should help my friend and classmate to have a bit of music inspirations in the school. So therefore ten years ago we found it the denominator national foundation in New York and now we have almost sixty schools and I also want to thank but also I want to have this opportunity to Arctic because from the first time when we played concert Alec was to host already and then are- every every fundraising time he's always there and he's so so don't say no to you. Thank you know we really appreciate your call so the Foundation Bennett existence for how long now ten years ten years and sixty schools in the US around the world grow US yeah. How would you say to the extent that this is possible because I'm always quick to to undervalue or under a emphasize the American experience if you will but you are prodigy obviously there's not GonNa. I'm dead at the piano since you're five years. How much would you say the United States and in your experience of living in ended states helped to crystallize some of your town so you're a very lucky. I had this best teacher in a world guard Graffman so Curtis Curtis Peop- basically became a lifetime mentor to me and so because this this is quite important. There are many schools many different teachers UNIDO find someone who's having a great knowledge but but also fits your style way. Gary is absolutely the right one because he told me so much about different culture learning learning piano. This is not just playing the note you have to learn the culture and you have to learn the history you need to learn their culture roots folk music and somehow you're learning the culture of the world and you really need to dig into it and then I think the US it's a it's it's a really have so many different neighborhood. If you WANNA find more European neighbourhood like Germantown under the French quarter or you know so we always find people from different culture and they can share their culture of you and I still remember the first few years it was difficult for me to understand the culture and then Gary found a wonderful teacher who told me Shakespeare then after reading a few wealthed books than I starting to understand the western classic music you know the relationship between the music to our theme theme two novels to you have to have the surroundings and then of course not only. US is important. You also need to go to a Europe because of some of the greatest composers that go into Moscow and Peter Spirit going to Vienna go into Benin Humber Perez and or Madrid to get into the European culture now. What does a conductor have to offer you you this does at your level. When I was a teenager I had many great live experience with I'm Dr Snake Salish Mozelle and like my grandfather they're like totally different generation and from from a totally different time and so they told me how to understand Beethoven Brahms how to understand you know no way that is hard to who is playing in the schools but this is like face to face. They show you the feeling like they they basically even though Oh sometime they don't seem really well. They can really show what they want and those are kind of life experiences and this is something that I'm so treasuring because some of those master's already passed away and I still have a beautiful memories of my first time meetings about show our Mozelle and this is just tremendous experience for me name if you can't a couple of of conductors who you really love working yeah absolutely Gustavo. He's my it gray buddy. I I love him. We just played yes they before your stay away and then would you be to a number two and also do. I love the new conductor burning ramonic- career approach Inko which is going to be starting with Bernie Infield this season and of course enough to be Mehta he showed me oh the tricks what harvested with him the Rock Concert Oh and also number. He said this on is not good enough. I said why is that so so what do you think he said Yeah. I play with Arthur Rubinstein. He didn't take this so my source told me I don't know how to do that but he did like the. Are you still learn so here's the thing you know. Sometimes you need to a master class and you'll learn a lot a lot of things in that class and then afterward helps you a little bit of a few more weeks but if someone's someone really good real master you will hear a master class and that class will carry at least another ten years and every time mhm you'll think about you know what he or she told you on that that class is not just about how to make music but it's a really the way how are think about music on how you connect with your personality you know to the composers and how are you breathing your imagination into the music and how are you going to develop your next ten years so they basically make you think much more than we are. Few musician can really do that and they really brings you to think much deeper and to think about in a very different concept and I still remember working with Maestro Nicholas Hannam core I'll mold heart and of course I played many times concertos but that lesson I played He showed me something that I never seen Mozart. Come be described orientated in their way and that changed the whole time you you basically think Oh my God what I did was wrong and I'm going to relearn everything so some musician position have the power to really restart. You'll thinking of everything. Are you going to tell us what he said about Mozart aw love or is that a secret that an industry secret then another. I I play a little bit tougher. Now would be the perfect time for that. It's yeah it's a little bit hard to to to describe because it's a quiet. You don't need to describe it. I've got to of Asians from the twinkle twinkle variation.

