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Fresh update on "becker" discussed on The Perfect Package Podcast

The Perfect Package Podcast

00:28 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "becker" discussed on The Perfect Package Podcast

"Even instagram we our P, three show across all platforms or visit our website at P, three show dot com remember to subscribe to the show and spread the with a perfect five star review. Otherwise we may start to think you're a hater. Thanks for listening and tune in next time for a brand new episode of the perfect package podcast. Pickle Piper Pecker. Perfect Becker pod package..

Wimbledon Re-Lived 1985

The Tennis Podcast

05:11 min | 4 d ago

Wimbledon Re-Lived 1985

"Hello, everyone and welcome to tennis relived Wimbledon relived day three. We've taken a trip back to nine hundred, seventy, eight and nineteen, eighty and today we're taking a trip back to nineteen eighty five. We are firmly now in the territory of David, laws voiced and cavernous memory I. Don't know if that's a good thing necessarily, but but it's where we are you doing David. I I'm enjoying trip down memory lane, and yeah, it's it's. It's very interesting. Watching scenes from my childhood that I have not watched since and trying to. Find out whether my twelve year old brain. Had any sort of accuracy in its its conclusions. You couldn't quite remember watching the one thousand nine hundred eighty book McEnroe final that we covered yesterday. The you were aware of it in your consciousness. Do you remember watching? Boris Becker Kevin Curren Nine, thousand, nine, hundred five. You remember where you were. Vividly. Are would typically do you remember what your head was like? It was appalling. It was it was probably quite similar to Kevin. Currency if I'm honest. All sort of curly and waffly. So I would have been twelve years of age I just got into the the senior school is as we used to call it and I was just watching Wimbledon back toback hour upon hour, and there was nothing else tennis wise to watch I didn't even know. Existed I was absolutely fascinated after that tournament to try to find. Opportunities to see a tennis match with Boris Becker playing somewhere else. To See. 'cause I couldn't understand how. How does Barsebaeck not win every tennis match that he plays given how hard he hits the ball, I knew nothing of clay coats and hardcourts and things that did as a twelve year old seeing seventeen year old win Wimbledon. Did it did it make you think oh? Crikey, I'd better start achieving some life goals I remember I remember watching the dull when the French Open realizing we the same age and thinking. Catherine! You've achieved nothing in your life. Salt. Out. The way couldn't it could inspire you or it could make you feel like enough to fight. Now on C., no, because twelve to me seventeen was really old, and seventeen was basically a man, and I was such a young child including my age, but I look back at it now, and it does make me shudder to think of what this we having just watched it to watch. This guy who seventeen who physically is easing credible presence, and he's muscular and strong and strapping, but he's got this really young. Young, face, and he you hear him. We've just had him interviewed after the match as well and and it does make me shudder to think my word this on his shoulders, and yet it was also very exciting at the same time. Not your formative Tennessee's will have been spent watching Boris Becker the pundit. Boris Becker the coach. I know obviously you'll have been very aware of know what he achieved in his career, but actually. Watching it back in seeing a seventeen year old Boris Becker wate struck by. Well. It's actually quite difficult to reconcile as you were saying the Boris Becker. I've always known with this Boris Becker. I actually think that this achievement of voice rose Becker winning Wimbledon seventeen oversee I've always been aware of it, but I and in many ways it's. It's become a more extraordinary achievement as time has passed, and as the sport has got kind of older, and it's hard to make those breakthrough so young, but also in a way. It's actually one of those achievements, which is so of its time that if you didn't live through it, it's really quite difficult to understand the impact that it had and the feeling that it gave people, so it's interesting to go back and read about it and walked in here David's memories of it. I mean what I'm struck by is the sense of belonging that he seems to have on that court. He is striding around the coal like he owns the place. He would go on to say that it was his living room. Denise and Toco famously, but and it's like that he's. He's walking with such confidence playing such. Tennis okay, it's one thing to have the game another thing to believe in the game and know that it's a game that you can win, and that just comes through on just as you watch all the match really. I didn't anywhere with confidence when I was seventeen I was just to a crippled bull of angst. And Self Doubt I. Mean I I just can't relate. Assholes, everyone, stop looking at me. Not Looking at you, you think everyone is looking at you any of that. Yeah I think my my mum describe. That is the peculiar phase when you didn't like taping taken.

Boris Becker Boris Becker Kevin Curren Nine Tennis David Rose Becker Catherine Mcenroe Barsebaeck Tennessee Denise Toco
Fresh update on "becker" discussed on Fox News Sunday

Fox News Sunday

04:35 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "becker" discussed on Fox News Sunday

"Or invest for the future for decades to come in order to retire, knowing the market is lower today than it was yesterday won't make a difference, but sure won't But sweeping tax changes or legislation on retirement, such as Thie Secure Act that was enacted this year. Might news reports often oversimplify or overstate the conclusion of studies, and sometimes they're even completely. They misinterpret them. Or they'll fail to provide important qualifiers. Such is the length of a study its size sample. Where how the data was actually composed. Let me ask our listeners. Has your retirement been affected adversely by this Chinese communist Corona virus. There's some really great information from a recent Forbes article that I want to discuss. According to streetwise Retirement Confidence index that was released in May. Over 25% of recent respondents said that they would postpone retirement now due to this corona virus or more specifically due to the economic conditions that this Chinese corona viruses cause. That's not surprising, given the level of the level of fear surrounding both to pandemic and the financial uncertainty that have gripped the nation in the world. But should you postpone your retirement to to the Corona virus is postponing your retirement. Really the right strategy for you? Or staying with your original retirement itinerary. Make more sense. Would you like to get an opinion on that? A second opinion on that? Well, let's take a look at both options. Though it's hard to get solid numbers on exactly how many people are currently unemployed, you get the exact number. It could easily be a CZ, many as 40 million people right now. That's huge. That is a report issued this month by the Becker Friedman Institute for Economics at the University of Chicago. Estimates that as many as 42% of those workers will not be rehired. Wow, that unemployment uncertainty in combination with volatility in the financial markets is worrying. Many Americans who are approaching retirement age for some unemployment may force in earlier than expected. Retirement. Absolutely. But for others withdraws from retirement plans. Retirement savings accounts to pay for current living expenses due to a job loss are causing them to favor postponing their retirement. Now, the delay may actually help enable them to regain employment and rebuild their retirement assets. Whatever your long term plans might be a crisis as sudden and pervasive. As this Chinese Corona virus is bound to raise some questions. You know what Mike Tyson once said famously, You know, everybody's got a plan until they get punched in the mouth by him. That would change your plans. Change your whole life. The Corona virus seems to deliver that punch to millions of people who thought they had the retirement all planned out. Thie economic shutdown brought on by the Chinese Corona virus pandemic. Has really hasn't affected all occupations equally. While millions previously employed and been retail restaurants, hospitality service travel service had lost their jobs or even been reduced a part time status. Many employed in healthcare, for example, education, government information technology. Well, they've been relatively unaffected. You know, if your employees in one of the more stable fields there's no need To change your retirement plans. You can exit the workforce on your own timetable. And the longer you delay collecting Social Security benefits, the higher the payments are going to be so think about that is part of Ah, making up for the difference. For example, you can increase your monthly benefit by 8% per year just by delaying your benefits until reaching your full. Retirement age. If you're that agent 66 you can increase your monthly benefit by 32%. That's a lot of delaying it until age 70. The same situation will actually apply in reverse if you take early retirement by collecting benefits before reaching a retirement age, for example, if your full retirement age is 67 Which it is for many people now and you begin taking benefits. At 62 your monthly benefit will be reduced by 30% by postponing retirement. Even though it means accepting ever do salary, You'll increase your Social Security benefit. The longer you delay up until 8 70 There's no increase past age 70.

Mike Tyson Thie Forbes Becker Friedman Institute For University Of Chicago
Time To Be Ready For What Comes

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

06:00 min | 5 d ago

Time To Be Ready For What Comes

"Pretty cool to say a lot. More paid will now starting to say that huddling must not be the best way sure there's one thing to have a portfolio that you hold onto is another thing to be able to build up portfolio? Grow your amount of Bitcoin of time. A lot of the stuff I do is still spot trading, which is just buying into different projects under the races I. I don't know. Know, what the project actually do! I look at the charts and build sites. That's what I do now I. Do use leverage. Do Use Mahjong. I do try futures. I try to will these different things, but also do tried spot so whether or not you're actually came to be leveraged. Try to in the market out of the market frequently you can certainly use strategies just to manage your portfolio for example the weekly timeframe there are some epic weekly pullbacks at the moment weekly trade. I Ford I dialing that sort of thing try to be being for. Wake so possibly even months there's been some great all moves popping off left front and center against Bitcoin Antenna. This is what I do. It's not just Dallas futures contracts with tx watch. It is about getting people into the market, so they can manage their portfolio a lot better. You can try these strategies on any timeframe that you actually like it doesn't make a difference so welcome to the new members, and for all of you out there. This requires a huge amount of Tom. InFocus low talk frames at hectic. It's not. It's about managing a portfolio well and coming in and out of the mock as you say opportunities rows over here and over here for example link a couple of weeks back or look fantastic I bought link a manage my portfolio. I bought link. Link went up excellent when I hit. My target are sold out of link moved back to Bitcoin, fear him, and you can build your portfolio in that why it's not always crazy, leverage toxic and leverage a margin. It's not crazy. It's really easy. As a matter of fact, I've got a video on Youtube. How to go long using managing your risk and also. Yesterday about how to go short as well so it's not complicated. It does take some time to learn a tykes some focus. Because what's going on in the market right this second. Tell you. The biggest winnow the biggest moves on on Banco as far as trade's guy. We had a beautiful little cradle. Becker was the twenty eighth of June whether it's bank. Who Against Ted, A. Bank or against Bitcoin both have moved quite Nassir. Think it looks like maybe about one to one or close to. What's Beta? Fantastic trends threat. The months of June again high at timeframe tried. They're looking to build your sat's ability. Which of course you can invest how you'd like, but across the top ten. Gee, WHIZ! There's not a lot going on still still. We've been open for the last one. How many hours now? Six or seven hours tonight and Bitcoin is flat. It's pretty much exactly where it closed yesterday. More or less, there is a small bearish candle, and it is in that cradles on. A great daily downtrend, if we broke the lows of nine thousand and fifty well then show, we might see more of a downside full bitcoin. The big level may is getting through nine thousand, and then down through the most recent low, which is eighty, eight, hundred, Fifty, eight, thousand, eight, hundred fifteen. Until we break that level. We really have a good downtrend. There's really not too much certainty in the market at the moment volumes. Damn people are not as interested as there's less people. Acting as far as getting involved in Bitcoin but like I said a lot of clients now. During the courses and learning how to try perfect on a dope. When it does pop off, you'll have you'll have this strategies. You'll know what to do so is up nine dollars. Nine, thousand, one, hundred, forty, five in theory up twelve cents, two hundred and twenty five dollars, and sixty full sent Siamese bitcoin nays, bright yesterday's law, and then it needs to break down to seventeen thirty two for really have a bit more space as a matter of fact, he's of that to fourteen seventy three x out of being short of the last few days. Let's say what. It still below my entry point, but it is really sluggish is very very sluggish, indeed Adine, struggling to find any real strong momentum. Yesterday we did have good momentum. It did four quite nicely. hit a low of seventeen point three cents when trading at seventeen point five its up point two three. percent, but the simplicity's gone today. It's the market doesn't know what it wants to do. At this moment, Bitcoin cash big crazy candle a few hours ago. I was at three hours ago. We had a high of that candle sitting at. To. Order Twenty three, twenty, six and low, two hundred and twenty dollars and seventy, so basically like A. Candle that was a very crazy looking whip. Their third locked ice holds a candle. There have been walled that difficult to try, and it's really wrecked the structure there are on bitcoin cash that being said it easy in a down trend. More or less it easing that cradles, and if it does break down three yesterday's low of two hundred twenty dollars fifty, we might see further selling coming in here, but again it's not really join us at. Percent to twenty four thirty five base is one, and I'm looking at very closely for potential short tried the level of looking at his one, fifty, five eight. It's got to do more work for a short trade there for Bitcoin Brad yet, but as trying is working into that level, and it's consoling very very well as a matter of fact, spanking solar, adding for how many days at that point we've got three full days of that is a strong downtrend. It did have that big full on Sundays at one, fifty seven and fourteen cents down half a percent.

Youtube Dallas TOM Becker TED Adine Nassir A. Bank
Fresh update on "becker" discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

00:52 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "becker" discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"Really wasn't expecting it. Mattie Cutler looks more like he potentially was expecting that feedback. And then she gets voted off which I don't think she was. Voted off in week. One bad I feel like that's a tough hand bit. She definitely wasn't very good at it and cheat if money didn't enjoy being not very good at it. That's some sums up. The challenge I've seen it with a lot of other people John McEnroe's jokes. When I play Music Live Music Guitar it ruins, good elbows at tennis. I in my mind I'm greater this because that's what I WANNA BE I. WanNa be great at everything that I. do just like I was at tennis when he wasn't even rubbish. Say to him. You know just just leave the music to me, Chon? The rocks ing. He's going to set list of three songs as One of them's Gloria as. Its glory days it satisfaction, and it's Johnny be good. Yeah? Yeah. honky tall occas-, occasionally Honky tonk woman. If. He's having a real like rolling stones. But anyway. Somebody wants. Is John McCain or any good at music and I heard somebody say he's in. He doesn't as into these. Comments. Give become dancing to the really bad ones, yeah! She still the youngest open Air Wimbledon champion. Is that likely to remain? The took him about Martina Hingis now not John McEnroe Is that likely to remain the case full the foreseeable future? Yes old coca Gulf. The is. There wasn't a pandemic around she's. Had to win it this year kickoff to I. Don't think that was impossible for coca golf to win a slam this year. I. Bet On it, but I think she was improving at such a rate at the end of last year. I think it's possible. and. She lost to the eventual champion in Australia this year and pushed her to three cents But, no I think all the trends going away from. Youngest ever records being broken the ones that are being broken oldest ever at the moment. I think they would have to be like. We were talking about with Boris Becker. There's going to have to be some massive. Switch in in tennis for these youngest ever records to be broken yet. Lottie DOD is the only. The only younger women champion, but that was that was in the nineteenth. Century! And somebody younger than twelve Windsor Genius Flom then. I want to be here to see it. Because just that's ridiculous. You've got to be a teenager at least making us feel bad. So. That's Martina Hingis the youngest ever Wimbledon champion in the era and Likely to. To. Hold that record for for a long time to come, it's. It's an unorthodox career. She had an. It's kind of difficult was going to ask you to. To to some per legacy or to sum up by both, remember her, but I think that's potentially almost impossible. Because as you say, she doesn't quite fit. Into a category, So said let's just remember her for her SAS. And leave it at that which leaves me only other than saying hello to Gerald a lovely lovely mascot cat. To us about where we're heading tomorrow, we are going to two thousand one tomorrow the first of two matches we're doing from two thousand and one over the next couple of shows and into the fourth round of the men's tournament. Pete, Sampras is the. Reigning champion the full time defending champion, and he plays Roach Ephedra in the fourth round, and that be the only ever meeting between those two greats. And it's not the nineties, but David still looks like he's about to explode with unanticipated election. So pumped. Can we watch it now. He. Can I mean again have some lunch, thanks, company and FIA Chitchat and thank you for listening and we'll see tomorrow..

Martina Hingis Mattie Cutler John Mcenroe Tennis Chon Honky Tonk John Mccain Lottie Dod David Fia Chitchat Boris Becker Roach Ephedra Johnny Australia Gloria Pete Gerald Sampras
Using non-verbal clues on your video meeting

Talking Tech

03:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Using non-verbal clues on your video meeting

"This is Larry Becker filling in for Jefferson Graham and you're listening to talking tech on today's episode. I'll share some things. People do on video that they don't know that they're doing. And how you can leverage nonverbal communications and other words, everything beyond the words that you're speaking to come across better and more likable and be more trusted and achieve your goals whenever you're on a video, and this works for video meetings like skype and zoom meetings, and it works for live streaming on facebook live or even with recorded videos. Let's start with I contact when you meet. Meet somebody in person and you're talking with him. If you're making eye contact that is going to telegraph engagement this matters on video, and since you're not actually making eye contact, it's GonNa take some extra concentration in practice. You need to look at the camera to seem like you're making eye contact ironically, if you're looking around your computer screen, and you're actually looking at the presenter of Zoom meeting or something, you can seem disconnected because it seems like you're looking away from the camera away from the communication. Obviously you do need sometimes to look around on the screen. Screen like if there's a slide show, but if you can just keep looking at the camera and participate in your video meeting by listening other people in that same video meeting are going to see you as a specially engaged, and if you're recording a video that will be edited later on, and you're explaining something or promoting your business. You definitely need to be looking straight at that camera lens next. You need to smile this tied with I contact as the most important nonverbal signal that you're somebody who is likable, your trustworthy and your relatable. It sends a message. Message that you're honest and people want to be around other people who are in a good mood. People do business with a person or a company that they know like and trust, so a smile is critical, but here's the big challenge. Most of US lose our smile when we start concentrating or when we're giving a presentation, and that always happens when you're on video. If you're not used to being on camera, you're going to be thinking about a lot of things and your smile GonNa Fade, and when you feel like you have a neutral expression, it really comes. Comes across on video as looking bored or stressed out or potentially even angry, another big challenge is that even when you feel like you're smiling. Less of the smile comes through on camera that you think one of my strongest coaching phrases for people on Camera. Is Talk through your smile now? This next step works a little bit differently depending on if you're using a Webcam or if you're delivering a message on a regular video camera while you're standing, maybe on a set, or maybe in your business, and doing some sort of video, training or an explainer video about. About Your Company for social media or a website, this thing is talking with your hands now. If you're filming one of those video narrations and you're standing in front of camera, you can use open-handed gestures, and your palms are up, and you can move your hands as oppose to folding your hands together, or maybe having a tight fist, that's all going to

United States Larry Becker Jefferson Graham Facebook Skype
Fresh update on "becker" discussed on The Swing Doctor

The Swing Doctor

08:28 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "becker" discussed on The Swing Doctor