United States Alec Baldwin Curtis Institute of Music Gary Dr Snake Salish Mozelle Philadelphia China officer Arthur Rubinstein Curtis Curtis Peop Mozelle New York Mozart Europe Maestro Nicholas Hannam Arctic Germantown Beethoven Brahms Graffman Bernie Infield
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tripadvisor. But after decades of scoring film and television Danny wanted to step away briefly from sculpting other people's worlds and create one of his own his new album is it's the pricing. It's called eleven eleven. It's Danny Alvin this famous film composers first violin concerto and listen. This is never happened to me before. But speaking of surprises. So we were just about to start our conversation and his his phone went off like his phone rang, and I couldn't help but notice he had an interesting ring tone. So I had to ask him about it. Anyway, that's that's where things start off with Danny often. Phone off there. It is. That's the violent, by the way, I'm dying to know. Now that it happened. What your ringtone is day the earth stood still Bernard Hermann? Wow. It's the first piece of music that ever got me into film music. That's that's something beautiful about that. Like whenever it rings. It would it would trigger something in you. Yeah. I was around twelve when I saw the movie, and it's the first time I ever became aware of a score. And it started my long interest in film music. It was Bernard Hermann because at that young age a lot of my favorite movies in that period of time were really Harry housing. Adventures like, Dave, you're I mean other than the day there is that still it would have been like Jason and Argonauts. The seventh voyage of Sinbad mysterious island. These were the really fun fantasy films of my youth. And if I saw Herman and Harry housing on the Bill, meaning the animator, the claymation animator Ray, stop motion animator Ray, Harry housing and the composer Bernard Hermann, I knew it would be my favorite movie or I loved that combination. So I always have a special place in my heart for the day the earth stood still because like. I suppose everybody you see movies. And you think the music is just there for the first time. I said I remember thinking somebody wrote this. This wasn't just there. The music stood out for me. And I paid attention to who I actually saw. There was a name. There's a person who did this. And so it was a turning point for me. But anyhow, I digress. I I was reading some of your notes on the violin concerto. One thing. Stuck out to me? Can you wrote the violin is to me a very intimidating solo instrument violent concertos were not really a part of my repertoire, classical music listening and skip ahead. And you said one thing became abundantly clear. Writing a violin concerto would require far more disciplined than anything. I had done previously and would be even more difficult to execute than I'd imagined. I I love difficult. Well, it's funny because I had made a mental decision around that time that would have been two three years ago that I am going to sacrifice some film work and do concert work every year. I need to do that. And I've done a couple pieces over the previous decade. But I just never found the way to make it a regular thing. Because you know, film work is just always there, and it's hard to say, no. And the thing is I imagined my I work because in a way, I see this as my first attempt at this new career if that's what it is. Because even though I've done three non film works before this. They weren't designed to become part of an orchestra in orchestra's repertory. I'd never imagined a violin concerto. I was imagining something for percussion or piano because those were the things I felt closer to and we were playing Burton concert three years ago. I guess in Prague and in the bar afterwards. I was approached by my agent for non film. Music, right. And he said, I had an interesting conversation with the orchestra director after the show, and he'd like to know if you'd be interested in writing a violin concerto for sandy. This is sandy Cameron Cameron. How would you like to write her a violin concerto and always with just about anything in my life my mouth works faster than my brain? So I said, yeah. Sure. And then I start thinking that mean, I'll figure that outlet. Yeah. And then it was it wasn't for a couple of months later when I started to really delve into violin concertos that I thought oh my God. Maybe this was a huge mistake. So I really spent a couple of months sandy kind of got me started on about twenty five different the violin concertos and these were like post twentieth century, romantic concertos. This wasn't like Mendelssohn or Mozart or anything like that. No, I already I knew that even though I love Beethoven Brahms and Mozart. It's not where my heart is my orchestral music heart got connected in the early twentieth. And that probably really I should call it the late nineteenth century because it starts with a lineage of Russians really probably beginning with.

Bernard Hermann Danny Alvin Harry housing Cameron Cameron Tripadvisor. Ray Mozart Prague Beethoven Brahms Dave director Mendelssohn Jason Burton Herman two three years three years
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On fresh air. How extremist you social media to amplify their message, recruit, new, followers and incite violence. Terry gross talks, jam burger who has studied and written about ISIS and white nationalist movements in the US and abroad. Tune in today at two on ninety three point nine FM. Welcome back to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. It's Monday and on Mondays and the show we listened to classical music with the crave director at our sister station W cue that is news clemency Burton hill every week. She stops by the places plaza music and share some of the stories from her book year of wonder classical music to enjoy day by day clemmie. Hi, nice to see you. Nice to see you. You were going to kick us off. With Bela Bartok. Yes. On this day, the twenty fifth of March he was born in eighteen eighty one. So thinking about Bela Bartok and the incredible. I guess contribution that he made to musical history. He was very much steeped in music from the past. So the big giants whether it's Barco Beethoven Brahms, Strauss and ABC, but he was also really interested by what was happening in that moment in his own history. Which was the kind of breakdown of western tonality, so pay like you have with Cuba with people like. The Casio or modernism in literature people like James Joyce, not as Elliot you have these renegade Mavericks, come along and music, like Arnold shun bug, for example, and shake the tree really hard on what? Harmony even is. And why all we all like playing around in the same structures that people have been doing so forever. Why don't we just hit the whole thing on its head? So he has this interesting musical perspective of being able to see and incorporate the pause being very receptive to what's happening at that moment in the present. But then he also brings this. I would say very special source to proceedings, and he was obsessed with the folk music of his own native, Hungary, but also beyond so he collected and curated and arranged and analyzed by music from places like Turkey and Algieria the Carpathian basin. He was I think it was be described as an early pioneer in comparative Musicology. So the idea of thinking about the human beings who actually make this in the context in which they make it rather than just sort of coldly academically. Analyzing the music itself. So he's very interested in the people's and the culture and technology apology, essentially, I mean now he would call it ethnomusicology. But exactly that so real people really making the stuff in real time. And he was a great synthesizer vote of that. And I find that for his music has just kind of endlessly interesting. It's not all or it's not necessarily the easiest or most familiar musicals on well to get into. But then some of it feels like amazingly kind of. Yeah, I get this. This feels rooted in a sort of folk idiom is very much a familiar to people in wherever you come from. And the funny kind of way. So I love this piece particularly the backstory behind it. Because in the summer of nineteen o four it was a completely chance and serendipitous thing that happened to him which was he was on holiday, and he had a nanny singing some traditional Transylvanian songs to the children that she was looking off. And he was kind of so captivated by this. Melody, apparently, followed it and again made a sing. Again, tracked down and incorporate this, and I just love that this idea that this very elevated classical music comes from these real moments in life, and he himself said that peasant music, and the idiom of peasant music is elevated to the point where it's become his musical mother tongue. Great advocate for the idea that these musics that we might think of is somehow less important in the classical music or she often at all. So he was a great musical. Hey, rose. I felt we should place him botox on the twenty fifth of March. And this is from his Romanian folk dances. And it's such don's. It's based on a dance in which the don's is traditionally wet, very distinctive, colorful, sash or waistband. So while you're listening to this. You can picture some dancers. Learn is beautiful sashes. So happy birthday develop. Thank you. For.