"Integration issues. So welcome to the show today, Nancy. Thank you so much. Still really appreciate you and Ellen Becker giving us the opportunity to talk about this amazing work that goes on with veterans. Absolutely. Absolutely. I mean, I'm just overwhelmed by all the good stuff already, and we've got more good stuff to come. Um, I am so intrigued by your name that says it is very unique. We often that's usually the first thing that people ask about is where where that comes from, based of Crispian is from the same speech. That band of brothers comes from, which is out of Shakespeare's play. Henry the fifth That it's a very, very long speech, where he's he's rallying hiss hiss lieutenants for the For the Battle of Agincourt, and, um, he is trying to their very, very outnumbered, and so he's trying to bring up the spirits of of his warriors. And the part of the speech that we use starts this day is called the Feast of Crispian. He that outlives this day and comes safe home will stand a tip toe when the day is named, So it's It's Ah, it's Ah, It's a marker for this particular day that goes on in that speech goes on. To talk about several things that we really address with the veterans, one of those being the invisible wounds of PTSD so many veterans because of the Survivability of the modern conflicts comeback with. Perhaps they don't have physical wounds, but they have those internal wounds that that are so important to address because of the fact that People don't see them and so they don't understand. And in that speech they also talk about you know, On that day, I'll strip my sleeve and show my scars and say these wounds I had on Crispin's day and then that same speech goes on later to say we few we happy few we band of brothers. And that's a big piece. A lot of veterans don't even know that when they're saying band of brothers that they're actually quoting Shakespeare in that And that was why we chose piece of crisping. Be the name of the organization. What a unique story. Very interesting. So then why do you use acting specifically to accomplish this connection between thoughts and feelings with you? Well, it's Actor spend all of their Education and working with understanding and having access to their emotional life. And one of the things that that is really important to actors is that there's there's no judgment call on any of the on any of the emotions. It's tio reference other art forms. We think of it as our paint box. You know, all of the emotional range that we have, and in the military emotions are trained out of them. They're trained to suppress their emotions. Because if you're if you're feeling things in the midst of combat, it can get you or your Your band of brothers killed in the situation and can get in the way so they really need to have that put aside. When they come back at the end of war. Um, there isn't a lot of opportunity for them to reconnect with any kind of sense of their emotional life. And our bias as actors is that the emotional life is imperative to the satisfaction of living and and and also the relationship of being able to to relate to your family being able to relate to your co workers building community. And so as actors we come in with the whole skill set of howto how to reach Into those emotional places and to express them in a really healthy way. What happens A lot of times in PTSD is that they it gets it's suppressed. It suppressed it suppressed, and then they Go into, Ah heightens place of expression out of you know it'll. It'll go into hyper arousal and help they'll show rage or huge grief or or whatever it ISS and They don't have an opportunity to really express it in a healthy way, and so through acting we have we have some supports for that, then bringing in Shakespeare on top of that is really Particularly amazing. You know, we how we got into this in the beginning is is the three of us founders who who started this? My partner's Bill Watson and Jim Tasi. All of us are Complete Shakespeare geeks. We love it. We've always loved Shakespeare. It's always been a big part of our of our theatrical lives, and we all felt really strongly that That by doing Shakespeare, who has thes thes very big stories on the language of Shakespeare is deeply emotional in its present language. So in Shakespeare, if if the character is saying something The rule of thumb is that that it is what they're thinking right there in the moment, and so it allows for this huge expression of emotions, and the language itself elicits Emotions. And they're all these. What I call magical properties of Shakespeare that are actually science is is on our side. With all of this stuff. There's a couple of studies that come out of GNU that's speak specifically. To how the language of Shakespeare functions in the brain in order to kind of reconnect the areas and PTSD. One of the things that happens is all of the sensory parts of the brain go off line. So that they just don't feel whoever it is experiencing PTSD is is usually and this is for coping. This is just for coping with it. They're usually in a state of numbness in a state of dissociation, where they just don't feel anything and can't really connect up with those things. Um, metaphor has this Barry unique property in the brain? That it it? U. We must go into the sensory parts of the brain. In order to understand what metaphor is, I always tell the veterans You know, plum lips. What do plums and lips have to do with each other? Nothing right. So we have to go into the part of the brain where we have experienced a Pallone. And go. What is it about the plum that I remember. I remember that it smells pretty and lovely and sweet and it's juicy and it's got this beautiful, shiny red color and It's something that I want to put against my mouth. And so when you pair that up with lips you go. Oh, that sounds like something I want to kiss right And they have to go into those sensory parts of the brain in order to make sense of that. And so very gently. Those parts of the brain kind of Bump back on a little bit, and they start to and the other unique thing about the sensory parts of the brain is that when we are in those when we're thinking about something that isthe or speaking about it That sensory There's a little ripple of actual physical sensation in that, and so it's very, very gentle way of bringing their bodies back into the experience of the other thing that I didn't talk about an acting. Is that also the mask of the fact that Mom so many times veterans will tell us. They can't. They can't speak to some of the stories that that they that they experience. They just either They have tried to speak to them, and people responded badly, or they literally just can't get the words out. They just can't talk about it. So we give them this mask of character where it's not they themselves that are playing this. It's a roll, so it's It's not. It's not this veteran that's talking about this experience. It's Cassis. And and then we give them the words and one of the things that's really unique about us. We've never had a veteran who went through the program who Couldn't do We have special techniques so that um, even though the language is difficulty to speak, we have somebody that stands at their shoulder and reads it for them. And so all they have to do is repeat what we say, and then we can act if they could do whatever they want with it. Damn..

Shakespeare Ptsd Crispian Ellen Becker Nancy Pallone Crispin Henry Partner Barry Bill Watson Jim Tasi
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

03:06 min | Last month

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"So that we can do this, and of course Becker, and thank you for you know walking through all this together and and it's still fun. You know it's still razor. It stays fund you. We want to make sure it stays that way. Listen just go ahead and listen to this conversation and then go back and listen to the last. Last episode we did with Matt Luzio where matinee time about burnout, and listened to that entire hour of conversation, the energy level. The excitement like were we were done. Yeah, we believe that doing his own thing for shows Yeah it. It needed to happen to thank you for your patience, and to those of you who use the website and submitted some feedback yes, in. Of Encouragement. Thank you to those of you. Who did that. That meant a lot. It's always nice for me. I've always felt like I've always felt like my purpose kind of the overall goal with everything that I do whether it's career or side hustle, or whatever is that I'm equipping and empowering dental to become. Who got his call them to be absolutely and if I'm. I'm doing podcasting. That goal is in mind, and if I feel like that's not happening and I'm just speaking into the air and I'm not actually no one is being empowered that I'm wasting my time and effort it just so I'm someone who actually does need the feedback to keep going right. Yeah, no, some sand. I don't think it's vein to ask for that. Either but I also your listeners. You're the ones giving us of your time, and you know over over over a month or each week. You're giving us so much of your of letting us into your life. Yeah, so you have every right to give us feedback, constructive feedback at suggest episode, ideas and topics, and and let us know what you want to hear US talk about even if it's a topic, we've already covered. You say you don't can you? What about this there was? was. Actually one suggestion that was great and it's on our episode list as one we'll be recording soon about a form of privilege that we haven't covered yet There's there's quite a few episodes suggestions that we have to to that. We sort through and we're going to be doing and I'm excited to cover those in excited to do content and create content that you as the listener are asking for and that I've have said yes, this would be beneficial to me. so yeah, that's what we're. That's what we're here to do is ultimately to serve into create and create something that makes. Makes your life and the lives of those around you a little bit better, yeah? So yeah, that's so that's kind of the overall plan. We're GONNA continue trucking on June one. There will be a full length episode sending and with that go check out the podcast network. Go check out the new YouTube Channel and by new Youtube Channel. I mean just Youtube Channel that I v Youtube. CIA finally started a posting videos to. My students about it so long to finally have is like Ha Yup so my channel and the link is in the description as well and just thank you so much for your support through now At you and wouldn't be here without you. So you know share this podcast with your friends as we pick back up and we'll see you on June one yeah..

Youtube Matt Luzio Becker US CIA
Seattle - Here’s why the coronavirus is hitting Hispanics in Washington state particularly hard

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:54 sec | Last month

Seattle - Here’s why the coronavirus is hitting Hispanics in Washington state particularly hard

"While cases of corona virus going down to Washington state are ticket off reports. Racial disparities increasingly are being laid bare. According to The Washington State Department of Health White people are sixty eight percent of the state's population but make up forty three percent of cases. Meanwhile thirteen percent of the state is Hispanic but they represent thirty six percent of cases. African Americans are four percent of the population but seven percent of cases. Sarah Becker with Seattle Economic Opportunity Institute says essential workers. Disproportionately are people of color faced with greater economic. Insecurity may actually face quite a grim choice. Either to expose themselves daily to the virus or to lose their job and their ability to meet the needs and pay for a roof over their head. Structural racism is a major reason. People of color are more likely to be exposed to in contract. The

Washington State Department Of Economic Opportunity Institute Washington Sarah Becker Seattle
'Major reallocation shock' from coronavirus will see 42% of lost jobs evaporate: Study

Motley Fool Answers

00:22 sec | Last month

'Major reallocation shock' from coronavirus will see 42% of lost jobs evaporate: Study

"Citing report from the Becker Friedman Institute at the University of Chicago. They predict forty. Two percent of the recent layoffs from the pandemic will result in permanent job. Loss okay. In some related goodish news. The federal government is working on making some changes to the paycheck protection program because of criticisms from business owners who say they can't tap the funds

Becker Friedman Institute Federal Government University Of Chicago
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

04:25 min | Last month

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Is that he was jogging neighborhood. near his home and there was a two men one a former police officer and his son. Travis a Jordan Travis McMichael and George Michael recognized him as a burglary burglary suspect from From a few nights prior having stolen eighth I think a pistol from his car or his truck No confirmation that that was arbitrary. You just said are running and said that's the guy who is you know and he's running and so he went and got his got his son. They grab their guns. They hopped in the truck with a neighbor and or with a couple trucks with neighbor in and they quite literally like chased him down. They ask them to stop. He said no essentially he kept going. And so then The truck pulled ahead of him and Travis Scott of the truck with his shotgun armory runs around the truck and to get the drop on Travis in that moment and in the ensuing tackle or in the ensuing struggle for the shotgun. Arboretum shot a total of. I think three times the first one through his hand the other two absolutely are actually fatal and he dies face down in the street and there is a video of this. So very twenty. Three's when that happened A twenty four The DA or Barnaul says that there is no grounds for an arrest. Re Twenty seven The Da for the Brunswick Georgia Judicial Court. Jackie Johnson recused herself from the case citing the fact. That robbery McMichael not. George Gregory McMichael is a former investigator with her office and then in early April barnhill himself recusals And then on April thirteen. Tom Durden is appointed on April. Twenty Nine Glenn County requests that the Georgia Bureau of Investigation or the G B I To e he asked them to investigate and then on May five. The video surfaces ironically released by the neighbor that they recruited with them thinking that this would exonerate all of them right. Yeah video releases to a news network. That News Network put makes it public And once that was in the public spotlight abby. This just took off. I mean within thirty six hours I think. Yeah within thirty six hours of the video essentially going live or at least with the with the with a G. B. I looking into the release of the video itself The McMichael's were arrested. So may five the video services and Tom durden recommends. The case be presented before a grand journey jury for criminal. Charges may six the investigation officially launches May Seven. Mcmichael's are arrested and may eight bond was denied to the McMichael's In in court and it was is weird seeing them appear like over video All Weird but So to give a couple more facts here Travis McMichael's father told the responding officer A. J. Brand Berry. Rb caught their attention because he resembled a man accused of a rash of residential break INS. He said they decided to grab their guns and chase him. Here's the funny thing this is. These are some of the details we're GONNA get into the Brunswick News reported that one burglary was reported in the area from the start of Twenty Twenty. Two the day armory died. The sole items stolen was a gun from Travis. Mcmichael's unlocked pickup truck hilarious. Like you're gonNA look at a man who doesn't have the same look who stands out to you because he's running in a neighborhood that's predominantly white and you're going to say that man you're GonNa try and blame him as A. You know accused him of a rash of of break INS. And what's been amazing is ever since this shooting. It's not amazing. We've watched this play out over and over and over again right. Yeah is that basically now. Everyone's trying to dig into arteries pass to try and his past actions that day. Frying to essentially find a reason that justifies the McMichael's shooting after the fact. And they're trying to do so like any evidence.

George Gregory McMichael Travis Scott Twenty Twenty Tom Durden burglary Brunswick Georgia Judicial Cou officer Georgia Bureau of Investigatio Glenn County Barnaul Jackie Johnson George Michael robbery investigator Brunswick News A. J. Brand Berry
If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

Science Friction

08:18 min | 3 months ago

If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

"This ovid nineteen pandemic horrifying as it ease. Ease making us old. Think deeply about what comes afterwards about what out. Society will o'clock about what sort of society we? What's been really incredible? He's seeing how quickly the world can mobilize when it really needs to not quickly enough. Shore and the economic consequences are already devastating about four a behemoth of Planet. We have found a common purpose. Eradicating the pandemic. It's Natasha Mitchell joining you for science fiction and given all that. What could we mobilize around next if there was similar will mitigating climate change? What about the mountains of waste we generate as a species we flush freshwater Dan at Danny's landfill is piling up Arandas? Chana doesn't want out rubbish for recycling anymore and we throw out perfectly. Edible food by the ton make sense. No not really so I want you to meet to revolutionaries who have been well breaking rules to change. The world to me is a reflection of in particular in urban our society. That's not working. The fact that we twelve thousand years ago there was four million people on the planet and you sort of think so we take Melbourne and we better data across the planet and they probably created waste but it was Beautifully by the planet putting on being people on the planet and the same model. We exactly the same model now. It's clearly not an appropriate model anymore. We have a million tons of waste water a day in Melbourne. And what we do is we clean it up enough or we put it in a hole. We'll put it in the air or put it in the sea and we say our hope. The planet just fixes that problem and at some point probably when we hit a bad abi and people the planet's wasn't able to fix that problem anymore and so the model of waste that says that we can just put it out there and the planet will assimilated hall or in the Sea. He's finished so for me. Waste Rip presents a problem that we have to solve. That goes back a very long way. So it's hard to solve. I want you to make precipitated scales a chemical engineer and director of the particulate fluids processing center at University of Melbourne. He's a problem solver an inventor a makeup from water reuse and recycling to enormous batteries powered by your piece. Joost Becker is an environmental activist. Experimental End Artists to in two thousand twelve opened. The world's first zero waste RISTORANTE SILO BY JOOST. And they join me. As part of an event at the science gallery. Millwood's last pop-up exhibition called disposable. I want to talk about what happens when you try to challenge systems as they are to cleverly rethink how we use wise because what. We've got here people who do that and joost. You decided early on that you were going to respond to the the whole West Challenge and goes zero waste and not only that trying to open up a restaurant that was wholly zero waste. So what did that look like what most people do is? They see the waste product and then try and work out what to do with the waste product. I go back and look at the system if the system is generating something that is now used in the system needs to change. And so. That's what I did basically just change the system so the milk I spoke to a dairy fabric supply me and stainless steel cake so we developed like tap system we ground our own flow because we we have our own flower roll around oats. We spoke to winemakers about putting wine in kegs. One on tap might our own data everything that kind of generated waste but an even does myself. Yeah but this is much that has has come from that. I mean that was a forty two square meter cafe and it has caused ripples across the world is stuff going on in New York and in London in China and in South America. That has happened because of that cafe. Today I was sent an image of a Steiner Steel Keg and the farmer has worked for four years with the health department to try and get his keg approved now. Just my little cafe was like you know quarter of a million milk bottles or some crazy amount of milk bottles that we didn't need to buy that. My dairy farmer didn't need to buy that went didn't didn't need to purchase them and then I didn't pay someone to come and collect them and that plastic really copy restocked because he's got a fat coating from this animal fat on it. Which makes it really difficult to recycle it. So you know there's so many things and then in two thousand twelve the year on Harvesting was that was completely illegal but like my main sponsor was the city of Melbourne and had the city of Melbourne. Lago all over it and I thought if I'm going to get a crack at this I'm going to do it now. Okay so you're on harvesting in a commercial restaurant space. What were you doing because you're pushing the boundaries in all sorts of directions in this cap so people will come in and inspect building and go on my God. We had no chemical us. We had so much stuff this allies of things going on that for for people that were you know from the council checking to see you know. I had no plastic chopping boards and I had electrolytes water so water that came from was invented for surgery to clean hands and clean surgical tools in Japan. Twenty five years ago. It's basically water with salt and electric current goes through it and kills bacteria instantly us. Four billion gloves every single day that get thrown away which ended up in landfill which copy recycled and now here nets. No nothing so no bins no rubbish. We had like a little jam jar that showed there may capstone came on the kegs so I had to work to say. I don't want plastic cats on paper caps so they can go into our invisible composter so you can imagine how if you don't have been you've gotta work it out because you end up being left with stuff you know. We ended up having this board. That big of rubber bands because everything on the veggies and stuff in rubber bands but work with we were just talking about a with. Kerama on unlike a twin ball toilet so that Iran could be separated and stuff toilet applies to boys. Talk about in the toilets. Okay so so the so. This is the Iran harvesting story in this cafe. What did you do? And how did you challenge the health authorities big time? This was instilled in me by my dad. Probably account remember how it was maybe three or four years old so we were living in Holland and I used to go with my dad so he's veggie patch and be little like delft. Were little bottles. It'll all these little things coins I'd find one that had all this stuff come here in the solar we miles away from any any city or and he said we'll hundreds of years ago. Farmers would go to cities and shovel the human manure of the trenches to re fertilized their soil. Because you can't just keep pulling from soil so became caught assist with that idea and knowing that you know I don't know what it is some safe. Three percents is seven percent of the world's gases used to create a fertilizer a synthetic fertilizers. And I must say that. That fertilizer isn't even a good fertilizer because it doesn't actually narcisse soil properly. What we're doing is with mining soil. And we're not putting back what we've taken out so for me. It's like logical that we can't solve this problem unless we start looking at putting the nutrients that we've taken out back in. So what did you do with Iran in the restaurant so we use it on grain crops so use it to fertilize mustard crops in thousand and use it as a herbicide that we did all sorts of trials different levels to say what kind of facility was brought back to soil? We ended up with three and a half thousand Litas from a five-week pop-up.

Melbourne Iran University Of Melbourne Joost Becker Steiner Steel Keg Natasha Mitchell Chana Experimental End Artists Japan Millwood South America Director China Holland New York Delft London
Tips for looking great on Zoom

Talking Tech

05:30 min | 3 months ago

Tips for looking great on Zoom

"For All your money questions turned to the nerds at Nerdwallet DOT COM okay. So we're all taking a lot of zoom meetings right now and we're looking at the camera and we're looking ourselves and saying God. I really look awful. Don't I what's wrong with this picture. Well my good friend Larry Becker. Who's a photographer and bibliographer in Florida has just written a book? It's called Great on-camera. He's got a bunch of tips for how to make yourself look way better Larry. I'm going to toss it right to you. Where shall we start? Thank you appearance right. Yeah it it's all about how you look and how you sound so there are a couple of different things that That I push people toward but one of the problems is people. Don't realize that the camera that they're using whether it's a a Webcam or one that's built into their tablet or their phone or their computer is wide angle and so there are a lot of bad things that happen when you're really close to a wide angle lens and it starts with making you look extra around so what I tell. People is first of all. Let's get camera in the right place so for me. I always suggest go straight at I level so you make eye to eye contact. Another thing is back away from the camera a little bit so that you're more normal human proportions so one of the challenges people feel like they need to be really close to the camera and that's not always a good thing so definitely back up to. Let's talk about appearance. Yes so there are a lot of things that have to do with your appearance. And one of the things that affects your appearance is going to be lighting. I have a really bright outside light coming into my office all day long whenever I'm not on video but as soon as I'm getting ready to go on video I shut the blinds. Because that overpowering light just makes my appearance look really bad. I'm really really blown out white on the side that the sunshine comes in and hits me on the side of the face. So that's terrible. Another thing that affects my appearance is I have really smooth forehead skin and if you have any extra lights on at all I look shiny and if you look shiny you look sweaty and if you look sweaty that tells people you're not really somebody I can trust and so believe it or not just a little bit of powder will knock down the shine and you'll look a whole lot better and another thing is what are you wearing. A lot of people don't realize it but The cameras do this thing with the sensor the image sensor in the camera that causes more pattern interference in the way. I explained it to people a lot of times. Is it's like if you're looking through a screen door at another screen and in Florida here where I live. Everybody has a pool with a big screen cage over it and they all know if you have to screen. You're looking through both of them at the same time. You get these weird patterns of interference. Well that happens with digital cameras and small patterns on shirts so if you or any cloth so if you have a shirt with a really tight design or even a ribbed look on the fabric that that can cause pattern interference and your shirt then just looks all like it's electrical. It looks like bad. Interference Patterns clothing is forget about a plaids and patterns solid colors. But not white or black. Right I I like to stay away from black white and tight patterns. I don't mind stripes. If they're really big you can get away with that okay. What about backgrounds? A lot of people like to go in front of bookshelves That's fine if it's all just books but if you have a bookshelf and you have all kinds of different objects. But what's going to happen? Is People will start listening to you. And then they'll get distracted by the weird stuff that's in your background. And if you want people to pay attention to you make your background. Simple lighting webcams are very low resolution and We usually look pretty dark when we look at ourselves on the laptop. What can we do about that couple? Things the Webcam is trying to balance all the light throughout the whole scene. And if you're wearing dark stuff in your scene is dark and your backlit your face is going to be fully in the shadow so the best thing to do is have the brightest light near your Webcam but actually pointed at your face. So that'll light up your face. The other thing is the lighter shirt. You wear the lighter. Overall the exposure will be throughout the image and are probably end up looking better if you're wearing a a medium to a light colored shirt so bottom lining No no distractions on on on a bookshelf. Notice tractions on my clothing coma. Hair shave my face. Put on the makeup and Get a light in front of me and most importantly I di- contact. Don't have the Webcam looking up your chin. Yeah that's the worst is looking up your chin. It's a little bit better to have it looking down at Ya but I see beauty bloggers a lot saying do that. But I recommend Ida eye