Bela Bartok Arnold Alison Stewart Terry gross US don Burton hill Barco Beethoven Brahms director ABC James Joyce Strauss Cuba Carpathian basin Hungary Turkey Melody Elliot
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:13 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well, the opera is conducted by ignite. So's son is based usually in New York. But returned to Russia for the production. When my father was in those labor camps, particularly in the in the special camps so-called special camps in Siberia, and in Kazahstan, he was thinking how could I possibly ever describe this to the world? And he realized that the only way it could be done with be by describing just one day out of a ten year or twenty five year sentence that a typical prisoner was subject to the idea being that when you read it you hear all digest the one story and can therefore put it against the stories of thousands, millions of people who may have been through a similar experience. Absolutely. Because simply to cite statistics, obviously, or to some as to constantly implore, the reader to imagine how many people multiply this by. So that's not art. That's that's pamphleteering. No matter. How accurate it might be? But for an artist for writer, this I think was the. Genius approach. This was the right approach to the reader's mind. But also the reader's heart and on stage. How does it look to those sitting in the audience? What do they see what what's the actual spectacle in front of him in this production? It is on the chamber stage of the Bolshoi theatre. It is very much an environment in which I think the listener or the spectator is engrossed the idea I think from from the stage director is that the spectator becomes part almost part of the action. And what does it mean to you to be conducting this and to be conducting it back in Moscow to do it here to have those words, or in some cases spoken on stage that bring to mind, very directly, the extraordinary injustices to have all of this out in the open in the same geographical space and same cultural space where it happened is extremely important and fundamentally liberating I think for the performers and. Perhaps more so for the audit and on a personal level. And there you are in Moscow in the country that expelled your father. Yes, it was the Soviet Union then. And now it's Russia and a lot has changed, but I just wonder on a personal level. How that makes you feel well, it's it's tremendously satisfied pleased on a really fundamental level. And yes agreement vacation for my father and most importantly, really for the truth that he dared to speak that he dared to write for which he paid a high personal price. And yet that persevered in the end, and it really goes back to his famous words are actually his quoting of a Russian proverb one word of truth shall outweigh the whole world and really his life in the history of his works is a living testament to that property and on him, and what he would have thought. And I realized that to an extent a speculative question, but he spent the last fourteen years of his life back in Russia. What do you think he would make of the changes that had taken place by then? Then but also some of the criticism that he's leveled at Russia today. Well, it's difficult to say I don't presume to speak for him now. But I would just say that for 'em politics was as everybody says a dirty business in a way of thinking that is far below art and culture, but to the extent of its as we know necessary for a state to function. I mean, I think his approach was always quite pragmatic. Meaning it's not so much that I'm doing to support such a specific person or specific candidate. But really is it the right policy, and I think that would be his way of looking at today to ensure that things that mattered to him which still be the same today as they were before what of the wider picture because I know you're performing not just in this operatic performance. But you also got a piano solo concert coming up and also another confidence in Petersburg next week. Does this point two more trips to Russia in the future for you? I mean what what's the plan? I have been very actively conducting and playing so just performing the Russian in recent years, quite quite many years now. Now. And it's something that is again very gratifying for me because the cultural level musical level. If you will is extremely high. Generally, speaking, things are economically, of course, more more stable, and there's more money for everything including for art in your mind. Is there a role there to straddle two coaches in a sense as a Russian American for some of the political reasons we touched on a moment ago is it important for you to be seen to having a a foot in both camps. If you like, well, I think it's inevitable important. I don't make it my mission. If you will because still my mission is more modest is to do perhaps as more modest fort, or perhaps it's more grandiose, but it's really to do my job as well as they possibly can. And that of course for an artist and attempting to re imagine and reinterpret the heritage of Beethoven Brahms Shostakovich and anyone anyone else is monumental challenge. But yes, for ticker Lee in this current cool climate, shall we say, yes, it seems all the more important because these cultural. Bridges as they used to be called in the Cold War. When a lot of times, they were farcical, and yet also maybe served a purpose at times, certainly today when there is that virtually unrestricted of course, travel back and forth and internet and all the ways that people can communicate it's such an obvious, and I suppose irresistible way for people to relate to other and to that old trope that there is much more that unites us than divides us, and I think that's I if I can play a small role in that then all the better the Russian-American pianist and conductor Ignat Solzenitsyn Stephanie we began the program by talking about your family ties with Vermont and there's a tie. There's a soldier units in time with bemoaned. Yes, he eventually emigrated to the United States and lived in Vermont and a small town called Kevin dash about an hour away from where I grew up. And I think in true Vermont Yankee spirit, everyone left him alone. And didn't give him the privacy. He really. Craved? I think the weather was quite similar to what he had experienced in in Russia for Mont winters, particularly back, then were very cold and snowy. And so I think he felt very at home interesting that he was left alone to the extent that you described because I mean at the time he was an enormously, very well-known rather. Well, recognized international figure. Yes. Indeed. And as a teenager, I read his books the life of Yvonne, Denisovich and Gulag Archipelago. I remember really enjoying them. And I do feel like that he played some part in leading me eventually to live in Russia and developed my my love of Russian culture. I did look at the story and wonder how they can turn that book into an opera. It's quite harsh stuff. I think there was a film made of the book many years ago. I do see the Russian intellectual elite of many political stripes embracing that and really flocking flocking to. To that opera. Particularly because in his later years Sozhenitsyn. Supported Putin before of course, putting embarked on his foreign adventurism. So we don't know how he would view Putin today's Putin. So that I think makes him an easily embraced figure in Russia. Yes, I ventured into that political territory carefully with these sound because as you say by the time Putin was doing what he does. Now Alexander associates who is no longer with us the cooling of relations, the role of of this figure who can straddle both America and Russia, how important jazz is that kind of figured you think in the current geopolitical climate massively side, I think we we have an equivalent at the moment. I think the J playschool sort of dynamics which going on with Russia really concerning they seem to be acting with impunity throughout the world. I think one thing which you seen from Putin. Russia's is a very soft power. They're very good at buying their way into countries, you coach institutions be that running Chelsea football club of the same. Links between Abramovich impeach him. But they have their tentacles into many aspects of British life, for example. And. I think no one's really go to handle on how to deal with Peyton a journalistic take on that before we move on Stephanie from somebody who's who's lived in work there in the post. Yeah. I mean, obviously, there's a Putin today is posing. Unprecedented challenges to the global community through his sort of dark arts through Russian intelligence operations both in Europe and the United States. I think it remains to be seen how sanctions policy is really having an effect in some respects. I think you could argue at a strengthening Putin by driving some of the all Russian billionaires back home. Which is something that he has long wanted to shore up his role. You're listening to weekend from the BBC World Service. Reminder of our main news the agreement reached at.

Russia Putin United States Vermont Moscow Bolshoi theatre Siberia New York Soviet Union Kazahstan BBC World Service Petersburg Europe writer director Brahms Shostakovich Peyton Ignat Solzenitsyn
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"So it's very important that we do look back, and that we sort of incorporate, and I it's this very slow. It's like a. A glacier. That's what I feel like music is is this huge glacier. That's moving. We can't see it moving as imperceptible, but it's moving over hundreds and hundreds of years so for everyone who's kind of going off the beaten path, and experimenting and doing all sorts of different things than there are people who are more traditionalist, and there are people doing both. And it's kind of it's inching forward, and it might go back a little bit and then inches forward some more, but always maintaining this kind of I of the hurricane like. Center about it that has both worlds. And I think that that is really important, and it's it's important in education, especially people studying to to be in music that we do have that tradition, which I had the, you know, the only thing I wished as a student was that I did more of the other which more maybe improvisation more jazz more experimenting and kind of it took me until you know, later after school joining bang on a can where I began to embrace those ugly sounds that I was talking about or embrace mistakes. There can be a lot of anxiety and pressure on like how something should sound. I'm based on what came before. And I think new music is beautiful. And it's it's new and it hasn't been recorded. Knows how it should sound. There's this freedom. And that's how I now approach older music. Whenever I go back and play Bach or Beethoven Brahms or any of those composers. I look at it. Like, a new piece of this new way that you've learned how to be with music has shut a new new light on this very old vast off. And I think I just wish that those two things could merge sooner in life for people. I think they are. I think that colleges and universities, and even hopefully, you know elementary on up are becoming more aware of that and incorporating those things contemporary music is playing a bigger role in education, and I just want. I wanna see that happen more. And when I do visit schools or when I do or coming demonstrate or lecture. I I like to talk about that, you know, just encourage people to to get off the page, you know, and don't spend all your time in a practice room, go out and play with other. People out and talk to other people collaborate like that's what you know. You have so much time, you know, and everybody says oh enjoy it while it lasts. And you're like Heidel always be there. And then you realize you get into real life and professional life, and you don't have you have very little time. Yeah. So that's what I wish I could see more of is not only that we're doing classical music and tradition, but we're also bringing as much of the new and the experimental into that kind of really platform of in that those stages of development because that's kind of where it counts, you know, it's much harder later in life too. Teaching dog matrix. And we're back to Dr. This man, this has been so much fun. Actually. Thank you so much for taking the time to come into the same me have so much fun on your tour. I hope you enjoy the drive on the west coast. Right. What is it US one one one? Oh one. Okay. Yeah. I've never done that you'll have too much. All right, everyone.