Larry Becker Florida
Pension Time Bombs

Rich Dad Radio Show

08:17 min | 3 months ago

Pension Time Bombs

"Today our subject is It started off as a five piece. Subject is called. Who stole my pensions. And the more we do these things the number of people coming out of the woodwork. Who went to tell their stories about what happened to the. Pensions keeps growing. So let's start off as a five program of five unit program is now going to ten and the reason it's important for all of you. Listen to this. You know the story about the pension time bomb is because it is the biggest story that nobody knows about. And it's only now making the news. And the reason pension time bomb is so important because as much like this corona virus and all that is a systemic problem like chronic viruses. About you and me. Getting the SNIFFLES. It's about the whole supply chains breaking down all over the world which will cause crashes all over the world. This is number three as start off as a five unit program and now it's expanding so app some very exciting people who just want to tell all and let the world know how this pension program is going to blow up and it's GonNa bring down the biggest crisis bigger than corona virus bigger than the subprime of two thousand eight and Becker than they Student Loan Program simply says you've been ripped off. That's that's really what's happening here being ripped off and one of the ways that Wall Street the US government and the banking system. Reps this office via our pensions so stay tuned on the Rich Dad. Show have more of these programs come to let you know how Wall Street the government and the Crooks of the world have been stealing our wealth via different vehicles and our this vehicles pension. One of them is student loan. One is your home mortgage one is the stock market. So this is a very important series of programs started off as five and what might stop at ten whenever no so our guest. Today again is tense Adele. Here's my co author on the book. Who stole my pension and our second gases. Mark Rain and Mark. Green is in the book who stole my pension and mark is a thirty year veteran a ups driver from upstate. New York he is former. He is formerly the organizer and president of the Teamsters Alliance for Pension Protection Aka T. a. p. p. a. grassroots pension watchdog organization mark led to raise funds to perform the first ever forensic investigation of a union multi employer plan the New York State teamsters conference pension and retirement fund. They are robbed blind. So Ted. Let's start with you because you're my co author on who stole my pension. Please give them a little little bite. Your background about why you and I are interested in pensions. My Dad didn't have a pension poor dad and your dad that have a pension so please introduce yourself tent and then how you got interested in. Pensions sure thanks Robert. My background is I'm a former. Fdic attorney and I have done over a trillion in forensic investigations of pensions. And some of the first investigations. Ever done and one of the things that I uncovered it in these investigations. Is that the reason these pensions were? Failing was not because not enough. Money was going into them or the benefits. Being paid out to workers to rich was because the people running the pensions were grossly. Mismanaging the money what we call Bros. Malpractice generally crafty and For the investigation ideas more threes. Pensions The New York State. Teamsters pension is in the book In the exhibit to the and that was the first forensic investigations of over one hundred. Twenty one multi employer pensions. That are going to be taken over by the government and so that was the first one that was ever done so and also You know like my dad lost his pension because of corruption again in government and he ran for Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawaii and got crushed and lost his pension. And what up until your dad? My Dad was working in the intelligence community so he disappeared in nineteen seventy one in east Africa and it turned out he'd been murdered in Africa in doing an investigation for the American government of being the brutal dictator so since he just could not be found his life insurance wouldn't pay social security wouldn't say his state couldn't be pro baited so there was nothing available for those of us in the survivors of the family. Also so he had no mention either so so one of the reasons I think Ted ireson paddock. Oh you know brothers on this project. A book called. Who STOLE MY PENSION? Is that our fathers. Had their pensions taken. And we're very concerned at this moment. There's many mothers and fathers who will find out if if they already have not found out they have no pension and that's why the but it's more than just a pension is the ripple effect like the corona virus is going to have upon the whole system of the world economy so mark grain Plea thank you and welcome to the program. And I'm glad you raise the money to hire Ted's saddle to go in after the pension so tell us your story Mark Place. Thank you for having me on. I really appreciate you guys working on this project and bringing attention to this pretty serious issue which is affecting us in upstate. New York and of course the whole country so You know how I met Ted. You know it started back in two thousand ten actually the story. We have to step back. A little bit are fun. Started sending US letters in the mail saying We were under sixty five percent funded which is critical status so there was a law passed under the protection. Act of two thousand six. It said the trust. These hasn't make benefit cuts and implemented funding improvement plans. So that's what we first started forming committees. That's when I started getting people together calling attention to this problem and we saw a lot of irregularities with the trustees with telling US misleading statements and we call them out on so as the years went by kept saying. There's enough money in plan to pay low the commerce fabulous and you have nothing to worry about. That's what they were telling people publicly. This is thirty. Four thousand member plan with three or four thousand families involved. Keep in mind privately. They were telling us that the fun needed a fourteen percent. Investment returns every year for the next ten to fifteen years just to break even and not take that step so we knew they were not being honest with the participants. So we had these meetings parking lot meetings town halls and we started raising money in two thousand sixteen to get some inter interventions and. That's where Ted Payments. So thank you ted. I appreciate your work on this investigation and unfortunately we find that the plan was grossly mismanaged and now. I can't retire. You know me along with thousands of other people can't retire because the benefit is way too low and so That's the story as of right now. We can't get the money back but certainly wants to reform of pension legislation to make sure this doesn't happen to anyone

TED Teamsters Alliance For Pension Teamsters American Government New York New York State United States Ted Payments Ted Ireson Mark Rain Sniffles Fdic Becker Adele Hawaii Mark Place Africa
Stephen Curry set to return for Warriors against Raptors

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Stephen Curry set to return for Warriors against Raptors

"Becker Steph curry back with the warriors tonight at home against the NBA champion Toronto raptors game to be nationally televised by TNT step of course played just four games this season broke his hand against Phoenix here in that fourth game and missed the next fifty eight the warriors of one two of three both on the road the latest the most improbable of their fourteen wins coming back from twelve down late in the third to beat the nuggets in Denver by sixteen with the following nine players three on ten day contracts rookie molder also Bender and Randall three more rookies pull paschal and the young drafted to Scott Anderson and two who played earlier this season on two way contracts Lee and Chris and finally the only one making big money twenty five year old Andrew Wiggins who may be looking forward to playing alongside staff more than anyone else particularly after scrimmaging with him and he said it just changed the whole complexion of the team you got to be on his team and he caught himself just look in Adam and marble in Derry St Jean this morning on KCBS and that you know that's the impact the greatness has on the game you know you you know that his name will be at the top of the white board tonight you know you look at the opponent they're gonna say healthcare we can double team on pick and rolls are probably gonna double team of mine he gets a nice situation so there's a lot of respect there and when a great player comes back like this he makes the game easier for everybody and that's the thing we should think about what we can do in the future play with clay and train mon and staff it's going to make the game a lot easier for him and in the meantime we've done a darn solid job with Garry St Jean at the sports desk Steve Becker

Phoenix Nuggets Denver Bender Randall Scott Anderson LEE Andrew Wiggins Adam Derry St Jean Kcbs Steve Becker Steph Curry NBA Chris
Coronavirus: Two passengers dead from quarantined Diamond Princess

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Coronavirus: Two passengers dead from quarantined Diamond Princess

"Four two elderly passengers who were on that cruise ship that was quarantine for two weeks in Japan now have died from the corona virus BBC news correspondent Laura Becker in Yokohama we had an eighty seven year old man and an eighty four year old women died after contracting coronavirus aboard the diamond princess they were taken to hospital last week and we understand that both have underlying conditions

Japan Laura Becker Yokohama BBC
How Man City Became Banned City

The Lead

02:38 min | 4 months ago

How Man City Became Banned City

"It's so big. And it's so impressive in in the fact that we're talking about and the fact that you know news stations across the world. If I lied artem you know from Friday night on woods is because I think the size of of city or the clubs are being banned from the Champions League before and Galatasary Turkish slogan AC. Milan Daping Bam this while Icy Milan. This season banned from the Euroleague. I think it's probably the fact that it's Manchester City. And also the factor the other two mentioned we kinda bound for fallen foul of the rules and spending a bit too much but this one. This is more about the seat. This is a club with a long history since eighteen hundred ninety four. This club has been at the very core of a city. That's proud a city. This allowed a city. That's always stood out from the crowd. A club foot all of Manchester. But it hasn't historically been one of the top clubs in England. You know the the sort of long been seen as the second team in Manchester. Yes the modern era. The modern era in English. Football is the Premier League and Manchester United Hopping Kings. Becker again. Nobody will dramatically traveling ninety nine hundred nine. They won the double in two thousand and eight for a lot of years. Manchester City weren't in the premier league. And even when they were they. Were very much an also ran Kanda team. So you know that goes to show the fortunes but really everything changed in two thousand eight when he was purchased by new owner. Toss a little bit about. She commenced or After the show up in Minnesota a chain is a member of the Abu Dhabi royal family. He's the Deputy Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates. And he's the half brother of the current president of the United Arab Emirates. He sits on all kinds of borden bodies including the Emirates Investment Authority on the Supreme Petroleum. Council it sounds some Laaksonen over an Bolom say these worries love me collected. He owns the Abu Dhabi united. Which in two thousand and eight bought Manchester City and his mouth sprawled into not just Manchester City but New York City Melbourne city stakes in and China in. Uruguay gives you a bit of an idea of this guy and I suppose the the influence that he he's not regional and now beyond

Manchester City Manchester Manchester United Hopping King United Arab Emirates Deputy Prime Minister Abu Dhabi United Champions League New York City Melbourne Milan Daping Emirates Investment Authority Milan England Abu Dhabi Royal Family Becker Bolom Uruguay Football Minnesota China
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

05:40 min | 5 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Then thirteen minutes which you know what I mean. There's so many things well. This is true mental to them. I'm not saying that this is good or right. I'm not saying that but it's like if that's the reason why while you're getting angry is to say that all were we're only saying. The women are empowered for that. Okay are we paying women scientists. Yeah I mean. Scientists are still getting paid seventy percent like they're still in. I mean I think we're we're not so I think your point is dead on. Why are we talking about Demi Lovato? Oh yeah why are we talking. You positive things to write. Why are we? Why are we only spotlighting this stuff and a granted? I get that the Super Bowl halftime show itself is spotlighted but so is the national anthem but no one talks about that. Like I just it just yeah. It makes me angry because what it does is it tells me how thinly veiled the sexism. Actually he is. That's what it does to me and so franken. Graham had a really big reaction to this. I'd use that because I was about got to come after Franklin Graham next so yeah so And you can read the actual quote if you want. I'm just going to kind of bring this up. Basically he criticized it and it's the the main points that I said. Oh you know it's failing millions of kids all this type of stuff. Franklin Graham in trying to be a moral arbiter and saying that this is disgusting. Supports a man who cheated on his nude model fourth wife while she was is pregnant with her son with a porn star and paid hush money to cover it up. That's what's more Franklin Graham's moral high ground that's the mountain that he has locked himself onto to then look down upon these women and say shame on you now whatever else he says I just want you all to understand this that this man has said and that is perfectly fine for the president whose amazing how the United States to get away with that behavior and for him to hire a lawyer who Who went on a public a public parade with his mistress by his side while his wife was is fighting cancer? Okay understand that regardless of where your politics lie understand from a moral moral stand point. This is where Franklin Graham has said. I'm fine drawing the line here. Now that being said Becker wooded what did Franklin Graham have to say facebook. I don't expect the world to act like the church but our country has had a sense of moral decency on prime time television in order to protect children to point out that the show Lucifer is on prime time television. Anyone can watch the show supernatural. Oh is on primetime. Television Riverdale is on Primetime Television Net flicks Riverdale is is CW. You're right Friends is on was on primetime television for a long time Just just pointing that out. Starting interrupt continue. We see that disappearing before our eyes it was demonstrated tonight in the Pepsi. Super Bowl halftime show with millions of children. Children watching this exhibition was Pepsi. Showing young girls. That sexual exploitation of women is okay with the exploitation of women on the rise worldwide. Instead of lowering the standard we as a society should be raising it. I'm disappointed in Pepsi and the NFL K.. Here's why this bothers me because I don't I cannot. I mean aside from aside from what you've just shared which yes that bothers me. What bothers me is? I have no idea what efforts Franklin Graham Graham is actually putting in to protect women or to to raise the standard for women. Or you know what I mean like to actually empower uplift and create equality in that sense. There's nothing I see doing that. In fact I see him. Doing is empowering and enabling the exact opposite to happen and then he's going to say shame on Pepsi and the NFL. For Um I'm for allowing this to happen while he directly supported and endorsed and used his entire platform as an evangelist. In a in the most probably the most most famous evangelist in modern history. using that platform earn that name to do so right that to me doesn't like like I'm not okay with that. A but be millions of children are not just watching the super bowl halftime show. They're watching everything else. Play out and to me like outside of that and I think there are more. There are more things that are having a greater impact on on them. They're not And One and I'm just going to jump to this because I think this is. This is a point that I wanNA make anyway. One of the facts like straight straight up one of the facts in is that around major sporting events like the super bowl like the NFL finals like the world series. Whatever one of them a all star game up up one of the major spikes In in crime is around human trafficking. It's huge.

Franklin Graham Graham Pepsi NFL Demi Lovato Riverdale franken facebook United States president Becker
Living Life By Your True Values

Duct Tape Marketing

08:18 min | 5 months ago

Living Life By Your True Values

"This is John. John is my guest. Today is Dr John De Martini. He is a world renowned specialist in human behavior. A researcher author author and global educator on his most recent books has called the values factor the secret to creating inspired and fulfilling life. So let's talk about values. Shall we welcome John. Thank you for having me. Thank you appreciate the time here. So let's give people a little I read kind of the official stuff that you do. But let's give giving people a little bit of background. How'd you get here to to where you are today? Well I was a I started when I was seventeen. Actually I I had a dream to travel the world into teach. I set out to do that at age. Seventeen almost eighteen and I god I. It just didn't give up on it. And I just kept of emerging. It had a learning problem as a child. I was told that I went in first grade. Never be able to read never ever built right now relocate Mounting never go very far in life and high school dropout was living on the streets from years and But then I met this amazing teacher named Paul Bragg when I was seventeen that made me after During his talk for the first time in my life I thought maybe I could to overcome learning problems. Someday I could read become intelligent and I'll tell you what that was the most inspiring night and the turning point of my life and I never gave upon. I had to. I learn how to pronounce words and spell and practice speech things. I had a speech problem and I just I never gave up on it. I just and this is is the thing I just love doing much so at seventeen you were still not reading or even speaking well. I didn't read my first book till I was eighteen was it was it ultimately neurological solar psychological. or well I had when I was very young I had a speech impediment so I had to go to Speech pathologist very young. And then I when I got into first grade I had what they defined. Now's dyslexia. I I wasn't able to put it all together together. The only way I've been through school by asking smart kids questions and and but but you know when you really really really really WanNa do something and there's no turning back on it you can turn your life around. That's what happened to me. Just I had such a desire to win and I never thought I'd ever be intelligent. I had a desire to be intelligent and man when I went out on the pursuit of that it was like a relentless pursuit that I I I had with. The help of my mother had read thirty words a day and pronounce them and spell them properly and put them in a sentence and say I could go to bed until at thirty new words a day when I was eighteen and my vocabulary groove and eventually took a ged in high school equivalency test and a college entrance exam. And and I went on and then I end up being a scholar so I I just never give up on IT I. I've read now over thirty thousand books and I just I love reading. I just love learning and you people might have heard me introduce you as a doctor John D. Martinez so you now have even achieved advanced degrees. Yeah did I did ten years. Here's a college in almost in. Yeah I just. I wanted to be a teacher philosopher heater. That's so high fulltime travel around the world today researching and teaching students all of the world today every country. So I've I've been quite Hundred and fifty four countries in this January one hundred fifty four and you reside you were telling me before we started recording Somewhat unique home I live on ship call. The world went on their most time. I'm traveling like my residential last eighteen years on a condominium private condominium ship that travels all over the world I often on his I travel placed. That's right so mentioned the name of one of your core works is called the values factor. I wonder if you could define that. Term values factor. Yeah well every individual regardless of gender or age or culture lives moment by moment by a set of priorities a a set of values themes that are most important to least important in your life an every in this hierarchy a set of values that they hold things that the most importantly sports so this set of values is unique to them and it determines how they perceive what they decide and how they act the the perception decisions Actions are dependent on these values and whatever's highest on their value they spontaneously inspired intrinsically to pursue and this this is where they'll excel and fulfill and expand whatever's low in their values lower in the party's they'll require extrinsic motivation to get them to do it so they'll need lead punishment if they don't do it rewarded. They do kind of things in order to get them to do it. And this is not where they excel. This is where they kind of held back and finding out what's really truly truly truly most important people's lives and structuring their life through prioritize action a delegation to pursue that it's extraordinary it capacity to build momentum and go on to greater achievement as an entrepreneur or is anybody in any field early. I'm fascinated by that. And that's what the values factor is How do we get people to live concurrently in line with what they value most so they can be inspired so let me make sure? I'm I'm hearing this right. You're suggesting that people have these values even if they haven't it really associated words or names with them you're saying that they make decisions based on them and part of the job is to figure out what they are. Well if you ask somebody what their values are they'll tell you social cliches and ideologies and I'd idealisms that are injected in inculcated from individuals individuals like mothers fathers preachers teachers conventions traditions mores of the society that their subordinates and conforming to but I'm not interested in that I'm interested in what their life demonstrates I look at. I have thirteen value determined to help look objectively what their value determined. Germans are so how do they feel their space because things are really important to me fill their space with how they spend their time. They find time time spent time on things that are truly valuable. What is it the energizes when they're doing something on their values? The energy goes up there not to damage goes down. Wears their money. Being spent look carefully at how they spend their money tells you what the priorities are where they most organized and ordered where they most disciplined disciplined spontaneously. What is that they think about visualizing affirm inside internally dialogue with themselves about how they want their life that shows evidence coming true not fantasies but what are they converse with other people about most about what they wanNA keep bringing the conversation to what inspires brings a tear of inspiration to there is what exactly is it? The consistent persistent goals that they've been pursuing that are actually coming true not the ones fantasies that are self-defeating and what is the thing that they love studying about reading about learning about in listening to I look at those value determines to get a clear understanding what their life is truly demonstrating not their fantasies about what they hope it will be. However would you suggest also that there are a lot of people that fifty sixty seventy eighty percent of their lives? They're living outside of those things that you just described exactly. Most people people are comparing themselves to others putting on others on their pedestal. Minimize themselves into the pit living vicariously through other people paying high nine dollars for other people's brands instead of building brand around themselves and they are basically doing one. Emerson warned not to do n being imitating people which is sort of a death breath sentenced to their their self worth their empowerment and key. The key is to giving themselves permission to not subordinate to the world on the outside but to let the voice navision vision on the inside direct their destiny and take command of their life as as Ernest Becker says instead of conforming to the collective heroes you WANNA BE A. They'd be the individual hero within and so in the process of doing it. Most people don't give themselves permission to do that. They they live in the shadows of others instead of on the shoulders of giants.