US Heidel Beethoven Brahms Bach
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"Order with code classroom. There's a rumor going around that classical music can be Whitey toy d. But here in the classroom, we beg to differ. Beethoven faa. Aw. Prospal music is where we have to feel restricted or we have to act a certain way, you know. That's not going to be helpful going forward shaking with excitement. I mean, there's just so many parts of the opera PS me to play his favorite spot in the first one. Browns by started using those lex mega tires. How be classical music Rockstars because there's not enough of that in this business choosing really blogging demanding to my head. I don't change my voice talking to class. I'm playing classical music now. I mean, yes, same twelve notes. That's what's so cool about it. I'm Dacia Klay a classical music newbie. And I'm trying to learn all I can about the music. Come learn with me and the classical music experts I invite in to the classical classroom. Hello everyone. Welcome to the classical classroom. I'm dish Klay. And here with me today is violinist Joshua bell. He doesn't really need an introduction. But for the sake of formality among go ahead, and do it Joshua is the music director of the British ensemble academy of Saint Martin in the fields. He's a Grammy and Avery Fisher prize winner among many many other things he's put out an album of max Brooks work called Scottish fantasy. And that's what he's going to be teaching me about today. Joshua, welcome to the classical classroom. Thanks for having me. Okay. So this is gonna sound like kind of Aleem question to ask you to begin with. But I have always wondered about the name academy of St. Martin in the fields, which is the on samba that you play with them reporting. What is up with that name mouthful? And I remember growing up listening to classical radio is a kid. My parents always headed on. And it seemed like every other recording was the kademi of. Saint Martin in the fields with sir Neville Marriner. He turn I learned later. He founded the orchestra they came up with the name. It's I don't know exactly how it came about. He he put together an orchestra when he was very young. And they started playing concerts in. I don't know how they came up with the name. It's too late to change it now because everybody knows that you get but it is about full. May not be the best aspect of the orchestra is their actual name. But I think it's one of the great orchestras around. They could they can always certain it to like an acronym. What would that be as well? SM f-. Yeah. Academy sounds a little bit. You know academic. I guess you might say which is not what comes through when you hear them play. They're really great artists. And and I'm I'm so lucky to get to be their music director. That's there year only their second music director ever. We're just kinda crazy. Well, sir, Neville Marriner. Started them as a youngster young man leading them not as a conductor with a baton, but from the violin, and he stayed with him as music for fifty some years. So I'm not going to be able to. I don't think Bill to match as his longevity in that way. So that records going to stay in the in the books for a while. I think and then and then when he finally retired at the age of ninety almost ninety I they asked me to be the music director, so great privilege. Wow ninety. That's amazing. Yeah. Well, that's conductors live along. That's why I'm starting to lean in that direction. I'm it's of. Transitioning into being a conductor or semiconductor, you might save. You know, they they do have a tendency to live very long time. Yeah. This sounds like a wise decision. So. Tell me about max Bruch. So we can kind of put this piece in context when did he live was he all that? Good stuff. Max, bro. You might not. If you're if you're new Dacosta music, you probably know Beethoven Brahms and Mozart, and maybe Bach and some few others. Brooke may not be one. You know, though, some of his pieces are as popular as anything else in classical music. One of them is the violent concerto the g minor concertos played by every violence..

sir Neville Marriner Saint Martin Joshua bell director Dacia Klay max Bruch Whitey max Brooks Max St. Martin Grammy Avery Fisher Beethoven Brahms Bill Brooke Bach Mozart
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"Something in the fifteen to twenty five dollar range, which is within shouting distance of a movie. I think that a lot of presentations are within shouting distance of the theater Broadway as much more. Than a lot of opera productions and you don't hear the same scream about Broadway because it's an iconic thing to do. That's very true and certainly pop concerts or even going to hear some singer-songwriter that you like if you spend an evening at a club and get entry tickets, and then a couple of drinks you're going to end up spending, maybe one hundred dollars. So in that sense, it's not priced, so completely out of reach. Yeah. I mean, I've yet to be able to afford to see Justin Timberlake. I feel like this is where you go in for me. So so I think classical music isn't the only entertainment that's expensive, but it's become so much seen that way. And also the people are thrilled to give the money to hear Justin. Timberlake people aren't sure they want to give that money to the orchestra. They're not sure they're going to have an experienced, they like, and so it seems more expensive. You know to buy something you don't know you're going to like, of course, there's more of a barrier to giving out that money, but it is interesting. You know the the people have that perception because you're right, like if you look, if you look hard enough, you know you poke through the ticket prices on your at your local symphonies website. It can usually find something that you can you can afford. But yeah, yeah, some is often discussed. I think part of the problem too is that the experience that is being marketed is not inherently appealing to people because the experience is you were going to go and sit in silence for two hours on velvet seats. You're not exactly comfortable. You're not sure what to wear. You're not. Sure. When the clap, you don't know what you're supposed to be getting out of it. Why on earth would you want to pay for that experience? And it's, it's too bad. I think that orchestras have become. So we're talking about orchestras in particular because of course, chamber music is much more flexible. I mean, classical music can be as solo piano doing something, you know, but an orchestra isn't ticket or an opera is a particular size and orchestras are trying to break down that perception. But I think it's a shame they don't do it more. It's possible to perform different kinds of venues. Now when you speaking of classical music offering something on a large scale, I'm wondering if you could recommend a couple of pieces of music that people could get started on to listen to it home, maybe find on Spotify or whatever to to listen to, with regards to orchestra, music. Well, I assume that anybody who's heard of an orchestras heard of Beethoven Brahms. And of course, listening to a Beethoven symphony is never a waste of time. I love Beethoven's third, but I wonder if people know how much more recently has been done. I heard Philip glasses, fifth symphony recently, and I just loved Philip classes, fifth symphony..

Justin Timberlake Beethoven Brahms Beethoven Philip glasses Spotify one hundred dollars twenty five dollar two hours
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"It's not like I was some kind of trailblazer, but because that was at the time. So it was sort of seen as a marker. Well, you know, and I, I love finding out people's origin stories like how they wound up in the careers that their end because inevitably, I think I think people who are getting started and things have these this misconception that you know, there's this clear path that you take to doing whatever it is that you're doing, especially in the classical music world. Yes, there so not. And you know, not I, yeah. And I think that. You know, you're an unusual path. You're, you're winding paths to getting to where you are now and where you're firmly established and a voice that so many people listen to maybe what gives your writing such a fresh taken. Like I love this article, the beginner's guide to enjoy classical music because it's it's so fresh, like most of the articles that I've read about how to get started in classical music. It's like, okay, well, you wanna start with buck and periods, you know, and like all that kind of stuff like, all right. All right. Yeah, I kind of know all that, but, but your article takes us really different approach. I'm just gonna read the first couple of sentences because I feel like I really sets the tone for the rest of the article. So well, when it starts out, classical music aficionados go away. This article is not for you instead. It is for everyone who sees classical music as a private club and who feels they're standing outside the clubhouse girl. You are preaching. To me. Now I said immediately say that there is predictably commenter on the website on the article who is completely offended that I am discriminating against him with this opening because he is an admission auto. It doesn't wish to be shut out of this article. So there's really no policing everybody. No, no, never. But I do. I think it's it's such a shame that classical music and I don't think I realized quite how true this was until I wrote this article. We see it as the sort of set of predetermined hurdles that you have to leap over before. You're allowed to listen to any of the advanced stuff. Like if you don't know your basic Bach, Beethoven Brahms, and Mozart, you can't. You don't get to listen to the advanced stuff and I literally saw somebody post on a classical music website. Well, I appreciate DARA. I can't pronounce her last name the. There's a female composer from nine hundred eighteen from Croatia whose music I love whom I included in this. And this writer said, I appreciate her Buzek, but this isn't something to give to beginners. Why not? Music is truly for everybody. We don't have sort of entry level versus advanced level things in pop music, but you can't listen to Bjork because you haven't digested the Beatles yet..