Dr John De Martini Researcher Paul Bragg Speech Pathologist Ernest Becker John D. Martinez Official Emerson
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

03:50 min | 5 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"James McDonald Mark Driscoll or any of these other pastors noble on their on their issues before they became what they it became. So we don't actually know we can't confirm it. We're not saying we know. But we're saying that conflict confrontation improper conflict-resolution can ride into those areas and other words. You're you protect victims and you protect the offender from becoming an offender like that's the thing is a protects everyone it protects you potential victims and potential offenders. That's who it that's what I would. I would even say on a not a lighter example but maybe a less intense example is what's kind of going on right right now with he'll sign united Did you read the article that they wrote About how like. They're all struggling. wrote an article. And this may be even be a topic for another Episode but kind of this article about how. They'd kind of lost all their spirituality like they didn't they burned out. They didn't WanNa do it anymore. they were Kinda. Just doing it for You know the the rhythm of it more than anything else. They didn't really believe in it anymore. And I think even that's that's a situation that while there were no real victims other than the people themselves someone in that situation I think that's one that could have been avoided waited with good conflict resolution by stepping up. And saying hey guys this is an okay Example withdrawal with that as you look at Now I don't know if they if it happened again but all my goodness they did Garden new debris right with need to breathe like need to breathe was confronted by someone this. Hey you guys are not living Christian life and they went out and publicly apologize and they were like hey warrior rain circles. We're doing this tour. Sure we were not living in Christian life and we want to Polish that now whether that was sincere or not but that's an example of like. Hey they were able to stop it. They will keep doing Their Music Zik and not getting burned out and not get to the point where they felt like Oh. This is a farce because someone was able to step up so I think there's a lot of advantages to to having that level. I mean again you know I don. I can't use personal examples because I don't don't WANNA put people on blast but I mean I can you and I have how many mutual you know X.. Pastors that we know of that had people confronted them. Who knew about the situation and you know what I mean like now? It's it's just become a whole thing you know we. There was a situation I think a couple of months ago that you and I were talking about because and just it came from it. Came from it came from a place where nobody was willing to confront this person especially the people closest to them. I mean I can't even other another one a few months ago and I'm being intentionally vague but it's like there were like two or three. I think that popped up like in the same area in the same time because people weren't able to confront someone and say you are doing things that are not okay. And and I think having healthy talking thing about healthy conflict-resolution Talking about obviously the logistics of Matthew Eighteen. You know we're not knocking being matthew eighteen. We think that's a good model. I think that's a good model. And we'll speak for you becker but I think there has to be some logistics to it and I think that you can even take that model and apply in a way that is is unhealthy. And so you have to be able to train people on how to do this Or get professional help so I here's some to me. I just wanted to some ways that I thought were healthy for Conflict Resolution Becker thrown any that. You want Or and trust me or whatever so A.

Matthew Eighteen Becker James McDonald Mark Driscoll
Building Great Teams and Obsessing Over the Customer Experience with Scott Becker, Founder and Publisher at Becker's Healthcare

Outcomes Rocket

09:04 min | 5 months ago

Building Great Teams and Obsessing Over the Customer Experience with Scott Becker, Founder and Publisher at Becker's Healthcare

"I have the privilege of hosting Scott Becker for the second time I had him on the podcast about three years ago we. We talked a lot about leadership and a lot of the trends in healthcare. Lots has changed in the last three years so excited to have Scott back on in in. What's close to five hundred episode So we've had many conversations if you don't remember Scott is the partner at McGuire Woods Alpi and also publisher at Bekker's healthcare Scott previously served on the McGuire Woods Boorda partners and served for nearly fifteen years as chairman airman of the national healthcare the apartment. He really the the firm has one of the best regarded healthcare practices in the world and Scott got has played a major role there. He's also the founder and publisher of bekker's healthcare and Becker's hospital review and it's related events and publications he remains remains. The publisher and chief content officer of Bekker's healthcare Yasser produces the BEKKER's C. Suite report and related media which is all focused done business outside of healthcare a graduate of Harvard law school and also Author of four books in a CPA. I don't know how he does it all but he does it. He's one of the best thought leaders in healthcare in my opinion and Excited to join him in a conversation once again. So take a listen to this. Awesome interview. you're gonNA enjoy the thoughts that that he has to share and the fun that we have during our conversation and with that introduction. I WanNa give you who a warm welcome Scott. Thanks so much for joining me again. Well thank you so much for having me always a pleasure to visit with you. Thank you sir. So Scott. You're doing on. I really cool things and and before we get into the meat and bones of today's interview is I do WanNa Park at the work you've been doing with your podcast uncast. Can you share a little bit more about it and why you guys started. There was sure so the core that we do. At bekker's healthcare has two parts of it. Our digital media efforts in our big conferences and events around three or four core core sectors and healthcare hospital systems health. It surgeries others is by so to get your of course podcasts. The podcasts are sort of a fascinating to me. It on. They're more sort of a as you know a magnificent way to just visit with interesting people people in a format you might not otherwise get to visit with them in and so yes people listen to them but the great pleasure for me is getting talk up to a whole range of leaders and people in all aspects of life. I mean yesterday at a podcast with a woman physician who's Muslim background. Speaking about being a Muslim docker America two weeks ago I spoke with Jean Woods. The CEO of Atrium health also former chair of the HA and one of the great growing systems. Those are the country. Here's get a chance to visit with magnificent group at different people and twelve chance to visit with interesting people. I tend to enjoy people. So that's that's what I love most about the podcasting and then people listening to them. It's more of a kind activity tool and a way to visit with people and if people visit in the conversations or anything else I think it's great and you're so right about that right. I mean the the ability to connect with others. That are doing great things a while. Back AGO folks ahead Scott on the podcast. He was At the very beginning actually and for those that have been listening for quite some time. You know that Scott was is one of the key people that inspired me to do my podcast so awesome to see him doing his his podcast. Now it is a great way to visit with others. And if you haven't but listen to that first episode with Scott It's episode number five. You GotTa Outcomes Rocket Dot Health type and Scott Becker. You'll you'll see where we focused on being patient centric and building outstanding teams which is something that Scott does so well and and and Scott. What's inspiring your work today? I I would say really two things inspire what I see. One is with all the talk about healthcare which you are seeing is tremendous advances in some cure for certain diseases. So oncology sort of almost didn't make that much progress for a long time in certain kinds of oncology and now making crazy progress so that inspires me just watching those things inspires me. I don't have anything to do with it. But they inspire me and then the other thing that spires ars me just you know working with magnificent people in visiting with people and hearing their stories and seeing what they're doing it so those are the two things that sort of excite me the great advances out there all all the negative talk in to just talking to people Scott and I've been to to your meetings and there are a lot of. I always connect with so many great people people to your point. You know the speakers and the keynotes are always super entertaining. What would you say makes what Bekker's offers different than what's out there? We're trying to is be queer concise fast moving and try and be very clear about our goal to teach people and entertain and the core of what we do is building everything we do around the core audience the core participants in the sector. So if you're looking at are hostile meetings it's really built around the jets built around three hundred great hostile leaders. It's not built around us. It's built around the core audience. The cord leadership in our we were in four different areas health. It also some surgery centers in spine but dissimilar a similar rasping everything. We're really built around the audience. Not around us and we try and teach entertain in clear concise simple content. And we've got a great team that implemented we've got great editorial team a Great Jenner team great leadership and Business Valentin which you can't do anything without those so it's it's a mix of things that we try and do to make work well and and it's a constantly changing environment but we've got a great team and we try and save very close to the audience really counts. That really. Is the driver behind everything we do. Love it serving bring. Your audience is super important. And it's hard to do in easy to be distracted. Can you share what you do to stay hyper focused on your audience against well. It is a is a great question. We have very very clear goals and directives on how we try and build everything that we do. And how now it's built to be audience centric versus vendor centric. And they're two very different things and we focus. I making sure our team and our audience dance is well taken care of we those things then things seem to work out well and it just a constant clarity of focus on what really counts. And we've got you know we've a few constituents. We have to take care of the audience. First and foremost doing short commercial interest. It makes sense for them and obviously our speakers speakers in our team are the other parts of that sort of stool love it. How about on the law side of things? You're still a practicing partner at at McGuire. Woods anything that you WANNA share to the listeners. That that are thinking about their their Legal Affairs and the things that they do there air. Anyone WANNA share. Yeah no it's. It's a great question so I've struggled to forever in one of them really out of the other. All my work has been in healthcare for thirty years. Now it's started as a law career and then built this media business almost by accident but grew into serious company money due to great leadership of our team. There are editorial team are Jonah deem our our business team just call and everybody else the On the law side ride the biggest congressman I've had is pretty similar built in its practice but to do that and build a practice in healthcare and then insert your center selfless equity. I was able to early on start to build great teams and everything that one dozen life. Today it requires great teams so the thing most of proud of him most excited about at the law firm is a team I built in the number of people there that have become partner in the firm that were under my mentorship. It's our ship is a whole cadre of people that really were part of my team originally and now grown to be leaders in the firm partners in the firm and one of which is now the cheer of our national healthcare practice but just a great group of people from you know give shots to all them you know people like Melissa. Holly Barks Howen Gretchen amber in more and more and And and others that really came up under in with me and Jeff cockrel perspective. Some practice that came along with me now of largely built greater backs may but was just a magnificent experience.

Scott Scott It Scott Becker Partner Bekker Jean Woods Mcguire Woods Alpi Mcguire Woods Boorda Wanna Park Harvard Law School Publisher Jonah Chairman Founder CEO Atrium Health
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

04:24 min | 5 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Had been mistakenly pronouncing for his entire life Ah Yeah I agree with that is like like it's one hundred percent agree with that. Yeah and I think instead of idea of so sometimes people apologize to either get closure or to like make make right feelings like. I don't like this awkwardness. So I'm going to do this thing to to make things not awkward anymore and it's like no that's not it and I don't think are malicious. I think some people do inappropriate apologies. Oh Jeez for reasons. That aren't malicious just. Don't understand what the purpose of an apologies for Other people do it you know because they on closure they feel guilty like oh man. I don't like this guilty thing so it it's about it becomes solely about them and their feelings and it's not about the other person and I. I really want to be clear here to that in apology. And and I think this was intentional whether we realize it in the moment or not but our definitions of apology excluded. The forgiveness side of it like policy is not based on or should not be nice expectation. Tation an expectation of forgiveness. Yeah an apology is done because you did something wrong and now you're you're making you're attempting to make things right. But in of forgiveness. Business is an entirely separate side of this coin. That is the responsibility of then the other party. But it is not something but it's not what you you can't control that so honestly and honestly there are times when an apology. You have to you know so you can apologize for something that you're not even Needing forgiveness for it's simply a you know what my actions caused her. Yup and I you know that's what I'm apologizing for him. Sorry that this hurts you. Even though I truly did not hurt you know I it. There was no reason for you to need to forgive me But I was a part of this. You know and I'm sorry for that we've been like you know if I were to apologize for my ancestors ancestors you know. I don't need forgiveness Ryan sisters but I do need to apologize for for their bad actions sometimes And in that way you know I am truly so you know. I have a family where well I won't get into necessarily that much. But you know they they might own slaves back in the day and it's like man you know that I I truly am sorry about that because it's terrible it's horrible. It's something that never should have happened. I did not do anything and so it becomes difficult because there are times when you don't even need you to be forgiven but you might still need to apologize and that that is where you need to understand. It truly is not about. It's not about getting something out of it and people who make an appropriate apology. They don't understand that they always are trying to get something out of it. Yup absolutely and to be fair. There are natural byproducts that you do get out of apologizing right like it's not this. This isn't like a a zero benefit game or a lose lose for you but it's understanding that you no longer like you don't in in order to in order to keep up with our nerdy sells like you no longer have the high ground here. You Talk You you don't get to you don't get to dictate the terms anymore out. Underestimate my power packer. You were the Chosen One Don't do it Dan again. So her brother to me Becker. If you're not with me you're my enemy the no no but you don't have you don't dictate the terms anymore and whether you did before you certainly don't now and so I think it is really important to to make that distinction action but I WanNa talk about I do want I do want to talk about the some of the the absurd reasons that we actually do make an appropriate appropriate apologies. And I think over those. Yeah so I think that's good. I think one of the first ones is is using them as an attempt for quick closure closure Or just as a way to make myself feel better because I feel bad that I hurt you instead of you. Know what the definition finish.

Becker Ryan Dan
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

07:13 min | 5 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"At some point preached a sermon or made a reference about the about the I generation the iphone on the ipod. The I culture in the I you know everything's about me and then I realized that this isn't really a modern thing. No this really is part of the human condition that we do values self preservation and value me above every about above. Everything else like that. Tends tends to be our default setting. I guess we'd love to take the sins of our own generation and then applied to like the principles of what we did in our generation than apply to the new particulars of the following generation. Like as a millennial. I'll be like these stupid talks like we didn't do vines. You know like all all these jealousies and they're dumb tic tacs it's like dude. We had the exact same thing like we. Can you know you can do that within the I'm sure later on when we have you know completely digital phones phones that you just you stick something in your I get a chip implanted in your brain and you tap your forehead and you get a phone We're going to be complaining about this generation like I. I had actually tax with my hands back in the day. You know and we're going to be saying the same things That was specific. That was suspiciously sleaze specific. All of it. I can't tell if you're quoting revelation. I've seen a lot of sci-fi in my teacher I'm very interested. In how many Seifi movies and episodes books I have read in my lifetime. I would. I am thirty anyway but no I think I think that that that idea or that default mode is one of those is is one of the main reasons that we have We've this is what I do. Believe we've built it. Which is we've built a culture that only values apologies in so much as they get me out of my negative feelings faster or they get me out of a negative situation fascination yeah All apologized to a cop. If it means I won't get a ticket all apologize to my significant other and and they'll forgive me really quick and we'll be done right I don't believe I've done anything wrong but I'll apologize anyways just to keep the you know just a just a just to Get past this and it's it is an in some cases. I do think that they're born out of a desire to return to the way things were before but ultimately I do see them like a motivation to make inappropriate apologies specifically typically comes from this selfish desire to get out scot-free or to get out as easy easiest possible right yeah. It's deflection of blame by admitting admitting to some of the guilt. It's a deflection of the blame and a lot of a Lotta in in the you'll often hear from these insincere apologies in these inappropriate apologies reflection of blame Because that's the ultimate purpose of it. It's not to acknowledge or own. The the the blame. It's it's a desire to deflect it and Oh and you know I'll keep saying I'll go through that debris but it's like I I really don't want to get ahead. I WANNA start from baseline. So let's let's talk about this real quick. What would you consider appeared to be an apology? Stores Standard so standard anymore. Let's all right set. The baseline would consider an apology to be Becker. I think I think an apology is a specific thicke knowledge of wrongdoing. On the part of the you know apologizing party and a you know in in an effort to restore a what was broken or right. What was wrong that is so if it was you know? Broken Trust or if I can see that So I don't don't want to say you know they. They're they're usually our goals. In addition to that but ultimately I think at the end of the day you're either trying to write what was wrong. And that is the justice part of of it or you are trying to restore. What was you know what you broke and that is I think those are the two core things that I would say A? Are you know a key components of of an apology of an actual apology. But I don't know what were you differ on that I I mean I would only add that. It's It's that same thing in indulgent of guilt and inexpressible of the desire to never do that again. Oh Yes essentially to me like an apology is if I could go back and not do this. I would never do this therefore I will never do this again. Yep that to me is it true apology On Yeah I can get to me I would just I would just tack that on as as the second part of the apology like the first part is that acknowledgement. Like something has happened. This is my fault And then and then I don't want you know how can we was in the future. I will avoid this in the future. You know this is not going to happen again because if I could go back I would not do this thing Well and and it's acknowledging like not just that I did something wrong but that That what is causing hayme that something happen Suggested I did wrong. Forgive me I did wrong and it hurt you you and that's not okay either. There's two there's two wrongs right wouldn't even. Yeah like I wouldn't even say wrong. I would just say I did this. Like my sins or in actions caused this. Yeah I would agree with that so that that I think is a is a is a decent baseline and the hard thing with defining something like this is it covers over such a wide variety wide wide range of yeah of apologies are of situations to apologize for. And so so you know you've got to find out like are we. What are we apologizing for? I see you know I took a dollar from your purse or I cheated on you my my spouse of thirty years like I. Don't you know like there's there is a very big difference between those two things and the but I think the core of the apology policy is still the same. It's an acknowledgment of an inappropriate action or inaction taken and a desire to Or an expressed desire to in acknowledgment management of what was wrong or what. The person did wrong and an expressed desire to heal what was broken to fix. What was fixed what they broke so oh yeah so the so the flip side would be that an insincere inappropriate apologize would be one? That's more interested in something other than healing that broken relationship and Ryan the wrong. Yep that's that's exactly what does is. Yeah the flip side is is true if one insiders choosing the flip side is also gallery in the other way we going back to high school. Geometry we're talking about the Kerala. Now the chorale are corollary. Harry is what I've heard other people say but I'm pretty sure it's Kerala. Ry You know it truly outing. It was the word that Steve always messed up arth real it tru truly is as an earth real experience. Ethereal is the word that we found out our friends Steve who.

Kerala Steve Seifi Becker Ryan Harry
Elon Musk launches Tesla SUV program in China

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Elon Musk launches Tesla SUV program in China

"News textbooks starts us off with Tesla tests were delivered its first Chinese made model threes to consumers in China today three months after the opening of its factory in Shanghai the lan must was on site for the festivities and announced the launch of Tesla's model white programming trying to say in the crossover ultimately could prove to be more popular than all other Tesla cars combined musk also said test level open in engineering center in China where it will design a future car for the global market test was stock continues to hit new records and with its market cap now standing at around eighty three billion dollars Wall Street journal reporter Nate Becker pointed out that Tesla he's the most valuable auto maker ever topping Ford's high water mark in nineteen ninety

China Shanghai Tesla Nate Becker Ford Reporter
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

01:34 min | 6 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"A lot of us aren't used to like strong criticism or harsh rebuke or even difficult conversations with people? Because we're so used to like. I got good grades and I went to college. My teachers guest me up and all that stuff so like not getting employed right away in the seventh avenue. This church was pretty pretty. What was what was like the one of the first time where things didn't play out the way I wanted it? I've had an. I've had few experiences in my life. Where things that didn't play out the way I wanted it so even imagine that there's probably a lot of personal ego? That was at the root of yeah of why I had such a difficult time after graduation so once I sort it all that ego stuff out I was able to take a step back and realize that was in a tremendously blessed opportunity and they had no reason for me to complain. A Wonderful Church community that I'm a part of a lot out of amazing friends like Ryan Becker among is a loser so like I have a wife. I've I am stable. I don't have a lot of a student. Loan debt like there's so much blessing in my life that the particular details of the way that my money is coming to. My pocket doesn't really he matter anymore because I've recognized that yes I am called to Minister But that doesn't always have to look like lake. I've been told that should look like and that. That's okay and again nothing. Mind blowing there. That's not a revolutionary condo wanting to state the fact is of it and it's a whole nother thing to internalize the the the reality of it. Well I think too. There's.

Ryan Becker
Truth vs. Lies: Anime

Pants On Fire

07:48 min | 6 months ago

Truth vs. Lies: Anime

"Every week we bring onto grownups one. I think you're GonNa know where this is going. An expert the other also an expert. Uh No a liar. Yes and it's the job of a human child to help us figure out who who'd get spot a liar better than a kid. What are we about about today? Deborah we are lying about. Hannah may a style of Japanese animation that is known for colorful graphics and action packed stories that often take place in the future or fantasy World Lisa. Do you know anything about anime. Well it just so happens that there is an anime character modeled after me. Who is that so it was Mecca Music Moto? He was a giant sound machine in the future. Wow more concern observe somewhere with that. We could see that enemy No unfortunately he didn't reduce go over very well People wanted to see action but Mecca music. Modo was all music all the time you know. How do I do and Show was cancelled after the pilot. I'm sorry to hear that. But it's a thing we appreciate sound machines here. And now and we'd love to hear the sound of you telling us about our contestant that's it way better than anime thank you sure are human child. Contestant is an eleven year old from Waterloo Ontario Canada who loves surf and as a five pound dog named Lola. Back Up. Bafana's Hi Becca. Welcome to pants on fire. Take you came all the way from Canada. That's amazing. Have you been here before. No this is my first time. Oh so nice. I hope you have a great time. Are you planning on doing anything anything fun while you're in town. I think we're going to go to Central Park Nice. That sounds like fun. I'd love to go deborah. Take me I will take you. If you'd like to go anytime any time. You said the dogs are Peon me. Not say that but it's probably true that would probably happen and also tell me you own a small business. Is that correct. You're an entrepreneur. Uh what kind of business do you have a dog Englishness. I have a full total of one client five pound dog now. It's my mom's friend dog know her mom's friends dog. Oh that makes sense. Yes and what is the name of Your Business and that does barking mad dog walking walking services. I loved that. Did you come up with that yourself. Yeah that is fantastic. Will Best of luck but we also want to know more about you back up but we're going to do quit while we play our game to choosing ally so you are going to tell us three facts about yourself. Two of those facts will be true. One we'll be ally Lisa and anybody. You're listening to the PODCAST. We'll try to figure out which one is ally. Okay Becca. Tell us your three facts. Okay I've been to La. I broke my wrist on the first week of school. I Love Sharks and WanNa swim with them. One day. Okay I think the line is breaking the ricin and because if she wants to swim with sharks she definitely wouldn't want to swim with that's true. So yeah that's why the broken wrist you think is the lie all right back coat which one of those things is to lie. I have been to La. I've never gone tally. You've got it wrong would you like to go to La one day. Hopefully we'll maybe didn't come on the show me we could get you the LA. Jeez oh no. Don't listen to him okay. Our first expert is Paul Wolcott. Paul can you please introduce yourself tobacco as High Becker. My name is Paul Wall. Glad I'm a freelance Manga artist working on three different titles right now. So I'm very busy. Okay Hey and our next expert is Carrie Mallon Carey. Can you please introduce yourself tobacco. Hi Becca I'm Carrie Mallon and I'm a coma creator. That means that I create anime aimed at young audiences like kids under the age of ten. I most famous for my character tools pup chime make youtube luke videos about Berry interesting Nazi shuts they have some food on a Hibachi or something Lisa I do and it's GonNa be delicious but also yes S. eight times that is that's right. That's when we put our experts on the hot seat while they answered questions Lisa. Who should we put on the hot seat? I I'm going to go with Kerry. Because she said she does stuff on Youtube and maybe if I'm nicer she'll introduce me to those people who do the youtube videos where they open up. All these videos may open up bags and you're like what's it going to be in that egg and then you get inside and it's a toy and you're like Oh my God. I love that tour. That sounds very cool. Can't wait to see that carry you GonNa Hook me up I'll I'll find out if I know anyone in the world very good. Okay Beck. I do have a question for Kerry A. K.. What exactly do you do What I do like on a regular day to day basis ACIS is computer animation of characters that I've created? I was really inspired when I was a kid by. Hello Kitty and so Tuttosport my character. There is a super cute French bulldog who has all these adventures and he's always on his way out the door and that's where he got the name tools So I create those on my computer using to Zucca programming and then I upload them onto the Internet where they've gotten a quite a following. If I do say so myself you should put them inside of an egg. Maybe next time the reason why I was inspired to work in the first place was that I feel like kids. Kids love it. Adults love it. Even older people love it like. I don't know if you know this. But in Japan there's a whole version of an ray called the game okay which is aimed at older audiences and it's specifically about older characters like eighty and older telling stories about their grandchildren's success? Okay cool and call. What do you do exactly? Yes I'm illustrator. which the illustrates Manga Stories? Now do the pencilling inking and coloring. I have a Manga coming out next year called Sheesh Bro which is really female female empowering we see a lot of male male female roles and not a lot of female roles. I've really wanted to switch up the game a little bit. Well thank you if I was GONNA be What you do carry? What tips would you give me? I would say the first thing to do is come up with something that you find cute because If you find a cute than likely a whole bunch of other people well There's another character in my episodes. That's Larry the typewriter so sometimes like inanimate objects can be cute. So look around your world Decide what if you added is to it would become a character and then start doodling. Becca do you not typewriter is this is something from ancient time. Yeah just check it and by the way machines are not just cute. Were ruggedly handsome as well. Yes fair point.

LA Lisa Becca Deborah Youtube Kerry A. K Hannah Central Park Carrie Mallon Carey Canada Paul Wall Modo Waterloo Ontario Canada Sheesh Bro Bafana Wanna Paul Wolcott Beck Japan
Speaker Pelosi will not name impeachment managers

Jay Talking

00:35 sec | 7 months ago

Speaker Pelosi will not name impeachment managers

"The vote house speaker Nancy Pelosi said that she would not take the next step of naming impeachment managers the house members who would essentially trying to houses impeachment case in the Senate until after she learns what the Senate process for a trial is going to be to be official Becker Kaplan at the capitol the president was in Michigan as he was being impeached correspondent we Georgia and president trump pointed to carefully choreographed this store appearance he showed up to the stage over one hour late came out and within a couple minutes started attacking Democrats in general and the Michigan Congress woman in her late husband among many

Nancy Pelosi Senate Becker Kaplan President Trump Michigan Official Georgia Michigan Congress One Hour
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

11:29 min | 7 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"That you want to help someone. I think the other ethical center that you want to look at is you want to really great article about you know the unintentional the unintentional harm done to people who try to help but ended up causing more issues in poverty so that people bring this up and I think it's a valid question that hey if someone's irresponsible finances giving more finances just means they're going to be more irresponsible with him And so that's true you don't want to make you don't you don't want to. How do I say this like sink money into a system? That's designed to fail. So sometimes you have to. You have to Train someone one you know. Who's a perpetual you know? I have friends that are just there perpetually in debt. It's just like well you know. That's just who they are at this point you know until they make contentious in their life their that's going to happen But then I also know there are some people who truly need a leg up like they get so behind that they're living responsible lives financially you know or or they never had the training to learn how to be responsible CEPAL. I'm going to try and find it. If there's a link in the show notes then it means I found it if not it means I haven't One of those things but I'm pretty sure I've read articles that basically we said that like I think it's fifty percent or some absurdly high number like that of Americans are one bad day away from being completely homeless like or one bad week or if I got fired tomorrow I'd be screwed like like you know what I mean like laws dog tomorrow. I I'm definitely screwed. There's no then that's what it means like in other words you don't have `sugar out on the corner we have enough yeah right. We don't have enough money savings and we don't have enough whatever in order to in order to actually live. Ah to live with or to support ourselves between jobs or whatever the bad day is you know incorporates dashboards to have three three months unsworth of now. Is that the number that is six to six to eight months or something like that more realistic. Yeah for sure And I'm not there the I'm I'm getting there in the worst possible way possible. But I'm not there but this is look I think I think the other thing too is i. I want to be careful in complaining because really realistically are you know the the way that we build the way that we've established tablist our churches in the way that Western lately financial. I mean not even I mean just purpose. We built worship we. We built places of worship. That's true he built places of Build. Yeah we did not build a lot of churches with community showers and funks and whatever ever we built churches where we are supposed to meet throughout the week and worship and study the Bible damned hangout synagogues. Yeah that's what we built so I don't WanNA I. I'm not trying to to you know. I want to acknowledge what is and we've done a good job of building that my question is is that really like all we want to be and Kim realistically we be anything more or do anything more with those resources because I agree with you when you said earlier. I don't think we should just caning free money. That's not we're not built that way and that's and that's the thing that I struggle with. You know we had. I've I've been on so many boards where it's like. There's a family that's just under water you know. And they're are not they're good they're working. They're trying they're doing the best they need help. And you know as a church. We had some funds for it but we weren't designed that way. I'm the tide goes out you know. We're supporting the World Church and all of the churches in our conference degree every and I think this affects affects smaller churches more than bitches but bigger churches to like the reality is when tie goes one hundred percent of Thai is remitted up the chain distributed out and you the only keep what's local. It means that it requires more than ten percent from your church members to actually have any Any local funds to do anything with your lights on. That's that's printing anything. That's I mean that's repeal of the building on top of mission and goals right right and now it's it's it's an issue Community MM unity churches that have their ties stain house. Regardless of the theology behind it they're just logistically and pragmatically able to do more in their community. I mean I look at. I look at Calvary Chapel which. I don't know if they still do this. But several years ago I was out with a mutual friend of ours and we were eating at olive garden in our waiter is a member or was attending a Calvary Chapel Chattanooga and he was talking about. How like the Calvary Chapel owns a apartment complex like behind the property or or some like and they use the they utilize it as a halfway house. Almost like someone comes in with with addiction or coming out of jail or whatever they let them stay there for six months or up to a ear with very strict rules as they basically build up a plan to leave and re in in they use that time to rebuild their lives. Isn't that what two French Chan's Church did. I'm not sure one. I'd say it was cornerstone. It was James. Actual Churches they by According to the big book of Now You know I I I remember reading somewhere. That is churched. Sold off their building building and and Bought a apartment complex to provide low income. Housing Yeah so yeah I mean you know. It's one of those things that you can do because you have the funds day. I mean there's a lot of issues that come with that a lot of times Yeah I I I don't think there's there's I would. I would unfortunately say there's a lot more not a lot more but there tends tends to be more Righteous Gemstone perception of. That's it's an. Hbo Show about Schwager Show About Church. The tends to be more of that perception with with churches that keep their tithe but most I most. Churches aren't huge like that. You know that I'm megachurches like that. Most churches that can do a lot unfortunately tend to be the you know huge you know campuses and massive things and they decide where the money that they don't keep exactly and they can really poor back into the community whether or what they do as a whole and once again we're not we're not saying the grass is greener there aren't they can. They're designed to be able to do that versus with an adventist church. Yeah I I mean it's worldwide a lot of money. A lot of money goes to help each other worldwide and that's awesome and it's great and it's not. I'm not saying that it's bad. I'm just saying we are designed to be differently so we can't do some other. Churches are able to do but that being said okay so maybe we can't build a you know a scarf. Komo hold a school by our own Partner with churches in the area Advanced Churches in the area. You know most most advocate schools have a district district of ten twelve churches. And that's you know it's it's sometimes can be a problem you know with school boards but you know what. Hey you're reaching more kids in an area a lot of a lot of tragedies half system. I think you visited the school. Structure is strange. But yes I you can partner with adventist schools and do a lot more and do a lot of reach or get and and and you know you chin Over versus having one church afford to keep a school running really well You know there are things that you can do you. There are things that you can do as avance church even with finances And that's what I'm saying is like hey let's to our our list. Let's try to it'd be intentional about making Making the community needs the issue that we're looking at you know there's a church. I won't say which city in a city that I have lived in. I will say that much that is technically named after are large city in the area but is not actually in that city and it just makes no sense to me. it's a church that doesn't minister to the community IT Ministers to a vastly different. The faces in the church are vastly different from the faces walking by and driving by And it just doesn't make any sense to me when you're like okay but wh why why. Why does your church look different than the people in the neighborhood that it is or the neighborhoods that it reaches You know we plant churches sometimes incorrectly directly. I would say we plant where they're already adventist people rather than saying. Hey here's a place that you know. Let's we we already have a family in this area. Let's have them start a small group Rather than saying. Hey let's move a bunch of people you know to this spot by because we have five address families well and like started small group you know stars smoke group in a neighborhood. How many how many of you neighbours you know? Know that you're an adventist send you've met them and this. This was directed at me but you know how many people have you talked to on a daily basis that you interact with a you can realize you you can have a ministry for them. Well I WANNA WANNA jump in because I think the other the other half of this is I don't think either of us are necessarily advocating to say that the church has to become the expert in fixing all these social insisting like well. We're not going to be able to know. But here's here's the other half of it though. There are nonprofits charities and in organizations that have dedicated themselves to these things and I think one of the I I think that most church mission statements are slightly disingenuous. Because they're all like you know we wanna you WanNa love people into you know into the Kingdom of God and we want to do these things and this is our mission and our vision but really what your mission is. You're going to is that you WanNa meet twice a week once or twice a week in this building and you want to invite that other people too if we're being like that's the mission that you're accomplishing is you're getting Byu. You want more people in your pews and so that you can get more people in your views and the.

Calvary Chapel Partner area Advanced Churches Schwager Show About Church Calvary Chapel Chattanooga World Church Hbo Kim James
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

11:21 min | 7 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"From the mess that their life is in and they hear you need to start living better instead of a risen? Savior that is is here to rescue you from from the the the mess and community that can that can actually really helped you walk you through it that will walk you through it and And not just give you literature and say goodbye And it's not deny literature. I'm just saying like if that's all you do but that's not gonNA. It's not enough not enough. I've always said that literature ministries are great but it opens doors. That's the purpose of it. If no wins walking through you know what I mean. No one's walking through those doors or following up. Then it's we're just wasting stuff and I think that's the the issue that I have with a lot of times. I'm just a lot of the stuff we do. A lot of the stuff we do ministry In the church as a whole were not even an address. The problems that are there like we're we're we're fixing problems that people don't have I mean they go back to the comment that Markdavis made I guess since we added him on the On the show mark talking about like you know I feel like we're talking about things and bring things you know. No one in my generation's excited about radio is true. I mean radio super super helpful across the world because there are a lot of places that that's still the main you know media tool. But you know virtue podcasts are almost out. You know. Got A resurgence. I was talking talking about this the other week I did. A you know. A was talking to a bunch of friends in Phoenix and the golden age of starting new podcast and being rich off of it as an artist say Dun. We're not like that time's kind of passed But it's still a media that people use and I think people don't realize like in how put radio on the internet or or you know some of this stuff. It's like that time has passed. We're moving to the next big thing. And so with that. I want to announce sat right. Now we'll be starting a tick tock ministry that's right We did it but I think that's the big issue as you are. You know we're we're Hash. Why one of the reasons why I think forty percent of the people that come into our church are leaving adding and one of the big reasons why eighty percent of you know the last two generations have been leaving and the and the current young generation is is? Because we're we're fixing problems that don't exist you know. Well we're we're we're trying to preach preach solutions of problems that like no one is really having. Yeah I mean and it's not something that the message is bad odd or even theologically wrong. It's just not applicable. It's not relevant. Eventually that'll come down the line but you know now it's it's just not something that were not couching it in a way that makes a solution and and I think you know it's interesting so we're talking about you know financially is kind of where we're going with this And so so this is more than just about finances but just finances for this episode. But that's kind of like okay. So okay so Becker would you say on at an average shirt an average symptoms church. Would you say the main ministries and focuses are at. Where would you say that I mean definitely worship. The Worship Service I would argue in a typical adventist. Church you've got men's women's men and women's ministries you've got youth ministry if it exists and Sabbath School. I would argue that. Those are your kind of main functioning. Ones As far as like actual ministries concerned Depending on what your resources have you know you might have evangelism. You might have You know you might have a community service. Gorkhas room is what they usually call them where you have like a mini pantry or something like that. But I'm nothing Those aren't does those tend to be like we do them if it comes up but there's no intentional stuff to really grow it. It's just like we're going to do a canned food drive around Christmas or Thanksgiving and and you know we'll if we hear of a need we'll give we'll give a family a box but there's not really it's about it the okay and I'm talking about typical pickle smaller if you're in a bigger church which I would say two hundred or more I'd even I'd go as low as fifty one hundred but let's just say fifty or more for attending. Then you're you're you're you're not the church I'm talking about though it still may be true for you But those those tend to be the ones that I see the most happening happening And there are GONNA be wrong. There are churches that do some things and even in our even our addition episode. I shared one of my churches. That had done something. Amazing for are had really rallied around to someone and walked through their addiction recovery with them. But what I think is I would. I would argue. That are preaching. Teaching doesn't necessarily lend itself and a lot of our teachings themselves whether it's through the Sabbath School quarterly or so you know in you know Sunday Sunday. I school or anything like that. There's not a lot that seems to really be taught about How to actually and and as part of the church body people in situations like this yes? We are good at answering questions. Don't get me wrong and there and the other thing is I don't want to downplay the significance that that many people have had coming in the doors who have gotten answers to the questions. They've really been asking and and and they've been having problems with the Bible because of these questions and and that's really been stopping them and they come in and they hear this word and and it's been amazing life changing for them like. I'm not saying that our message is completely worthless. I'm just saying that the vast majority of what we do Seems to just kind of hope that none of this ever comes up and when it does come up we just kind of we kind of keep going. You know we just kind of keep doing are things. I'm a church members I I watched this happen. Where a church member basically became came in invalid And was was at home hadn't been to church in years and no one really talked to them and no one really visited them maybe on occasion and and we just kind of the Church's K- kind of kept going you just gotTa keep preaching whatever you're preaching aging and you're just gonNA keep going. Maybe someone goes and takes communion to them. When when we do communion but like you're I mean there's no we just kind of we just kind of pretend like that thing that none of us really know exactly how to fix goes away or is in there and we just kind of continue life as normal and I get that not? Everyone can and feel as one hundred percent can compassionate for forever but I fully understand fully understand Dan that sometimes. We can't feel all the time but it just seems irresponsible to pretend like those problems aren't really there. No I completely understand I've seen that just I don't WanNa say way too often but it happens a lot. I mean it happens. A lot and people slipped through the cracks or not intentional ministry. But I think it's it's that kind of thing where I you know. I've always always felt that churches is something we do. It's a people movement and the problem is we've come to think of it as an organization we've come to think of it as a place as a ritual as event event. Yeah Yeah and I said this time and I get that a ton of young adults and just people have complained about church that way forever but the problem is we've complained about it and it's all the same thing so there's a lot to sing. Nothing has happened troop group but I think for a lot of churches. I you know they don't know another way or there. There's no training to be able to do it. They just like well. This is what we do. Oh you know churches and something you do which is something you are and you know I I mean I've said before you know my vision for for a church is where you have something something. Not everyone shows up to every single thing but you have a church function every single every single night of the week. Yeah every single night of the week. There's something so that if someone is new they. Have you know a way to connect with their church family every single day at every day of their of their week can involve God and Church and Family 'cause I mean life is hard and and we need to be able to do it together other and especially think about people who don't have families you know. I think a Lotta Times. Our church is also focused on the adventist model of with two point. Five key like you went to an address school you so you had church. You know all five days a week or all seven days a week You were involved in Pathfinder's you Went to an adventist college. You you married there you came back you. You can't do a place with adventists young people and you start. A family and church is kind of geared for that but if someone doesn't match that model You can feel extremely isolated yet. We don't even isolated. We don't know what to do. You know someone's in their forties and not married. I mean it's like you know Y- know especially for younger. I think older older adults have a little bit more. Ministries that are geared towards Samuel men men's ministry and things like that but even then it's like you know our elderly. You know a lot of times. We don't have elderly ministries a lot of times. You don't have young parents ministry song as we. You Know Church only works for certain people well and and I would say to like. I'm also. We're not trying to guilt trip like if your if your church is doing what it can. Then it's doing what it can but but to me. I think the other thing is don't worry so much about about quality. Just go just start like intentional about it. As long as you're intentional about it try which means which let me fail. Let's let's let's be. Let's be clear because when you're talking about things like finances or otherwise like there's legal issues there too when we say intentional and do research meet with p Fray to reach tried to reach is the needs of your community in a in a feasible way. Use Conrad Sat and do the research you need to do and partner. With whom ever you need a partner but try and do something the s I would agree with that. I think. Yeah No. Yeah if your church like with addiction even if your church doesn't have an addiction. Ministry for instance like you right. You found You know you found a place that could do it and you know you walked with that individual until they were able to find success so I mean that's the type the.