Croatia Bjork Beatles writer Beethoven Brahms Bach Mozart
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Out of musical biographies lately i've finished the the bronze biography that i've been reading and it's just antastic john elliott gardner has a very good book about box of buff music in the castle of heaven and he talks about about life in i in his music bought his one of the rare composers who actually had a relatively happy life you look at beethoven brahms is it guys who are single until they died never had any children by had a bunch of kids including some kids who are more famous than he was in their time fill a carlphilip emmanuel cp bar was more famous composer than johan sebastian actually own sebastian was famous for being a great organised but his music itself wasn't really amply discovered until a little bit later he became the basis for everything is famous story that mozart the mozart was in the middle of of writing and he actually discovered box music box music was rediscovered after one hundred seventy years and what it was rediscovered but then mohtar actually took a break from composing for months to study the counter in bah if you if you look at box music it's very often sounds when it when for example when you when you listen to box inventions his twopart inventions than what you see i in in his panda music is the use of counterpoint counterpoint is basically two themes that are playing simultaneously and it sounds like two different instruments are playing simultaneously it's just brilliantly britain he's also written some most beautiful music that's ever been written i so we'll we'll we'll you will have to play some botha's week i'll take some favorite pieces of mind that are that are about um because there really are spectacular okay other things that i like so the one thing at the emmys at the grammys rather that were pretty great uh that was pretty great joy villa who has been a guest i believe on michael mols a show i.

john elliott gardner beethoven brahms mohtar botha michael mols johan sebastian one hundred seventy years
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Either going to be saying one of six things it's either debbie faster or slower louder a softer a longer or shorter and in many ways you have to her what may be in the printed in need what you're looking for so in effect you are changing perhaps what is on the page as far as actual creativity i think it's very important not just for conductors but for every musician at sit down and try to create something out of nothing the reason for that is that it puts us in touch with the creative spirit we are recreativo's when we are playing the violin or singing or waving our arms but understanding the effort if jakes shehu just a name culture the twelve notes we have and trying to make something out of them that didn't exist before it zhu to be to uh press perhaps aeneas about a beethoven brahms schubert whoever happens the music russians also have their own ideas about this mentioned slovene bhd there's a story a buddy britain by of the trump player yells at the end of a of a piece too damn loud and too damn fast the up well there's another famous where peter shikli in his assessing a guest on this show and discussing with something of pd who bok didi cuba cata pillow in which was embroidered uh the words fasts is good loud is better faster and louder is a now a ahead will you started studying musa have become must be a begin fairly young to become the top level musician uh i don't know always the case it happened with me because virtually every member of my immediate family word musicians than i was exposed to all kinds of music from the earliest age personally i began playing the violin what i was three realized there wouldn't be as good as my father's sort quit that than i took up the piano at age eight new i wouldn't be as good as my uncle so i quit that i took up the viola later because china was out of the question we already had four generations of cellist the family there was no hope for that all my brother dubbed the prince tells over the.

debbie recreativo britain peter shikli china
"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

03:23 min | 6 years ago

"beethoven brahms" Discussed on Rick Steves Britain & Ireland Audio Tours

"Bach. Beethoven brahms bay. the beatles. future generations will have to judge whether the musical cortez. The beatles ranks musically with artists such as handel and chopin but no one can deny their historical significance. Look for photos of john lennon. Paul mccartney george harrison and ringo starr before and after their fame the rock band burst onto the scene. In the early nineteen sixties unheard of popularity with long hair and loud music they brought counterculture and revolutionary ideas to the middle class affecting the values of an entire generation during the globe. They served as a link between young people everywhere. Among the displays. You'll find the manuscripts of song lyrics written by lennon and mccartney the to guiding lights of the group. I wanna hold. Your hand was the song that launched them into stardom a hard day's night and help we're titled songs of two films capturing the excitement and chaos of their hectic touring schedule. Some call a ticket to ride the first heavy metal song. Yesterday by paul was recorded with guitar and voice backed by a string quartet. A touch of sophistication from producer. George martin also read the handwritten poem by young john lennon labeled untitled verse. Rambling depressed cynical but humorous. Is that a self portrait down at the bottom. The beatles memorabilia hangs alongside manuscripts by mozart. Beethoven schubert and others kind of an anti-climax after the fab four i know off and on display a work by german-born composer who found a home right here in london. Find george frederic handel's famous or a you the messiah. It was written in a flash of inspiration three.

George martin john lennon london Beethoven lennon Bach handel chopin paul mccartney Yesterday early nineteen sixties george frederic handel Beethoven schubert two films Paul mccartney george harrison german three first heavy metal song four