Sabbath School partner Markdavis Phoenix Becker p Fray Dun Conrad Dan Pathfinder
Lawrence Weschler: And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?: A Biographical Memoir of Oliver Sacks

Bookworm

14:19 min | 7 months ago

Lawrence Weschler: And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?: A Biographical Memoir of Oliver Sacks

"Today I have a special guest his name. He's been on the show before is Lawrence Weschler. He's writing a book about someone else who's been on the show fight a few times. That's Oliver Sacks. Oliver one of my favorite guests and I had the excitement of learning that he was one of Lawrence. Weschler 's coasts Closest Friends Godfather to Lawrence. Wash lers daughter Sara. Yes yes. Of course you're going to want to read Oliver Sexes owned autobiographical writings. But you will learn something both about friendship and the interaction of two minds that in thirty years I never really parted company. They were talking constantly and at a time when we're forgetting what it's like to have friends that you don't fight with without making up within twenty hours. Think of all the people you'd stop. Stop being able to talk to Gore Vidal or Norman Mailer Susan Santen. And they're they are Lawrence Weschler my guest and end the great neuro physician. What did he call himself? He called himself a clinical oncologists. What did we? We used to go on rounds. Rounds Ed Ed We would be dry in those days. This is back in the early eighties and by the way it's with knowing that the when I I was getting hanging out with him I'm in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred eighty one. He was largely unknown. AWAKENINGS had come out but nobody had read it ten years after it had been published in Nineteen in seventy three. I interviewed the publisher in England. Colin Hay craft the first edition had been fifteen hundred copies and they had not yet sold out. I mean it's it's amazing but anyway the point is we would go on on rounds and he in those days was and pretty much through his life was mainly going institutions and poor houses and so forth you will gospels. They were status poor houses. They were you know places where people are warehouse where he specialized it you know. And and he said that's where where the jewels are. You know you have all the time in the world. Nobody's expecting anything but any case So he would be driving between them and what you know I think of myself as a clinical oncologists apologist you know analogy is the philosophy of being. You know what. Why is there something rather than nothing and so forth? And he said my I am somebody for whom the diagnostic diagnostic question of the kinds of people I see is how are you. How do you be? What is it like to be you and here we are? This is the title of the book. And how are you Dr Sour you doctors and it's an autobiographical memoir memoir and my guests. Lawrence Weschler is a specialist in the creation of what he calls writer writer Louis Nonfiction. Which I think you know we've discussed on the show in the past literary nonfiction what what I call readily nonfiction is non-fiction in which the writing matters you right if the reading matter and you read the writing mattered? That's my definition. You do classes. Yes you teams this and you see I knew Ren Weschler when he was a young man in Los Angeles Los Angeles was home. There were people like Carole Eastman who wrote five easy pieces who called US invaders. Jack Potter's she felt. We were here to to rob the natives of their do I used to see Lawrence Weschler in a bookstore called intellectuals and liars tires wonderful place who was a wonderful wonderful place once upon a time and not very long ago a bookstore was a place ice. Will you hung out. You sat around may be ready chapter of something you were considering buying where you crease the pages in the poetry books will you read it out loud. Everybody so I I met Lawrence Weschler and he'd written terrific things was it mostly for the weekly I would right. I was the only person who was awry. Loud right for both the L. A. Reader and the L. A.. Weekly the Qazir writing was so good and no Alan would turn you down and it was fascinating because he went off to New York not yet thirty years old. I had unwritten. I'd spent three or four years with Robert Irwin. The artist who was who was already then probably one of the top ten artisan America but the one who was least known because he never allowed his work to be photographed. He most of the work didn't exist anymore and and I had an occasion. Why that happened? And then I wrote a book based on the conversations nations and are manuscripts forgetting seeing is forgetting the name of the thing one sees was the title nine thousand nine hundred eighty. I had six or seven Rave Steve Rejections from all the New York publishers. All them saying they wanted my next book. But how could they be expected to publish a book on a California artist. That's that's nineteen eighty But I said at the New Yorker and it was accepted kind of over the transient which was extremely. You know lucky on I mean. I always say that he does that. They get fifty thousand manuscripts year of this type and maybe a hundred of them are worth publishing and they published two of them and going that hundreds of that too was just luck and there was the famous lunch with the top editor. The head of the shocker. Mr Shawn was at the Al Gunk Right Hotel by the way. Says you know it's Apparently I live in California. We're going to hire you but we're very live in California. Can you but I mean where were you born. I said Ben is and California Baby. Where'd you go to high school? I said I'm high and I could. College Judge Santa Cruz either. I just didn't make any sense at all but he kept on drilling until he was able to establish that all of my grandparents were released. Jews which case okay. That was okay. You mention a name name that I haven't seen her thought about in years. Maurice Natan Somehow he was Donald Barthelme. These great world was amazing about him. I used to go to classes and Santa Cruz. He has a phenomenology as a philosophy professor and he looked like Martin buber looked like God basically but that I would go go because it was like sitting in on Donald Martha Stories one after another you. It was just an entertaining. No not when I was taking the cats had just go there and years later when I saw Barthel may I asked him. What does your great influence that? When I was at the New Yorker Enescu was becker? He's I had this professor. At the University of Houston Maury Dayton said and had they abide melted was really. I'm talking to Lawrence Weschler. Who is also known by his friends as Ren Weschler and We're talking about around his book. And how are you Dr Sex. You know we were of the generation. Yes you got. Talk to be close to Robert Irwin and to our mutual friend art spiegelman on I got to be coast to Donald Barthelme. John Barth was the time with wonderful. Nobody had read awakenings as I was graduated. Maurice Natan said I'm graduating seventy four. The book had been published in seventy three mornings and thrust this book into my chest and said read this us and and I get around to reading it right away but when I did read it in seventy nine I sent a letter to Oliver. That's how how we begin the influenza right right. After World War One killed more people than all of World War One it probably affected hundred million but twenty million were killed of those who survived live particularly young people age that we were back in the days of intellectuals and liars five or six years later began suddenly in the middle of their day's Day's coming to stop you know and they were in trammelled in this statue like Situation for thirty years they were just warehoused and then Oliver came upon this population and began to realize that. Some some of these people at this institution. We're we're different than others and had the heroine notion that some of them were that these people were completely alive inside something he knew because he had these incredible experiences and so forth which is a different story but the point is that the rookie writes about their situation about giving the Mel dopey about their coming alive about the horrible tribulations afterwards. His great theme of of Fate and freedom as he used to say when he got his is bound galleys awakening in one thousand nine hundred ninety two. He sent it the first copy of Bengali. To auden and Auden who in those days Osha the days of thank you fog and so forth Is a master of adjectives and auden sends back a letter. Saying I WANNA thank you for your delightful manuscript which is the most amazing thing to say about awakenings. But it's true. There was an invasion long. Before the British invasion of the Beatles was an invasion of the Brits to America and that including W.H. On Thom Gunn and Tom Gun and Oliver Sacks ax here you have this legendarily kind. Man Who wears leather across across America period crosses American motorcycle. lives I up north in the bay area. And then then down here where this neurophysiologist. But let's say more this genius this eccentric this beautiful unaccommodating person who could only be his self. He was very close to his mother. was the first woman she was the first woman. Surgeon in England She she was formidable character and they knew they had a prodigy on by the Orthodox Jews and her husband was also Dr They knew they had a project. Didn't know what to do with him and she would do things like when he was eight years old. She would bring home Stillborn fetuses 'cause she was an OBGYN surgeon For him to dissect because that would probably be interesting for him and when he was twelve she took him along to the autopsy of a twelve year. Old Boy who committed suicide that would probably be interesting. They had a very close relationship of and then when she found out that he was gay she tore into him. She called him an abomination. I wish you had never been born. And went on like that. And that was when he was eighteen when he finishes his Medical School at Oxford he is a bat out of hell. Getting out of England. Finally when he's out of England he is in motorcycles. He is On the fringes of hells angels where. He's known as Dr Squat because he is also the California state heavyweight lifting champion. Yes he used to hang out at muscle beach and must do all the body builders. He'd come to California because of Tom Gun. Actually who was okay with US homoerotic imagery and so forth in the Patriot. Way that he oliver wasn't yet are never would be actually but But in any case for three or four years I I up there then down here in. La He was led this extravagant and especially drug-fuelled life. The reason was able to recognize those guys at the the statues. I choose as being alive with because he'd been there too and in each of the pieces that I've heard of yours. You begin with a strong subject if you are out there wanting to ride writer Lee nonfiction. Don't think you can do it with just anything. And and Oliver Sacks does not come on every day of the week and Lawrence Wessler my guest hand the the great talent of interesting the people who interested him and so all of her sacks by the time they'd spend time together wanted a profile by the young Lawrence Weschler who was this new at the New Yorker The New Yorker. Let me give you some history. Here was famous for hiring people from Harvard. When he asks Excu where you went to school when Mr Shawn asks the it's because he's expecting Harvard to crop up somewhere in the itinerary? What are you doing going coming to school at? UC Santa Cruz And so in a certain way you are as original and strange a presence as sunny about Santa Cruz and my graduating class at Santa Cruz at Calle College to under people in one thousand nine hundred four three of them became New Yorker Writers Bill Finnegan allocation has also. Oh I love Bill Finnegan. We were classmates all the way through.

Lawrence Weschler Oliver Oliver Sacks California Santa Cruz Oliver Sexes Lawrence England United States Donald Barthelme America Robert Irwin Maurice Natan Mr Shawn Writer Professor Gore Vidal Bill Finnegan
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

14:58 min | 8 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"She didn't catch him looking at her breasts. She didn't catch literally Elliott. That like he brought this up out would have nowhere. This was not something that needed to be apologized for because it didn't like if anything what it did was just creeper reaper out. It didn't make her feel like there was actual restoration or Or reconciliation in this moment if anything now there was an issue because now she's aware of this thing that she didn't need to be aware of like this is what she said. Yeah I don't think I needed to know that. So if I had seen him and I had been like visibly offended writing in communicated that to him. That's one thing but this was out of nowhere. He confessed I that he thought about her. In certain ways and it was way too much info for her and she felt very uncomfortable like he was telling i. Yeah who's telling. Her things is that he thought about doing things about you know and like for her. This was like it felt super invasive. It was she did not give consent to be to be have this described describe to her and Like she didn't know what was coming this. That's the kind of thing it's like I don't she felt like an object in that moment. And and the thing that we're saying here is and this is why it's relevant to what you brought up is. This made it her problem even though she didn't know it was a problem bloom and her problem the idea that so many men have with this is it's it becomes the woman's problem and I I have to tell her about it now. I don't don't have to do now. She's invited she has to deal with it too. I'm not alone anymore. And that's just inappropriate for the these are like these so royal stories that are happening tame in some respects in some respects I the it was funny because I was reading through the story and I remember. I've heard multiple instances where guys have abused the public confession of. How do I say this concept I guess is the word? I'm looking for kind of They've abused that privilege is to try to use it as an excuse to tele girl that they like them to express that I am attracted to you and so they essentially trap this individual. I've never heard a girl using this but I'm sure it's happened the same. Yeah it it. Though the instances that were related to me it was always a guy approaching female and honestly it was. It was fascinating to me because they literally uses to trap them in and so they use God as a bait and switch and then they're just flake but do you know you really hard and obviously it was more than that but it was. Is this kind of thing of just like I can't stop thinking about shooting and so do you WanNa go on a date and not the end. They're like no. I don't WanNa go on a date like that's it's not okay. Yeah and and it it is. It's not okay. It's not the intended purpose of it. the the purpose of public confession is to first of all it needs to be done. It should never be done on a retreat. If you understand anything about the purpose of public confession it should never be done with strangers. Yeah it should be done in a GR safe group than understand. You knows you a community that is family And it should be done with people that are willing to hold you accountable. That's the other thing that consent is not for you sang. I WANNA open up. That is true the consent is also. I am not only willing to open up about myself but I am now willing to hold you accountable for the things you were opening up to me about and that that to me is just what it bugs the snot out of me that we do these things Because it's not some pub confessions for them. We don't understand it and then we abuse that privilege rich and it made it makes it like you said it's exactly what you said now. The problem is no longer. I think it's almost the guys almost absolved of the issue. Now they don't even have to do with it now. It's all on the female. The guys I feel better now that that weight off my shoulders because you just made someone else carry it exactly like now you have to think about that at night as you sleeping and then just run away like that's not cool at all right just so we're clear. I just took my last sip of water. It's all downhill from here. You have one minute not one. Not You have my permission. If you take a drink of water please stop me Okay now. Here's the thing I still will probably swigs water and spit it out. But I'm not going to drink it because no ooh so Let's don't even know why I won't if someone out there one of our listeners. Who is a medical professional? Could explain clean to me. Why you can't drink fluids? Get the food. It's because it makes you nauseated after the anesthetic or like after you wake up with anesthesia having something your stomach with anesthesia apparently apparently makes him more nauseated. also fun fact When you saying that you are feeling sick to your stomach or like going to throw up? The correct. Term is nauseated nauseated. Have you say that you're nauseous. You're saying that you induce nausea in others. So it's really fun to hear people saying it's it's fun to hear people say I'm so nauseous. Right stay stay away from me for to be fair. If you're not gated stay away from me too but neither here nor there yeah okay. No Water Yep Downhill. I'm from here. Yes squeal just. It's going to be really upset if I have to go through this. Deny my surgery tomorrow. So here you go. Here's another one ready for making it. The woman's Problem Yup similar group for us. This this got me all my gosh. This one got me so because I'm like just I. Is this happens. This is completely realistic to expect. We'll say it and then I'll talk about the the multiple issues. I have with it but the biggest way so she walked into vespers one one time and she was wearing boots that had he'll And she was she sat down. She was taking her boots off Because often women will do that. They'll take their heels. Sales are the there you know whatever shoes that are not one hundred percent comfortable the entire time they're wearing them they'll take them off and get more comfortable wherever they're sitting right so as as she was taking her boots off some guys stood up and started to tell the group of that was at that vespers about why heels were so bad and ready he went into detail. He said that heels were designed by men to tilt the women's pelvis forward so that men would be attracted to them and it would signal that the woman is ready for sex. It's like it's it's passive aggression. It's real life. Sub tweet asked my gosh so I have problems with this. The illogically I I have problems with this historically probably this in every way shape and four problem with like literally on every possible level. have an issue with this Ah this socially oh my gosh so first of all historically The only part of that statement is that high heels were designed by Amen. But they were designed by men for men. high-yield invented in the sixteenth and fifty Sixteenth and seventeenth in century in France as a male fashion statement. Sue Awkward. What yeah it is? Awkward and women started wearing heels because in the early parts of the eighteenth century it was a fashion forward thinking to have women start emulating more quote unquote masculine styles. Apparently wearing high heels was a masculine thing to do So that's know your history slope says new on that one big act but this is the same. This is the same type of ignorant rent. Because I don't know of this person invented the story my guess is it was told to them by another. I call it the Wikipedia of stupid. Because it's just one person writing something stupid down and another person being like no. It's true because they set it up up No both you're wrong and stupid. That's just you're both idiots This is the same argument that we get about drums. I heard one guy go off on why anything with gelatin had pagan it was bad and I was like dude. You do understand what gelatin is made from. He's like yeah it's the hoof and I'm like you do understand Dan. What gelatin is made from is not at all considered pork right? He's like what and I was like that pork. Is the the meat you. I didn't say you idiot. I thought it better according to Jesus I the Tony. This is a safe space. Oh my gosh. Here's the problem I to tell him privately because I want to embarrass him he got to see this in front of Doc. Some brilliant person who. I'm not GonNa Make Fun of here but I will say they had good intentions at the beginning. Decided when I was a pastor at the church down to devote every other week and like a twenty minute talked for health during the church service which ruins the flow of worship. It was all done by amateurs. Here's who had no clue what they were talking about. There were two in the year and a half that we had this thing that actually I was like Oh that was good and they were both done by Ford medical professionals. Shocks DOC shocker. Yeah shocker and this was just one where they got to say in front of the whole church. There were visitors there. The whole time like marshmallows are bad because it's jolting Alton because it's a big. I'm just like Marshall's or bad because of the sugar. Not because not because of Leviticus. It's yeah it's the same argument in White. Drums are bad. It's the same argument. Why you know musical? Oh syncopated beats our evil. I remember I took a worship class. They talked about syncopated. Beats and this guy won on. I'll say three Bien. Yeah I said it when on Three A. B. N.. And talked about why syncopated beats horrible. Dude there's a liar. The ministry dedicated to that idea. Yeah the professor of the class then showed a clip of the same die on the same network in a different instance. Seeing a song long he then brought up. And it's a famous Steve. Steve Green made the song famous. That's huge in the conservative avid circles. He brought up the sheet music for it and he goes okay so you see how this note is in between this beat and this beat that's called syncopation so he goes unless it was going I am who said crews say If the press he goes if you do anything in between that that's called syncopation. That guy's an idiot. The whole class went nuts. I mean the whole classroom and there were some really traditional people in there and even they were like ah because it is. It's the level of ignorant. Yeah used to harm another person. Because I'm like look I hate the fact that anyone stands ends up in publicly shamed another person. I hate that fact. It should not be it should not. It does not help. But if you're GONNA do that at least be correct. Yeah if you're going to publicly shame someone had because you like this guy killed another human being. I'm not really comfortable with him. Coming in talking to us about stewardship yeah it remained. Yes like I'm not cool with the embezzler telling us how to save money like that. If you're going to do it at least be accurate. Yeah but to to to and to me that's the big thing that it's about control when you hear something like that. It's not about helping somebody. It's not about making the situation better. It's about control because you don't even have the foresight to back up what you're saying and make sure the facts are correct and and it's not even like it's about controlling about pride because then you're celebrated as the guy who who has all this knowledge and wow that's amazing and just so glad that somebody stood up and said something praise God that we have people who stand up for morals breath and for right thing and I'm just so super I've just praised God that we have people of character who will stand for the right no matter if the polls fault well you're standing on the wrong side. Let let let's be Tony. You're standing on something. Tony isn't even making fun of the person saying those things he's I know he's making fun of the person receiving those comments. Because like here's here's the deal like those are intoxicating comments pass. I know several pastors. who think they're great preachers? Because because their their members shocking things thinks because their members walk out the door was six wherever. Senators saying good sermon. Passer the shake their hand and they leave because your members are very rarely ever going to tell you it was a bad sermon. Airman your their pastor and they care about your opinion so they care about the way you see them and they don't want you to offend you right. There are so many passengers were terrible. Preachers preachers and stroking the EGO. Never lead anyone to growth. Yes just the reality. These last two stories are I. This is these last. Two stories summarized the biggest issue. I have with the functional aspect of body called a body shaping immodesty culture which is what we talked about in ninety eight like the first three kind of. You've yeah we we kind of brought up at the these last couple of soil. It's like one story kind of mashed into these are. These are two separate or is two separate entity separate lives Ah they both encapsulate. The exact they demonstrate the same thing. Yeah it's the same idea and this is this is really what we talked about. So go for it. So no water. Becker I I know I hate you So passers what. When she's been she she she would wear nail Polish a lot and not like out there? Nail Polish whatever out there nail Polish count says I almost took a drink of water out of the happened just now I've reached for the bottle title..

Tony Steve Green nauseated Elliott France Ford Becker Dan Alton Marshall White
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

12:07 min | 8 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"I think with me me having just been to a funeral and spending time with family up here and then With both of like. It's something that I've talked about a little bit because I didn't episode with Stephanie. Yeah and James Johnson. Back in somewhere in the seventies I think early seventy seven Yeah and not the years the episode numbers and The four thank right around the right around when the Sakaria rebels were being. Yeah that's right out of Masada so this is is a So this is our opportunity to go back into Greek. More in depth does not mean that we're gonNA This is the only ever talked about it or anything like that But it is something that That I think is we're talking about a new so yeah a and and our own take on it as well And I think we're also going to try to include some links to some resources some helpful podcast or anything else that we can think of. That might be helpful to those of you. Who want to know a little bit more about grief Sure so make sure to check the show notes. I I WANNA start off with the caveat that the research that I did unfortunately I have access to a really great Because I'm in school right now. I have access to a really great system That that allows me to get so a lot of research I did. I'M NOT GONNA be able to link up to the show notes because it's not gonNA be available to most people But what I am GonNa to do is Everything that I bring up from my end. I don't know about you becker. But from my in what I'm GonNa do is essentially I'm going to to a safe things are you can google and look up So feel free to like call us on it and and like disagree. But y'all the research I did I can't really replicate per se And so I'm just going to do my best to to try to give you has an option to be able to Google it and do your own research like like I would love for me personally if there was a You know psychologist or grief counselors somebody who can just contact us and say hey you know here's what we right. Here's where we were wrong We've had that happen a couple of times in various places I remember one time we were talking about you know like wouldn't ministries or independent Tim. What ministries are dependent on the Church and It was so you know somebody at the NASD called us up high. You had a completely backwards and so I have no problem No realistically realistically I have no problem continuing to Be Learn and and just and so anyway. That's a big thing for me is just know that he I'm not going to be able to like give you the sources I put. I think a couple on there that were open access but feel free to like again again. Minimal amount of research. Google search You define the concepts that we're talking about so I'm looking forward to that so I think the the best way to move forward is to do what we always do on absurdity and that's operate with some sort of established sort of operating definition. Yeah so yeah Tony. How would you define grief Within the context. We're talking about Greece about loss specifically today. Just so we're clear Like dealing with the the death of a loved one or yeah just kind of responding to death so yeah what What how'd you find grief? So Oh grief is I would describe it is the process and reaction to some form of loss And the process assist of healing that follows That's kind of the best way I can say it like. It's not it's not the dictionary definition. Little DEF definitely action definition. I like that. It's the different diction Nixon. It's not the dictionary definition. But it's that to me is the best understanding of it in a very broad sense like something has been lost and this is your reaction to it and path to healing An understanding is. Yes that's how I understand we've Yeah grief I mean. The definition is deep sorrow. Especially that by Cau- ah that caused. By someone's death death. Death were both were screwed and then lean into at this point man. Yeah right exactly so. I think we're more interested in the process of grief and the operating definition here. I think we're talking about the process of grieving. The loss of someone and what that actually looks like so grieving entails both the initial reaction to as well as the healing process or or whatever process ensues beyond that. I don't really know here's my thing I think closure is kind of a myth I think closure is not I think acceptance is what we mean when we say closure but there is no closure to say like Oh. This chapter is done. This is is why I think when the family loses like parents lose like a young child to let's say cancer those those parents usually become major advocates for are raising awareness for whatever that type of cancer was working in that that field right. It's not like it's not because they're able to close the chapter. It's because they were able to do. I think what we would we would say closure or what what you typically think of as closure is really the redefining of our life after after it's establishing new normal and And accepting that as normal. But it's never really closure. I don't think because I I I don't see see. You never being upset or sad again. At someone's death you know like letting no I I totally agree so it's establishing meaning from it. Yeah I can closer even in relationships I can understand more closure in a relationship or a friendship. But even then I just I just feel like the residual effect stay with you forever like there is no such thing as closure closure only happens for the one who is no longer there. I mean yeah like if if you are no longer here sure if you die you get closure in in you know. That's it. Everybody else deals with the effects of it either. Negative or positive So so yeah. I'm I'm with you on that. I think that's true. I think part of the thing that I think is important is the fact that we talk about that part of it is a process just to me even adding that to the definition and having that I think is huge wjr in creating a healthy grooving process. Yeah having the word process and understanding that because I think a lot of people think it is just an the most like well. We'll talk about that. I don't want to get to look in my head. I'm like no we get to that. Let's let's just jump into. It's okay so so first things first If you're grieving let me be the first one to give you permission to grieve. However the heck you need to grieve the only Astra's or caveat that that I add there is unless you're going to harm yourself or someone else because of the grief that is the only that is the only time where I go? That's the only thing that's worth intervening on as far as grief is concerned but grief. Every whatever way you need to grieve If it means you're crying and eating ice cream for a month go for it. If it means that you are not crying if it means that you just want life to go back to normal. That was my experience formal Then then by all means go for it. Like don't let anyone tells you that you're not grieving correctly because grief looks different for every single person. And that's why the prices is principle based and kind of topic baster eastern zone based with emotions. But it's not A. It's not like a prescription of specific behaviors. It it isn't and it's so hard it to say to someone like oh well this isn't healthy because they're grieving over for twenty years. I'm like well it. Yes but no Ooh you know it kind of depends and so there's a few different theories about how that works and one of the reasons why You kinda do have like a a a bit of a standard of like what it means to grieve is. You know there are some patterns that generally generally Kinda show up when it comes to the grieving process and one of these are kind of the five stages So this is kind of the famous five states theory that not everyone goes through but it kind of seems like a great majority of people go through and so those five sages famously are denial the Nile. The new get anger as and you go through bargaining you get depression and then finally acceptance and there's a a bit of can of the the the book ends or denial and acceptance everything else kind of can waver back and forth forth But you kinda start with the Nile and then finally get to acceptance of the situation and that can be for people who are going through right the the grief of as the victim of the incident Beit Cancer or an accident or whatever Or the person person who is D- like a relative or the close person who's dealing with the situation someone from the outside dealing with the grief of it or someone in the in the situation and So what support we can go with that keep going. What are your thoughts on the five stage theory so my thoughts on the five stages are thus the actual the best way that I was introduced to the five stages was was through was through the show robot chicken on adult swim And I'm going to include a youtube link to this specific it clip because it's hilarious also not safe for work slightly as far as languages -cerned clip but the clip is a giraffe that gets stuck stuck in quicksand and the giraffe is not gonna Spoil it necessarily but it does go through the five stages as the as the giraffe sinks further and further into the quicksand to sink. Yeah it is the funniest thing And if you don't find it funny I get it it's five. I think it's funny. I'm with you manage hilarious. The opinion in my purse and robot chicken is a is a weird animated show from adult swim on cartoon network where They basically used to take like action. Whatever but they would animate natural mouth over And and it's great to stem the mouth. Yeah it's incredibly credibly inappropriate at times but there's a lot of as well that is hilarious. The Star war scenes are funniest. Yes I was literally going to bring it up. So they do like the star wars janitor so like through the episode. They'll do clips like into first clips of like the janitor dealing with all the death and destruction that happens on these these stores. Just like a body'll audio fall. You just like sweeps it up to the site. I need to get transferred to that new death star. I like the application comes through when Darth vader calls Paul's Pal fifteen to tell him that the star blew up and So there's been a problem like what do you mean. They blew up the death star like he goes off on Darth vader. He's he's like wait two weeks you've been floating around in space for two weeks you must smelly smelly feet wrapped in leathery burnt Bacon Like it is the funniest.

A Showcase Start to the College Basketball Season in N.Y.C.

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:51 sec | 8 months ago

A Showcase Start to the College Basketball Season in N.Y.C.

"Becker the college basketball season kicked off all across the country last night including in New York at Madison Square Garden where the top four teams in the nation were in action freshman guard Tyreese maxi had twenty six leading number to Kentucky over number one Michigan state in the night cap sixty nine sixty two after number for Duke edge number three Kansas sixty eight sixty six forcing twenty eight turnovers the most for Kansas team in forty one years sophomore guard Trey John ten fifteen for the blue devils and said this team might not provide the highlight reel plays night after night after night as the team did a year ago led by Zion Williamson RJ Barrett but this team may play better defense for us this year so I mean we talk about it every day that's all we focus on the to be so that we

New York Madison Square Garden Kentucky Trey John Zion Williamson Rj Barrett Basketball Tyreese Michigan Kansas Forty One Years
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

12:43 min | 8 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Back to absurdity where we explore all things absurd in religion culture and society and Tony is joining me for the first part of a two part episode so we decided to give you a two for one this this week and for us this is actually a a to for on recording this episode so both of us had a Catis catastrophic failure with our files on our respective ends and a re recording this so I'm just letting that cat out of the bag immediately in case something comes up again as things do yeah it is what it is some somehow lost recording gets put up Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah for like three hours yup basically and then well it's the three hours like I made the mistake on three different hours worth of content and I am having to rerecord this we had to rerecord part two and then we had you too I have to re record a different episode for something else so it is like nonstop for me having and I'm in the middle of a move like I you had to be up at four am this morning takes them to the airport and I went to sleep at three am and then fifteen minutes afterwards done here I'm going to be moving all my furniture so to my new house and this is the last recording we will do in my apartment after this we are I'll be in my house Dan have a dedicated recording space rather than like the foot of my bed in my room and it's going to be technically that's still a dedicated according space but yeah yeah but like the the room it sells only is going to be honest with you though like the the the room using for my quote Unquote Studio Is Really Small and kind of tempted to put my bed in it and then use the master bedroom as my I'm I'm actually toying with the idea in my head because the only thing I use my I dream for his actually go to like to be in my bed like I don't need all that space necessarily I could do it but I so now we'll see luckily my bet is easy to move if I decide that I want to super easy to move my my bed but air mattresses just you just blow them up and they're they're so exactly it's perfect and I'm you know that's believable because I'm not married at twenty at twenty six that's one hundred percent believable and then there's a pile of a used Rahman Bulls Nick is to my next to my air mattress obviously as a single in as a bachelor or Velveeta Mac and cheese I respected you up until the Velveeta that no one should ever eat vida for any reason what no doubt is ally that is that is ally that is orange chemicals it just now that's that's that's crap Oh either one is good now they're amazing but if you ever want to be grossed out just go check out vices documentary dude who has only eaten Mac and cheese for like seventeen years or so because he was five yeah it's he has a cabinet full of juice boxes of Velveeta and that is all he uses the same pot every time he like it is the Gr- I could only watch five minutes of it it was it was really gross. Yeah it was not so that's a good start to this episode hey look freedom to only eat yeah where do you get this stuff where where does this all come from Tony Are you okay I don't know the voices in my head the the rock one is the rock jazz one blaring out today hey everybody welcome to ninety eight point seven the cool man and Becker and Becker Ah Becker so I quick disclaimer for everyone this is an adventist centric episode this is an adverse centric week we are talking about General Conference Annual Council which just happened October ten through sixteen out in Maryland and at the at the General Conference church can headquarters and just a you kind of understand as we as we go into the store not evidence listeners you know you're going to hear some stuff that really has frustrated US angered at some ridiculous things as well so just be patient with us as we work through it so this episode is Tony and my reaction to some of the stuff that that went down and then part two with Matthew Lucio is should be live at the exact same time this is that episode kind of talk about what's next how do we what do we do with any residual anger and frustrations that we haven't had to actually take action from there and and Tony and I made what are we may touch on a little bit of that but this was something I felt like would be warranted for for two parts and if I'd say this like I I wanNA temper this conversation with with the couple things you know just just personally I think number one is this The both Tony and I are one hundred percent committed dedicated seventh day adventist Tony's in seminary I worked for seventy institution I lay pastor a church and like we are both kind of like we're both in this we're not going anywhere and so we you know I get that I criticize a lot on this show Tony Criticizes a lot on this show but the one thing that I always it comes across as we're not just criticizing because we don't like someone or because we or want just way yeah we're not trying to be cavalier about anything yeah we're doing this because we see things that we believe are damaging to people or are hurtful or wrong and we're going to we're going to talk about those things in a hopefully one of the things that I firmly believe is that we can't do anything if about these problems if no one knows about them so tony and I we talk about these things we we bring them to people's attention so that's number one number two the big thing is in explanation of it kind of just a quick explanation of how our church works so at the local level you the local church then you have state conferences or regional conferences these typically you've got the Carolina conference that covers both of the Carolinas Florida Conference Arizona Conference so But then you get Georgia Cumberland which covers most of Tennessee and all of Georgia right so and then you've got you know several you've got all these different conferences that that cover kind of this about a state or twos region and then you've got the union which covers a region of or a group of conferences yeah so like I'm in in in Tennessee in the Southern Union Florida Conference Storage Cumberland Carolina Conferences Gulf states those are those are in the the Southern Union as well as Kentucky Tennessee and then in be above the union so to speak is the division the division is usually a continent however there thirteen divisions there's not there's not thirteen continents so it's mainly the division basically like a really really large area it's the next step up from union inside and from there then you have the the general conference or the World Church and so that's kind of the the technically the highest level of authority and adventist is the local church but the you know the it's step of that ladder basically is nominating people to become a part of constituencies and vote for their own leadership so you know the conference constituency session where Church members that are nominated by their own churches and by their you know by people within their Prince will meet and vote on their church officers for the for the conference officers unions have constituencies that it goes completely up the chain and so at the the idea is that whenever general conference meets these are delegates that have been chosen from around the world not by General Conference but by but I kind of local churches at some level of of that at some point in that process so the the highest level of authority at that point is whatever vote the general the World Church takes so g see the short for general conference that meets every five years in DC session next year is G. Twenty twenty and that's going to be the sixty first general conference and inbetween that there are still things that happened in the church that need to be addressed as well as the agenda the has to be set people have to make what are the things actually going to talk about a general conference session and so there's something called the General Conference Executive Committee which meets his annual council and they they meet every year for in the spring and every year in the fall and they set the agenda they talk policy they vote on things that are important every you know every year and this kind of keeps the things going this keeps the wheel turning as slowly as it may turn and see just came out of annual council and some big things came out that we you know some things people knew about going into it something's people didn't know so Tony and are going to be pretty candid and Tony I don't WanNa give any any disclaimer personally for yourself here but Yeah yeah you premiums set it I mean it's just like we we think we think that we can do better you know and so that's why we're seeing this if we thought it was like well this went as good as it could possibly go then we wouldn't say anything and it'd be like here here's how it went which I mean we're still kind of describing a little bit but I think we're also GonNa talk about here the things that we could do better here the things that we think we can improve on I really don't have a place here that GonNa think it doesn't really have a place it's needed it's not helpful you know I think it just boils down to to me all things lawful but not all things are helpful it's like let's let's be discerning on what things are helpful things are going to make a positive prince yeah exactly so we're gonna I we have links to things we have there's going to be a bunch of links in the show notes and the one thing that you should know that spectrum magazine basically live tweeted every meeting which is wonderful because its objective like literally just like delegate X. says why says you know it's very just straight to the point there's no there's really no spin so even if you think spectrums buys like these are tweets that you can just look up on twitter and no so what said without having to watch a bunch of hours of livestream because this was live streamed for people to watch the and then you can verify on the livestream should you so desire it has a time stamp yep so you've exactly yeah and so we'll we'll include links to the tweets that we reference we're going to do it for just for her you know speed sake but hopefully every link is here if not one thing you can do to find any of these quotes if if I forget a link or whatever focus is going to be a ton of them you can easily just search at spectrum mag on twitter space in them like put a space bar and then whatever word is is in the tweet and you should be able to you know one of the words in the tweet and you it should come right up basically you search for a specific twitter a tweet on twitter and so we're GonNa kind of jumping on this if you want more information can over to the scratch news dot com there're blinked there we kind of did a recap of all of the stuff that was voted on the official votes that took place in what was discussed kind of objectively and then this is just reacting to it so I I want to talk about is the is the morning we chips so every day there was a there was a worship that that that took place in on on Sunday Neil Nedley who's the prison went we mar- came up and spoke and he spoke on the health message so if you're unfamiliar with the health message it is just a it's just a kind of one of the things that autism is known for and it's it's the idea that it focuses on the holistic health of a human being and one of the main ways at focuses on that is through diet in is through what we eat and so you know if you go it's you know if you're at an adverse church most of the time you're going to encounter vegetate Indian food you're GONNA find meat substitutes instead of.

Becker Ah Becker Tony one hundred percent three hours fifteen minutes seventeen years five minutes five years
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

11:28 min | 9 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"The third of the exploration of all things absurd in religion culture and society where we seek to navigate these issues and what it means to be a Christian don't you love that tagline cool so I decided to update our tagline online in the middle of all of the shifting and things I've been doing with the podcast which by the way I want to open this up with a huge shoutout to a friend of Mine Sebastian Zaldivar who apparently just discovered this podcast today we're recording this on the on September twenty five and he discovered this today and listened to like he's just been like binge listening to episode since he discovered it like he's completely blown away by so I took that as a high compliment he went on this like tagging spray on social media he texted me about like he's super super thrilled so I'm going to give a shout out to him because I know he'll be even more thrilled but it's really cool I think it's really cool when friends find this on their own and listen to it and decide they like it rather than me telling them hey or rather than me telling them hey you should go listen to this I don't like doing that so I've always made it a point to not just shove this people's faces I talk about it because it's a part of my life like a shared on social media like I would share me going to do something cool so because it's not cool no correct knows that it's like it's like the things in my life that are cool but it's not rhythms there but it's not cool it's there's hints of cool to call it cool would beg credulity I agree it's who we really some might say that somebody justify in the city so today I I found out about what we're talking about on Mondays two days ago and this hit me like a ton of bricks like I don't think anything else in my time hosting absurdity the and doing podcasting work in general has hit me as hard as as this has it's not the topic in general but it's the it's what brought about the incident yeah yeah so if you've never heard of relevant magazine and you're a Christian you must not be on social media at all they're joke in there somewhere there's like a me it's like the millennial version of Christianity today like it's a lot of it's by Scott thanks even bigger than Christianity today I'm easily yeah but it's because it's also a lifestyle thing and they're like it's it's it's like it's hard to find a parallel yeah they do they do studio performances with big artists and yeah they have podcast the whole nine yards like there are there it's a multimedia company but there they specialize in a lot of articles like lifestyle articles religious articles things like that opinions reviews and our whole nine yards so relevant magazine has been huge it was it was founded by Cameron Strang about twenty years ago and he is he's the publisher I mean he's the lead editor and see how and everything right he owns the company and Relevance in Orlando Florida they were the office was like I don't know twenty fifteen minutes from where I lived where my mom lived ran apart and base clearly this has been starting to note now starting to know yeah I'm impressed the the next thing will be if you can get the palm without using even said don't even say it was the greatest I love the place off Bombie Avenue in in Florida and you need to go get five years five years man I took the flats at this point but do you WanNa flats yes thank you sorry it's close you knew what I meant installer so relevant been this huge thing in the in the in the Christian scene in culture because they've done a lot of work in the area of awareness regarding social justice issues racial justice issues etc they've done a lot of they've interviewed a lot of people about it they've they've they've highlighted about his articles yeah but suddenly last week I think it was Thursday I think it was on the eighteenth that it was released but Andre Henry who released an an opinion piece on medium dot com where and where he basically puts relevant on blast so he was a former he used to be the managing editor there he had committed to a here he lasted six months before he quit because he couldn't do it and he is black and he basically writes it kind of this not necessarily tell but also tell all about the not it's hard to say it's hard to say exactly how he describes this but he's saying it's not that relevant is directly racist but it's that they're not as racially not sensitive but they're not as woke as they claim to be let's put it that way and a lot of this comes back to the founder Cameron Strang in fact that is the only person in this article that is named that is actually named everyone else is not named but they do talk about it being a general culture that exists within relevant right and so shortly after this the the the managing editor that Andre replaced Rebecca I think it's Rebecca Marie Joe I don't know exactly she has like a pen name and then she has her name but Yeah Rebecca Marie Marie Joe Yeah row a response article basically affirming what Andre said she saw it she felt she was reading her own story and so she wrote co-signing what Andre did and sat in so they both have some really powerful stuff that they talk about And I and I WANNA jump into a bit about it and and what this is and the the entire theme of Andres article is that Black Christians deserve better than companies like relevant media group and so his his his entire kind of thesis here is that these that companies like this may say they're racist but it turns out aren't may say that there they pride themselves on social justice and and the good side of racial issues but they're actually kind of coopting these causes for their own credibility and and yeah and fame and wealth and prosperity and so it's kind of coming at the expense of black Christians and people and people of Color in general so I want to so we're going to talk about a few highlight quote from this that I think kind of summarize a bit of this and I will say it does less to a to not necessarily attack Strang but accused Strang call him out then Rebecca does Rebecca comes out swinging and we'll get to hers for sure but I think Andres biggest thing his article was a slap in the face to me and we'll we'll get to why the first is this is what he says he says if people like if people like insert rich white evangelical male leader have the final say on how to pursue racial progress there it'll be little racial progress and this was a this is a powerful quote to me because I struggle with this actually a little bit because there's been this call for white people to kind of start talking a lot more and be more vocal in the arena for social justice and racial racial injustice right it's been saying white people use your platform people use your platform and use your privilege to help others to lift others up but now what's starting to happen is we're starting to basically create celebrity culture but around this and we're looking to all the white leaders now to tell us how to not be racist and this is this is kind of what's happening and it almost feels like it was somehow a catch twenty two for a lot of them right like don't speak up and be labeled racist for not being up and now speak up then it looks like you're just co-opting the movement and this is something I've struggled with personally a bit because I've the reason I started this podcast was to give life to give voice to some of these you can use whatever sphere of influence I have and so this was this is something that I still struggle with a bit but I agree with it overall as long as we let the majority decide what is right for the minority the minority will never actually get justice so this is something that is I think I think it's a really good point to bring up so that's the first thing from this whole from this that that I caught and I think it's that idea of who who nope questioning who decides who gets to decide how far or are what the norm is when it comes to social justice you know by yeah that that idea of is it the oppresses the person's dealing with it or is it the businessmen and I you know it's but that I'm not going to slow down on this because there's a lot that we gotta go through but yeah I it's it's a good point that he brought up and it's one of the really all this made me think but definitely that was one that had just like Yeah now I think the next quote builds on S. O.. Tony if you WANNA if you wanna read the next here so basically says I have come to accept many youngest white evangelical leaders with large platforms be they podcast megachurches meteoric organizations conferences or even social justice campaigns are not simply not committed simply sorry are simply not committed to being anti-racist but only in appearing non-racist and they're using us as props for the show that's their right I guess as these platforms are literally their businesses so this I just I don't that was a tongue twister white leaders with large platforms are only interested in appearing non-racist they're not actually committed to being anti-racist you're making a change yeah yeah so they're just using black people's a prop for the show and he's like that's the right I mean it's their business but that doesn't and kind of his point here is that doesn't mean we have to participate in it right and we're just just like it's there right because it's their business it's alright as consumers to either consumer not consume and participate and that's the that's the the title of the article is you know black by Christians deserve better down that's kind of the theme of the whole thing is what we deserve better and and we need to choose to honor things that do better than this yeah so he goes yeah it's their right I guess that's their business but we don't have to attend them you know we we can get our little chicken sandwiches from somewhere else chick-fil-a you know we don't have to buy from there if we don't agree with what support or whatever you know insert said business and issue that they have and I think that really is.

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

25:40 min | 10 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"See where that that complaint comes from I can see where that would make sense of hey you know you need to be able to if you're going to if you're going to talk about something this important it is from a article from Al Dot com which is basically Alabama dot com but it is in Alabama kind of news News Source Alabama Media Group and they kind of their one of the news outlets got ahold of this story in the midst of that article they quoted a student they asked they asked they interviewed a student and the student gave us perspective on something and this is what he says as far as his feelings on the topic of of sex and or and everything sexual assault and abused could he said and we'll link this in this description I promise the leadership of Oakwood University tries to reflect the values and traditions of the adventist church many of the students there come from adventist academies around the world when abstinence is the only instruction kids try to figure it out themselves chiefs students aren't given a safe space to explore sex and this movement is a direct result of cutting off the conversation now I have significant issues with this because let me be clear let me be clear before I say what about to say first of all I am all for calling out the institution when it needs to be called out that I've made that no secret on this podcast Hi call us out for a lot of stuff and I am proud to be an adventist I'm proud to be a Christian I am proud to be where I am I'm proud be working at southern but I have no like I'm no stranger and I'm comfortable with calling the institution however I'm only okay with calling out the institution when it actually deserves to be called out about something right now I fully I will I will I will give him I will concede as much as possible here that yes adventist is not handled sex education well cool all right that's all I can give him here because I cannot blame the institution for an individual males decision to violate someone else's boundaries violent someone else's innocence and violate someone else's sexual sexual boundaries as well sexual abuse is not the fault of the institution it is the fall talk of the individual abusing however the caveat there is the institution can absolutely protect abusers it can and it can the the institution it has before and multiple institutions have and but the institution not being specifically Oakland but I mean the institution like just any institution bright we've done a lot in perpetuating abuse and allowing in creating a system where creaming environment yeah where where it can happen and can happen but I will I refuse I refuse to let any sexual abuser off the hook for what was their decision that's that's like to violate that boundary so I will say okay I understand this idea of absence only does it like I said you know we we dropped the ball a little bit as far as sex education we have we just have and most and here's the thing if you get sex education and the adventist system you're getting more than most adventists kids that's just it we just want to talk about it at all yeah another episode we'd talk about but this is just the reality is like most don't get anything so I do acknowledged stat fact of yeah when you get to a place you don't understand what boundaries are right a person here understands consent if you don't understand what consent is you need to get tested and I'm not that is not a joke three year olds been proven scientifically to be able to understand comprehend an acknowledged consent they just may not know the literal word word consent they don't know what that word means but they understand the concept yeah and like there have literally been studies on this and so it's like yeah understand what that is okay you may not understand the greatest harm that sex education has done is actually ruin marriages not created actual Salt K it is frustrating to me when one says that because it takes the blame off of the individual and I think you said it I'm not GonNa let I'm not gonNA let I'm not GonNa let these people off the hook and and that's that's it gave you doing this violate Shen is wrong end of story and by the way if anyone is actually studying their bible the way that they should the way that we claim we supposed to his adventist you will read right there in exodus in deuteronomy and numbers and Leviticus you will read that it is wrong so for someone to say well it's because we're not teaching sex education right and so then they know that is that is incorrect that's wrong it's just it's just not even close to being right it's not the Ballpark of being yup and more than anything that it's dangerous and understand what they were trying to well it seems to me what their spirit was trying to say which was we need to get such a sex education right look if knowledge was all it took nobody would smoke day now did knowledge is helping and smoking's down to like fourteen percent but understand smoking kills you smoking by itself every cigarette you taste doc lowers you life if knowledge was enough it would have radicalized that if knowledge was enough we wouldn't be dealing with racism we wouldn't be dealing with terrorism we would be having extreme accountability in our government's world governments are economics would be completely different if knowledge was enough our world would be working at an optimal level because this is the age of information you could argue back in you know pre bird days in the Middle Ages when people were afraid of the sun you can argue that because people could read the communicate there were isolated from each other in the days of the Internet you cannot say oh well this is working out yeah all you need is knowledge you just need to educate them it's an irresponsible statement and it takes the blame off of the person and here's why I'm I'm in sense by this because this is not just an awkward problem this is not just an an adventist problem this is a world problem so to say well it's happening because of sex education okay explain to me why this happened so often on public episode then yeah and you can say well they don't do so now you just arguing levels of sex education will what is yeah what is correct that's education and now we're on a completely different subject and that's the danger of it is now we're not talking about the do you see quickly the subject has shifted that's the danger of it is that immediately start changing the conversation conversation needs to be how do we prevent how do we make our women and men feel safe on campus that even if this horrible terrible thing happens that there's a place where they can feel safe to go to and say this needs to stop and and it is a headache and I will agree one hundred percent but if we cannot make that provision well let me let me go then then we that we did in our institutions we need we need to take a deep hard look at what we're really trying to do and Stanford let me let me go further if the headache is a bigger deal to US the fact that women and men are being abused and assaulted on our campuses or at our institutions then there's there's an even bigger problem like that that that's is it like I've I get that it's a headache this you accepted this role if you're in a position that you have to directly deal with this this is your job this is you have to do this is what you accepted this is the responsibility that you accepted there are parts of my job I don't like I do them there are parts of it a job that I love and I do them and I love doing them way more than the parts they don't like but I have to do the parts I don't like to and listen I know one hundred percent I know that in my life if I do know that I have especially like it was especially true in high school I know that I did I should never have done there's part of me that hasn't gone back and apologize to those people become too too it's not that many lives not long but to the people and I'm talking about things like like general sexting like the things that are kind of unfortunately now normal for even people below eighth grade I have a friend who used to teach second grade who was having problems with sexting her second grade class so that's gotten way younger than when it was a problem for me but part of it is because I feel like I don't know if they've forgotten about it and I don't want to reopen like an old wound if I don't have to get that I've made decisions that caused women to feel uncomfortable and I've taken I've tried to from from the point that I realized it on I've tried to make that right and he's my platform to do something good about this in this area absolutely understand that look I come I come from a hugging culture K I come from a culture that hugs people I come from a family that hugs people I used to hug people without asking permission then I came to southern I made someone feel uncomfortable I was specifically told don't and I reacted badly I reacted badly basically yeah I would very publicly and very loudly say tuna acuvue a hogue and then go and not realizing the other side of it because I was immature because I didn't really is what that actually meant and then someone explained to me why someone would feel that way and once I understood that I said wow I was clearly in the wrong and I apologize I apologized and I try to do my best from that point on and now disturbing realities I almost always asked for permission if I'm not paying attention sometimes I'll just do it for pretty much everything I go can I give you cool I just ask you because some people it's not okay and some people may feel uncomfortable and I that's I don't WanNa make anyone feel unsafe now I true I want to do my best to make sure that people are are S- feel safe with me and if they feel unsafe I want to stress Yup well but there are some people that do wanNA feel safe I want people who are abusers I want them to feel safe with me I want them to feel like they are they are what's eighth with me around that I do because I want I want them to know that those actions are not okay those are the people that I want them to feel nervous and comfortable and your your actions are now okay but I want to make sure that victims are safe with me yeah I agree and that they feel like the only way we can do that is and I I hope that I will react the same way that I'm reacting now if and I'm not saying saying that I know of something but if I have made so much feel uncomfortable in that with if they come forward and say hey you know this time this happened just I did I felt uncomfortable I didn't like it that I will have the same reaction I hope and that's why I'm prepping for it but my thing is I wanna make sure people feel because.

Alabama Alabama Media Group one hundred percent fourteen percent three year
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

22:09 min | 10 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"It's an advocates donating time away from their state and local groups publish written analysis attract legislation provide media interviews advise members of Congress and the executive branch but one girl who was really kind of out there as far as like really trying to take hold of this latch onto it and and makes them an advocate for change out of it so she tweets out or on the fourth or the false accusations the devil is a false accuser that's the literally his name in the Old Testament ties with the devil being someone who just is all about falsely accusing and he says if China is making false accusations against someone else than you are were you are of the devil like false accusations of the devil uses that that that phrase again our boss to every ten so what you've done is you've equated the two false accusations with the eight actual instances of assault and abuse that a reported every every and every ten accusations that happen so he's equated things that really don't have equal weight as far as concern is is as as far as like in about accusations matters so that's why people flip out about this and I happen to agree with that assessment I don't think this was wise on his part to in the breath say something if he wanted to say something about false accusations later that's fine but the other reason that other people came on to him for this was because he this also tends to silence of actual victims because they become afraid to speak up for fear of being labeled a false accuser so like this is there's there's more here than just like he's falsely acquainting because of statistics no this is actually the kind of rhetoric that has silenced a lot of victims because victims are always told you were falsely accusing we don't believe you I'll but he's so and so and he's such a good guy and he would never do this or he's just trying to get an education and we we don't want to disrupt that right all of this happens and so they already know they're fighting an uphill battle to seek justice and now you've just made it harder so bird gets under attack burqas under attack for that and Tony can you can acas through his response do you have that tweet pulled up yeah I do on it there's response specifically was this has come to my attention that a portion of my sermon on September seven nine two thousand eighteen may have been misunderstood by Ver- online viewers who may not be where the immediate context in which the statements were made the entire Oakwood University Church and community was shocked and saddened by revelation of hurtful experiences by number of students expressed online primarily using twitter the manifestation of these horrifying stories is indicative of several breakdowns in our community we much we must create safer spaces for students and community members and affirming mechanisms to ensure that they receive justice wherever they speak out as stated in the full sermon central salt is wrong and abused it'd be prosecuted and brought to justice the twitter account upon which the experiences and accompanying statements were shared last week later shared an apology to Melissa wants that statement had been proven to be false the statements in the sermon Sato Jesse's very unfortunate occurrences false statements make it harder for actual victims to be heard and believed I continue to stand with all those who stories need to be heard I have heard I have already begun to connect with the Church and community leaders who will help to provide additional counseling and legal counsel to all those involved with regards peoper so oh there's also something about this that's also problematic in the third fourth paragraph Fourth Paragraph because I'm looking at the is now to this is the twitter account Oh you me too upon which the experiences and accompanying statements were shared last week later share in an apology to acknowledge that one such statement had proven to be false one this dude gave listen call Timberg great great preacher I know that he's been loved by lots of people for a Lotta years this was a misstep on his part can we just bike that's putting it lightly but this was not a wise move from him I get what he's trying to say. and I'm glad that he is reaching out and working with community members to fix this but one false accusation out of all of those and now you're giving that equal weight airman in fact I would say you almost I think he gave it more time than he did in saying sexual abuse is wrong in that same little clip so the this is something that's really interesting to me I think this was a misstep on him and I don't think it was worth in your sermon giving equal weight to something to one false accusation and believe me I'm someone who has been falsely accused very in a very minor fashion and I understand the fear that that has understand the the the the the fear that that gives you right and fills you with but I'm sorry the weights not the same because the fear that you expect Silence of a potential false accusation is nowhere near the pain and hurt and fear that victims of actual sexual assault abuse feel like I can't I can't equate those two so this was like this was a big step on on pastor pastor birds part I don't know I like I I really that's I really wrestled with that I'm going to be honest I don't think that was good for him one of the things that I saw online to people I I have not seen the sermon Alison clips of it on twitter and people's responses to one of the things that a lot the people said that they complain about what's that this had this was a tangent in this was not the main point of the sermon this was not something he he kind of stepped aside if you will to bring this up and they go if you're going to step aside to bring it up and you bring up both parts of it you know you really should have if you're going bring it up like that you really need to make it the entire focal point of your sermon so you can explain both those things more in depth so to me I I very much.

Congress executive
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

12:22 min | 10 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Donate Tony Hashtag oh you me too the time has come interesting stuff man this is hard because we're waiting quite literally almost three weeks basically three weeks after the story is broken when all this started and there's a reason for that I don't like talking about this stuff right when it happens because information is still coming to light usually the story is in Yup that I wanna talk about it when the story is complete only but it's one of those things where it's really important that we kind of wait to see how it levels out moving and then because there's no use in US talking about this for an hour and then a week later having to come back and correct a bunch of crap like I've zero in doing that and and and this would be something where we really would have to do that because you know reputations and livelihoods are at stake you know with this kind of thing and I think it's just really important that you wait I you know I I'm always reminded situations like this of the Boston massacre where you had news outlets reporting because it was all about get the the quickest get the information out the quickest so you had some fairly reputable news let's getting stuff completely wrong because they weren't interested in being right there were interested in being fab yet and I just think that that's very irresponsible I that to me was the moment that realize twitter and read it we're the future because I was getting information on twitter and that was hands down more accurate and quicker than the news media were you're getting direct statements from people will it wasn't secondhand it wasn't a spin you know they weren't trying to make it more salaciously and it's nineteen people you know they're all screaming you know and no it was very quick it was this is this is what we know so far this is what's happening you know on the scene type stuff and be of that I always said you know I you just have to wait it it it's so much better to wait just a little bit even if you get scooped and be yes and make sure you have all your facts and to me that's always been and to me that's the market of good investigative reporting is that you're not just printing something flashy you're printing something that has substance and you can back it up well and so and with that when we're talking about a subject like what we're talking today and this is bigger than me too but it's definitely what it started you want to I mean you know you as a guy you always have trepidation because you hope that you've never made a female feel uncomfortable female you'll never made a a woman feel uncomfortable lady feel uncomfortable and you and you always hope that hey this is not going to turn out to to come back on me and and so a lot of guys don't want to go into the subject and talk about it they want to kind of avoidance like no we have to talk about this but in order to would you do have to do it responsibly and so that's that's why we're coming out a little bit late because it's like we want to who want to make sure that we're talking about is bigger than just incident and also that the facts are correct of lutely so this is one of those instances and let's be clear today we're talking about Oakland University and we were talking about something that's been going on with Oakwood but this issue in general is larger than Oakwood it just so happens that what is the place where this got publicized where this kind of it's it's like Ground Zero Ground Zero for this happening on our at our institutions but this is the institutional problem no matter what and I'm not just talking about schools and I know I work for one I this is an institutional problem period I mean every denomination churches every part everyone's having these issues the fact that Oakwood is the first one that this is happening to an adventist as far as in a public way that's just bad luck Tuck for Oakwood at this point so but the reason I say this is because we're not attacking Oakwood today I think the the bigger conversation is after but to do that we need to sit right what actually happened regarding Oakwood so right and and and that's what sparked this conversation which is it is absurd that we're not talking about at a church for the most part so in a way it's it's it's good that it's out there you you've course wish it would never happen you know I I I honestly sincerely wish we could live in a world where we would never have to worry about this we're all we had to worry about were you know bears attacking us and raptors getting inside your house your front door isn't isn't a Knob you know I I sincerely wish that that was the world that we live in but it's not what unfortunately humans or predators to and we need to talk about this we need to deal with it and a lot of people and you know I'm sure we're we're putting Patricia warring before this but a lot of people when they hear that trigger warning it's just going to bring them to a bad place because there's so many you know I've had issues struggled with this as a guy on the receiving end of it Yup and and it's just one of those things that you just you wish it would never happen to anyone but it does and so that a fear of talking about it should be so much less than the fear that women have and even men in in our institute shins that they have to go through thinking that they are not safe so I think we need to talk about I think we need to that's one of the first way's to start making it safe as start talking about it cut it out in the open and then the Policy Yep so now that we're eight minutes in let's actually say what happened so so we're two minutes early September her early September a twitter account surfaced Going by the handle Oh you me to one and it started posting anonymously submitted stories of sexual assault and abuse that were happening on and around the campus of Oakwood University These were stories that were very graphic in detail Oh and in addition to said stories that were now gaining traction not only get not only were their stories but people were also sharing space civic names and this grew into this thing Hashtag oh you me too it's latching onto the Hashtag movement priming in yeah sorta trying in some defending some trying to defend their friends who they felt were being falsely accused others trying to warn girls about other girls about this thing and and I should be like this was all targeted one direction I didn't see I when I scroll through I couldn't find a single thing about a girl so this was this this was not targeted one direction but it was all kind of going one direction as far as genders are concerned but I certainly don't want to pretend like guys or never taken advantage of so and I have a feeling knowing knowing how twitter works that had I have a feeling that and this would happen in general but someone came in with the kind of any sort of alternative story they would get demolished because social media works that way but this is there was one dude actually remember who was upset because he he said one of his friends got falsely accused and he went off on twitter he popped off on twitter and he got attack he got just attacked for relentlessly and so this was happening it was kind of all over the place basically there was one girl will link her twitter in the show notes. if the September hey you know here's oakwoods phone line let's flood these calls as soon as the office opens tomorrow and demand that they make a statement about this that they address this you and like and actually do something about all of these stories of sexual assault and abuse that are happening on their campus and all these guys are having their facebook like screen that's of their facebook being shared on twitter and like this has gotten big right there are people that are saying they're lawyering up get finding attorneys and getting ready for these for impending lawsuits whatever so this call comes and this call these calls let's come in and Oakwood eventually puts out a response and will link to that as well in the show notes there's there's links to everything we're referencing today in the show notes and the length the oakwoods response shared as an image on all social media and the response is basically like hey we take complaints of sexual assault and abuse seriously view if you if you or you know if you or someone you know has been abused or sexually assaulted please contact our our dean who oversees the Us you know will we're going to investigate and then Dr Pollard the president also made calls for also made calls for for the basically for the school to reinvestigated title nine policies and this is something that actually goes up to the resident as well not because Dr Pollard did anything but there's one tweet it did not gain a lot of traction but I saw it and it stood out like it stood out not to me but like it just kept staying up on top of popular even though it wasn't getting a lot of re tweets and stuff but there was someone that said is anyone GonNa talk about Dr Brother and that was it there was nothing more than that and so I know this is something that has the potential to kind of rock administration as well one way or the other but the yeah so there's this call that goes out and then and people start criticizing Oakwood for their response being week and being too passive and then Carlton Bird The pastor of the Oakwood University Church which I don't know if there's a name other than Oakwood University Church I've not a this is the first I've needed to reference the church specifically and so now I don't remember I don't remember either so either way Carlton Bird the pastor there speaks on sexual abuse and will link to a tweet that that references of civic clip that he says this is what he says he says sexual abuse sexual abuse the devil and victims you ought to stand up and say something and so he says it's the devil it's wrong Invicta if you've been a victim of sexual abuse or assault you need to stand you ought to stand up and in say something and then in the very next sentence he says but let me also say this so he literally equates sexual abuse as evil as falsely accusing someone and There's a reason that this is problematic and in my opinion rightfully so called out but for the sake of objectivity I'm just going to say exactly why it was called out basically was called out because while yes false accusations are wrong they've ruined a lot of lives there's actually a lot of their statistics out there will link to those as well I have the studies in the scratch actually released an article that also references those studies the basically two out of every ten.

three weeks eight minutes two minutes
"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

02:24 min | 10 months ago

"becker" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Victim of either of those or your life has been adverse affected by anything in today's episode just wanted to give you a heads up that that's what's coming Tony I get pretty specific about some stuff and we opened up a bit about our own kind of Failures in this area so just please just no I we care about you we want you to know what's in this episode so now that we're praying for you we love you and we hope that you can find healing injustice in your situation Welcome back to absurdity an exploration of all things absurd in religion culture in society and I am excited because today is the day that two.